Welcome, Eloisa James

      Eloisa_james  The Wenches are delighted to have bestselling author Eloisa James as our guest today.  Eloisa has been writing since the age of 5, when she penned family plays and charged her parents exorbitant admission fees to watch them.  A professor of English literature specializing in Shakespeare, she lived a double life for a time.  A few years ago, there was some fainting (well, it could have happened) in the academic community when she came out as a romance writer.  If I didn’t already like her, I certainly would have developed a powerful admiration after learning of this and reading her marvelous defense of the romance genre in the New York Times.
Desperate_duchessesl     Eloisa’s most recent book, DESPERATE DUCHESSES, was released May 29 to rave reviews.  I could try to capsulize this story, but I won’t, as the few lines space permits could never convey its many delights, from the father who writes terrible poetry and cries to the Worst Seamstress Known to Woman to….
      Never mind.  If you’ve read it, you know.  If you haven’t, you’re in for a treat.  On to the interview.
      Being a nerd, I ask nerdy questions, but do please chime in with your own queries and comments.  One of you will win an Eloisa James book and a box of chocolate dominoes.
      
      Mr_and_mrs_william_hallettwki LCUnlike your previous books, DESPERATE DUCHESSES is set in the 1780s, the Georgian era.  On your website you mention wanting a challenge, after twelve Regency-set historicals.  Could you tell us more about what made you choose the Georgian era?  What drew you to this time period?
      
      EJ:  The Regency period is great fun to write about in part because of the codes that governed the behavior of men and women regarding marriage, courtship, adultery, etc.  It’s a challenge to create characters who are historically accurate (or reasonably so) and still engage the sympathy of thoroughly modern women. It’s also a challenge to design the courtship of two characters who are not supposed to be private together or even kiss.
      I started thinking about the Georgian period because there were so many fewer strictures.  Basically, society was a lot wilder.  Noblewomen were frequently unfaithful to their husbands, and many couples lived apart.  Women moved to Paris and lived there.  There was more impropriety, both before and after marriage.  It suited the story I wanted to tell — about a set of wild duchesses.

LC:  What were the biggest challenges of changing eras?  Now that you’ve lived in the 18th C for a while, how do you feel about continuing there for several more books?      

Waldegrave_ladiesreynoldswki EJ:  Hands down, the biggest challenge is the research.  There’s a different feel to the Georgian period.  Many of the little strictures are gone.  Women are much freer, talking about sex in conversation, singing bawdy songs, trading jokes about impotence and desire.  I had to move into that language and rhythm.  Reading letters helped a great deal.  I also backed up and read letters written in the Restoration–they gave me even more of that rowdy feeling.

LC:  With its several subplots, this story had the feel of a Georgian-era novel, like TOM JONES.  You’ve spun a deliciously intricate spider’s web.  While Damon and Roberta’s love story is primary–and the arc of this story is perfect, by the way–the troubled relationship of the Duke and Duchess of Beaumont’s seems to be the heart of the web–with the other stories radiating out from it.  Have I got this right?  And can you tell us more about your vision for the series as a whole?
      
1785robealaanglaisedightoncalendarm  EJ:  My series tend to have an over-arching story, a thread that continues from book to book.  It gives me a greater canvas:  so in my last series, Imogen elopes and is widowed: her story continues through four books.  The same is true here.  I relish the longer time period and great word count so that I can develop a really complicated story, either of a marriage (in this case) or a woman’s life.  Jemma will be the focus of the longer arc, though I can’t tell you that she will necessarily end the last book with her duke.
      
LC:  This blog loves costume talk, and I think you’ve plenty to say, having made such brilliant use of clothing.  You use it to show us character and to forward plot elements–most notably in the case of a wicked game of dominoes–along with creating a potent sense of time and place.  What did you need to do, to understand Georgian dress, what it could mean and how it could be used?
      
Gainsborough_lady_georgiana_cavendi  EJ:  I read books of costume, of course.  Most helpful to me was a plain little book called HANDBOOK OF ENGLISH COSTUME IN THE 18TH CENTURY by C. Willet Cunnington and Phillis Cunnington.  But reading plays helped the most.  Popular plays from the Georgian period give a vivid sense of how people used fans, or moved in dresses and side-panniers.  I should watch the movies, but I haven’t found time.

LC:  Were there any elements of Georgian dress you found particularly enlightening or useful or hilarious?  Did you ever wish your people were in Regency dress instead, or were you completely seduced by the world of Dangerous Liaisons?

1778jeunedamedequaliteengranderobew EJ:  Well, Regency dress is really fun to write about because it’s so obviously sexy.  There is a moment in DESPERATE DUCHESSES when my hero pulls down my heroine’s bodice — and my research assistant pointed out that given her structured undergarments, and stiff bodice, that was not a very true-to-life moment.  I think I fixed it somehow, but I did feel a pulse of nostalgia for the way the Regency garments basically fall off the body.
      That said, there is something enormously enticing about a woman whose clothing needs to be truly taken off, in an almost ritual manner.  I love the wigs, in particular.

LC:  And speaking of seduction:  Some of the Wenches find Georgian men much sexier than Regency men.  What about you?  Mr. Darcy or Tom Jones?  Or both?      

Charleswentworthwkijpg EJ:  Either one as long as they had an obsessive-compulsive relationship toward bathing!

LC:  If there’s anything you’d like to tell us about Georgian corsets–or other forms of underwear–this is the place to tell it.  Dress/undress is a favorite subject.

Tight_lacingwkiEJ:  Nope.
      
LC:  The chess games in this story absolutely vibrated with tension, sexual as well as psychological.  I’m still trying to figure out how you can teach, write novels, raise children, and be a chess expert.  Please elucidate.
      
Chess_pieces   EJ:  I’m no chess expert — I can’t even play.  But I am huge believer in the ability of writers to absorb information from experts and (in essence) fake it.  I’m a Shakespeare professor, and one of my graduate students gave a paper on that scene in THE TEMPEST when the lovers are “discovered” playing chess.  They were in private, and this paper investigated the fact that men and women were allowed to play chess together in private, back to the Middle Ages — and frequently those games happened in a bedchamber.  Then I discovered that one of my closest friends in the English Department is ranked just below a chess master.  He talked; I listened.  He lent me chess magazines and chess books.  I firmly believe any of us can absorb enough to depict almost any skill in words.

LC:  A Publishers Weekly review compares you to Shakespeare, a comparison you’ve rejected.  But you are a Shakespeare scholar–and your love of language and appreciation of literature is clear on every page of DESPERATE DUCHESSES.  We Wenches often talk about the difficulties of balancing the urge for historical minutiae with the needs of our readers, who come to us for love stories, not dissertations.  Does having a double life–professor & romance novelist–take care of this problem, or do you, too, struggle for balance?
      
Pitt_the_youngerwki  EJ:  I don’t seem to have much of a problem there, perhaps because I come to romances for the stories.  I was a scholar before I was a writer, and so I never bothered to read romances for fact–but for the core of it, the romance.  Perhaps every writer really writes for themselves.  I know that I try very hard to write the kind of books that I would like to read.  And I don’t need any lectures on the politics of the 1800s, but I long, and always have, for funny books about men and women’s relationships.

LC:  DESPERATE DUCHESSES tantalizes us with a number of secondary characters.  Some appear briefly, others make a lengthier stay…but they’re all so intriguing!  Can you give us an idea of what the next book holds for us?
   
