Welcome, Shana Abe

Shana

Jo here.

We’re delighted to have Shana Abé as our guest.

Truelove_bride_thum
Shana has a long career in historical romance, but is currently a huge success with her Drakon book, about shapeshifter dragons in Georgian England. The first, THE SMOKE THIEF, was one of those books that got huge reader buzz. Everyone was saying, “You have to read this!”

Jo: Welcome, Shana. I’m always curious about a writer’s origins. Were you a writer from the cradle, or did the insanity come to you later in life?

Shana: I can’t make any claims to sanity from the cradle or otherwise, LOL. I do know that I always loved creating fantasy worlds. I could tell stories for hours to my friends and not run out of steam. I don’t know they put up with me.

Jo: What is the first fiction you remember writing?Intimate_enemies_thum2

Shana: I remember writing a play in the first grade. It starred me as a beautiful princess (ha ha) who gets kidnapped by an evil sea hag (my older sister). I’m rescued by a sea prince (my younger brother). My sister refused to be the sea hag, however, and since she was four years older than I was, I couldn’t make her do it. I think I had to beg my best friend to be the hag instead.

Jo: The mark of a really best friend!

Shana: I recall that I made my parents sit through the whole thing…and that it didn’t actually have an ending, LOL.

Jo: When did your interests turn to romance?

Shana: Like lots of incredibly well-rounded, intelligent, accomplished people, I love to read romance. *G* My mom had this wonderful collection, and as a young teenager I would filch whatever I could from it to devour late at night. I think I went straight from Nancy Drew to Regencies, actually. And I was hooked.

Jo: That’ll do it. I was sucked in by Georgette Heyer. Here’s a link to a site about Regency romances. The Nonesuch How did you learn/practice your writing? Have you belonged to writing groups, chapters of RWA, or other organizations?

Shana: I’m afraid I’m one of those people who just got lucky and fell into writing as a profession. I didn’t study it extensively in college. I joined RWA only after my first book was accepted for publication, and only because my agent gently informed me that I should. I didn’t really know what RWA was, which was a shame, because I know now it’s such an amazing resource for writers.
Check out RWA here.

Otherwise, I’m a bit of a lone wolf. I’m sure I’d benefit by belonging to a writing group or RWA chapter, but it always seems like I’m running behind on even everyday moments, like grocery shopping or paying the bills. Writing can be such a lonely profession; it’s always a delicate balance between practicing the craft and seeking outside support for it.

Dragusual
Jo: That’s so true, especially as groups and writer friends can be wonderful when things aren’t going so well. Your writing career hasn’t followed a completely smooth path. Can you tell us about some of the ups and downs and what lay behind them, creatively speaking?

Shana: I thank God every day I still have this job, and that’s the truth. I’m so grateful to be able to write. So when there were downs, it was mostly when I felt so drained or exhausted that I couldn’t find that magic within myself any longer. It was worrisome.

About a year and a half ago I went through an excruciatingly distressing divorce. It rendered me into something like the walking dead. I had a manuscript due and I simply couldn’t write a thing, month after month after month. My heart wasn’t just broken, it was shattered, and I couldn’t imagine writing about love ever again. But…I had that book due, and I knew I had to write it. Even though I was very late with it, everyone at Bantam was incredibly wonderful and supportive. Still, there were definitely days when I thought my career was over.

Jo: That must have been terribly rough. Our ability to write can be extraordinarily robust, but so vulnerable to some assaults.

Shana: Somehow, in what I could best call a delirium, I wrote the book. It turned out to be THE DREAM THIEF, which to this day has plot points that escape me. Sometimes I’ll flip through it and think, “Oh, yeah. I wrote that.” I do remember that I have a line in there by the heroine, Lia, who says that love is the most terrible feeling in the world. That was absolutely where I was emotionally at that time.

Jo: That was a very wrenching book in parts. Now I know why.

Shana: But of course, I gave Lia a happy ending! And Amazon.com named THE DREAM THIEF Dt
the Number One Romance of the year. So I guess it worked out.

Jo: Very well deserved. Is there anything in particular you wish you hadn’t done, or had done? This is by way of advice to the writers who read and sometimes comment in Word Wenches.

Shana: I wish that I hadn’t, and still didn’t, procrastinate so much. I mean it; I’m really terrible that way. Even when I try not to, I procrastinate. It’s an awful habit. If you don’t do it already, don’t get sucked in!

Jo: Even before the Drákon books you’ve had paranormal elements in some books. Is this a long standing interest? Have you ever written specifically for the SF&F market?

Shana: I have always had a fascination with the concept of other worlds, either magical or spiritual or physical. I think I’m one of those people who’ll always wonder “what if” when I gaze at the stars, or get lost in the woods, or read fables. And although both THE SMOKE THIEF and THE DREAM THIEF are being marketed by Bantam as fantasies (in addition to romance), I haven’t yet written strictly for the SF&F market.

Jo: Have you been a big dragon fan for a long time? What are your favorite fictional dragons? Not saying there are any real ones, but you never know….

Shana: Um, according to some of the fan mail I’m getting these days, apparently shapeshifting dragon-people are real…

Jo: Yikes!

Shana: … and some people think I might be one of them. Yeah. Yikes.

But okay, seriously, I guess I’ve been a dragon fan as long as I’ve been a fan of any sort of fantasy concept. Dragons, unicorns, mermaids, faeries…what’s not to love? *G* I think one of my most favorite dragon tales is a very old Swedish one, which I’ll both condense and paraphrase for you, probably to its great detriment:

Once there was a prince who was most unfortunately born as a dragon instead of as a human boy, and was thus banished by his parents to live in the royal woods. He spent a lot of time acting out—wouldn’t you be mad if you were really a prince trapped in a dragon’s body, forced to eat berries and sleep on twigs?—and so grew up to become a big nuisance to his family and people, destroying crops, capturing livestock, that sort of thing. Saddrag

(Jo’s picture of a sad dragon.)

But the truth was, he was lonely, and he wanted a wife. None of the village virgins were especially keen on this idea, but finally one clever girl agreed to wed him. On their wedding night, she showed up wearing layers and layers of gowns. The dragon prince was a little puzzled, but politely asked her to remove her clothing. She, just as politely, replied that she would, but that for every dress she took off, he had to shed a layer of skin.

So they stripped. And stripped. And in the end she was naked, but so was he: at last a handsome, human prince.

Surely one of the earliest examples of a resourceful woman saving the day.

Jo: Indeed, and a beautiful metaphor for love. What about the Georgian period? Why did you set the Drákon books in that time slot?

Shana: I really loved the idea of having this tightly-knit, tribal and enclosed society of feral, animal-like people functioning within the confines of upper-class Georgian civilization, with hoops and corsets and powder and lace. It was actually a very sexy time period, both visually and culturally speaking, I think much more so than the years just before or after.

Jo: Definitely. And those aristocrats could be feral, too, at times. Georgian aristocrats and shape-shifter dragons is such a great fit it seems as if it should be true. Did the idea just come to you or were you circling something like that for a while? Please tell us more about the way it all came about. Did it come to you smoothly, or was there a lot of struggle to get that world just as you wanted it? For those who haven’t found the series yet, please tell us a little about the world and the books already out.

Shana: I had been writing medievals for a while, because that was where my interest began as a romance writer. But I was really starting to feel that I’d explored the limits of that world. By the time I wrote THE LAST MERMAID, I knew I wanted to move into a different time period. Fortunately for me, THE LAST MERMAID gave me the opportunity to explore four different centuries in one novel. The second story in the book (there were three) was set in 1721: I had an assassin heroine whose next assignment was a Scottish lord, the hero. This book was an unabashed paranormal—there are mermaids!—with the heroine, Leila, having the bittersweet gift of being able to read people’s true hearts if she physically touched them. But that gift was also slowly killing her.
Tlm

Leila really sparked my imagination. I adored that she was so cunning and resilient, but had to look and act like a delicate court lady cinched up in her gowns and glittering with jewels. I had a lot of fun writing the story, and when it was time to think about where I wanted to go next, I instinctively returned to that time period, and that paradox.

I knew I wanted to write about shapeshifters of some sort, and my first thought was werewolves. But there are already so many great werewolf romances out there, and I really wanted to do something different. One day I was watching the hawks soaring above my yard (I have house rabbits as pets, so watching out for hawks is part of my job) and I was so taken with their ferocious beauty and grace. I’d love to be able to fly like that! And I just thought, “Dragons!” That’s how it happened.

THE SMOKE THIEF was one of those amazing stories that pretty much wrote itself. I was so lucky.

So, to summarize the books: There exists a group of highly secretive, highly constrained creatures known as the drákon, who have the ability to Turn from human to smoke to dragon. They have many other Gifts as well: they can hear the unique music of metal and stones, like gold and diamonds. All their senses are heightened; they’re strong, and swift, and sly.

Because their kind has been hunted nearly to extinction over the centuries, they live disguised as humans in the lush, isolated community of Darkfrith, England. These are powerful, sensual beings who, for the sake of survival, have become farmers and miners and smiths, all ruled by an Alpha: the Marquess of Langford.

Naturally, in such a tightly controlled world, there are going to be rebels. One of them is Rue, the heroine of the first book, who actually fakes her own death to escape the shire and live free. She resettles in London and begins to use her Gifts to become the Smoke Thief, a notorious jewel thief. Problem is, Rue is the first female drákon in generations who can complete the Turn, and once the Alpha learns of her existence, he’ll move heaven and earth to find her, to get her back to Darkfrith as his bride.

I loved Rue. I think she was me back in high school: a shy sort of social misfit who lives in a dreamworld. Only Rue has the courage to make her dreams real.

Rue eventually has a daughter, Lia, the heroine of THE DREAM THIEF. Lia is the fifth of five children, quiet, apparently completely without the Gifts that define her kind. But the truth is that Lia’s been keeping secrets: she can hear the future in her dreams, and in that future, her entire tribe is destroyed by the human man she is destined to love.

Poor Lia! I gave her quite a dilemma: do you try to save your family, or do you try to save your true love? Either way, she loses. But she fights back by rejecting those two choices entirely, and flinging herself headfirst into a plan to save everyone, even if it means destroying herself in the process. Lia turned out to be much stronger than I first anticipated. She never gives up on love, and refuses to accept that she can’t fix the devastating future that’s rushing toward her. I loved her determination and desperate faith.

Jo: Did you have trouble interesting editors in the concept?

Actually, my editor loved the idea from the start. Thank God. In fact, Bantam was so happy with THE SMOKE THIEF that they decided to publish it first as a hardcover instead paperback, which was a big leap for me as an author.

