Wenches Rock!

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

Often our monthly Ask A Wench post is a reader question that all the Wenches answer in our different ways.  But today’s compilation is rooted in Christmas pictures.  Anne sent us a photo of some of her holiday decorations, another wench noticed the beautiful gemstone bonsai tree and other polished stones—and we were off the races! Or perhaps the quarries. <G> 

It turns out that all of the Wenches love stones and minerals, and we love taking about them.  We could have easily generated a multi-part series on Stones We Love, but I restrained myself. We'll start our rock stories with Anne and her bonsai tree:

Bonsai1--AnneAnne Gracie: 
I love stones, too, and compulsively bring them home from my travels because they're pretty or I like their shape or they evoke a place I loved in my memory. I have round white stones from a beach in Brittany, rugged mountain-shaped rocks from Montana, smooth wave-washed pieces of colored tiles from the south of France, shards of slate from a sliding mountain of slate in North Wales — and much more.

I've had Aussie customs officers heave up my backpack to check it and say, "Gawd, this is heavy.  You got rocks in here or something?"  
    And I say, "Yes, and books."

I also have a couple of friends who are fossickers —— they dig for gold and BoulderOpal3--Annegemstones as a hobby, albeit a fairly serious one. They go bush (to remote locations) several times a year and camp and fossick and dig.  They also dig for opals and I've bought a few beautiful stones from them. I also have these stones (in the picture) that they were going to toss into the garden. They're not valuable, but they're beautiful stones with tiny gleams and glitters of blue, aqua and red opal in them (more visible in the sun than in this photo) and I love them, not just because they're beautiful, but because my friends found  them and polished them and gave them to me.

Amethystgeode_susanSusan King:
Stones, gemstones and rocks can bring very good energy — light and color and beauty — to the home and for writers. I've collected some lovely rocks and stones over the years that I've stashed around the house and in my office, where they catch the light and help to inspire (and distract!) me while I'm working. I find them very soothing and fascinating.

And because most of them were gifts from friends, they have additional meaning and Lapis_susanpersonal connections. My son's girlfriend is an amateur gemologist and rock collector, and I've learned a lot from watching her identify, categorize and rank the stones she collects; she also displays them at gem shows. Several of her discoveries in the wilds of Virginia and Maryland have found their way onto our bookshelves and into our garden, and into my office, where I like to think they're happy clustered on windowsills or on the desk. 

Among the stones in my office are several amethyst geodes of various sizes, including one that's a gorgeous purple cavern big enough for a fairy or a dragon figure (and they've been in there, believe me!); a beautiful polished phantom crystal with curls and whorls and tiny scenarios within the stone; and a big fist-sized chunk of raw lapis lazuli that a friend brought from Brazil. Lapis has very good energy for writers, so I keep it near my computer. That saturated blue is chalky in its raw form, veined with other stone material, and just gorgeous. Medieval artists coveted lapis lazuli, and carefully chipped and ground the stones into a powder to mix with egg (and later oil) to create the heavenly blue that was considered rare and costly in the medieval era.

Madagascarcrystal_susanI also have a crystal point a friend brought from Madagascar — a split terminus quartz crystal about ten inches long, heavy, full of depth and beautiful cloud like veining. You can just feel the powerful energy in it. I clear my crystals now and then with running water and sunlight, as crystals can pick up dust and get a bit dull — and they can absorb energies around them just like little radio transmitters; it's good to keep those energies clear so the stones won't refract the stale energies right back at ya. So they say! 

Rocks15Joanna Bourne:
I've travelled around a good bit, so the rocks I keep are small rocks.  Me, being practical, you know. 

Every one of my rocks has a story.  Some are presents — that carved bird perched on top of the pile so protectively is a present from a friend who carves rock.  Some of my rocks I've found.  The jasper — that's the irregular big brown-red chunk on the right — is from the Southwest of the United States.  The carnelian, a bit above it, is the same color, but translucent.  That's from Iran.  It rated a special professional polishing. 

To the right, the dirty-looking, complicated quartz crystal is what they call a 'desert diamond'.  You find those out in the middle of the sands.  This one is from the Nejd in Saudi Arabia.  You'll be all shook up from driving in the dark, off-road.  There's, oh, just desolation all around
and some scrub brush and big stone cliffs a mile or two off, still black.  It's dawn behind you because you're looking west.  The sun comes up.  You see a glint way off.  That's your crystal.  You go racing off to get there before it's lost again. 

And there's that egg-shaped sort of pink rock in the center.  That's from the north Rocks23part of the coast of Maine, from the beach.  There's a layer of granite that underlies the coast that's about pure pink.  They made buildings of this 'Red Beach granite' or 'Pembroke granite' up and down the Northeast a hundred years ago. 

The egg shaping comes from the washing of the sea.  I picked it up when I was twelve or so and thought of the years it took and the accidents of time that made a neat hen's egg out of some boulder.  So cool, thought I.  And I still do.

I keep my rocks in a basket where the first sunlight hits them. 
They just light up.

Nicola'srockNicola Cornick:
We collect stones on our Scottish holidays, usually round ones that have been washed down by the burn that runs past our holiday cottage. They sit in our garden at home so that we have a ittle bit of Scotland with us all the time. They make great paperweights if we actually get the chance to sit reading in the garden!

My most prized poseession, though, is a piece of chalk that was cut to restore Ashdown House. They opened up the original 17th century quarry to do this and my husband begged a piece from the restoration guys and had it engraved for me. Most people don't get it and wonder why I have a chunk of rock on my desk!

I also have some sarsen stones (mine are a bit smaller than the ones in the photo!) Sarsenwhich are the local sandstone rocks washed into extraordinary shapes during the Ice Age. There are may legends around them. They are the stones that made Stonehenge and Avebury stone circle. The holes in them were made by the roots of palm trees

Cara/Andrea:
ROCKS!!! I love rocks! My friends give me such a bad time about my passion for rocks. I'm always finding pretty rocks in my driveway gravel, in the pasture, on day trips to various places like Mount St. Helen's (I have a lava rock from there), and many other rocks, geodes, ammonites, agates, crystals and petrified wood collected over the years. Below are some of my water washed stones from Prince Edward Island.
Andrea'sPEIrocks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our webmistress Sherrie Holmes has some amazing stones, too.