EJ:  Readers always hate this — but the fact is that you may never see some of those people again.  How can I create a “thick” enough world, a round-enough world, if I don’t people it?  And yet I’m not Trollope–I can’t keep series going for 18-19 books, just to pair off every single person who gets mentioned.  I’m sorry…  Some will reappear and many won’t.  But (she said cheerfully) there’s lots of new characters in the next book.  Which is called AFFAIR BEFORE CHRISTMAS, by the way, and will be published November 15th.  It’s actually rather delicious. 
      I can tell you that the Duke of Villiers has a large role in AFFAIR.  My guess is that people are going to be very interested by him!

LC:  Finally, what didn’t I ask that you’d like to answer?
    
EJ:  I’ve heard about your “Extra” chapters — what are they?
      
      As soon as a book is published, I put up a topic in my bulletin board asking one simple question:  what chapter did you wish had been in the book and it wasn’t?  After giving people a few weeks to read the book, we select the top three or four candidates and every one votes.
      And then I write that chapter and put it up on my website (on the Extras page).  Taming_of_the_dukel For THE TAMING OF THE DUKE, I wrote one more scene in bed.  Pleasure_for_pleasurel For PLEASURE FOR PLEASURE , I skipped ahead a few years, and brought all my sisters back into a conversation together in which they discussed their children and their husbands.
      For DESPERATE DUCHESSES…I don’t know!  Please read the book and then tell me what you want!

200 thoughts on “Welcome, Eloisa James”

  1. Hallloooo Eloisa,
    Is there a place I haven’t visited where I haven’t oohed and aahed about DD? LC is right. DD is best experienced first-hand, rather than after reading the reviews.
    Q: What was the most surprising fact you discovered about Georgian wigs?
    Q: Which are some of the plays (turned into movies) that depict Georgian costumes in detail?
    Eloisa, you have me worried: Who do you plan on killing off in your ABC?
    Keira-formerly-of-the-Squawkettes-who’s-haunted-by-EJ’s-tendency-to-off-her-cast

    Reply
  2. Hallloooo Eloisa,
    Is there a place I haven’t visited where I haven’t oohed and aahed about DD? LC is right. DD is best experienced first-hand, rather than after reading the reviews.
    Q: What was the most surprising fact you discovered about Georgian wigs?
    Q: Which are some of the plays (turned into movies) that depict Georgian costumes in detail?
    Eloisa, you have me worried: Who do you plan on killing off in your ABC?
    Keira-formerly-of-the-Squawkettes-who’s-haunted-by-EJ’s-tendency-to-off-her-cast

    Reply
  3. Hallloooo Eloisa,
    Is there a place I haven’t visited where I haven’t oohed and aahed about DD? LC is right. DD is best experienced first-hand, rather than after reading the reviews.
    Q: What was the most surprising fact you discovered about Georgian wigs?
    Q: Which are some of the plays (turned into movies) that depict Georgian costumes in detail?
    Eloisa, you have me worried: Who do you plan on killing off in your ABC?
    Keira-formerly-of-the-Squawkettes-who’s-haunted-by-EJ’s-tendency-to-off-her-cast

    Reply
  4. Hallloooo Eloisa,
    Is there a place I haven’t visited where I haven’t oohed and aahed about DD? LC is right. DD is best experienced first-hand, rather than after reading the reviews.
    Q: What was the most surprising fact you discovered about Georgian wigs?
    Q: Which are some of the plays (turned into movies) that depict Georgian costumes in detail?
    Eloisa, you have me worried: Who do you plan on killing off in your ABC?
    Keira-formerly-of-the-Squawkettes-who’s-haunted-by-EJ’s-tendency-to-off-her-cast

    Reply
  5. Hallloooo Eloisa,
    Is there a place I haven’t visited where I haven’t oohed and aahed about DD? LC is right. DD is best experienced first-hand, rather than after reading the reviews.
    Q: What was the most surprising fact you discovered about Georgian wigs?
    Q: Which are some of the plays (turned into movies) that depict Georgian costumes in detail?
    Eloisa, you have me worried: Who do you plan on killing off in your ABC?
    Keira-formerly-of-the-Squawkettes-who’s-haunted-by-EJ’s-tendency-to-off-her-cast

    Reply
  6. Hi Keira — nice to hear from you again! Well, about my homicidal tendencies…
    I wish I could promise that the life of all my characters would be perfect. But life is various and long. Plus I find grief interesting.
    I was rather shocked to find out how many animals lived inside Georgian wigs! And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair… I have enough trouble with insomnia as it is.
    As for movies…I don’t know! Does anyone else? There’s Marie Antoinette, obviously.
    I’m off to drive children hither and thon…will be back later. Thank you for lovely interview, Loretta!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  7. Hi Keira — nice to hear from you again! Well, about my homicidal tendencies…
    I wish I could promise that the life of all my characters would be perfect. But life is various and long. Plus I find grief interesting.
    I was rather shocked to find out how many animals lived inside Georgian wigs! And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair… I have enough trouble with insomnia as it is.
    As for movies…I don’t know! Does anyone else? There’s Marie Antoinette, obviously.
    I’m off to drive children hither and thon…will be back later. Thank you for lovely interview, Loretta!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  8. Hi Keira — nice to hear from you again! Well, about my homicidal tendencies…
    I wish I could promise that the life of all my characters would be perfect. But life is various and long. Plus I find grief interesting.
    I was rather shocked to find out how many animals lived inside Georgian wigs! And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair… I have enough trouble with insomnia as it is.
    As for movies…I don’t know! Does anyone else? There’s Marie Antoinette, obviously.
    I’m off to drive children hither and thon…will be back later. Thank you for lovely interview, Loretta!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  9. Hi Keira — nice to hear from you again! Well, about my homicidal tendencies…
    I wish I could promise that the life of all my characters would be perfect. But life is various and long. Plus I find grief interesting.
    I was rather shocked to find out how many animals lived inside Georgian wigs! And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair… I have enough trouble with insomnia as it is.
    As for movies…I don’t know! Does anyone else? There’s Marie Antoinette, obviously.
    I’m off to drive children hither and thon…will be back later. Thank you for lovely interview, Loretta!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  10. Hi Keira — nice to hear from you again! Well, about my homicidal tendencies…
    I wish I could promise that the life of all my characters would be perfect. But life is various and long. Plus I find grief interesting.
    I was rather shocked to find out how many animals lived inside Georgian wigs! And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair… I have enough trouble with insomnia as it is.
    As for movies…I don’t know! Does anyone else? There’s Marie Antoinette, obviously.
    I’m off to drive children hither and thon…will be back later. Thank you for lovely interview, Loretta!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  11. Eloisa, it was a pleasure.
    Keira, offhand I can’t think of movies-from-plays, either, but for Georgian dress, what about Dangerous Liaisons, Valmont, Casanova, and the BBC miniseries, Aristocrats, based on the book by Stella Tillyard?
    Anyone else have suggestions?

    Reply
  12. Eloisa, it was a pleasure.
    Keira, offhand I can’t think of movies-from-plays, either, but for Georgian dress, what about Dangerous Liaisons, Valmont, Casanova, and the BBC miniseries, Aristocrats, based on the book by Stella Tillyard?
    Anyone else have suggestions?

    Reply
  13. Eloisa, it was a pleasure.
    Keira, offhand I can’t think of movies-from-plays, either, but for Georgian dress, what about Dangerous Liaisons, Valmont, Casanova, and the BBC miniseries, Aristocrats, based on the book by Stella Tillyard?
    Anyone else have suggestions?