Smokethief_th_2
Jo: With a beautiful cover, too. So, what are you working on now?

Shana: I’m working on the third book in the drákon series, which is the story of a princess of the drákon, Maricara, and Kimber, Rue’s eldest son. And I recently got some good news: Bantam wants me to continue the series, so it looks like there’s going be a few more drákon books even after this one.

Jo: That’s very good news. Is there anything you’d like to ask the Word Wenches readers?

Shana: Hmmm. Do you think the upswing in the paranormal market has played out? I’ve heard all kinds of opinions on this one!

My answer: For obvious reasons, I really hope not! *G* I remember that when I was starting out as a published author, I wanted to plunge right into writing paranormals, but my agent and editor shied away from the idea because the market was so relatively small. Now it’s booming, and I love that. I truly hope it continues to grow.

Jo: I remember that — when everyone said paranormal romance wouldn’t sell. Ha! You’re one of the few combining it with historical, however, and I think you’ve found the perfect fit.

Okay, everyone, time for you to talk to Shana. And remember, everyone who comments here will be in the draw for not one but TWO hardcovers from Shana.

You can visit Shana’s website by clicking here.

So, which of Shana’s books is your favorite? Do you have specific questions to ask her? Now’s your chance.

What about Shana’s question? What do you think about paranormal romance? Will it continue to be very popular? If so, why? Do paranormal elements enhance a romance for you or make it more difficult to believe?

What sort of paranormal elements do you like most? Vampires? Werewolves? Dragons? Faeries? Merpeople?

Do you think, like me, that Georgian aristocrats, with their dangerous, amoral arrogance and lush Ashportrait
ornamentation, were made to be dragons? This guy isn’t particularly glittery, but he has a very dangerous look in his eye. I could see him developing claws!

Jo

208 thoughts on “Welcome, Shana Abe”

  1. HUGE fan of the Smoke Thief here, and I’m not predominantly a paranormal reader. Your writing was lyrical. You can bet I’ll follow this series and look up your backlist too, Shana. I wish you much success in your writing and personal life. Great interview, Jo.
    I’m no expert on trends, but I think the future of paranormal is strong…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.

    Reply
  2. HUGE fan of the Smoke Thief here, and I’m not predominantly a paranormal reader. Your writing was lyrical. You can bet I’ll follow this series and look up your backlist too, Shana. I wish you much success in your writing and personal life. Great interview, Jo.
    I’m no expert on trends, but I think the future of paranormal is strong…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.

    Reply
  3. HUGE fan of the Smoke Thief here, and I’m not predominantly a paranormal reader. Your writing was lyrical. You can bet I’ll follow this series and look up your backlist too, Shana. I wish you much success in your writing and personal life. Great interview, Jo.
    I’m no expert on trends, but I think the future of paranormal is strong…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.

    Reply
  4. HUGE fan of the Smoke Thief here, and I’m not predominantly a paranormal reader. Your writing was lyrical. You can bet I’ll follow this series and look up your backlist too, Shana. I wish you much success in your writing and personal life. Great interview, Jo.
    I’m no expert on trends, but I think the future of paranormal is strong…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.

    Reply
  5. I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.
    Thank you so much for giving me yet another wonderful world to fall into!

    Reply
  6. I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.
    Thank you so much for giving me yet another wonderful world to fall into!

    Reply
  7. I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.
    Thank you so much for giving me yet another wonderful world to fall into!

    Reply
  8. I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.
    Thank you so much for giving me yet another wonderful world to fall into!

    Reply
  9. Hi Shana. I love paranormal novels and I think they will continue to be a popular read. I think paranormal elements enhance the plot. I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.

    Reply
  10. Hi Shana. I love paranormal novels and I think they will continue to be a popular read. I think paranormal elements enhance the plot. I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.

    Reply
  11. Hi Shana. I love paranormal novels and I think they will continue to be a popular read. I think paranormal elements enhance the plot. I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.

    Reply
  12. Hi Shana. I love paranormal novels and I think they will continue to be a popular read. I think paranormal elements enhance the plot. I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.

    Reply
  13. Shana, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As Jo says, your drakon books are the sort where people walk up, grab one’s hands, and say hoarsely, “You have to read this book!” So I did.
    I already had a fondness for shapeshifting dragons (a la DRAGON LOVERS), so your books were a perfect fit. I’m so glad to hear that the series will continue.
    As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.
    Dragons forever!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  14. Shana, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As Jo says, your drakon books are the sort where people walk up, grab one’s hands, and say hoarsely, “You have to read this book!” So I did.
    I already had a fondness for shapeshifting dragons (a la DRAGON LOVERS), so your books were a perfect fit. I’m so glad to hear that the series will continue.
    As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.
    Dragons forever!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  15. Shana, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As Jo says, your drakon books are the sort where people walk up, grab one’s hands, and say hoarsely, “You have to read this book!” So I did.
    I already had a fondness for shapeshifting dragons (a la DRAGON LOVERS), so your books were a perfect fit. I’m so glad to hear that the series will continue.
    As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.
    Dragons forever!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  16. Shana, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As Jo says, your drakon books are the sort where people walk up, grab one’s hands, and say hoarsely, “You have to read this book!” So I did.
    I already had a fondness for shapeshifting dragons (a la DRAGON LOVERS), so your books were a perfect fit. I’m so glad to hear that the series will continue.
    As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.
    Dragons forever!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  17. Fantastic interview Jo!
    Welcome to Word Wenches, Shana. Thank you for sharing so openly. Love the story about the dragon prince. I haven’t read any of your work, so, after this post, I’m off to Amazon.
    But, before I go, I’d like to take a stab at your question about paranormal romance and if the upswing is played out. [Warning: The following is only a personal opinion.] The generation I see entering the workforce seems to be sporting a unique cynicism. They spurn the tangible: government, Corporate America, organized religion and even sometimes family. Considering how many of these systems have done nothing but dole out disappointment, one can hardily cast blame. On the flip side, this generation puts huge stock in the intangible: IMing, blogging, gaming. They willingly, and sometimes without second thought, put their faith in the invisible. If fact, this generation seems to be the happiest when their best friends and advisers wear nothing but virtual skin.
    While such virtual activity can have a negative cumulative affect (i.e.: the social skills needed to deter war becoming sorely diminished), it’s only a small leap from taking the advice of shapeless friends to believing in shape-shifting. In truth, they themselves shape shift as they surf the powerful waves of virtual-ality. Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” Now, all we have to do is convince them they can find it in a book. Of course, this rant could just be a un-pub writing a paranormal romance with two in the wings who wants to believe the genre’s upswing will take her with it. Ah, well…back to reality.
    If I may, I have a question for you, Shana. You shared with us what you wished you hadn’t done/didn’t do. What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?
    Nina, aka the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  18. Fantastic interview Jo!
    Welcome to Word Wenches, Shana. Thank you for sharing so openly. Love the story about the dragon prince. I haven’t read any of your work, so, after this post, I’m off to Amazon.
    But, before I go, I’d like to take a stab at your question about paranormal romance and if the upswing is played out. [Warning: The following is only a personal opinion.] The generation I see entering the workforce seems to be sporting a unique cynicism. They spurn the tangible: government, Corporate America, organized religion and even sometimes family. Considering how many of these systems have done nothing but dole out disappointment, one can hardily cast blame. On the flip side, this generation puts huge stock in the intangible: IMing, blogging, gaming. They willingly, and sometimes without second thought, put their faith in the invisible. If fact, this generation seems to be the happiest when their best friends and advisers wear nothing but virtual skin.
    While such virtual activity can have a negative cumulative affect (i.e.: the social skills needed to deter war becoming sorely diminished), it’s only a small leap from taking the advice of shapeless friends to believing in shape-shifting. In truth, they themselves shape shift as they surf the powerful waves of virtual-ality. Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” Now, all we have to do is convince them they can find it in a book. Of course, this rant could just be a un-pub writing a paranormal romance with two in the wings who wants to believe the genre’s upswing will take her with it. Ah, well…back to reality.
    If I may, I have a question for you, Shana. You shared with us what you wished you hadn’t done/didn’t do. What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?
    Nina, aka the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  19. Fantastic interview Jo!
    Welcome to Word Wenches, Shana. Thank you for sharing so openly. Love the story about the dragon prince. I haven’t read any of your work, so, after this post, I’m off to Amazon.
    But, before I go, I’d like to take a stab at your question about paranormal romance and if the upswing is played out. [Warning: The following is only a personal opinion.] The generation I see entering the workforce seems to be sporting a unique cynicism. They spurn the tangible: government, Corporate America, organized religion and even sometimes family. Considering how many of these systems have done nothing but dole out disappointment, one can hardily cast blame. On the flip side, this generation puts huge stock in the intangible: IMing, blogging, gaming. They willingly, and sometimes without second thought, put their faith in the invisible. If fact, this generation seems to be the happiest when their best friends and advisers wear nothing but virtual skin.
    While such virtual activity can have a negative cumulative affect (i.e.: the social skills needed to deter war becoming sorely diminished), it’s only a small leap from taking the advice of shapeless friends to believing in shape-shifting. In truth, they themselves shape shift as they surf the powerful waves of virtual-ality. Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” Now, all we have to do is convince them they can find it in a book. Of course, this rant could just be a un-pub writing a paranormal romance with two in the wings who wants to believe the genre’s upswing will take her with it. Ah, well…back to reality.
    If I may, I have a question for you, Shana. You shared with us what you wished you hadn’t done/didn’t do. What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?
    Nina, aka the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  20. Fantastic interview Jo!
    Welcome to Word Wenches, Shana. Thank you for sharing so openly. Love the story about the dragon prince. I haven’t read any of your work, so, after this post, I’m off to Amazon.
    But, before I go, I’d like to take a stab at your question about paranormal romance and if the upswing is played out. [Warning: The following is only a personal opinion.] The generation I see entering the workforce seems to be sporting a unique cynicism. They spurn the tangible: government, Corporate America, organized religion and even sometimes family. Considering how many of these systems have done nothing but dole out disappointment, one can hardily cast blame. On the flip side, this generation puts huge stock in the intangible: IMing, blogging, gaming. They willingly, and sometimes without second thought, put their faith in the invisible. If fact, this generation seems to be the happiest when their best friends and advisers wear nothing but virtual skin.
    While such virtual activity can have a negative cumulative affect (i.e.: the social skills needed to deter war becoming sorely diminished), it’s only a small leap from taking the advice of shapeless friends to believing in shape-shifting. In truth, they themselves shape shift as they surf the powerful waves of virtual-ality. Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” Now, all we have to do is convince them they can find it in a book. Of course, this rant could just be a un-pub writing a paranormal romance with two in the wings who wants to believe the genre’s upswing will take her with it. Ah, well…back to reality.
    If I may, I have a question for you, Shana. You shared with us what you wished you hadn’t done/didn’t do. What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?
    Nina, aka the littlest wenchling.