Sherrie Holmes:
A former co-worker's mother was an artist who hiked the rugged Hell's Canyon trails along the Snake River that borders Oregon and Idaho. When she found out that the Hell's Canyon dam would flood a section of the canyon rich in historic pictographs, she made it her mission to preserve as many of them as she could for posterity. She did it in a RockBullseyeStarChainunique way: first photographing them, then painting their exact replicas on rocks from the area. She donated her painted rocks to a local museum, which sold them to tourists. Her generosity helped keep that small museum afloat.

When my co-worker showed me samples of her mother's rocks, I begged her to sell them to me. Despite the fact the museum was the only outlet for those rocks, her mother made an exception and allowed me to buy several pieces, after which she turned the money over to the museum.

This one us irregularly shaped, and each of the four sides has a different pictograph from Hell's Canyon.

RockDeerHunterHere's another stone of a deer hunter:  

 

 

The Flower that Survives in the StoneMary Jo again: I have my share of amethyst geodes and pale blue fluorites and pretty pebbles and minerals (of which I don't always remember the names!)  The only one I'll show here is actually a piece made by my sister, Estill Putney, who is a professional stone carver.  It was created as a memorial for the Virginia Tech shooting, which took place in her home town.  The orange flower is made from a rare shade of natural alabaster.  The carving presides over my dining room.

 

BoulderOpal1Do you also love stones and collect pretty ones from your travels?  Do they all have stories?  I’d love to hear more!

 

Mary Jo, adding more of Anne's opal boulders 

150 thoughts on “Wenches Rock!”

  1. Nothing better than a pretty rock. Our 5 acres has several veins of milky quartz. I’ve dug up several good chunks.
    We’ve even gone “rock hounding” to several places all over California.

    Reply
  2. Nothing better than a pretty rock. Our 5 acres has several veins of milky quartz. I’ve dug up several good chunks.
    We’ve even gone “rock hounding” to several places all over California.

    Reply
  3. Nothing better than a pretty rock. Our 5 acres has several veins of milky quartz. I’ve dug up several good chunks.
    We’ve even gone “rock hounding” to several places all over California.

    Reply
  4. Nothing better than a pretty rock. Our 5 acres has several veins of milky quartz. I’ve dug up several good chunks.
    We’ve even gone “rock hounding” to several places all over California.

    Reply
  5. Nothing better than a pretty rock. Our 5 acres has several veins of milky quartz. I’ve dug up several good chunks.
    We’ve even gone “rock hounding” to several places all over California.

    Reply
  6. I can’t resist pebbles on the beach, and wander around picking them up. I’m not sufficiently organised that I know what minerals they are or remember where I picked them up… they’re just pretty!
    And I’m interested to learn that fossick has a serious meaning. I’ve always used it in the sense of rummaging through piles of stuff to find something.

    Reply
  7. I can’t resist pebbles on the beach, and wander around picking them up. I’m not sufficiently organised that I know what minerals they are or remember where I picked them up… they’re just pretty!
    And I’m interested to learn that fossick has a serious meaning. I’ve always used it in the sense of rummaging through piles of stuff to find something.

    Reply
  8. I can’t resist pebbles on the beach, and wander around picking them up. I’m not sufficiently organised that I know what minerals they are or remember where I picked them up… they’re just pretty!
    And I’m interested to learn that fossick has a serious meaning. I’ve always used it in the sense of rummaging through piles of stuff to find something.

    Reply
  9. I can’t resist pebbles on the beach, and wander around picking them up. I’m not sufficiently organised that I know what minerals they are or remember where I picked them up… they’re just pretty!
    And I’m interested to learn that fossick has a serious meaning. I’ve always used it in the sense of rummaging through piles of stuff to find something.

    Reply
  10. I can’t resist pebbles on the beach, and wander around picking them up. I’m not sufficiently organised that I know what minerals they are or remember where I picked them up… they’re just pretty!
    And I’m interested to learn that fossick has a serious meaning. I’ve always used it in the sense of rummaging through piles of stuff to find something.

    Reply
  11. HJ–
    You sound very like me–poking over the beach and picking up the pretties. I put translucent water washed shells right up there ewith the pretty pebbles. I must admit I wouldn’t have much use for a rare mineral specimen if it wasn’t also lovely.

    Reply
  12. HJ–
    You sound very like me–poking over the beach and picking up the pretties. I put translucent water washed shells right up there ewith the pretty pebbles. I must admit I wouldn’t have much use for a rare mineral specimen if it wasn’t also lovely.

    Reply
  13. HJ–
    You sound very like me–poking over the beach and picking up the pretties. I put translucent water washed shells right up there ewith the pretty pebbles. I must admit I wouldn’t have much use for a rare mineral specimen if it wasn’t also lovely.

    Reply
  14. HJ–
    You sound very like me–poking over the beach and picking up the pretties. I put translucent water washed shells right up there ewith the pretty pebbles. I must admit I wouldn’t have much use for a rare mineral specimen if it wasn’t also lovely.

    Reply
  15. HJ–
    You sound very like me–poking over the beach and picking up the pretties. I put translucent water washed shells right up there ewith the pretty pebbles. I must admit I wouldn’t have much use for a rare mineral specimen if it wasn’t also lovely.

    Reply
  16. We collect rocks everywhere we go but fail to make note of where they come from. We have several spectacular crystals we use as bookends. But I could see you had plenty of material and I didn’t need to dig out my camera to take pics. Great blog!

    Reply
  17. We collect rocks everywhere we go but fail to make note of where they come from. We have several spectacular crystals we use as bookends. But I could see you had plenty of material and I didn’t need to dig out my camera to take pics. Great blog!