    Reply
  14. Eloisa, it was a pleasure.
    Keira, offhand I can’t think of movies-from-plays, either, but for Georgian dress, what about Dangerous Liaisons, Valmont, Casanova, and the BBC miniseries, Aristocrats, based on the book by Stella Tillyard?
    Anyone else have suggestions?

    Reply
  15. Eloisa, it was a pleasure.
    Keira, offhand I can’t think of movies-from-plays, either, but for Georgian dress, what about Dangerous Liaisons, Valmont, Casanova, and the BBC miniseries, Aristocrats, based on the book by Stella Tillyard?
    Anyone else have suggestions?

    Reply
  16. Eloisa–
    Welcome to Wench World! It’s such a pleasure to have you here, even if there are critters living in your wig. 🙂
    I’m particularly intrigued by your tidbit about men and women being able to play chess in private. So many sensual possibilities!
    Have fun offing more characters–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  17. Eloisa–
    Welcome to Wench World! It’s such a pleasure to have you here, even if there are critters living in your wig. 🙂
    I’m particularly intrigued by your tidbit about men and women being able to play chess in private. So many sensual possibilities!
    Have fun offing more characters–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  18. Eloisa–
    Welcome to Wench World! It’s such a pleasure to have you here, even if there are critters living in your wig. 🙂
    I’m particularly intrigued by your tidbit about men and women being able to play chess in private. So many sensual possibilities!
    Have fun offing more characters–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  19. Eloisa–
    Welcome to Wench World! It’s such a pleasure to have you here, even if there are critters living in your wig. 🙂
    I’m particularly intrigued by your tidbit about men and women being able to play chess in private. So many sensual possibilities!
    Have fun offing more characters–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  20. Eloisa–
    Welcome to Wench World! It’s such a pleasure to have you here, even if there are critters living in your wig. 🙂
    I’m particularly intrigued by your tidbit about men and women being able to play chess in private. So many sensual possibilities!
    Have fun offing more characters–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  21. Hey, Eloisa! Can’t wait to get my hands on your new book (but then everyone here knows my love for all things Georgian, LOL!).
    The idea of the overarching thread for the whole series is brilliant (I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to the workshop you gave in Atlanta where you talked about this series; love that iPod).

    Reply
  22. Hey, Eloisa! Can’t wait to get my hands on your new book (but then everyone here knows my love for all things Georgian, LOL!).
    The idea of the overarching thread for the whole series is brilliant (I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to the workshop you gave in Atlanta where you talked about this series; love that iPod).

    Reply
  23. Hey, Eloisa! Can’t wait to get my hands on your new book (but then everyone here knows my love for all things Georgian, LOL!).
    The idea of the overarching thread for the whole series is brilliant (I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to the workshop you gave in Atlanta where you talked about this series; love that iPod).

    Reply
  24. Hey, Eloisa! Can’t wait to get my hands on your new book (but then everyone here knows my love for all things Georgian, LOL!).
    The idea of the overarching thread for the whole series is brilliant (I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to the workshop you gave in Atlanta where you talked about this series; love that iPod).

    Reply
  25. Hey, Eloisa! Can’t wait to get my hands on your new book (but then everyone here knows my love for all things Georgian, LOL!).
    The idea of the overarching thread for the whole series is brilliant (I don’t know how many times I’ve listened to the workshop you gave in Atlanta where you talked about this series; love that iPod).

    Reply
  26. Hi, Eloisa!
    Your books have been termed “comedies of manners” by a number of critics, but some of us who are devoted EJ readers thought DD was especially reminiscent of the comedies of Congreve or Sheridan. Was this quality something you were conscious of as you were writing?
    And since Pleasure for Pleasure fulfilled the fondest hopes of the Mayniacs, I am going to beleve the new series will eventually do the same thing for the Jelis. 🙂

    Reply
  27. Hi, Eloisa!
    Your books have been termed “comedies of manners” by a number of critics, but some of us who are devoted EJ readers thought DD was especially reminiscent of the comedies of Congreve or Sheridan. Was this quality something you were conscious of as you were writing?
    And since Pleasure for Pleasure fulfilled the fondest hopes of the Mayniacs, I am going to beleve the new series will eventually do the same thing for the Jelis. 🙂

    Reply
  28. Hi, Eloisa!
    Your books have been termed “comedies of manners” by a number of critics, but some of us who are devoted EJ readers thought DD was especially reminiscent of the comedies of Congreve or Sheridan. Was this quality something you were conscious of as you were writing?
    And since Pleasure for Pleasure fulfilled the fondest hopes of the Mayniacs, I am going to beleve the new series will eventually do the same thing for the Jelis. 🙂

    Reply
  29. Hi, Eloisa!
    Your books have been termed “comedies of manners” by a number of critics, but some of us who are devoted EJ readers thought DD was especially reminiscent of the comedies of Congreve or Sheridan. Was this quality something you were conscious of as you were writing?
    And since Pleasure for Pleasure fulfilled the fondest hopes of the Mayniacs, I am going to beleve the new series will eventually do the same thing for the Jelis. 🙂

    Reply
  30. Hi, Eloisa!
    Your books have been termed “comedies of manners” by a number of critics, but some of us who are devoted EJ readers thought DD was especially reminiscent of the comedies of Congreve or Sheridan. Was this quality something you were conscious of as you were writing?
    And since Pleasure for Pleasure fulfilled the fondest hopes of the Mayniacs, I am going to beleve the new series will eventually do the same thing for the Jelis. 🙂

    Reply
  31. I didn’t know you were over here today! Well, I probably knew and forgot. You know me…
    I was wondering what made you use a different character from your four Duchesses as the heroine in the first story?
    And which characters came first? Did you have Roberta first and the Duchesses came about or the other way around? I know these wonderful stories brew in your head for a while so I’m interested in sort of seeing how so many characters are “born”.
    And Ms. Putney, please do not encourage her. *sigh*

    Reply
  32. I didn’t know you were over here today! Well, I probably knew and forgot. You know me…
    I was wondering what made you use a different character from your four Duchesses as the heroine in the first story?
    And which characters came first? Did you have Roberta first and the Duchesses came about or the other way around? I know these wonderful stories brew in your head for a while so I’m interested in sort of seeing how so many characters are “born”.
    And Ms. Putney, please do not encourage her. *sigh*

    Reply
  33. I didn’t know you were over here today! Well, I probably knew and forgot. You know me…
    I was wondering what made you use a different character from your four Duchesses as the heroine in the first story?
    And which characters came first? Did you have Roberta first and the Duchesses came about or the other way around? I know these wonderful stories brew in your head for a while so I’m interested in sort of seeing how so many characters are “born”.
    And Ms. Putney, please do not encourage her. *sigh*

    Reply
  34. I didn’t know you were over here today! Well, I probably knew and forgot. You know me…
    I was wondering what made you use a different character from your four Duchesses as the heroine in the first story?
    And which characters came first? Did you have Roberta first and the Duchesses came about or the other way around? I know these wonderful stories brew in your head for a while so I’m interested in sort of seeing how so many characters are “born”.
    And Ms. Putney, please do not encourage her. *sigh*

    Reply
  35. I didn’t know you were over here today! Well, I probably knew and forgot. You know me…
    I was wondering what made you use a different character from your four Duchesses as the heroine in the first story?
    And which characters came first? Did you have Roberta first and the Duchesses came about or the other way around? I know these wonderful stories brew in your head for a while so I’m interested in sort of seeing how so many characters are “born”.
    And Ms. Putney, please do not encourage her. *sigh*