    Reply
  21. I read paranormals very selectively. I can’t bring myself to read vampire romances, for example, even when they are written by some of my favorite writers. But I was persuaded by all the praise I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose.
    As for the paranormal trend, I hope the vampire craze diminishes, but I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.

    Reply
  22. I read paranormals very selectively. I can’t bring myself to read vampire romances, for example, even when they are written by some of my favorite writers. But I was persuaded by all the praise I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose.
    As for the paranormal trend, I hope the vampire craze diminishes, but I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.

    Reply
  23. I read paranormals very selectively. I can’t bring myself to read vampire romances, for example, even when they are written by some of my favorite writers. But I was persuaded by all the praise I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose.
    As for the paranormal trend, I hope the vampire craze diminishes, but I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.

    Reply
  24. I read paranormals very selectively. I can’t bring myself to read vampire romances, for example, even when they are written by some of my favorite writers. But I was persuaded by all the praise I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose.
    As for the paranormal trend, I hope the vampire craze diminishes, but I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.

    Reply
  25. I came to romance via time-travel historicals, and I hope that fantasy and romance will continue to mix so deliciously. I read to escape, and fantasy worlds make that possible. Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point. I’m so glad to hear that there will be more Drakon!

    Reply
  26. I came to romance via time-travel historicals, and I hope that fantasy and romance will continue to mix so deliciously. I read to escape, and fantasy worlds make that possible. Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point. I’m so glad to hear that there will be more Drakon!

    Reply
  27. I came to romance via time-travel historicals, and I hope that fantasy and romance will continue to mix so deliciously. I read to escape, and fantasy worlds make that possible. Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point. I’m so glad to hear that there will be more Drakon!

    Reply
  28. I came to romance via time-travel historicals, and I hope that fantasy and romance will continue to mix so deliciously. I read to escape, and fantasy worlds make that possible. Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point. I’m so glad to hear that there will be more Drakon!

    Reply
  29. I am a huge fan of paranormal reads. This is probably my favorite genre. As an avid reader of all genres I’m always looking for new authors to read. I must admit I haven’t read anything by you but your books sound like my kind of read. I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!

    Reply
  30. I am a huge fan of paranormal reads. This is probably my favorite genre. As an avid reader of all genres I’m always looking for new authors to read. I must admit I haven’t read anything by you but your books sound like my kind of read. I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!

    Reply
  31. I am a huge fan of paranormal reads. This is probably my favorite genre. As an avid reader of all genres I’m always looking for new authors to read. I must admit I haven’t read anything by you but your books sound like my kind of read. I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!

    Reply
  32. I am a huge fan of paranormal reads. This is probably my favorite genre. As an avid reader of all genres I’m always looking for new authors to read. I must admit I haven’t read anything by you but your books sound like my kind of read. I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!

    Reply
  33. Jo here. Fascinating observations, Nina! Yes, we do indeed put blind trust in the intangible these days. For example, if I stop to think how the internet exists, my mind freezes and it feels like one of those cartoons where someone sleepwalks off the girder and is fine until they wake up and realize there’s nothing beneath their feet.
    And also about the way we shift ourselves as we move through cyberspace. Most of us do it only a little, but some people do it in a big way, becoming completely different people.
    Shana, perhaps some of those shape shifting dragons who contact you really ARE real!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  34. Jo here. Fascinating observations, Nina! Yes, we do indeed put blind trust in the intangible these days. For example, if I stop to think how the internet exists, my mind freezes and it feels like one of those cartoons where someone sleepwalks off the girder and is fine until they wake up and realize there’s nothing beneath their feet.
    And also about the way we shift ourselves as we move through cyberspace. Most of us do it only a little, but some people do it in a big way, becoming completely different people.
    Shana, perhaps some of those shape shifting dragons who contact you really ARE real!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  35. Jo here. Fascinating observations, Nina! Yes, we do indeed put blind trust in the intangible these days. For example, if I stop to think how the internet exists, my mind freezes and it feels like one of those cartoons where someone sleepwalks off the girder and is fine until they wake up and realize there’s nothing beneath their feet.
    And also about the way we shift ourselves as we move through cyberspace. Most of us do it only a little, but some people do it in a big way, becoming completely different people.
    Shana, perhaps some of those shape shifting dragons who contact you really ARE real!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  36. Jo here. Fascinating observations, Nina! Yes, we do indeed put blind trust in the intangible these days. For example, if I stop to think how the internet exists, my mind freezes and it feels like one of those cartoons where someone sleepwalks off the girder and is fine until they wake up and realize there’s nothing beneath their feet.
    And also about the way we shift ourselves as we move through cyberspace. Most of us do it only a little, but some people do it in a big way, becoming completely different people.
    Shana, perhaps some of those shape shifting dragons who contact you really ARE real!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  37. Hi Shana, I adore dragons but have not had a chance to discover your writing yet. I think the paranormal category will remain popular but only writers with a strong voice and something unique in their stories will stand out. Paranormal elements offer great entertainment and escapism if they are well thought out and woven seamlessly into the story.
    Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?

    Reply
  38. Hi Shana, I adore dragons but have not had a chance to discover your writing yet. I think the paranormal category will remain popular but only writers with a strong voice and something unique in their stories will stand out. Paranormal elements offer great entertainment and escapism if they are well thought out and woven seamlessly into the story.
    Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?

    Reply
  39. Hi Shana, I adore dragons but have not had a chance to discover your writing yet. I think the paranormal category will remain popular but only writers with a strong voice and something unique in their stories will stand out. Paranormal elements offer great entertainment and escapism if they are well thought out and woven seamlessly into the story.
    Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?

    Reply
  40. Hi Shana, I adore dragons but have not had a chance to discover your writing yet. I think the paranormal category will remain popular but only writers with a strong voice and something unique in their stories will stand out. Paranormal elements offer great entertainment and escapism if they are well thought out and woven seamlessly into the story.
    Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?

    Reply
  41. Hello, Shana!
    I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.
    I’m off to Amazon to buy the Drakon books. I love paranormal elements, and outright fantasy. I hope I don’t start believing in shapeshifting dragons, but after reading MaryJo’s KISS OF FATE, I believed in Enchantresses enough to be sad I wasn’t one!!!
    Cathy

    Reply
  42. Hello, Shana!
    I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.
    I’m off to Amazon to buy the Drakon books. I love paranormal elements, and outright fantasy. I hope I don’t start believing in shapeshifting dragons, but after reading MaryJo’s KISS OF FATE, I believed in Enchantresses enough to be sad I wasn’t one!!!
    Cathy

    Reply
  43. Hello, Shana!
    I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.
    I’m off to Amazon to buy the Drakon books. I love paranormal elements, and outright fantasy. I hope I don’t start believing in shapeshifting dragons, but after reading MaryJo’s KISS OF FATE, I believed in Enchantresses enough to be sad I wasn’t one!!!
    Cathy

    Reply
  44. Hello, Shana!
    I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.
    I’m off to Amazon to buy the Drakon books. I love paranormal elements, and outright fantasy. I hope I don’t start believing in shapeshifting dragons, but after reading MaryJo’s KISS OF FATE, I believed in Enchantresses enough to be sad I wasn’t one!!!
    Cathy

    Reply
  45. Shana,
    I am completely captivated by your drakon! Your writing is so lyrical and evocative, and at the same time beautifully economical–every word necessary and meaningful. I particularly like your use of light in your descriptive passages–it adds so much to the atmosphere and the emotional depth of your characters.
    I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.
    I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)
    Having you and Jo talking together is a little bit like one of those “ideal imaginary dinner parties”–sort of too good to be true, and I have loved it.
    Thank you for being here and for your beautiful writing!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  46. Shana,
    I am completely captivated by your drakon! Your writing is so lyrical and evocative, and at the same time beautifully economical–every word necessary and meaningful. I particularly like your use of light in your descriptive passages–it adds so much to the atmosphere and the emotional depth of your characters.
    I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.
    I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)
    Having you and Jo talking together is a little bit like one of those “ideal imaginary dinner parties”–sort of too good to be true, and I have loved it.
    Thank you for being here and for your beautiful writing!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  47. Shana,
    I am completely captivated by your drakon! Your writing is so lyrical and evocative, and at the same time beautifully economical–every word necessary and meaningful. I particularly like your use of light in your descriptive passages–it adds so much to the atmosphere and the emotional depth of your characters.
    I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.
    I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)
    Having you and Jo talking together is a little bit like one of those “ideal imaginary dinner parties”–sort of too good to be true, and I have loved it.
    Thank you for being here and for your beautiful writing!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  48. Shana,
    I am completely captivated by your drakon! Your writing is so lyrical and evocative, and at the same time beautifully economical–every word necessary and meaningful. I particularly like your use of light in your descriptive passages–it adds so much to the atmosphere and the emotional depth of your characters.
    I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.
    I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)
    Having you and Jo talking together is a little bit like one of those “ideal imaginary dinner parties”–sort of too good to be true, and I have loved it.
    Thank you for being here and for your beautiful writing!
    Blessings,
    Melinda

    Reply
  49. I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)
    I loved paranormals before they were popular, and I’ll still seek them out if the market loses interest. Yes, I think paranormal elements enhance just about any romance. To me, reading a good paranormal is like being in Aladdin’s cave. I like just about any kind but generally not angels/demons, witches, and faeries. Though a really good author can make me like even these. [I loathe time travel romance, but there are two time travels on my keeper shelves. :)] I’m more selective about my werewolf/vampire reading these days because there’s so much of it, and it’s not all good. I’d love to read some good merpeople and genie books. The Arabian Nights stories have alway fascinated me. And the dragons, of course, are wonderful. That’s great news about the drakon series. Will the Wenches be writing any more dragon stories?
    I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?

    Reply
  50. I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)
    I loved paranormals before they were popular, and I’ll still seek them out if the market loses interest. Yes, I think paranormal elements enhance just about any romance. To me, reading a good paranormal is like being in Aladdin’s cave. I like just about any kind but generally not angels/demons, witches, and faeries. Though a really good author can make me like even these. [I loathe time travel romance, but there are two time travels on my keeper shelves. :)] I’m more selective about my werewolf/vampire reading these days because there’s so much of it, and it’s not all good. I’d love to read some good merpeople and genie books. The Arabian Nights stories have alway fascinated me. And the dragons, of course, are wonderful. That’s great news about the drakon series. Will the Wenches be writing any more dragon stories?
    I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?