    Reply
  18. We collect rocks everywhere we go but fail to make note of where they come from. We have several spectacular crystals we use as bookends. But I could see you had plenty of material and I didn’t need to dig out my camera to take pics. Great blog!

    Reply
  19. We collect rocks everywhere we go but fail to make note of where they come from. We have several spectacular crystals we use as bookends. But I could see you had plenty of material and I didn’t need to dig out my camera to take pics. Great blog!

    Reply
  20. We collect rocks everywhere we go but fail to make note of where they come from. We have several spectacular crystals we use as bookends. But I could see you had plenty of material and I didn’t need to dig out my camera to take pics. Great blog!

    Reply
  21. Since I’ve already admitted in a past comment section to being metaphysical, no surprise that I have a collection of crystals and rocks!
    I have a fossil very like Anne’s (the smaller one on the left) from Michigan brought to me by a friend. Interesting how similar they are from such distance parts of the world.
    The basket in which I display many of my rocks and crystals is almost identical to Joanna’s! At first glance, I thought it *was* mine!
    My favorite stones aren’t the showiest – a good sized shiva lingum from India and a fairly simple looking rock from Machu Picchu brought to me by a dear friend.
    Mary Jo – that carving by your sister is stunning and very moving.

    Reply
  22. Since I’ve already admitted in a past comment section to being metaphysical, no surprise that I have a collection of crystals and rocks!
    I have a fossil very like Anne’s (the smaller one on the left) from Michigan brought to me by a friend. Interesting how similar they are from such distance parts of the world.
    The basket in which I display many of my rocks and crystals is almost identical to Joanna’s! At first glance, I thought it *was* mine!
    My favorite stones aren’t the showiest – a good sized shiva lingum from India and a fairly simple looking rock from Machu Picchu brought to me by a dear friend.
    Mary Jo – that carving by your sister is stunning and very moving.

    Reply
  23. Since I’ve already admitted in a past comment section to being metaphysical, no surprise that I have a collection of crystals and rocks!
    I have a fossil very like Anne’s (the smaller one on the left) from Michigan brought to me by a friend. Interesting how similar they are from such distance parts of the world.
    The basket in which I display many of my rocks and crystals is almost identical to Joanna’s! At first glance, I thought it *was* mine!
    My favorite stones aren’t the showiest – a good sized shiva lingum from India and a fairly simple looking rock from Machu Picchu brought to me by a dear friend.
    Mary Jo – that carving by your sister is stunning and very moving.

    Reply
  24. Since I’ve already admitted in a past comment section to being metaphysical, no surprise that I have a collection of crystals and rocks!
    I have a fossil very like Anne’s (the smaller one on the left) from Michigan brought to me by a friend. Interesting how similar they are from such distance parts of the world.
    The basket in which I display many of my rocks and crystals is almost identical to Joanna’s! At first glance, I thought it *was* mine!
    My favorite stones aren’t the showiest – a good sized shiva lingum from India and a fairly simple looking rock from Machu Picchu brought to me by a dear friend.
    Mary Jo – that carving by your sister is stunning and very moving.

    Reply
  25. Since I’ve already admitted in a past comment section to being metaphysical, no surprise that I have a collection of crystals and rocks!
    I have a fossil very like Anne’s (the smaller one on the left) from Michigan brought to me by a friend. Interesting how similar they are from such distance parts of the world.
    The basket in which I display many of my rocks and crystals is almost identical to Joanna’s! At first glance, I thought it *was* mine!
    My favorite stones aren’t the showiest – a good sized shiva lingum from India and a fairly simple looking rock from Machu Picchu brought to me by a dear friend.
    Mary Jo – that carving by your sister is stunning and very moving.

    Reply
  26. Joanna, you have a HUGE, wonderful Petosky stone in your collection. They’re so hard to come by anymore in a size bigger than a quarter and just as flat. I do have several big ones I collected as a teen, but now, one is fortunate to find any. They’re all scooped up and used in commercial jewelry.
    Love the opal boulders and the Ashdown House is so cool. All of the collections are spectacular for a rock lover like me.
    I have geodes, beach stones from Lake Huron when we vacation there, stones from beaches in Florida, stones from the UP in Michigan. I have a little vignette on my jacuzzi, my desk, my counters…
    When I was young, it was such a habit, I’m still always looking down for them when I walk.
    Great post! You could post more pictures like this any time ;o)

    Reply
  27. Joanna, you have a HUGE, wonderful Petosky stone in your collection. They’re so hard to come by anymore in a size bigger than a quarter and just as flat. I do have several big ones I collected as a teen, but now, one is fortunate to find any. They’re all scooped up and used in commercial jewelry.
    Love the opal boulders and the Ashdown House is so cool. All of the collections are spectacular for a rock lover like me.
    I have geodes, beach stones from Lake Huron when we vacation there, stones from beaches in Florida, stones from the UP in Michigan. I have a little vignette on my jacuzzi, my desk, my counters…
    When I was young, it was such a habit, I’m still always looking down for them when I walk.
    Great post! You could post more pictures like this any time ;o)

    Reply
  28. Joanna, you have a HUGE, wonderful Petosky stone in your collection. They’re so hard to come by anymore in a size bigger than a quarter and just as flat. I do have several big ones I collected as a teen, but now, one is fortunate to find any. They’re all scooped up and used in commercial jewelry.
    Love the opal boulders and the Ashdown House is so cool. All of the collections are spectacular for a rock lover like me.
    I have geodes, beach stones from Lake Huron when we vacation there, stones from beaches in Florida, stones from the UP in Michigan. I have a little vignette on my jacuzzi, my desk, my counters…
    When I was young, it was such a habit, I’m still always looking down for them when I walk.
    Great post! You could post more pictures like this any time ;o)