    Reply
  36. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m a huge fan of your novels! Your voice is simply wonderful and I always look forward to reading one of your novels. My question is, you’ve set books in Georgian and Regency England, are there any other period sin history you’d love to set a novel in?
    Love,
    Julie

    Reply
  37. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m a huge fan of your novels! Your voice is simply wonderful and I always look forward to reading one of your novels. My question is, you’ve set books in Georgian and Regency England, are there any other period sin history you’d love to set a novel in?
    Love,
    Julie

    Reply
  38. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m a huge fan of your novels! Your voice is simply wonderful and I always look forward to reading one of your novels. My question is, you’ve set books in Georgian and Regency England, are there any other period sin history you’d love to set a novel in?
    Love,
    Julie

    Reply
  39. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m a huge fan of your novels! Your voice is simply wonderful and I always look forward to reading one of your novels. My question is, you’ve set books in Georgian and Regency England, are there any other period sin history you’d love to set a novel in?
    Love,
    Julie

    Reply
  40. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m a huge fan of your novels! Your voice is simply wonderful and I always look forward to reading one of your novels. My question is, you’ve set books in Georgian and Regency England, are there any other period sin history you’d love to set a novel in?
    Love,
    Julie

    Reply
  41. Hi Eloisa,
    It’s wonderful to have you here (and on my birthday, too–still more proof that the Universe Revolves Around Me, LOL!). I’m right in the middle of your Essex sisters books right now, just about to finish “Kiss Me, Annabel.” I love the way you weave characters in and out and I can’t wait to get to “Desperate Duchesses” (already bought and waiting)
    I enjoy your web site, too, and I admire the way you list “errata” and have a sense of humor about it.
    My only “critique” of your books (see, this is a clever stratagem: make a critique that is actually a compliment!) would be that the last two Essex novels feature cover art that is Too Successful–actually Sensual (instead of slightly ridiculous). Just thinking about them makes me fan myself, and I sure don’t think I can read them in front of my kids. . . or indeed anyone who knows What I Do For A Living.
    Thank you for your wonderful writing!
    Melinda

    Reply
  42. Hi Eloisa,
    It’s wonderful to have you here (and on my birthday, too–still more proof that the Universe Revolves Around Me, LOL!). I’m right in the middle of your Essex sisters books right now, just about to finish “Kiss Me, Annabel.” I love the way you weave characters in and out and I can’t wait to get to “Desperate Duchesses” (already bought and waiting)
    I enjoy your web site, too, and I admire the way you list “errata” and have a sense of humor about it.
    My only “critique” of your books (see, this is a clever stratagem: make a critique that is actually a compliment!) would be that the last two Essex novels feature cover art that is Too Successful–actually Sensual (instead of slightly ridiculous). Just thinking about them makes me fan myself, and I sure don’t think I can read them in front of my kids. . . or indeed anyone who knows What I Do For A Living.
    Thank you for your wonderful writing!
    Melinda

    Reply
  43. Hi Eloisa,
    It’s wonderful to have you here (and on my birthday, too–still more proof that the Universe Revolves Around Me, LOL!). I’m right in the middle of your Essex sisters books right now, just about to finish “Kiss Me, Annabel.” I love the way you weave characters in and out and I can’t wait to get to “Desperate Duchesses” (already bought and waiting)
    I enjoy your web site, too, and I admire the way you list “errata” and have a sense of humor about it.
    My only “critique” of your books (see, this is a clever stratagem: make a critique that is actually a compliment!) would be that the last two Essex novels feature cover art that is Too Successful–actually Sensual (instead of slightly ridiculous). Just thinking about them makes me fan myself, and I sure don’t think I can read them in front of my kids. . . or indeed anyone who knows What I Do For A Living.
    Thank you for your wonderful writing!
    Melinda

    Reply
  44. Hi Eloisa,
    It’s wonderful to have you here (and on my birthday, too–still more proof that the Universe Revolves Around Me, LOL!). I’m right in the middle of your Essex sisters books right now, just about to finish “Kiss Me, Annabel.” I love the way you weave characters in and out and I can’t wait to get to “Desperate Duchesses” (already bought and waiting)
    I enjoy your web site, too, and I admire the way you list “errata” and have a sense of humor about it.
    My only “critique” of your books (see, this is a clever stratagem: make a critique that is actually a compliment!) would be that the last two Essex novels feature cover art that is Too Successful–actually Sensual (instead of slightly ridiculous). Just thinking about them makes me fan myself, and I sure don’t think I can read them in front of my kids. . . or indeed anyone who knows What I Do For A Living.
    Thank you for your wonderful writing!
    Melinda

    Reply
  45. Hi Eloisa,
    It’s wonderful to have you here (and on my birthday, too–still more proof that the Universe Revolves Around Me, LOL!). I’m right in the middle of your Essex sisters books right now, just about to finish “Kiss Me, Annabel.” I love the way you weave characters in and out and I can’t wait to get to “Desperate Duchesses” (already bought and waiting)
    I enjoy your web site, too, and I admire the way you list “errata” and have a sense of humor about it.
    My only “critique” of your books (see, this is a clever stratagem: make a critique that is actually a compliment!) would be that the last two Essex novels feature cover art that is Too Successful–actually Sensual (instead of slightly ridiculous). Just thinking about them makes me fan myself, and I sure don’t think I can read them in front of my kids. . . or indeed anyone who knows What I Do For A Living.
    Thank you for your wonderful writing!
    Melinda

    Reply
  46. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m so excited to read a book in an unique time period!
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  47. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m so excited to read a book in an unique time period!
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  48. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m so excited to read a book in an unique time period!
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  49. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m so excited to read a book in an unique time period!
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  50. Hi Eloisa!
    I’m so excited to read a book in an unique time period!
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  51. Great interview. I enjoyed reading about how you researched your book.
    Which time period did you find harder/easier to set your book in?

    Reply
  52. Great interview. I enjoyed reading about how you researched your book.
    Which time period did you find harder/easier to set your book in?

    Reply
  53. Great interview. I enjoyed reading about how you researched your book.
    Which time period did you find harder/easier to set your book in?

    Reply
  54. Great interview. I enjoyed reading about how you researched your book.
    Which time period did you find harder/easier to set your book in?

    Reply
  55. Great interview. I enjoyed reading about how you researched your book.
    Which time period did you find harder/easier to set your book in?

    Reply
  56. Eloisa, I’m delighted that your latest series of novels is set within one of my most favourite times. I share your enjoyment of writing/researching 1780-1790. (My other favourite time is the late 17th century.)
    Loretta, thanks for such a thorough and enjoyable interview!

    Reply
  57. Eloisa, I’m delighted that your latest series of novels is set within one of my most favourite times. I share your enjoyment of writing/researching 1780-1790. (My other favourite time is the late 17th century.)
    Loretta, thanks for such a thorough and enjoyable interview!

    Reply
  58. Eloisa, I’m delighted that your latest series of novels is set within one of my most favourite times. I share your enjoyment of writing/researching 1780-1790. (My other favourite time is the late 17th century.)
    Loretta, thanks for such a thorough and enjoyable interview!

    Reply
  59. Eloisa, I’m delighted that your latest series of novels is set within one of my most favourite times. I share your enjoyment of writing/researching 1780-1790. (My other favourite time is the late 17th century.)
    Loretta, thanks for such a thorough and enjoyable interview!