    Reply
  51. I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)
    I loved paranormals before they were popular, and I’ll still seek them out if the market loses interest. Yes, I think paranormal elements enhance just about any romance. To me, reading a good paranormal is like being in Aladdin’s cave. I like just about any kind but generally not angels/demons, witches, and faeries. Though a really good author can make me like even these. [I loathe time travel romance, but there are two time travels on my keeper shelves. :)] I’m more selective about my werewolf/vampire reading these days because there’s so much of it, and it’s not all good. I’d love to read some good merpeople and genie books. The Arabian Nights stories have alway fascinated me. And the dragons, of course, are wonderful. That’s great news about the drakon series. Will the Wenches be writing any more dragon stories?
    I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?

    Reply
  52. I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)
    I loved paranormals before they were popular, and I’ll still seek them out if the market loses interest. Yes, I think paranormal elements enhance just about any romance. To me, reading a good paranormal is like being in Aladdin’s cave. I like just about any kind but generally not angels/demons, witches, and faeries. Though a really good author can make me like even these. [I loathe time travel romance, but there are two time travels on my keeper shelves. :)] I’m more selective about my werewolf/vampire reading these days because there’s so much of it, and it’s not all good. I’d love to read some good merpeople and genie books. The Arabian Nights stories have alway fascinated me. And the dragons, of course, are wonderful. That’s great news about the drakon series. Will the Wenches be writing any more dragon stories?
    I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?

    Reply
  53. Hi, everyone! I’m sorry to be late. Like I mentioned, I’m typically running behind, LOL. Didn’t Jo do a fabulous job with the interview? I really enjoyed her questions, and especially the graphics. *g*
    Thank you all so much for letting me have this chance to interact with you. And for those of you who enjoyed THE SMOKE THIEF and/or THE DREAM THIEF, another big thanks to you! It’s a truly humbling, amazing feeling to realize that you have touched other people’s lives in a (hopefully!) positive way. It’s one of the reasons I love writing so much.
    I’m going to try to address each of you now, but I have to do it one post at a time; otherwise, it becomes one huge, long post. So please bear with me!
    >>…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.<< I agree, Maggie. And I have to admit that when I read for pleasure, I’m usually looking for an escape. I find it very easy, and satisfying, to become immersed in other worlds.

    Reply
  54. Hi, everyone! I’m sorry to be late. Like I mentioned, I’m typically running behind, LOL. Didn’t Jo do a fabulous job with the interview? I really enjoyed her questions, and especially the graphics. *g*
    Thank you all so much for letting me have this chance to interact with you. And for those of you who enjoyed THE SMOKE THIEF and/or THE DREAM THIEF, another big thanks to you! It’s a truly humbling, amazing feeling to realize that you have touched other people’s lives in a (hopefully!) positive way. It’s one of the reasons I love writing so much.
    I’m going to try to address each of you now, but I have to do it one post at a time; otherwise, it becomes one huge, long post. So please bear with me!
    >>…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.<< I agree, Maggie. And I have to admit that when I read for pleasure, I’m usually looking for an escape. I find it very easy, and satisfying, to become immersed in other worlds.

    Reply
  55. Hi, everyone! I’m sorry to be late. Like I mentioned, I’m typically running behind, LOL. Didn’t Jo do a fabulous job with the interview? I really enjoyed her questions, and especially the graphics. *g*
    Thank you all so much for letting me have this chance to interact with you. And for those of you who enjoyed THE SMOKE THIEF and/or THE DREAM THIEF, another big thanks to you! It’s a truly humbling, amazing feeling to realize that you have touched other people’s lives in a (hopefully!) positive way. It’s one of the reasons I love writing so much.
    I’m going to try to address each of you now, but I have to do it one post at a time; otherwise, it becomes one huge, long post. So please bear with me!
    >>…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.<< I agree, Maggie. And I have to admit that when I read for pleasure, I’m usually looking for an escape. I find it very easy, and satisfying, to become immersed in other worlds.

    Reply
  56. Hi, everyone! I’m sorry to be late. Like I mentioned, I’m typically running behind, LOL. Didn’t Jo do a fabulous job with the interview? I really enjoyed her questions, and especially the graphics. *g*
    Thank you all so much for letting me have this chance to interact with you. And for those of you who enjoyed THE SMOKE THIEF and/or THE DREAM THIEF, another big thanks to you! It’s a truly humbling, amazing feeling to realize that you have touched other people’s lives in a (hopefully!) positive way. It’s one of the reasons I love writing so much.
    I’m going to try to address each of you now, but I have to do it one post at a time; otherwise, it becomes one huge, long post. So please bear with me!
    >>…by the nature of the genre, just about anything can happen, so that will keep readers guessing and writers flexing their imagination muscles. Paranormal is the ultimate escape reading.<< I agree, Maggie. And I have to admit that when I read for pleasure, I’m usually looking for an escape. I find it very easy, and satisfying, to become immersed in other worlds.

    Reply
  57. >> I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.<< I appreciate your kindness, meardaba. THE LAST MERMAID was an interesting concept put together by my publisher: to put the three stories in one big book. I think it worked out fairly well. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.

    Reply
  58. >> I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.<< I appreciate your kindness, meardaba. THE LAST MERMAID was an interesting concept put together by my publisher: to put the three stories in one big book. I think it worked out fairly well. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.

    Reply
  59. >> I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.<< I appreciate your kindness, meardaba. THE LAST MERMAID was an interesting concept put together by my publisher: to put the three stories in one big book. I think it worked out fairly well. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.

    Reply
  60. >> I am really really looking forward to reading these books! I read THE LAST MERMAID and loved it.<< I appreciate your kindness, meardaba. THE LAST MERMAID was an interesting concept put together by my publisher: to put the three stories in one big book. I think it worked out fairly well. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.

    Reply
  61. >> I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.<< Thank you, Crystal. I’ve been very fortunate with my covers. I wish I could take some credit for them, but it’s all totally out of my hands. Yesterday I received the cover for the paperback edition of THE DREAM THIEF, and I can’t believe it, but it’s even better than the hardcover version. There’s lots of silver foil, so it’s shinier. I’m like a magpie. I love shiny! 🙂

    Reply
  62. >> I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.<< Thank you, Crystal. I’ve been very fortunate with my covers. I wish I could take some credit for them, but it’s all totally out of my hands. Yesterday I received the cover for the paperback edition of THE DREAM THIEF, and I can’t believe it, but it’s even better than the hardcover version. There’s lots of silver foil, so it’s shinier. I’m like a magpie. I love shiny! 🙂

    Reply
  63. >> I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.<< Thank you, Crystal. I’ve been very fortunate with my covers. I wish I could take some credit for them, but it’s all totally out of my hands. Yesterday I received the cover for the paperback edition of THE DREAM THIEF, and I can’t believe it, but it’s even better than the hardcover version. There’s lots of silver foil, so it’s shinier. I’m like a magpie. I love shiny! 🙂

    Reply
  64. >> I think your Drakons are awesome. Very original. Love your covers. They are beautiful.<< Thank you, Crystal. I’ve been very fortunate with my covers. I wish I could take some credit for them, but it’s all totally out of my hands. Yesterday I received the cover for the paperback edition of THE DREAM THIEF, and I can’t believe it, but it’s even better than the hardcover version. There’s lots of silver foil, so it’s shinier. I’m like a magpie. I love shiny! 🙂

    Reply
  65. >> As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.<< I think you’re right, Mary Jo. There will always be a market for it; I suppose everything ebbs and flows in its time. I feel blessed that I happened to have stumbled into the opportunity to explore the world of paranormal romance at a good time for my particular style. And I know there will always be some readers who won’t touch paranormals with a ten foot pole. I try to keep in mind that you can’t write a book to please everyone, so you just gotta try to please yourself. At least, that’s my working theory today...LOL.

    Reply
  66. >> As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.<< I think you’re right, Mary Jo. There will always be a market for it; I suppose everything ebbs and flows in its time. I feel blessed that I happened to have stumbled into the opportunity to explore the world of paranormal romance at a good time for my particular style. And I know there will always be some readers who won’t touch paranormals with a ten foot pole. I try to keep in mind that you can’t write a book to please everyone, so you just gotta try to please yourself. At least, that’s my working theory today...LOL.

    Reply
  67. >> As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.<< I think you’re right, Mary Jo. There will always be a market for it; I suppose everything ebbs and flows in its time. I feel blessed that I happened to have stumbled into the opportunity to explore the world of paranormal romance at a good time for my particular style. And I know there will always be some readers who won’t touch paranormals with a ten foot pole. I try to keep in mind that you can’t write a book to please everyone, so you just gotta try to please yourself. At least, that’s my working theory today...LOL.

    Reply
  68. >> As to whether the paranormal boom will continue–I think that there is some burnout likely, (I get wistful e-mails from readers wondering if I’ll return to straight historicals), but that paranormals will continue as a major subcategory of romance, and the really good authors will continue to flourish.<< I think you’re right, Mary Jo. There will always be a market for it; I suppose everything ebbs and flows in its time. I feel blessed that I happened to have stumbled into the opportunity to explore the world of paranormal romance at a good time for my particular style. And I know there will always be some readers who won’t touch paranormals with a ten foot pole. I try to keep in mind that you can’t write a book to please everyone, so you just gotta try to please yourself. At least, that’s my working theory today...LOL.