    Reply
  29. Joanna, you have a HUGE, wonderful Petosky stone in your collection. They’re so hard to come by anymore in a size bigger than a quarter and just as flat. I do have several big ones I collected as a teen, but now, one is fortunate to find any. They’re all scooped up and used in commercial jewelry.
    Love the opal boulders and the Ashdown House is so cool. All of the collections are spectacular for a rock lover like me.
    I have geodes, beach stones from Lake Huron when we vacation there, stones from beaches in Florida, stones from the UP in Michigan. I have a little vignette on my jacuzzi, my desk, my counters…
    When I was young, it was such a habit, I’m still always looking down for them when I walk.
    Great post! You could post more pictures like this any time ;o)

    Reply
  30. Joanna, you have a HUGE, wonderful Petosky stone in your collection. They’re so hard to come by anymore in a size bigger than a quarter and just as flat. I do have several big ones I collected as a teen, but now, one is fortunate to find any. They’re all scooped up and used in commercial jewelry.
    Love the opal boulders and the Ashdown House is so cool. All of the collections are spectacular for a rock lover like me.
    I have geodes, beach stones from Lake Huron when we vacation there, stones from beaches in Florida, stones from the UP in Michigan. I have a little vignette on my jacuzzi, my desk, my counters…
    When I was young, it was such a habit, I’m still always looking down for them when I walk.
    Great post! You could post more pictures like this any time ;o)

    Reply
  31. I only have some amythyst . My children ahve had small collections at times and my granddaughter collected rocks for a time. We had a rock tumbler and all but never did much with them.
    I think they are pretty and always can enjoy looking at them.
    I think Elizabeth Bennet was looking for some feldspar in Derbyshire– to bring in literature.

    Reply
  32. I only have some amythyst . My children ahve had small collections at times and my granddaughter collected rocks for a time. We had a rock tumbler and all but never did much with them.
    I think they are pretty and always can enjoy looking at them.
    I think Elizabeth Bennet was looking for some feldspar in Derbyshire– to bring in literature.

    Reply
  33. I only have some amythyst . My children ahve had small collections at times and my granddaughter collected rocks for a time. We had a rock tumbler and all but never did much with them.
    I think they are pretty and always can enjoy looking at them.
    I think Elizabeth Bennet was looking for some feldspar in Derbyshire– to bring in literature.

    Reply
  34. I only have some amythyst . My children ahve had small collections at times and my granddaughter collected rocks for a time. We had a rock tumbler and all but never did much with them.
    I think they are pretty and always can enjoy looking at them.
    I think Elizabeth Bennet was looking for some feldspar in Derbyshire– to bring in literature.

    Reply
  35. I only have some amythyst . My children ahve had small collections at times and my granddaughter collected rocks for a time. We had a rock tumbler and all but never did much with them.
    I think they are pretty and always can enjoy looking at them.
    I think Elizabeth Bennet was looking for some feldspar in Derbyshire– to bring in literature.

    Reply
  36. I do love pretty or interesting rocks – I don’t have very many small colorful rocks like in those baskets. My biggest ‘rock’ is my granite kitchen counter tops – it’s called Blue Pearl and is from Norway – I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it at the granite yard and get to use it everyday.
    I do have a big piece of petrified wood my uncle brought back from the western US (probably in the 1950’s – after that people were strongly discouraged from taking it (so that it all wouldn’t be gone from the area.
    After we went to Hawaii I found out my Dad had slipped a few pieces of lava rock from the Big Island into his bag – you aren’t supposed to do that – Pele gets mad at you.
    I also have some little slices of sandstone from the western US (Arizona/Utah) that look like desert scenes.
    I’ll have to poke around the house to see what other rocks have been stashed in drawers in the attic & basement.

    Reply
  37. I do love pretty or interesting rocks – I don’t have very many small colorful rocks like in those baskets. My biggest ‘rock’ is my granite kitchen counter tops – it’s called Blue Pearl and is from Norway – I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it at the granite yard and get to use it everyday.
    I do have a big piece of petrified wood my uncle brought back from the western US (probably in the 1950’s – after that people were strongly discouraged from taking it (so that it all wouldn’t be gone from the area.
    After we went to Hawaii I found out my Dad had slipped a few pieces of lava rock from the Big Island into his bag – you aren’t supposed to do that – Pele gets mad at you.
    I also have some little slices of sandstone from the western US (Arizona/Utah) that look like desert scenes.
    I’ll have to poke around the house to see what other rocks have been stashed in drawers in the attic & basement.

    Reply
  38. I do love pretty or interesting rocks – I don’t have very many small colorful rocks like in those baskets. My biggest ‘rock’ is my granite kitchen counter tops – it’s called Blue Pearl and is from Norway – I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it at the granite yard and get to use it everyday.
    I do have a big piece of petrified wood my uncle brought back from the western US (probably in the 1950’s – after that people were strongly discouraged from taking it (so that it all wouldn’t be gone from the area.
    After we went to Hawaii I found out my Dad had slipped a few pieces of lava rock from the Big Island into his bag – you aren’t supposed to do that – Pele gets mad at you.
    I also have some little slices of sandstone from the western US (Arizona/Utah) that look like desert scenes.
    I’ll have to poke around the house to see what other rocks have been stashed in drawers in the attic & basement.

    Reply
  39. I do love pretty or interesting rocks – I don’t have very many small colorful rocks like in those baskets. My biggest ‘rock’ is my granite kitchen counter tops – it’s called Blue Pearl and is from Norway – I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it at the granite yard and get to use it everyday.
    I do have a big piece of petrified wood my uncle brought back from the western US (probably in the 1950’s – after that people were strongly discouraged from taking it (so that it all wouldn’t be gone from the area.
    After we went to Hawaii I found out my Dad had slipped a few pieces of lava rock from the Big Island into his bag – you aren’t supposed to do that – Pele gets mad at you.
    I also have some little slices of sandstone from the western US (Arizona/Utah) that look like desert scenes.
    I’ll have to poke around the house to see what other rocks have been stashed in drawers in the attic & basement.