    Reply
  60. Eloisa, I’m delighted that your latest series of novels is set within one of my most favourite times. I share your enjoyment of writing/researching 1780-1790. (My other favourite time is the late 17th century.)
    Loretta, thanks for such a thorough and enjoyable interview!

    Reply
  61. Hi everybody!
    I just have to scream for a moment — DESPERATE DUCHESSES IS NUMBER 5 ON THE PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BESTSELLER LIST!! Woo-Hoo!!! I’ve only even squeaked onto that list once before, so I’m ecstatic.
    OK, settling down…
    Janga — of course, you’re right. I edited Sheridan’s School for Scandal and Etheredge’s Man of Mode for the Longman Anthology of English lit years ago, and the pacing and language, and just the mood of it stuck with me. So less comedy of manners and more bawdy restoration and after play.
    Terrio — hi! The truth is that I planned to make these books true ensemble books–with no one heroine. But in the writing Roberta became so darn interesting that I ended up with a heroine after all–and she wasn’t one of my 4 duchesses, so that was disconcerting. Between the planning and the writing, all kinds of things can go astray. The duchesses came first — but then as Roberta became a poet’s daughter (and I’m one myself), I grew more and more interested in her. So it goes.
    And Julie…I’m tossing around the idea of something different — Italy in the 1500s! But that’s so far out there I can hardly imagine it, and yet I itch to do it. We’ll see.
    Melinda… those covers. You should have seen Taming of the Duke before I insisted that they put pants and a shirt on him (he was starkers).
    Lori, the amount I’ve learned from my first book — and the amount I didn’t know then and know now is really terrifying to contemplate. One of the crucial things I learned was to trust my own voice. I absorbed a lot of criticism about my first book that insisted that my use of point-of-view was all wrong. I had to shake that off and go back to my own way of writing — another example: the overarching stories that no one else seems interested in writing. You have to go where your ideas are.
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    And Crystal, the regency period was easier for me — because I’d read so many wonderful regency romances! Seriously. If you’ve read most of Georgette Heyer’s books ten times each (or more), you’re ready to write your own regency!
    Have to pick up children at school…I’ll check back. Thanks for the terrific questions!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  62. Hi everybody!
    I just have to scream for a moment — DESPERATE DUCHESSES IS NUMBER 5 ON THE PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BESTSELLER LIST!! Woo-Hoo!!! I’ve only even squeaked onto that list once before, so I’m ecstatic.
    OK, settling down…
    Janga — of course, you’re right. I edited Sheridan’s School for Scandal and Etheredge’s Man of Mode for the Longman Anthology of English lit years ago, and the pacing and language, and just the mood of it stuck with me. So less comedy of manners and more bawdy restoration and after play.
    Terrio — hi! The truth is that I planned to make these books true ensemble books–with no one heroine. But in the writing Roberta became so darn interesting that I ended up with a heroine after all–and she wasn’t one of my 4 duchesses, so that was disconcerting. Between the planning and the writing, all kinds of things can go astray. The duchesses came first — but then as Roberta became a poet’s daughter (and I’m one myself), I grew more and more interested in her. So it goes.
    And Julie…I’m tossing around the idea of something different — Italy in the 1500s! But that’s so far out there I can hardly imagine it, and yet I itch to do it. We’ll see.
    Melinda… those covers. You should have seen Taming of the Duke before I insisted that they put pants and a shirt on him (he was starkers).
    Lori, the amount I’ve learned from my first book — and the amount I didn’t know then and know now is really terrifying to contemplate. One of the crucial things I learned was to trust my own voice. I absorbed a lot of criticism about my first book that insisted that my use of point-of-view was all wrong. I had to shake that off and go back to my own way of writing — another example: the overarching stories that no one else seems interested in writing. You have to go where your ideas are.
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    And Crystal, the regency period was easier for me — because I’d read so many wonderful regency romances! Seriously. If you’ve read most of Georgette Heyer’s books ten times each (or more), you’re ready to write your own regency!
    Have to pick up children at school…I’ll check back. Thanks for the terrific questions!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  63. Hi everybody!
    I just have to scream for a moment — DESPERATE DUCHESSES IS NUMBER 5 ON THE PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BESTSELLER LIST!! Woo-Hoo!!! I’ve only even squeaked onto that list once before, so I’m ecstatic.
    OK, settling down…
    Janga — of course, you’re right. I edited Sheridan’s School for Scandal and Etheredge’s Man of Mode for the Longman Anthology of English lit years ago, and the pacing and language, and just the mood of it stuck with me. So less comedy of manners and more bawdy restoration and after play.
    Terrio — hi! The truth is that I planned to make these books true ensemble books–with no one heroine. But in the writing Roberta became so darn interesting that I ended up with a heroine after all–and she wasn’t one of my 4 duchesses, so that was disconcerting. Between the planning and the writing, all kinds of things can go astray. The duchesses came first — but then as Roberta became a poet’s daughter (and I’m one myself), I grew more and more interested in her. So it goes.
    And Julie…I’m tossing around the idea of something different — Italy in the 1500s! But that’s so far out there I can hardly imagine it, and yet I itch to do it. We’ll see.
    Melinda… those covers. You should have seen Taming of the Duke before I insisted that they put pants and a shirt on him (he was starkers).
    Lori, the amount I’ve learned from my first book — and the amount I didn’t know then and know now is really terrifying to contemplate. One of the crucial things I learned was to trust my own voice. I absorbed a lot of criticism about my first book that insisted that my use of point-of-view was all wrong. I had to shake that off and go back to my own way of writing — another example: the overarching stories that no one else seems interested in writing. You have to go where your ideas are.
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    And Crystal, the regency period was easier for me — because I’d read so many wonderful regency romances! Seriously. If you’ve read most of Georgette Heyer’s books ten times each (or more), you’re ready to write your own regency!
    Have to pick up children at school…I’ll check back. Thanks for the terrific questions!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  64. Hi everybody!
    I just have to scream for a moment — DESPERATE DUCHESSES IS NUMBER 5 ON THE PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BESTSELLER LIST!! Woo-Hoo!!! I’ve only even squeaked onto that list once before, so I’m ecstatic.
    OK, settling down…
    Janga — of course, you’re right. I edited Sheridan’s School for Scandal and Etheredge’s Man of Mode for the Longman Anthology of English lit years ago, and the pacing and language, and just the mood of it stuck with me. So less comedy of manners and more bawdy restoration and after play.
    Terrio — hi! The truth is that I planned to make these books true ensemble books–with no one heroine. But in the writing Roberta became so darn interesting that I ended up with a heroine after all–and she wasn’t one of my 4 duchesses, so that was disconcerting. Between the planning and the writing, all kinds of things can go astray. The duchesses came first — but then as Roberta became a poet’s daughter (and I’m one myself), I grew more and more interested in her. So it goes.
    And Julie…I’m tossing around the idea of something different — Italy in the 1500s! But that’s so far out there I can hardly imagine it, and yet I itch to do it. We’ll see.
    Melinda… those covers. You should have seen Taming of the Duke before I insisted that they put pants and a shirt on him (he was starkers).
    Lori, the amount I’ve learned from my first book — and the amount I didn’t know then and know now is really terrifying to contemplate. One of the crucial things I learned was to trust my own voice. I absorbed a lot of criticism about my first book that insisted that my use of point-of-view was all wrong. I had to shake that off and go back to my own way of writing — another example: the overarching stories that no one else seems interested in writing. You have to go where your ideas are.
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    And Crystal, the regency period was easier for me — because I’d read so many wonderful regency romances! Seriously. If you’ve read most of Georgette Heyer’s books ten times each (or more), you’re ready to write your own regency!
    Have to pick up children at school…I’ll check back. Thanks for the terrific questions!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  65. Hi everybody!
    I just have to scream for a moment — DESPERATE DUCHESSES IS NUMBER 5 ON THE PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BESTSELLER LIST!! Woo-Hoo!!! I’ve only even squeaked onto that list once before, so I’m ecstatic.
    OK, settling down…
    Janga — of course, you’re right. I edited Sheridan’s School for Scandal and Etheredge’s Man of Mode for the Longman Anthology of English lit years ago, and the pacing and language, and just the mood of it stuck with me. So less comedy of manners and more bawdy restoration and after play.
    Terrio — hi! The truth is that I planned to make these books true ensemble books–with no one heroine. But in the writing Roberta became so darn interesting that I ended up with a heroine after all–and she wasn’t one of my 4 duchesses, so that was disconcerting. Between the planning and the writing, all kinds of things can go astray. The duchesses came first — but then as Roberta became a poet’s daughter (and I’m one myself), I grew more and more interested in her. So it goes.
    And Julie…I’m tossing around the idea of something different — Italy in the 1500s! But that’s so far out there I can hardly imagine it, and yet I itch to do it. We’ll see.
    Melinda… those covers. You should have seen Taming of the Duke before I insisted that they put pants and a shirt on him (he was starkers).
    Lori, the amount I’ve learned from my first book — and the amount I didn’t know then and know now is really terrifying to contemplate. One of the crucial things I learned was to trust my own voice. I absorbed a lot of criticism about my first book that insisted that my use of point-of-view was all wrong. I had to shake that off and go back to my own way of writing — another example: the overarching stories that no one else seems interested in writing. You have to go where your ideas are.
    My quesion is, what did you learn about the business and about writing romance in general from your first book?
    And Crystal, the regency period was easier for me — because I’d read so many wonderful regency romances! Seriously. If you’ve read most of Georgette Heyer’s books ten times each (or more), you’re ready to write your own regency!
    Have to pick up children at school…I’ll check back. Thanks for the terrific questions!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  66. Hi, Eloisa, and welcome to Word Wenches. Huge congratulations on the PW list!!!!!
    I’m looking forward to DD, especially as it’s 18th century. I have to say that you’re a braver author than I, though. I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.
    I agree with the screen Georgians Loretta listed. Dangerous Liaisons and The Aristocrats are probably the best. There’s also Barry Lyndon, but it wasn’t written in the period and then the movie takes some liberties, so it’s a little strange.But still visually wonderful.
    There are a couple of French ones — Ridicule is one, I think, but French historical movies tend to be peculiar, IMO.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  67. Hi, Eloisa, and welcome to Word Wenches. Huge congratulations on the PW list!!!!!
    I’m looking forward to DD, especially as it’s 18th century. I have to say that you’re a braver author than I, though. I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.
    I agree with the screen Georgians Loretta listed. Dangerous Liaisons and The Aristocrats are probably the best. There’s also Barry Lyndon, but it wasn’t written in the period and then the movie takes some liberties, so it’s a little strange.But still visually wonderful.
    There are a couple of French ones — Ridicule is one, I think, but French historical movies tend to be peculiar, IMO.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  68. Hi, Eloisa, and welcome to Word Wenches. Huge congratulations on the PW list!!!!!
    I’m looking forward to DD, especially as it’s 18th century. I have to say that you’re a braver author than I, though. I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.
    I agree with the screen Georgians Loretta listed. Dangerous Liaisons and The Aristocrats are probably the best. There’s also Barry Lyndon, but it wasn’t written in the period and then the movie takes some liberties, so it’s a little strange.But still visually wonderful.
    There are a couple of French ones — Ridicule is one, I think, but French historical movies tend to be peculiar, IMO.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  69. Hi, Eloisa, and welcome to Word Wenches. Huge congratulations on the PW list!!!!!
    I’m looking forward to DD, especially as it’s 18th century. I have to say that you’re a braver author than I, though. I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.
    I agree with the screen Georgians Loretta listed. Dangerous Liaisons and The Aristocrats are probably the best. There’s also Barry Lyndon, but it wasn’t written in the period and then the movie takes some liberties, so it’s a little strange.But still visually wonderful.
    There are a couple of French ones — Ridicule is one, I think, but French historical movies tend to be peculiar, IMO.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  70. Hi, Eloisa, and welcome to Word Wenches. Huge congratulations on the PW list!!!!!
    I’m looking forward to DD, especially as it’s 18th century. I have to say that you’re a braver author than I, though. I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.
    I agree with the screen Georgians Loretta listed. Dangerous Liaisons and The Aristocrats are probably the best. There’s also Barry Lyndon, but it wasn’t written in the period and then the movie takes some liberties, so it’s a little strange.But still visually wonderful.
    There are a couple of French ones — Ridicule is one, I think, but French historical movies tend to be peculiar, IMO.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  71. “I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.”
    LOL! I hunted carefully through the era because I wanted an age when it was becoming common for younger men to wear their own hair, and when powder was being left off, and I went right for the late 1780s. Though I’d love to go back to the 1750s . . . I love the clothes!