    Reply
  69. >> Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” << Nina, wow, you blew me away! What a clear and perfect analysis. I think you’ve really touched upon an undeniable truth. Earlier generations had their own form of imagination-aided entertainment--I’m thinking specifically of radio serials, comic books, mediums like that--but today we have available such a vast array of visually and thematically sophisticated tools to sweep us away into other worlds. (Heck, I remember being excited over Pong and D&D!) Now virtual worlds draw in legions of fans. It’s easy to submerge yourself into a game where all the fantastic happenings not only look real, they can *feel* real. It’s perhaps a bit less instantly gratifying to pick up a book and let the words guide you into that same sort of sensation. But smart people always figure it out. (Btw, I love all those shows you mentioned. Maybe I’m more hip than I thought! *g*)

    Reply
  70. >> Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” << Nina, wow, you blew me away! What a clear and perfect analysis. I think you’ve really touched upon an undeniable truth. Earlier generations had their own form of imagination-aided entertainment--I’m thinking specifically of radio serials, comic books, mediums like that--but today we have available such a vast array of visually and thematically sophisticated tools to sweep us away into other worlds. (Heck, I remember being excited over Pong and D&D!) Now virtual worlds draw in legions of fans. It’s easy to submerge yourself into a game where all the fantastic happenings not only look real, they can *feel* real. It’s perhaps a bit less instantly gratifying to pick up a book and let the words guide you into that same sort of sensation. But smart people always figure it out. (Btw, I love all those shows you mentioned. Maybe I’m more hip than I thought! *g*)

    Reply
  71. >> Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” << Nina, wow, you blew me away! What a clear and perfect analysis. I think you’ve really touched upon an undeniable truth. Earlier generations had their own form of imagination-aided entertainment--I’m thinking specifically of radio serials, comic books, mediums like that--but today we have available such a vast array of visually and thematically sophisticated tools to sweep us away into other worlds. (Heck, I remember being excited over Pong and D&D!) Now virtual worlds draw in legions of fans. It’s easy to submerge yourself into a game where all the fantastic happenings not only look real, they can *feel* real. It’s perhaps a bit less instantly gratifying to pick up a book and let the words guide you into that same sort of sensation. But smart people always figure it out. (Btw, I love all those shows you mentioned. Maybe I’m more hip than I thought! *g*)

    Reply
  72. >> Unlike its predecessors, this generation is coming to us (authors) pre-programmed to believe in the power of the invisible. If fact, they not only believe, they crave it. Take note of popular television–Medium, Ghost Whisperer, 4400, Heroes– each are set in an ordinary world home to ordinary beings who can do the extraordinary. They want that “power.” << Nina, wow, you blew me away! What a clear and perfect analysis. I think you’ve really touched upon an undeniable truth. Earlier generations had their own form of imagination-aided entertainment--I’m thinking specifically of radio serials, comic books, mediums like that--but today we have available such a vast array of visually and thematically sophisticated tools to sweep us away into other worlds. (Heck, I remember being excited over Pong and D&D!) Now virtual worlds draw in legions of fans. It’s easy to submerge yourself into a game where all the fantastic happenings not only look real, they can *feel* real. It’s perhaps a bit less instantly gratifying to pick up a book and let the words guide you into that same sort of sensation. But smart people always figure it out. (Btw, I love all those shows you mentioned. Maybe I’m more hip than I thought! *g*)

    Reply
  73. >> What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?<< Okay, I know this sounds trite, but the best other thing I did was to let go of my fears, and just believe that I could write. I had a story in my head I thought was worthy to share. And there were absolutely times I was riddled with doubt and put the entire notion of “I could be a writer!” aside. Like a lot of published authors, it took me years to write a manuscript that was good enough to even be considered by a publishing house. I’m stubborn, though, so I knew I had to banish that inner doubt and keep going if I wanted this career. That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.

    Reply
  74. >> What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?<< Okay, I know this sounds trite, but the best other thing I did was to let go of my fears, and just believe that I could write. I had a story in my head I thought was worthy to share. And there were absolutely times I was riddled with doubt and put the entire notion of “I could be a writer!” aside. Like a lot of published authors, it took me years to write a manuscript that was good enough to even be considered by a publishing house. I’m stubborn, though, so I knew I had to banish that inner doubt and keep going if I wanted this career. That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.

    Reply
  75. >> What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?<< Okay, I know this sounds trite, but the best other thing I did was to let go of my fears, and just believe that I could write. I had a story in my head I thought was worthy to share. And there were absolutely times I was riddled with doubt and put the entire notion of “I could be a writer!” aside. Like a lot of published authors, it took me years to write a manuscript that was good enough to even be considered by a publishing house. I’m stubborn, though, so I knew I had to banish that inner doubt and keep going if I wanted this career. That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.

    Reply
  76. >> What was the one thing you did, other than taking up your quill, that jumpstarted your career?<< Okay, I know this sounds trite, but the best other thing I did was to let go of my fears, and just believe that I could write. I had a story in my head I thought was worthy to share. And there were absolutely times I was riddled with doubt and put the entire notion of “I could be a writer!” aside. Like a lot of published authors, it took me years to write a manuscript that was good enough to even be considered by a publishing house. I’m stubborn, though, so I knew I had to banish that inner doubt and keep going if I wanted this career. That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.

    Reply
  77. >> I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose…. I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.<< Thank you, Janga! And I think you’re right, love for the magical will always be there. I’m constantly impressed by the wide and wonderful range of fiction being written that explores my favorite subjects.

    Reply
  78. >> I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose…. I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.<< Thank you, Janga! And I think you’re right, love for the magical will always be there. I’m constantly impressed by the wide and wonderful range of fiction being written that explores my favorite subjects.

    Reply
  79. >> I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose…. I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.<< Thank you, Janga! And I think you’re right, love for the magical will always be there. I’m constantly impressed by the wide and wonderful range of fiction being written that explores my favorite subjects.

    Reply
  80. >> I read from the Wenches and others to read The Smoke Thief. I loved it. Like Maggie, I was enthralled by both the story and the lyricism of your prose…. I think a love for the magical will always be with us. I agree that the best writers will continue to produce books that readers love and that leave them hungry for more.<< Thank you, Janga! And I think you’re right, love for the magical will always be there. I’m constantly impressed by the wide and wonderful range of fiction being written that explores my favorite subjects.

    Reply
  81. >> Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point.<< LOL! What a great idea, Trina! Did it work? I was a pretty wily teenager. I might have figured out how to ease out the staples and then put them back. Btw, did you enjoy TINKER? I’ve been wanting to read it.

    Reply
  82. >> Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point.<< LOL! What a great idea, Trina! Did it work? I was a pretty wily teenager. I might have figured out how to ease out the staples and then put them back. Btw, did you enjoy TINKER? I’ve been wanting to read it.

    Reply
  83. >> Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point.<< LOL! What a great idea, Trina! Did it work? I was a pretty wily teenager. I might have figured out how to ease out the staples and then put them back. Btw, did you enjoy TINKER? I’ve been wanting to read it.

    Reply
  84. >> Unfortunately, I find myself frustrated because I enjoyed these books so much, and yet can’t share them with my teenager! I actually resorted to stapling a few pages closed in Tinker by Wen Spencer and telling her I would summarize when she got to that point.<< LOL! What a great idea, Trina! Did it work? I was a pretty wily teenager. I might have figured out how to ease out the staples and then put them back. Btw, did you enjoy TINKER? I’ve been wanting to read it.

    Reply
  85. >> I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!<< Thanks, Teresa. I think credit for the interview has to really go to Jo. She’s the sparkle behind it, without a doubt. (If you do read any of the drákon books, I truly hope you like them.)

    Reply
  86. >> I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!<< Thanks, Teresa. I think credit for the interview has to really go to Jo. She’s the sparkle behind it, without a doubt. (If you do read any of the drákon books, I truly hope you like them.)

    Reply
  87. >> I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!<< Thanks, Teresa. I think credit for the interview has to really go to Jo. She’s the sparkle behind it, without a doubt. (If you do read any of the drákon books, I truly hope you like them.)

    Reply
  88. >> I think the Drakon series has to be added to my TBR pile. Enjoyed your interview today!<< Thanks, Teresa. I think credit for the interview has to really go to Jo. She’s the sparkle behind it, without a doubt. (If you do read any of the drákon books, I truly hope you like them.)

    Reply
  89. >> Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?<< Hi, Jennybrat (great name!). Okay, I have to admit that when I began THE SMOKE THIEF, I tore off the cover of a TV schedule published in the LA Times that had Travis Fimmel on it as Tarzan and kept it by my computer. Anyone remember that series? I think it lasted about three episodes! I don’t know enough about his acting skills to say if he would make a good movie Kit, but he certainly had the look I envisioned: longish, windswept gold hair; piercing green eyes; fantastic body. Lots of brooding, sexual intensity. Hmmm...I think I still have that cover around here somewhere...I need to go find it.... As for Rue: Keira Knightley. Or Natalie Portman. Heck, one could be Rue, and one could be Lia. Let them decide; I’m not that picky! 🙂

    Reply
  90. >> Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?<< Hi, Jennybrat (great name!). Okay, I have to admit that when I began THE SMOKE THIEF, I tore off the cover of a TV schedule published in the LA Times that had Travis Fimmel on it as Tarzan and kept it by my computer. Anyone remember that series? I think it lasted about three episodes! I don’t know enough about his acting skills to say if he would make a good movie Kit, but he certainly had the look I envisioned: longish, windswept gold hair; piercing green eyes; fantastic body. Lots of brooding, sexual intensity. Hmmm...I think I still have that cover around here somewhere...I need to go find it.... As for Rue: Keira Knightley. Or Natalie Portman. Heck, one could be Rue, and one could be Lia. Let them decide; I’m not that picky! 🙂

    Reply
  91. >> Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?<< Hi, Jennybrat (great name!). Okay, I have to admit that when I began THE SMOKE THIEF, I tore off the cover of a TV schedule published in the LA Times that had Travis Fimmel on it as Tarzan and kept it by my computer. Anyone remember that series? I think it lasted about three episodes! I don’t know enough about his acting skills to say if he would make a good movie Kit, but he certainly had the look I envisioned: longish, windswept gold hair; piercing green eyes; fantastic body. Lots of brooding, sexual intensity. Hmmm...I think I still have that cover around here somewhere...I need to go find it.... As for Rue: Keira Knightley. Or Natalie Portman. Heck, one could be Rue, and one could be Lia. Let them decide; I’m not that picky! 🙂

    Reply
  92. >> Do you ever use photos from other sources to visualise your characters? What is one actor you would like to cast and as what character if one of your books ever get made into a movie?<< Hi, Jennybrat (great name!). Okay, I have to admit that when I began THE SMOKE THIEF, I tore off the cover of a TV schedule published in the LA Times that had Travis Fimmel on it as Tarzan and kept it by my computer. Anyone remember that series? I think it lasted about three episodes! I don’t know enough about his acting skills to say if he would make a good movie Kit, but he certainly had the look I envisioned: longish, windswept gold hair; piercing green eyes; fantastic body. Lots of brooding, sexual intensity. Hmmm...I think I still have that cover around here somewhere...I need to go find it.... As for Rue: Keira Knightley. Or Natalie Portman. Heck, one could be Rue, and one could be Lia. Let them decide; I’m not that picky! 🙂

    Reply
  93. >> I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.<< Thanks, Cathy. It’s so funny, because I got a copy of THE LAST MERMAID in my bag at that conference, too. Until that moment, I had no idea that Bantam was going to do that, which was very cool of them. (I think I gave mine away at one of the luncheons to someone who *hadn’t* read it about a billion times.)