    Reply
  40. I do love pretty or interesting rocks – I don’t have very many small colorful rocks like in those baskets. My biggest ‘rock’ is my granite kitchen counter tops – it’s called Blue Pearl and is from Norway – I fell in love with it as soon as I saw it at the granite yard and get to use it everyday.
    I do have a big piece of petrified wood my uncle brought back from the western US (probably in the 1950’s – after that people were strongly discouraged from taking it (so that it all wouldn’t be gone from the area.
    After we went to Hawaii I found out my Dad had slipped a few pieces of lava rock from the Big Island into his bag – you aren’t supposed to do that – Pele gets mad at you.
    I also have some little slices of sandstone from the western US (Arizona/Utah) that look like desert scenes.
    I’ll have to poke around the house to see what other rocks have been stashed in drawers in the attic & basement.

    Reply
  41. Donna, there are metaphysical wenches, so you’re coming to the right place. My sister’s stone carving really is stunning–the gray stone is similar in look to the buildings Virginia Tech is built from and the blossom has 32 petals, one for each person who died that day.

    Reply
  42. Donna, there are metaphysical wenches, so you’re coming to the right place. My sister’s stone carving really is stunning–the gray stone is similar in look to the buildings Virginia Tech is built from and the blossom has 32 petals, one for each person who died that day.

    Reply
  43. Donna, there are metaphysical wenches, so you’re coming to the right place. My sister’s stone carving really is stunning–the gray stone is similar in look to the buildings Virginia Tech is built from and the blossom has 32 petals, one for each person who died that day.

    Reply
  44. Donna, there are metaphysical wenches, so you’re coming to the right place. My sister’s stone carving really is stunning–the gray stone is similar in look to the buildings Virginia Tech is built from and the blossom has 32 petals, one for each person who died that day.

    Reply
  45. Donna, there are metaphysical wenches, so you’re coming to the right place. My sister’s stone carving really is stunning–the gray stone is similar in look to the buildings Virginia Tech is built from and the blossom has 32 petals, one for each person who died that day.

    Reply
  46. I just had to comment on this topic. I love stones too, especially ones with fossils. In the 1960s I took a summer course in geology as my required science course at university. I still have a picture (b&w) of our prof sprawled in pieces of limestone outside the Stony Mountain penitentiary in Manitoba. Since then I’ve picked up rocks with fossils wherever I could find them: in the Yucatan in Mexico; in the forest behind my apartment in Germany; on Mt. Vesuvius, along the road north of Lake Superior, and a friend brought me one from Lesotho as a pendant. Most of the rocks more like yours I’ve had to buy, but I never had the money for such beauties. When my family moved from Winnipeg to London, Ontario while I was still living in Europe, some of my brother’s friends helped with the moving. One of his friends picked up a box and groaned, saying, “What’s in here? Rocks?!”
    He answered, “Yeah, you’ve probably got part of my sister’s rock collection in there.”
    The most intriguing stone I have is about the size of my hand. It’s a greyish rock but along one side there are several rows of regularly spaced small stones that look like a many-rowed necklace of diamonds frozen in stone. I haven’t been able to figure out how that came to be, and since I haven’t got the rock handy, I can’t even ask anybody who might know. But at least I know where the geology department is at Western University, formerly the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Maybe the rock will turn up soon and I can find out its secrets.

    Reply
  47. I just had to comment on this topic. I love stones too, especially ones with fossils. In the 1960s I took a summer course in geology as my required science course at university. I still have a picture (b&w) of our prof sprawled in pieces of limestone outside the Stony Mountain penitentiary in Manitoba. Since then I’ve picked up rocks with fossils wherever I could find them: in the Yucatan in Mexico; in the forest behind my apartment in Germany; on Mt. Vesuvius, along the road north of Lake Superior, and a friend brought me one from Lesotho as a pendant. Most of the rocks more like yours I’ve had to buy, but I never had the money for such beauties. When my family moved from Winnipeg to London, Ontario while I was still living in Europe, some of my brother’s friends helped with the moving. One of his friends picked up a box and groaned, saying, “What’s in here? Rocks?!”
    He answered, “Yeah, you’ve probably got part of my sister’s rock collection in there.”
    The most intriguing stone I have is about the size of my hand. It’s a greyish rock but along one side there are several rows of regularly spaced small stones that look like a many-rowed necklace of diamonds frozen in stone. I haven’t been able to figure out how that came to be, and since I haven’t got the rock handy, I can’t even ask anybody who might know. But at least I know where the geology department is at Western University, formerly the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Maybe the rock will turn up soon and I can find out its secrets.

    Reply
  48. I just had to comment on this topic. I love stones too, especially ones with fossils. In the 1960s I took a summer course in geology as my required science course at university. I still have a picture (b&w) of our prof sprawled in pieces of limestone outside the Stony Mountain penitentiary in Manitoba. Since then I’ve picked up rocks with fossils wherever I could find them: in the Yucatan in Mexico; in the forest behind my apartment in Germany; on Mt. Vesuvius, along the road north of Lake Superior, and a friend brought me one from Lesotho as a pendant. Most of the rocks more like yours I’ve had to buy, but I never had the money for such beauties. When my family moved from Winnipeg to London, Ontario while I was still living in Europe, some of my brother’s friends helped with the moving. One of his friends picked up a box and groaned, saying, “What’s in here? Rocks?!”
    He answered, “Yeah, you’ve probably got part of my sister’s rock collection in there.”
    The most intriguing stone I have is about the size of my hand. It’s a greyish rock but along one side there are several rows of regularly spaced small stones that look like a many-rowed necklace of diamonds frozen in stone. I haven’t been able to figure out how that came to be, and since I haven’t got the rock handy, I can’t even ask anybody who might know. But at least I know where the geology department is at Western University, formerly the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Maybe the rock will turn up soon and I can find out its secrets.