    Reply
  72. “I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.”
    LOL! I hunted carefully through the era because I wanted an age when it was becoming common for younger men to wear their own hair, and when powder was being left off, and I went right for the late 1780s. Though I’d love to go back to the 1750s . . . I love the clothes!

    Reply
  73. “I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.”
    LOL! I hunted carefully through the era because I wanted an age when it was becoming common for younger men to wear their own hair, and when powder was being left off, and I went right for the late 1780s. Though I’d love to go back to the 1750s . . . I love the clothes!

    Reply
  74. “I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.”
    LOL! I hunted carefully through the era because I wanted an age when it was becoming common for younger men to wear their own hair, and when powder was being left off, and I went right for the late 1780s. Though I’d love to go back to the 1750s . . . I love the clothes!

    Reply
  75. “I looked at the later period with the wigs and such and beat a retreat to the 1760s, when hair was mostly rational.”
    LOL! I hunted carefully through the era because I wanted an age when it was becoming common for younger men to wear their own hair, and when powder was being left off, and I went right for the late 1780s. Though I’d love to go back to the 1750s . . . I love the clothes!

    Reply
  76. There was also the BBC mini series of Clarissa with Sean Bean as Lovelace. I can’t remember who played Clarissa, but Sean Bean I remember vividly. The Tom Jones series was good too, and lovely and long.
    Those two are set in the mid-eigteenth century of course, but there are several tv versions and films of the Scarlet Pimpernel, and the film Jefferson in Paris is also set fairly late in the 18th century. So is Ridicule. I liked that film. It gave an interesting view of French court life, and Fanny Ardant wore her dresses with such a wonderful air.
    The clothes in the last two decades are very extravagant, and they keep changing. I adore Vigee Lebruns portraits from that period. I will definitely have to get my hands on a copy of those Duchesses.
    On the subject of bodices: they were quite low cut. The neckline was of course mostly covered by a fichu – you get those lovely pouter pigeon trompeuses in the 1780’s. I think it’s in Barry Lyndon that you see him putting his hand down a girl’s dress.