    Reply
  94. >> I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.<< Thanks, Cathy. It’s so funny, because I got a copy of THE LAST MERMAID in my bag at that conference, too. Until that moment, I had no idea that Bantam was going to do that, which was very cool of them. (I think I gave mine away at one of the luncheons to someone who *hadn’t* read it about a billion times.)

    Reply
  95. >> I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.<< Thanks, Cathy. It’s so funny, because I got a copy of THE LAST MERMAID in my bag at that conference, too. Until that moment, I had no idea that Bantam was going to do that, which was very cool of them. (I think I gave mine away at one of the luncheons to someone who *hadn’t* read it about a billion times.)

    Reply
  96. >> I enjoyed THE LAST MERMAID, which I received at RWA National 2006 in my goody bag.<< Thanks, Cathy. It’s so funny, because I got a copy of THE LAST MERMAID in my bag at that conference, too. Until that moment, I had no idea that Bantam was going to do that, which was very cool of them. (I think I gave mine away at one of the luncheons to someone who *hadn’t* read it about a billion times.)

    Reply
  97. >> I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.<< Thank you, Melinda. What a lovely thing to say. It *is* nice to think that something good came from all that mess. But I wouldn’t want to have to write every book that way, that’s for certain!

    Reply
  98. >> I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.<< Thank you, Melinda. What a lovely thing to say. It *is* nice to think that something good came from all that mess. But I wouldn’t want to have to write every book that way, that’s for certain!

    Reply
  99. >> I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.<< Thank you, Melinda. What a lovely thing to say. It *is* nice to think that something good came from all that mess. But I wouldn’t want to have to write every book that way, that’s for certain!

    Reply
  100. >> I think the Dream Thief will be more meaningful to me now that I know it rose out of the ashes of such an awful time for you. One would never choose to experience one of those painful times, but how redemptive to have it be the origin such a beautiful and perfectly imagined book.<< Thank you, Melinda. What a lovely thing to say. It *is* nice to think that something good came from all that mess. But I wouldn’t want to have to write every book that way, that’s for certain!

    Reply
  101. >> I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)<< I think that Leila is such a lyrical, beautiful name. I glommed onto it right away after deciding my heroine would be from Spain, which has such a strong Moorish influence.

    Reply
  102. >> I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)<< I think that Leila is such a lyrical, beautiful name. I glommed onto it right away after deciding my heroine would be from Spain, which has such a strong Moorish influence.

    Reply
  103. >> I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)<< I think that Leila is such a lyrical, beautiful name. I glommed onto it right away after deciding my heroine would be from Spain, which has such a strong Moorish influence.

    Reply
  104. >> I am so looking forward to reading your earlier work, especially now that I know a fictional “Leila” awaits! (It’s my daughter’s name and not all that commonly found–although a couple of wenches have “Leila” heroines, too.)<< I think that Leila is such a lyrical, beautiful name. I glommed onto it right away after deciding my heroine would be from Spain, which has such a strong Moorish influence.

    Reply
  105. Jo here, chuckling over stapling pages together. I’m not sure it would work.
    At my convent school, one nun went through the library redlining pages we shouldn’t read.
    Very helpful.
    Great answers, Shana.
    Another sort of question. It was clever of you to put Darkfrith in the north, which was still pretty wild and woolly back then. Some would say still is.*G*
    Do you have a particular geographical location in mind? Of course, that could be a secret.
    Jo, a northern lass. 🙂

    Reply
  106. Jo here, chuckling over stapling pages together. I’m not sure it would work.
    At my convent school, one nun went through the library redlining pages we shouldn’t read.
    Very helpful.
    Great answers, Shana.
    Another sort of question. It was clever of you to put Darkfrith in the north, which was still pretty wild and woolly back then. Some would say still is.*G*
    Do you have a particular geographical location in mind? Of course, that could be a secret.
    Jo, a northern lass. 🙂

    Reply
  107. Jo here, chuckling over stapling pages together. I’m not sure it would work.
    At my convent school, one nun went through the library redlining pages we shouldn’t read.
    Very helpful.
    Great answers, Shana.
    Another sort of question. It was clever of you to put Darkfrith in the north, which was still pretty wild and woolly back then. Some would say still is.*G*
    Do you have a particular geographical location in mind? Of course, that could be a secret.
    Jo, a northern lass. 🙂

    Reply
  108. Jo here, chuckling over stapling pages together. I’m not sure it would work.
    At my convent school, one nun went through the library redlining pages we shouldn’t read.
    Very helpful.
    Great answers, Shana.
    Another sort of question. It was clever of you to put Darkfrith in the north, which was still pretty wild and woolly back then. Some would say still is.*G*
    Do you have a particular geographical location in mind? Of course, that could be a secret.
    Jo, a northern lass. 🙂

    Reply
  109. >> I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)<< You’re very kind, MaryK! Thank you! *s*

    Reply
  110. >> I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)<< You’re very kind, MaryK! Thank you! *s*

    Reply
  111. >> I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)<< You’re very kind, MaryK! Thank you! *s*

    Reply
  112. >> I read The Smoke Thief based on Wench recommendations, and I’m sooo glad I did! It’s a great book. I haven’t read The Dream Thief yet, but I plan to. (Love the cover!)<< You’re very kind, MaryK! Thank you! *s*

    Reply
  113. >>I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?<< Well, for purely practical purposes, I’ve really appreciated “Daily Life in 18th-Century England” by Kirstin Olsen. It’s full of all kinds of astonishing facts, and some icky ones too. (Did you know that wealthy ladies carried around a kind of stick--usually bejeweled--meant specifically to dislodge the vermin that would try to nest in their wigs? I do NOT put that in my stories, LOL.)

    Reply
  114. >>I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?<< Well, for purely practical purposes, I’ve really appreciated “Daily Life in 18th-Century England” by Kirstin Olsen. It’s full of all kinds of astonishing facts, and some icky ones too. (Did you know that wealthy ladies carried around a kind of stick--usually bejeweled--meant specifically to dislodge the vermin that would try to nest in their wigs? I do NOT put that in my stories, LOL.)

    Reply
  115. >>I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?<< Well, for purely practical purposes, I’ve really appreciated “Daily Life in 18th-Century England” by Kirstin Olsen. It’s full of all kinds of astonishing facts, and some icky ones too. (Did you know that wealthy ladies carried around a kind of stick--usually bejeweled--meant specifically to dislodge the vermin that would try to nest in their wigs? I do NOT put that in my stories, LOL.)

    Reply
  116. >>I’m ashamed to admit that most of the Georgian references go right over my head even though I’ve read the Wench Georgians. I learned the major periods in history, but know next to nothing about the details of daily life. All the talk about Georgians lately has made me think I’m missing some important nuances. Can anyone recommend a good primer?<< Well, for purely practical purposes, I’ve really appreciated “Daily Life in 18th-Century England” by Kirstin Olsen. It’s full of all kinds of astonishing facts, and some icky ones too. (Did you know that wealthy ladies carried around a kind of stick--usually bejeweled--meant specifically to dislodge the vermin that would try to nest in their wigs? I do NOT put that in my stories, LOL.)

    Reply
  117. >> I’ve never read your books, but now I think I’ve been missing out. Have to hit the Borders on the way home tonight. :)<< Thanks, CM! I hope you’re not disappointed 🙂 Did I miss anyone? Sorry if so! I’ll be more timely now, I promise!

    Reply
  118. >> I’ve never read your books, but now I think I’ve been missing out. Have to hit the Borders on the way home tonight. :)<< Thanks, CM! I hope you’re not disappointed 🙂 Did I miss anyone? Sorry if so! I’ll be more timely now, I promise!

    Reply
  119. >> I’ve never read your books, but now I think I’ve been missing out. Have to hit the Borders on the way home tonight. :)<< Thanks, CM! I hope you’re not disappointed 🙂 Did I miss anyone? Sorry if so! I’ll be more timely now, I promise!

    Reply
  120. >> I’ve never read your books, but now I think I’ve been missing out. Have to hit the Borders on the way home tonight. :)<< Thanks, CM! I hope you’re not disappointed 🙂 Did I miss anyone? Sorry if so! I’ll be more timely now, I promise!

    Reply
  121. Hi, Jo! Sorry, I was on a roll there and unable to stop posting, LOL.
    Regarding Darkfrith’s location: I’m sorry, that’s top secret. I wouldn’t want all the real dragon-people to come after you. *g*
    Seriously, though: years ago I toured Great Britain with my mom, and some of my favorite spots were York, and Durham. They were so green and densely wooded still; there was just something in the air there that felt ancient and mysterious. I know that sounds silly, but it’s true. And I wanted the drákon to be in England instead of Scotland, mostly because I had that Georgian story from THE LAST MERMAID set mainly in Scotland.
    I have an antique map of England that lays out the area pretty well. The print is tiny, though. I have to squint to read the town names. 🙂
    About the nuns: if you held the page up to the light, could you read the text? (See, I’m still such a miscreant!)

    Reply
  122. Hi, Jo! Sorry, I was on a roll there and unable to stop posting, LOL.
    Regarding Darkfrith’s location: I’m sorry, that’s top secret. I wouldn’t want all the real dragon-people to come after you. *g*
    Seriously, though: years ago I toured Great Britain with my mom, and some of my favorite spots were York, and Durham. They were so green and densely wooded still; there was just something in the air there that felt ancient and mysterious. I know that sounds silly, but it’s true. And I wanted the drákon to be in England instead of Scotland, mostly because I had that Georgian story from THE LAST MERMAID set mainly in Scotland.
    I have an antique map of England that lays out the area pretty well. The print is tiny, though. I have to squint to read the town names. 🙂
    About the nuns: if you held the page up to the light, could you read the text? (See, I’m still such a miscreant!)

    Reply
  123. Hi, Jo! Sorry, I was on a roll there and unable to stop posting, LOL.
    Regarding Darkfrith’s location: I’m sorry, that’s top secret. I wouldn’t want all the real dragon-people to come after you. *g*
    Seriously, though: years ago I toured Great Britain with my mom, and some of my favorite spots were York, and Durham. They were so green and densely wooded still; there was just something in the air there that felt ancient and mysterious. I know that sounds silly, but it’s true. And I wanted the drákon to be in England instead of Scotland, mostly because I had that Georgian story from THE LAST MERMAID set mainly in Scotland.
    I have an antique map of England that lays out the area pretty well. The print is tiny, though. I have to squint to read the town names. 🙂
    About the nuns: if you held the page up to the light, could you read the text? (See, I’m still such a miscreant!)