    Reply
  49. I just had to comment on this topic. I love stones too, especially ones with fossils. In the 1960s I took a summer course in geology as my required science course at university. I still have a picture (b&w) of our prof sprawled in pieces of limestone outside the Stony Mountain penitentiary in Manitoba. Since then I’ve picked up rocks with fossils wherever I could find them: in the Yucatan in Mexico; in the forest behind my apartment in Germany; on Mt. Vesuvius, along the road north of Lake Superior, and a friend brought me one from Lesotho as a pendant. Most of the rocks more like yours I’ve had to buy, but I never had the money for such beauties. When my family moved from Winnipeg to London, Ontario while I was still living in Europe, some of my brother’s friends helped with the moving. One of his friends picked up a box and groaned, saying, “What’s in here? Rocks?!”
    He answered, “Yeah, you’ve probably got part of my sister’s rock collection in there.”
    The most intriguing stone I have is about the size of my hand. It’s a greyish rock but along one side there are several rows of regularly spaced small stones that look like a many-rowed necklace of diamonds frozen in stone. I haven’t been able to figure out how that came to be, and since I haven’t got the rock handy, I can’t even ask anybody who might know. But at least I know where the geology department is at Western University, formerly the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Maybe the rock will turn up soon and I can find out its secrets.

    Reply
  50. I just had to comment on this topic. I love stones too, especially ones with fossils. In the 1960s I took a summer course in geology as my required science course at university. I still have a picture (b&w) of our prof sprawled in pieces of limestone outside the Stony Mountain penitentiary in Manitoba. Since then I’ve picked up rocks with fossils wherever I could find them: in the Yucatan in Mexico; in the forest behind my apartment in Germany; on Mt. Vesuvius, along the road north of Lake Superior, and a friend brought me one from Lesotho as a pendant. Most of the rocks more like yours I’ve had to buy, but I never had the money for such beauties. When my family moved from Winnipeg to London, Ontario while I was still living in Europe, some of my brother’s friends helped with the moving. One of his friends picked up a box and groaned, saying, “What’s in here? Rocks?!”
    He answered, “Yeah, you’ve probably got part of my sister’s rock collection in there.”
    The most intriguing stone I have is about the size of my hand. It’s a greyish rock but along one side there are several rows of regularly spaced small stones that look like a many-rowed necklace of diamonds frozen in stone. I haven’t been able to figure out how that came to be, and since I haven’t got the rock handy, I can’t even ask anybody who might know. But at least I know where the geology department is at Western University, formerly the University of Western Ontario in London, ON. Maybe the rock will turn up soon and I can find out its secrets.

    Reply
  51. Mary Jo, I had to go back through because I didn’t realize at first (I was reading at work so…hurried) that the flower in your stone is also stone! It’s just gorgeous. I would never have the dexterity to do that and not break the petals off. Your sister is very talented.

    Reply
  52. Mary Jo, I had to go back through because I didn’t realize at first (I was reading at work so…hurried) that the flower in your stone is also stone! It’s just gorgeous. I would never have the dexterity to do that and not break the petals off. Your sister is very talented.

    Reply
  53. Mary Jo, I had to go back through because I didn’t realize at first (I was reading at work so…hurried) that the flower in your stone is also stone! It’s just gorgeous. I would never have the dexterity to do that and not break the petals off. Your sister is very talented.

    Reply
  54. Mary Jo, I had to go back through because I didn’t realize at first (I was reading at work so…hurried) that the flower in your stone is also stone! It’s just gorgeous. I would never have the dexterity to do that and not break the petals off. Your sister is very talented.

    Reply
  55. Mary Jo, I had to go back through because I didn’t realize at first (I was reading at work so…hurried) that the flower in your stone is also stone! It’s just gorgeous. I would never have the dexterity to do that and not break the petals off. Your sister is very talented.

    Reply
  56. Theo–
    The stone carving is a relatively late blooming talent for my sister, and it’s amazing the works she’s created. (If you went to her website, you can see some of what she’s done.) I love them, but have no desire to emulate her. In return, she has no desire to write romances. *G*

    Reply
  57. Theo–
    The stone carving is a relatively late blooming talent for my sister, and it’s amazing the works she’s created. (If you went to her website, you can see some of what she’s done.) I love them, but have no desire to emulate her. In return, she has no desire to write romances. *G*

    Reply
  58. Theo–
    The stone carving is a relatively late blooming talent for my sister, and it’s amazing the works she’s created. (If you went to her website, you can see some of what she’s done.) I love them, but have no desire to emulate her. In return, she has no desire to write romances. *G*

    Reply
  59. Theo–
    The stone carving is a relatively late blooming talent for my sister, and it’s amazing the works she’s created. (If you went to her website, you can see some of what she’s done.) I love them, but have no desire to emulate her. In return, she has no desire to write romances. *G*

    Reply
  60. Theo–
    The stone carving is a relatively late blooming talent for my sister, and it’s amazing the works she’s created. (If you went to her website, you can see some of what she’s done.) I love them, but have no desire to emulate her. In return, she has no desire to write romances. *G*

    Reply
  61. Such a fun post, Mary Jo. Am drooling over Anne’s opals and your sister’s amazing carvings. And Sherrie’s petroglyphs . . . Sigh. Rocks really are beautiful. Just what I need—-more things to collect. At least they take up a little less room on the shelves than books!

    Reply
  62. Such a fun post, Mary Jo. Am drooling over Anne’s opals and your sister’s amazing carvings. And Sherrie’s petroglyphs . . . Sigh. Rocks really are beautiful. Just what I need—-more things to collect. At least they take up a little less room on the shelves than books!

    Reply
  63. Such a fun post, Mary Jo. Am drooling over Anne’s opals and your sister’s amazing carvings. And Sherrie’s petroglyphs . . . Sigh. Rocks really are beautiful. Just what I need—-more things to collect. At least they take up a little less room on the shelves than books!

    Reply
  64. Such a fun post, Mary Jo. Am drooling over Anne’s opals and your sister’s amazing carvings. And Sherrie’s petroglyphs . . . Sigh. Rocks really are beautiful. Just what I need—-more things to collect. At least they take up a little less room on the shelves than books!