    Reply
  77. There was also the BBC mini series of Clarissa with Sean Bean as Lovelace. I can’t remember who played Clarissa, but Sean Bean I remember vividly. The Tom Jones series was good too, and lovely and long.
    Those two are set in the mid-eigteenth century of course, but there are several tv versions and films of the Scarlet Pimpernel, and the film Jefferson in Paris is also set fairly late in the 18th century. So is Ridicule. I liked that film. It gave an interesting view of French court life, and Fanny Ardant wore her dresses with such a wonderful air.
    The clothes in the last two decades are very extravagant, and they keep changing. I adore Vigee Lebruns portraits from that period. I will definitely have to get my hands on a copy of those Duchesses.
    On the subject of bodices: they were quite low cut. The neckline was of course mostly covered by a fichu – you get those lovely pouter pigeon trompeuses in the 1780’s. I think it’s in Barry Lyndon that you see him putting his hand down a girl’s dress.

    Reply
  78. There was also the BBC mini series of Clarissa with Sean Bean as Lovelace. I can’t remember who played Clarissa, but Sean Bean I remember vividly. The Tom Jones series was good too, and lovely and long.
    Those two are set in the mid-eigteenth century of course, but there are several tv versions and films of the Scarlet Pimpernel, and the film Jefferson in Paris is also set fairly late in the 18th century. So is Ridicule. I liked that film. It gave an interesting view of French court life, and Fanny Ardant wore her dresses with such a wonderful air.
    The clothes in the last two decades are very extravagant, and they keep changing. I adore Vigee Lebruns portraits from that period. I will definitely have to get my hands on a copy of those Duchesses.
    On the subject of bodices: they were quite low cut. The neckline was of course mostly covered by a fichu – you get those lovely pouter pigeon trompeuses in the 1780’s. I think it’s in Barry Lyndon that you see him putting his hand down a girl’s dress.

    Reply
  79. There was also the BBC mini series of Clarissa with Sean Bean as Lovelace. I can’t remember who played Clarissa, but Sean Bean I remember vividly. The Tom Jones series was good too, and lovely and long.
    Those two are set in the mid-eigteenth century of course, but there are several tv versions and films of the Scarlet Pimpernel, and the film Jefferson in Paris is also set fairly late in the 18th century. So is Ridicule. I liked that film. It gave an interesting view of French court life, and Fanny Ardant wore her dresses with such a wonderful air.
    The clothes in the last two decades are very extravagant, and they keep changing. I adore Vigee Lebruns portraits from that period. I will definitely have to get my hands on a copy of those Duchesses.
    On the subject of bodices: they were quite low cut. The neckline was of course mostly covered by a fichu – you get those lovely pouter pigeon trompeuses in the 1780’s. I think it’s in Barry Lyndon that you see him putting his hand down a girl’s dress.

    Reply
  80. There was also the BBC mini series of Clarissa with Sean Bean as Lovelace. I can’t remember who played Clarissa, but Sean Bean I remember vividly. The Tom Jones series was good too, and lovely and long.
    Those two are set in the mid-eigteenth century of course, but there are several tv versions and films of the Scarlet Pimpernel, and the film Jefferson in Paris is also set fairly late in the 18th century. So is Ridicule. I liked that film. It gave an interesting view of French court life, and Fanny Ardant wore her dresses with such a wonderful air.
    The clothes in the last two decades are very extravagant, and they keep changing. I adore Vigee Lebruns portraits from that period. I will definitely have to get my hands on a copy of those Duchesses.
    On the subject of bodices: they were quite low cut. The neckline was of course mostly covered by a fichu – you get those lovely pouter pigeon trompeuses in the 1780’s. I think it’s in Barry Lyndon that you see him putting his hand down a girl’s dress.

    Reply
  81. Eloisa commented: ‘And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair…’
    We don’t have to go back to the 18th century for that! Try the late 1950s/early 1960s, and the elaborate back-combed beehive. We used to cover our hair with a net, and then sleep on piled-up pillows, almost sitting up, so as not to flatten it. And even when there was not a completed hairdo to protect, one might well be trying to sleep with one’s hair full of metal rollers – not a recipe for a restful night.
    🙂 😉

    Reply
  82. Eloisa commented: ‘And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair…’
    We don’t have to go back to the 18th century for that! Try the late 1950s/early 1960s, and the elaborate back-combed beehive. We used to cover our hair with a net, and then sleep on piled-up pillows, almost sitting up, so as not to flatten it. And even when there was not a completed hairdo to protect, one might well be trying to sleep with one’s hair full of metal rollers – not a recipe for a restful night.
    🙂 😉

    Reply
  83. Eloisa commented: ‘And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair…’
    We don’t have to go back to the 18th century for that! Try the late 1950s/early 1960s, and the elaborate back-combed beehive. We used to cover our hair with a net, and then sleep on piled-up pillows, almost sitting up, so as not to flatten it. And even when there was not a completed hairdo to protect, one might well be trying to sleep with one’s hair full of metal rollers – not a recipe for a restful night.
    🙂 😉

    Reply
  84. Eloisa commented: ‘And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair…’
    We don’t have to go back to the 18th century for that! Try the late 1950s/early 1960s, and the elaborate back-combed beehive. We used to cover our hair with a net, and then sleep on piled-up pillows, almost sitting up, so as not to flatten it. And even when there was not a completed hairdo to protect, one might well be trying to sleep with one’s hair full of metal rollers – not a recipe for a restful night.
    🙂 😉

    Reply
  85. Eloisa commented: ‘And trying to picture a woman sleeping with her head upright so as not to disturb her hair…’
    We don’t have to go back to the 18th century for that! Try the late 1950s/early 1960s, and the elaborate back-combed beehive. We used to cover our hair with a net, and then sleep on piled-up pillows, almost sitting up, so as not to flatten it. And even when there was not a completed hairdo to protect, one might well be trying to sleep with one’s hair full of metal rollers – not a recipe for a restful night.
    🙂 😉

    Reply
  86. Hi Eloisa! *Waves at Wenches* Hi WW’s! Coming out of lurkdom to say hello and congrats on the PW list! Marvelous! DD deserves every bit of praise. It’s wonderful.
    I don’t really have a question, though I’d love to know how you figured out some of the practicalities of wearing 18th century dress–the scene where Jemma and Roberta wrestle with their panniers comes to mind. In my writing I have a hard time imagining myself into the clothes…

    Reply
  87. Hi Eloisa! *Waves at Wenches* Hi WW’s! Coming out of lurkdom to say hello and congrats on the PW list! Marvelous! DD deserves every bit of praise. It’s wonderful.
    I don’t really have a question, though I’d love to know how you figured out some of the practicalities of wearing 18th century dress–the scene where Jemma and Roberta wrestle with their panniers comes to mind. In my writing I have a hard time imagining myself into the clothes…

    Reply
  88. Hi Eloisa! *Waves at Wenches* Hi WW’s! Coming out of lurkdom to say hello and congrats on the PW list! Marvelous! DD deserves every bit of praise. It’s wonderful.
    I don’t really have a question, though I’d love to know how you figured out some of the practicalities of wearing 18th century dress–the scene where Jemma and Roberta wrestle with their panniers comes to mind. In my writing I have a hard time imagining myself into the clothes…

    Reply
  89. Hi Eloisa! *Waves at Wenches* Hi WW’s! Coming out of lurkdom to say hello and congrats on the PW list! Marvelous! DD deserves every bit of praise. It’s wonderful.
    I don’t really have a question, though I’d love to know how you figured out some of the practicalities of wearing 18th century dress–the scene where Jemma and Roberta wrestle with their panniers comes to mind. In my writing I have a hard time imagining myself into the clothes…

    Reply
  90. Hi Eloisa! *Waves at Wenches* Hi WW’s! Coming out of lurkdom to say hello and congrats on the PW list! Marvelous! DD deserves every bit of praise. It’s wonderful.
    I don’t really have a question, though I’d love to know how you figured out some of the practicalities of wearing 18th century dress–the scene where Jemma and Roberta wrestle with their panniers comes to mind. In my writing I have a hard time imagining myself into the clothes…

    Reply
  91. I remember reading that Milos Forman’s VALMONT used either authentic 18th C textiles for the costumes or real 18th C dresses (forgot which it was).
    When I think of 18th C Hollywood costumes, I always think of “The Dancing Cavelier”, the movie-within-the-movie in SINGING’ IN THE RAIN. No, no, no! Yes, yes, yes!
    EJ, a setting in 16th C Italy sounds absolutely wonderful!