    Reply
  124. Hi, Jo! Sorry, I was on a roll there and unable to stop posting, LOL.
    Regarding Darkfrith’s location: I’m sorry, that’s top secret. I wouldn’t want all the real dragon-people to come after you. *g*
    Seriously, though: years ago I toured Great Britain with my mom, and some of my favorite spots were York, and Durham. They were so green and densely wooded still; there was just something in the air there that felt ancient and mysterious. I know that sounds silly, but it’s true. And I wanted the drákon to be in England instead of Scotland, mostly because I had that Georgian story from THE LAST MERMAID set mainly in Scotland.
    I have an antique map of England that lays out the area pretty well. The print is tiny, though. I have to squint to read the town names. 🙂
    About the nuns: if you held the page up to the light, could you read the text? (See, I’m still such a miscreant!)

    Reply
  125. Shana said…”That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.”
    Thank you, Shana, for your encouraging words and for taking the time to write to me, today. A great comfort to this fledgling un-pub as she works to add another 2000 to her 35,000 word MIP.
    Nina, smiling.
    Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.

    Reply
  126. Shana said…”That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.”
    Thank you, Shana, for your encouraging words and for taking the time to write to me, today. A great comfort to this fledgling un-pub as she works to add another 2000 to her 35,000 word MIP.
    Nina, smiling.
    Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.

    Reply
  127. Shana said…”That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.”
    Thank you, Shana, for your encouraging words and for taking the time to write to me, today. A great comfort to this fledgling un-pub as she works to add another 2000 to her 35,000 word MIP.
    Nina, smiling.
    Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.

    Reply
  128. Shana said…”That’s the reason why I’m sitting here writing to you today. Stubbornness, LOL.”
    Thank you, Shana, for your encouraging words and for taking the time to write to me, today. A great comfort to this fledgling un-pub as she works to add another 2000 to her 35,000 word MIP.
    Nina, smiling.
    Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.

    Reply
  129. >>Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.<< Nina, that's so funny! I totally have that quotation on a plaque on a wall in my office! It's the only sort of "inspirational" thing I have around; my mom gave it to me years ago, and it really has helped remind me to focus during some tough times. I wish you the best of luck with your writing. Just so you don't feel alone, you should know my next manuscript is due June 1st and I have MANY chapters to go, LOL.

    Reply
  130. >>Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.<< Nina, that's so funny! I totally have that quotation on a plaque on a wall in my office! It's the only sort of "inspirational" thing I have around; my mom gave it to me years ago, and it really has helped remind me to focus during some tough times. I wish you the best of luck with your writing. Just so you don't feel alone, you should know my next manuscript is due June 1st and I have MANY chapters to go, LOL.

    Reply
  131. >>Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.<< Nina, that's so funny! I totally have that quotation on a plaque on a wall in my office! It's the only sort of "inspirational" thing I have around; my mom gave it to me years ago, and it really has helped remind me to focus during some tough times. I wish you the best of luck with your writing. Just so you don't feel alone, you should know my next manuscript is due June 1st and I have MANY chapters to go, LOL.

    Reply
  132. >>Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. – Calvin Coolidge.<< Nina, that's so funny! I totally have that quotation on a plaque on a wall in my office! It's the only sort of "inspirational" thing I have around; my mom gave it to me years ago, and it really has helped remind me to focus during some tough times. I wish you the best of luck with your writing. Just so you don't feel alone, you should know my next manuscript is due June 1st and I have MANY chapters to go, LOL.

    Reply
  133. Jo here.
    Funny you should mention bugs in wigs, Shana. That was my main reason for sticking my Georgians in the mid century when “heads” as they called hairstyles, were natural and neat.
    A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.
    Mind you, anyone remember the early sixties and the “beehive” hairdo? People used to have those done at the hairdresser and lacquered into place, then preserve them as long as possible.
    The things we consider beautiful at different times.
    I’ve made a note to blog about the 18th century. I have some good links to share.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  134. Jo here.
    Funny you should mention bugs in wigs, Shana. That was my main reason for sticking my Georgians in the mid century when “heads” as they called hairstyles, were natural and neat.
    A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.
    Mind you, anyone remember the early sixties and the “beehive” hairdo? People used to have those done at the hairdresser and lacquered into place, then preserve them as long as possible.
    The things we consider beautiful at different times.
    I’ve made a note to blog about the 18th century. I have some good links to share.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  135. Jo here.
    Funny you should mention bugs in wigs, Shana. That was my main reason for sticking my Georgians in the mid century when “heads” as they called hairstyles, were natural and neat.
    A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.
    Mind you, anyone remember the early sixties and the “beehive” hairdo? People used to have those done at the hairdresser and lacquered into place, then preserve them as long as possible.
    The things we consider beautiful at different times.
    I’ve made a note to blog about the 18th century. I have some good links to share.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  136. Jo here.
    Funny you should mention bugs in wigs, Shana. That was my main reason for sticking my Georgians in the mid century when “heads” as they called hairstyles, were natural and neat.
    A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.
    Mind you, anyone remember the early sixties and the “beehive” hairdo? People used to have those done at the hairdresser and lacquered into place, then preserve them as long as possible.
    The things we consider beautiful at different times.
    I’ve made a note to blog about the 18th century. I have some good links to share.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  137. Shana…
    Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.
    Keep on writing!

    Reply
  138. Shana…
    Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.
    Keep on writing!

    Reply
  139. Shana…
    Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.
    Keep on writing!

    Reply
  140. Shana…
    Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.
    Keep on writing!

    Reply
  141. On the future of paranormals:
    Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)
    On Power and the Paranormal:
    Perhaps with the current powers that be, many people are experiencing a sense of powerlessness, and fantasy worlds not only extend a chance to experience different levels of control in a world that although make-believe, makes sense.
    Ironically, my experience with the “paranormal” in life as opposed to fiction is all about responsibility, not power. In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me. No thanks. 🙂
    On vampires:
    There is a very real vampire undergound on-line and in cities like New Orleans. These people believe they are vampires and have “Sires,” etc. I’ve communicated with some of them on-line. It is both fascinating, sad, and excruciatingly funny. (So fan mail from shape-shifters is not at all surprising. Also, I think the anime culture plays into this in a big way.)
    A literary expose of real-life “vampire” culture would be a vampire book I’d read. Or perhaps I should write it…
    I love mermaids, though, and am thrilled to have a title to go get!

    Reply
  142. On the future of paranormals:
    Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)
    On Power and the Paranormal:
    Perhaps with the current powers that be, many people are experiencing a sense of powerlessness, and fantasy worlds not only extend a chance to experience different levels of control in a world that although make-believe, makes sense.
    Ironically, my experience with the “paranormal” in life as opposed to fiction is all about responsibility, not power. In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me. No thanks. 🙂
    On vampires:
    There is a very real vampire undergound on-line and in cities like New Orleans. These people believe they are vampires and have “Sires,” etc. I’ve communicated with some of them on-line. It is both fascinating, sad, and excruciatingly funny. (So fan mail from shape-shifters is not at all surprising. Also, I think the anime culture plays into this in a big way.)
    A literary expose of real-life “vampire” culture would be a vampire book I’d read. Or perhaps I should write it…
    I love mermaids, though, and am thrilled to have a title to go get!

    Reply
  143. On the future of paranormals:
    Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)
    On Power and the Paranormal:
    Perhaps with the current powers that be, many people are experiencing a sense of powerlessness, and fantasy worlds not only extend a chance to experience different levels of control in a world that although make-believe, makes sense.
    Ironically, my experience with the “paranormal” in life as opposed to fiction is all about responsibility, not power. In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me. No thanks. 🙂
    On vampires:
    There is a very real vampire undergound on-line and in cities like New Orleans. These people believe they are vampires and have “Sires,” etc. I’ve communicated with some of them on-line. It is both fascinating, sad, and excruciatingly funny. (So fan mail from shape-shifters is not at all surprising. Also, I think the anime culture plays into this in a big way.)
    A literary expose of real-life “vampire” culture would be a vampire book I’d read. Or perhaps I should write it…
    I love mermaids, though, and am thrilled to have a title to go get!

    Reply
  144. On the future of paranormals:
    Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)
    On Power and the Paranormal:
    Perhaps with the current powers that be, many people are experiencing a sense of powerlessness, and fantasy worlds not only extend a chance to experience different levels of control in a world that although make-believe, makes sense.
    Ironically, my experience with the “paranormal” in life as opposed to fiction is all about responsibility, not power. In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me. No thanks. 🙂
    On vampires:
    There is a very real vampire undergound on-line and in cities like New Orleans. These people believe they are vampires and have “Sires,” etc. I’ve communicated with some of them on-line. It is both fascinating, sad, and excruciatingly funny. (So fan mail from shape-shifters is not at all surprising. Also, I think the anime culture plays into this in a big way.)
    A literary expose of real-life “vampire” culture would be a vampire book I’d read. Or perhaps I should write it…
    I love mermaids, though, and am thrilled to have a title to go get!

    Reply
  145. So wonderful to see you here. I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. Which never takes away from the wonder of the stories.
    Barbara, another Colorado girl

    Reply
  146. So wonderful to see you here. I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. Which never takes away from the wonder of the stories.
    Barbara, another Colorado girl

    Reply
  147. So wonderful to see you here. I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. Which never takes away from the wonder of the stories.
    Barbara, another Colorado girl

    Reply
  148. So wonderful to see you here. I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. Which never takes away from the wonder of the stories.
    Barbara, another Colorado girl

    Reply
  149. Shana, thank you for being a wonderful guest. It’s been a pleasure and an honor.
    For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  150. Shana, thank you for being a wonderful guest. It’s been a pleasure and an honor.
    For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  151. Shana, thank you for being a wonderful guest. It’s been a pleasure and an honor.
    For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  152. Shana, thank you for being a wonderful guest. It’s been a pleasure and an honor.
    For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  153. >>A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.<< Jo--I know! I make it a point to either get my people out of wigs ASAP or to at least keep them vermin-free, LOL.

    Reply
  154. >>A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.<< Jo--I know! I make it a point to either get my people out of wigs ASAP or to at least keep them vermin-free, LOL.

    Reply
  155. >>A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.<< Jo--I know! I make it a point to either get my people out of wigs ASAP or to at least keep them vermin-free, LOL.

    Reply
  156. >>A lot about the later Georgian appealed, but not those absurd hairstyles and having them created and then keeping them for weeks and weeks. Ick.<< Jo--I know! I make it a point to either get my people out of wigs ASAP or to at least keep them vermin-free, LOL.