    Reply
  65. Such a fun post, Mary Jo. Am drooling over Anne’s opals and your sister’s amazing carvings. And Sherrie’s petroglyphs . . . Sigh. Rocks really are beautiful. Just what I need—-more things to collect. At least they take up a little less room on the shelves than books!

    Reply
  66. Am sitting here smiling in remembrance of our wenchly rock discussion. I have so many more rocks here — you’re right, Mary Jo, it could be a book. Maybe not all that interesting for everyone, but I’d like it.
    Love the photo of Joanna’s rocks in the sun, and in the background on the other side of the window a plaintive cat sits, wondering what the fuss over some rocks is, and WHY are people letting cats wait outside?

    Reply
  67. Am sitting here smiling in remembrance of our wenchly rock discussion. I have so many more rocks here — you’re right, Mary Jo, it could be a book. Maybe not all that interesting for everyone, but I’d like it.
    Love the photo of Joanna’s rocks in the sun, and in the background on the other side of the window a plaintive cat sits, wondering what the fuss over some rocks is, and WHY are people letting cats wait outside?

    Reply
  68. Am sitting here smiling in remembrance of our wenchly rock discussion. I have so many more rocks here — you’re right, Mary Jo, it could be a book. Maybe not all that interesting for everyone, but I’d like it.
    Love the photo of Joanna’s rocks in the sun, and in the background on the other side of the window a plaintive cat sits, wondering what the fuss over some rocks is, and WHY are people letting cats wait outside?

    Reply
  69. Am sitting here smiling in remembrance of our wenchly rock discussion. I have so many more rocks here — you’re right, Mary Jo, it could be a book. Maybe not all that interesting for everyone, but I’d like it.
    Love the photo of Joanna’s rocks in the sun, and in the background on the other side of the window a plaintive cat sits, wondering what the fuss over some rocks is, and WHY are people letting cats wait outside?

    Reply
  70. Am sitting here smiling in remembrance of our wenchly rock discussion. I have so many more rocks here — you’re right, Mary Jo, it could be a book. Maybe not all that interesting for everyone, but I’d like it.
    Love the photo of Joanna’s rocks in the sun, and in the background on the other side of the window a plaintive cat sits, wondering what the fuss over some rocks is, and WHY are people letting cats wait outside?

    Reply
  71. I Love stones and some of these in the pics are gorgeous. Just up the top of our farm on the ridge of a hill we have a seam of fossil rocks. They are ancient marine animals and I have a number in the garden, which, I must admit have been there so long I forget them. Know what you mean Anne. I also used to bring back rocks from my travels, and used to fill my pockets and hand luggage getting them through Australian customs. Always a comment about how heavy my handbag was!!

    Reply
  72. I Love stones and some of these in the pics are gorgeous. Just up the top of our farm on the ridge of a hill we have a seam of fossil rocks. They are ancient marine animals and I have a number in the garden, which, I must admit have been there so long I forget them. Know what you mean Anne. I also used to bring back rocks from my travels, and used to fill my pockets and hand luggage getting them through Australian customs. Always a comment about how heavy my handbag was!!

    Reply
  73. I Love stones and some of these in the pics are gorgeous. Just up the top of our farm on the ridge of a hill we have a seam of fossil rocks. They are ancient marine animals and I have a number in the garden, which, I must admit have been there so long I forget them. Know what you mean Anne. I also used to bring back rocks from my travels, and used to fill my pockets and hand luggage getting them through Australian customs. Always a comment about how heavy my handbag was!!

    Reply
  74. I Love stones and some of these in the pics are gorgeous. Just up the top of our farm on the ridge of a hill we have a seam of fossil rocks. They are ancient marine animals and I have a number in the garden, which, I must admit have been there so long I forget them. Know what you mean Anne. I also used to bring back rocks from my travels, and used to fill my pockets and hand luggage getting them through Australian customs. Always a comment about how heavy my handbag was!!

    Reply
  75. I Love stones and some of these in the pics are gorgeous. Just up the top of our farm on the ridge of a hill we have a seam of fossil rocks. They are ancient marine animals and I have a number in the garden, which, I must admit have been there so long I forget them. Know what you mean Anne. I also used to bring back rocks from my travels, and used to fill my pockets and hand luggage getting them through Australian customs. Always a comment about how heavy my handbag was!!

    Reply
  76. Hi Donna —
    I’m not sure, but I think that basket of mine comes from Africa. Abidjan. Not sure.
    You know how it is. You have baskets here and there, full of stuff, and after a few packing and unpackings you can’t quite remember where you acquired what.
    Anyway, I bought a basket very much like that once to sort beads in and carry them home from the market. So that might be what it is.
    Hope your basket has an equally interesting and happy history.

    Reply
  77. Hi Donna —
    I’m not sure, but I think that basket of mine comes from Africa. Abidjan. Not sure.
    You know how it is. You have baskets here and there, full of stuff, and after a few packing and unpackings you can’t quite remember where you acquired what.
    Anyway, I bought a basket very much like that once to sort beads in and carry them home from the market. So that might be what it is.
    Hope your basket has an equally interesting and happy history.

    Reply
  78. Hi Donna —
    I’m not sure, but I think that basket of mine comes from Africa. Abidjan. Not sure.
    You know how it is. You have baskets here and there, full of stuff, and after a few packing and unpackings you can’t quite remember where you acquired what.
    Anyway, I bought a basket very much like that once to sort beads in and carry them home from the market. So that might be what it is.
    Hope your basket has an equally interesting and happy history.

    Reply
  79. Hi Donna —
    I’m not sure, but I think that basket of mine comes from Africa. Abidjan. Not sure.
    You know how it is. You have baskets here and there, full of stuff, and after a few packing and unpackings you can’t quite remember where you acquired what.
    Anyway, I bought a basket very much like that once to sort beads in and carry them home from the market. So that might be what it is.
    Hope your basket has an equally interesting and happy history.