    Reply
  157. >>Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.<< Thank you, Louis! It was so wonderful to be here and meet you all. 🙂

    Reply
  158. >>Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.<< Thank you, Louis! It was so wonderful to be here and meet you all. 🙂

    Reply
  159. >>Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.<< Thank you, Louis! It was so wonderful to be here and meet you all. 🙂

    Reply
  160. >>Thanks for writing about the Drakon.
    Enjoyed both books very much. Looking forward to the next book.<< Thank you, Louis! It was so wonderful to be here and meet you all. 🙂

    Reply
  161. >>Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)<< No, Jane, I think that's right on. We all love to read good stuff, even if we've visited a certain theme or situation before. --In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me.-- That's so interesting! I think you have a good point: people like to think there's something powerful and perhaps even predestined to guide their lives. If you abdicate personal power in your life, then nothing’s your fault. (And then, logically, nothing is to your credit, either!) --A literary expose of real-life "vampire" culture would be a vampire book I'd read. Or perhaps I should write it...-- I’d read that! *s*

    Reply
  162. >>Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)<< No, Jane, I think that's right on. We all love to read good stuff, even if we've visited a certain theme or situation before. --In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me.-- That's so interesting! I think you have a good point: people like to think there's something powerful and perhaps even predestined to guide their lives. If you abdicate personal power in your life, then nothing’s your fault. (And then, logically, nothing is to your credit, either!) --A literary expose of real-life "vampire" culture would be a vampire book I'd read. Or perhaps I should write it...-- I’d read that! *s*

    Reply
  163. >>Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)<< No, Jane, I think that's right on. We all love to read good stuff, even if we've visited a certain theme or situation before. --In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me.-- That's so interesting! I think you have a good point: people like to think there's something powerful and perhaps even predestined to guide their lives. If you abdicate personal power in your life, then nothing’s your fault. (And then, logically, nothing is to your credit, either!) --A literary expose of real-life "vampire" culture would be a vampire book I'd read. Or perhaps I should write it...-- I’d read that! *s*

    Reply
  164. >>Logic says that readers will grow tired of the “same ‘ol, same ‘ol” but that there will always be a place for the clever and fresh, paranormal elements or not. (Or maybe I’m just horribly naive.)<< No, Jane, I think that's right on. We all love to read good stuff, even if we've visited a certain theme or situation before. --In fact, I worked as a professional trance medium for over a decade and quit because clients preferred to duck personal responsibility and instead hand their power over to me.-- That's so interesting! I think you have a good point: people like to think there's something powerful and perhaps even predestined to guide their lives. If you abdicate personal power in your life, then nothing’s your fault. (And then, logically, nothing is to your credit, either!) --A literary expose of real-life "vampire" culture would be a vampire book I'd read. Or perhaps I should write it...-- I’d read that! *s*

    Reply
  165. >>I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. << Well, coming from a fellow jaded Colorado chick, I really appreciate your compliments! Thank you, Barbara! 🙂

    Reply
  166. >>I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. << Well, coming from a fellow jaded Colorado chick, I really appreciate your compliments! Thank you, Barbara! 🙂

    Reply
  167. >>I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. << Well, coming from a fellow jaded Colorado chick, I really appreciate your compliments! Thank you, Barbara! 🙂

    Reply
  168. >>I have to add my admiration to the list–I had not read your work until THE DREAM THIEF and it absolutely blew me away. I’m a jaded, not easily impressed reader and your writing is amazing and lyrical and delicious. << Well, coming from a fellow jaded Colorado chick, I really appreciate your compliments! Thank you, Barbara! 🙂

    Reply
  169. >>For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.<< Jo, I had such a great time. Thank you to all the Wondrous Wenches for inviting me here! It was such a treat. *s* And another Big Fat Thank You to everyone who dropped me a line to say hello. I enjoyed all your thoughts and comments. What a smart bunch! It was great to stretch my brain in new directions and think about something besides my deadline, LOL. Thank you to everyone again!! 🙂

    Reply
  170. >>For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.<< Jo, I had such a great time. Thank you to all the Wondrous Wenches for inviting me here! It was such a treat. *s* And another Big Fat Thank You to everyone who dropped me a line to say hello. I enjoyed all your thoughts and comments. What a smart bunch! It was great to stretch my brain in new directions and think about something besides my deadline, LOL. Thank you to everyone again!! 🙂

    Reply
  171. >>For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.<< Jo, I had such a great time. Thank you to all the Wondrous Wenches for inviting me here! It was such a treat. *s* And another Big Fat Thank You to everyone who dropped me a line to say hello. I enjoyed all your thoughts and comments. What a smart bunch! It was great to stretch my brain in new directions and think about something besides my deadline, LOL. Thank you to everyone again!! 🙂

    Reply
  172. >>For the sake of international guests (I can never remember how international time goes) I won’t draw the winner until 8 am tomorrow pacific time. So if anyone’s just arriving to read and comment, you have a little time.<< Jo, I had such a great time. Thank you to all the Wondrous Wenches for inviting me here! It was such a treat. *s* And another Big Fat Thank You to everyone who dropped me a line to say hello. I enjoyed all your thoughts and comments. What a smart bunch! It was great to stretch my brain in new directions and think about something besides my deadline, LOL. Thank you to everyone again!! 🙂

    Reply
  173. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.
    Haha. Yeah, we all think we have something important to say, don’t we? I loved all three, and liked the idea of three-in-one. It was a nice change of pace.

    Reply
  174. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.
    Haha. Yeah, we all think we have something important to say, don’t we? I loved all three, and liked the idea of three-in-one. It was a nice change of pace.

    Reply
  175. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.
    Haha. Yeah, we all think we have something important to say, don’t we? I loved all three, and liked the idea of three-in-one. It was a nice change of pace.

    Reply
  176. What I learned is that when you smoosh together three romances like that, people instinctively rank them in order of favorites. And then they write to me to tell me what they liked and what they didn’t, LOL.
    Haha. Yeah, we all think we have something important to say, don’t we? I loved all three, and liked the idea of three-in-one. It was a nice change of pace.

    Reply
  177. Drum roll, please!!!!!!!!!
    The lucky winner of the books from Shana is
    MaryK.
    Congratulations, Mary. I’ll be putting you in touch with Shana.
    I notice in your comment above that you asked if the Wenches will be writing any more dragon stories. I can’t speak for Mary Jo, but I would love to do something more with Dorn and its lovely dragons, I’m just not sure what or when.
    Congratulations again, Mary, and thanks to everyone who took part. This thread doesn’t have to stop here if you have more to say, but Shana probably has to get back to writing her book.
    But you can all always talk things over among yourselves. Any particular thread, like a dragon, lives forever.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  178. Drum roll, please!!!!!!!!!
    The lucky winner of the books from Shana is
    MaryK.
    Congratulations, Mary. I’ll be putting you in touch with Shana.
    I notice in your comment above that you asked if the Wenches will be writing any more dragon stories. I can’t speak for Mary Jo, but I would love to do something more with Dorn and its lovely dragons, I’m just not sure what or when.
    Congratulations again, Mary, and thanks to everyone who took part. This thread doesn’t have to stop here if you have more to say, but Shana probably has to get back to writing her book.
    But you can all always talk things over among yourselves. Any particular thread, like a dragon, lives forever.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  179. Drum roll, please!!!!!!!!!
    The lucky winner of the books from Shana is
    MaryK.
    Congratulations, Mary. I’ll be putting you in touch with Shana.
    I notice in your comment above that you asked if the Wenches will be writing any more dragon stories. I can’t speak for Mary Jo, but I would love to do something more with Dorn and its lovely dragons, I’m just not sure what or when.
    Congratulations again, Mary, and thanks to everyone who took part. This thread doesn’t have to stop here if you have more to say, but Shana probably has to get back to writing her book.
    But you can all always talk things over among yourselves. Any particular thread, like a dragon, lives forever.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  180. Drum roll, please!!!!!!!!!
    The lucky winner of the books from Shana is
    MaryK.
    Congratulations, Mary. I’ll be putting you in touch with Shana.
    I notice in your comment above that you asked if the Wenches will be writing any more dragon stories. I can’t speak for Mary Jo, but I would love to do something more with Dorn and its lovely dragons, I’m just not sure what or when.
    Congratulations again, Mary, and thanks to everyone who took part. This thread doesn’t have to stop here if you have more to say, but Shana probably has to get back to writing her book.
    But you can all always talk things over among yourselves. Any particular thread, like a dragon, lives forever.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  181. Maybe I’m not a true procrastinator, but a perpetual optimist. The book deadline is looming and I’m chapters behind…but I still have time! LOL.
    I wanted to thank you all yet again, and get back to meardaba’s last comment: I do enjoy hearing from readers, and I try to grin and bear it when someone feels compelled to tell something they disliked about my work…but I admit it’s much nicer to hear good things. *g*
    Oh well! Either way, it’s clear readers care about what they read, and I appreciate that. I’m glad you liked all three books. 🙂

    Reply
  182. Maybe I’m not a true procrastinator, but a perpetual optimist. The book deadline is looming and I’m chapters behind…but I still have time! LOL.
    I wanted to thank you all yet again, and get back to meardaba’s last comment: I do enjoy hearing from readers, and I try to grin and bear it when someone feels compelled to tell something they disliked about my work…but I admit it’s much nicer to hear good things. *g*
    Oh well! Either way, it’s clear readers care about what they read, and I appreciate that. I’m glad you liked all three books. 🙂

    Reply
  183. Maybe I’m not a true procrastinator, but a perpetual optimist. The book deadline is looming and I’m chapters behind…but I still have time! LOL.
    I wanted to thank you all yet again, and get back to meardaba’s last comment: I do enjoy hearing from readers, and I try to grin and bear it when someone feels compelled to tell something they disliked about my work…but I admit it’s much nicer to hear good things. *g*
    Oh well! Either way, it’s clear readers care about what they read, and I appreciate that. I’m glad you liked all three books. 🙂

    Reply
  184. Maybe I’m not a true procrastinator, but a perpetual optimist. The book deadline is looming and I’m chapters behind…but I still have time! LOL.
    I wanted to thank you all yet again, and get back to meardaba’s last comment: I do enjoy hearing from readers, and I try to grin and bear it when someone feels compelled to tell something they disliked about my work…but I admit it’s much nicer to hear good things. *g*
    Oh well! Either way, it’s clear readers care about what they read, and I appreciate that. I’m glad you liked all three books. 🙂

    Reply

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