    Reply
  80. Hi Donna —
    I’m not sure, but I think that basket of mine comes from Africa. Abidjan. Not sure.
    You know how it is. You have baskets here and there, full of stuff, and after a few packing and unpackings you can’t quite remember where you acquired what.
    Anyway, I bought a basket very much like that once to sort beads in and carry them home from the market. So that might be what it is.
    Hope your basket has an equally interesting and happy history.

    Reply
  81. Hi Theo —
    Well I am delighted to know what it’s called. Like a lot of the others, it was a gift from someone who’d collected it.
    It’s a kind of fossilized coral, I think. Lovely to hold. It has a smooth surface, as if it’s been worn away by water.

    Reply
  82. Hi Theo —
    Well I am delighted to know what it’s called. Like a lot of the others, it was a gift from someone who’d collected it.
    It’s a kind of fossilized coral, I think. Lovely to hold. It has a smooth surface, as if it’s been worn away by water.

    Reply
  83. Hi Theo —
    Well I am delighted to know what it’s called. Like a lot of the others, it was a gift from someone who’d collected it.
    It’s a kind of fossilized coral, I think. Lovely to hold. It has a smooth surface, as if it’s been worn away by water.

    Reply
  84. Hi Theo —
    Well I am delighted to know what it’s called. Like a lot of the others, it was a gift from someone who’d collected it.
    It’s a kind of fossilized coral, I think. Lovely to hold. It has a smooth surface, as if it’s been worn away by water.

    Reply
  85. Hi Theo —
    Well I am delighted to know what it’s called. Like a lot of the others, it was a gift from someone who’d collected it.
    It’s a kind of fossilized coral, I think. Lovely to hold. It has a smooth surface, as if it’s been worn away by water.

    Reply
  86. JoAnna, yes, it is. They’re absolutely gorgeous when polished and really do make some beautiful jewelry. My BF has one the size of a softball she found when we were teenagers taking a stroll along the shoreline in Traverse City, MI where they had a summer home. We found so many then. Now, not so much unless they’re pea sized or smaller.
    Two links if you’re interested:
    http://www.petoskeyarea.com/petoskey-stone-73/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petoskey_stone
    Do look at the difference between the softly polished and the ‘raw’ stone though. It’s striking.

    Reply
  87. JoAnna, yes, it is. They’re absolutely gorgeous when polished and really do make some beautiful jewelry. My BF has one the size of a softball she found when we were teenagers taking a stroll along the shoreline in Traverse City, MI where they had a summer home. We found so many then. Now, not so much unless they’re pea sized or smaller.
    Two links if you’re interested:
    http://www.petoskeyarea.com/petoskey-stone-73/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petoskey_stone
    Do look at the difference between the softly polished and the ‘raw’ stone though. It’s striking.

    Reply
  88. JoAnna, yes, it is. They’re absolutely gorgeous when polished and really do make some beautiful jewelry. My BF has one the size of a softball she found when we were teenagers taking a stroll along the shoreline in Traverse City, MI where they had a summer home. We found so many then. Now, not so much unless they’re pea sized or smaller.
    Two links if you’re interested:
    http://www.petoskeyarea.com/petoskey-stone-73/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petoskey_stone
    Do look at the difference between the softly polished and the ‘raw’ stone though. It’s striking.

    Reply
  89. JoAnna, yes, it is. They’re absolutely gorgeous when polished and really do make some beautiful jewelry. My BF has one the size of a softball she found when we were teenagers taking a stroll along the shoreline in Traverse City, MI where they had a summer home. We found so many then. Now, not so much unless they’re pea sized or smaller.
    Two links if you’re interested:
    http://www.petoskeyarea.com/petoskey-stone-73/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petoskey_stone
    Do look at the difference between the softly polished and the ‘raw’ stone though. It’s striking.

    Reply
  90. JoAnna, yes, it is. They’re absolutely gorgeous when polished and really do make some beautiful jewelry. My BF has one the size of a softball she found when we were teenagers taking a stroll along the shoreline in Traverse City, MI where they had a summer home. We found so many then. Now, not so much unless they’re pea sized or smaller.
    Two links if you’re interested:
    http://www.petoskeyarea.com/petoskey-stone-73/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petoskey_stone
    Do look at the difference between the softly polished and the ‘raw’ stone though. It’s striking.

    Reply
  91. Oh, I love your rock collections! I’ve got quite a few myself, geodes from southern California, beach stones from the east and west coasts, amethyst crystals from right here in New Jersey, various rocks picked up everywhere from Yemen to Yosemite, the Petrified Forest, and a lovely Petoskey stone the size of a tangerine, given to me by my 4th grade teacher.

    Reply
  92. Oh, I love your rock collections! I’ve got quite a few myself, geodes from southern California, beach stones from the east and west coasts, amethyst crystals from right here in New Jersey, various rocks picked up everywhere from Yemen to Yosemite, the Petrified Forest, and a lovely Petoskey stone the size of a tangerine, given to me by my 4th grade teacher.

    Reply
  93. Oh, I love your rock collections! I’ve got quite a few myself, geodes from southern California, beach stones from the east and west coasts, amethyst crystals from right here in New Jersey, various rocks picked up everywhere from Yemen to Yosemite, the Petrified Forest, and a lovely Petoskey stone the size of a tangerine, given to me by my 4th grade teacher.

    Reply
  94. Oh, I love your rock collections! I’ve got quite a few myself, geodes from southern California, beach stones from the east and west coasts, amethyst crystals from right here in New Jersey, various rocks picked up everywhere from Yemen to Yosemite, the Petrified Forest, and a lovely Petoskey stone the size of a tangerine, given to me by my 4th grade teacher.

    Reply
  95. Oh, I love your rock collections! I’ve got quite a few myself, geodes from southern California, beach stones from the east and west coasts, amethyst crystals from right here in New Jersey, various rocks picked up everywhere from Yemen to Yosemite, the Petrified Forest, and a lovely Petoskey stone the size of a tangerine, given to me by my 4th grade teacher.

    Reply

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