    Reply
  92. I remember reading that Milos Forman’s VALMONT used either authentic 18th C textiles for the costumes or real 18th C dresses (forgot which it was).
    When I think of 18th C Hollywood costumes, I always think of “The Dancing Cavelier”, the movie-within-the-movie in SINGING’ IN THE RAIN. No, no, no! Yes, yes, yes!
    EJ, a setting in 16th C Italy sounds absolutely wonderful!

    Reply
  93. I remember reading that Milos Forman’s VALMONT used either authentic 18th C textiles for the costumes or real 18th C dresses (forgot which it was).
    When I think of 18th C Hollywood costumes, I always think of “The Dancing Cavelier”, the movie-within-the-movie in SINGING’ IN THE RAIN. No, no, no! Yes, yes, yes!
    EJ, a setting in 16th C Italy sounds absolutely wonderful!

    Reply
  94. I remember reading that Milos Forman’s VALMONT used either authentic 18th C textiles for the costumes or real 18th C dresses (forgot which it was).
    When I think of 18th C Hollywood costumes, I always think of “The Dancing Cavelier”, the movie-within-the-movie in SINGING’ IN THE RAIN. No, no, no! Yes, yes, yes!
    EJ, a setting in 16th C Italy sounds absolutely wonderful!

    Reply
  95. I remember reading that Milos Forman’s VALMONT used either authentic 18th C textiles for the costumes or real 18th C dresses (forgot which it was).
    When I think of 18th C Hollywood costumes, I always think of “The Dancing Cavelier”, the movie-within-the-movie in SINGING’ IN THE RAIN. No, no, no! Yes, yes, yes!
    EJ, a setting in 16th C Italy sounds absolutely wonderful!

    Reply
  96. Eloisa: Congratulations on the PW placement!!!
    Eek! I’d forgotten about those hibernating rodents in those beehives aka hair. How horrifying!
    And how could I forget that cupcake of a movie “Marie Anoinette”?! Adored those costumes. But man, that coronation dress. Despite the wide doorways, how did she fit through them?
    Loretta & Jo: I should go add “Valmont” and “Aristocrats” to my Netflix list. Thanks a bunch!
    Ingrid: I should check out “Ridicule,” too. Ooh, this is fun. Thanks!!
    Melinda: “Annabel” is probably my absolute favorite of Eloisa’s books. I loved the humor. And I love me some beta heroes.
    Keira-ducking-from-all-those-sharply-aimed-bon-bons-heading-her-way

    Reply
  97. Eloisa: Congratulations on the PW placement!!!
    Eek! I’d forgotten about those hibernating rodents in those beehives aka hair. How horrifying!
    And how could I forget that cupcake of a movie “Marie Anoinette”?! Adored those costumes. But man, that coronation dress. Despite the wide doorways, how did she fit through them?
    Loretta & Jo: I should go add “Valmont” and “Aristocrats” to my Netflix list. Thanks a bunch!
    Ingrid: I should check out “Ridicule,” too. Ooh, this is fun. Thanks!!
    Melinda: “Annabel” is probably my absolute favorite of Eloisa’s books. I loved the humor. And I love me some beta heroes.
    Keira-ducking-from-all-those-sharply-aimed-bon-bons-heading-her-way

    Reply
  98. Eloisa: Congratulations on the PW placement!!!
    Eek! I’d forgotten about those hibernating rodents in those beehives aka hair. How horrifying!
    And how could I forget that cupcake of a movie “Marie Anoinette”?! Adored those costumes. But man, that coronation dress. Despite the wide doorways, how did she fit through them?
    Loretta & Jo: I should go add “Valmont” and “Aristocrats” to my Netflix list. Thanks a bunch!
    Ingrid: I should check out “Ridicule,” too. Ooh, this is fun. Thanks!!
    Melinda: “Annabel” is probably my absolute favorite of Eloisa’s books. I loved the humor. And I love me some beta heroes.
    Keira-ducking-from-all-those-sharply-aimed-bon-bons-heading-her-way

    Reply
  99. Eloisa: Congratulations on the PW placement!!!
    Eek! I’d forgotten about those hibernating rodents in those beehives aka hair. How horrifying!
    And how could I forget that cupcake of a movie “Marie Anoinette”?! Adored those costumes. But man, that coronation dress. Despite the wide doorways, how did she fit through them?
    Loretta & Jo: I should go add “Valmont” and “Aristocrats” to my Netflix list. Thanks a bunch!
    Ingrid: I should check out “Ridicule,” too. Ooh, this is fun. Thanks!!
    Melinda: “Annabel” is probably my absolute favorite of Eloisa’s books. I loved the humor. And I love me some beta heroes.
    Keira-ducking-from-all-those-sharply-aimed-bon-bons-heading-her-way

    Reply
  100. Eloisa: Congratulations on the PW placement!!!
    Eek! I’d forgotten about those hibernating rodents in those beehives aka hair. How horrifying!
    And how could I forget that cupcake of a movie “Marie Anoinette”?! Adored those costumes. But man, that coronation dress. Despite the wide doorways, how did she fit through them?
    Loretta & Jo: I should go add “Valmont” and “Aristocrats” to my Netflix list. Thanks a bunch!
    Ingrid: I should check out “Ridicule,” too. Ooh, this is fun. Thanks!!
    Melinda: “Annabel” is probably my absolute favorite of Eloisa’s books. I loved the humor. And I love me some beta heroes.
    Keira-ducking-from-all-those-sharply-aimed-bon-bons-heading-her-way

    Reply
  101. Hi all —
    Manda, I just imagine myself in the clothing. I’d love to claim I did research and had antique clothing and really knew what I was talking about — but I don’t. It’s all imagination!
    It’s been a lovely day with you all — thanks so much! I’ll check in tomorrow am and see if any more questions popped up. Meanwhile, thank you (!) for all the congratulations.
    Off to swill champagne–
    Eloisa

    Reply
  102. Hi all —
    Manda, I just imagine myself in the clothing. I’d love to claim I did research and had antique clothing and really knew what I was talking about — but I don’t. It’s all imagination!
    It’s been a lovely day with you all — thanks so much! I’ll check in tomorrow am and see if any more questions popped up. Meanwhile, thank you (!) for all the congratulations.
    Off to swill champagne–
    Eloisa

    Reply
  103. Hi all —
    Manda, I just imagine myself in the clothing. I’d love to claim I did research and had antique clothing and really knew what I was talking about — but I don’t. It’s all imagination!
    It’s been a lovely day with you all — thanks so much! I’ll check in tomorrow am and see if any more questions popped up. Meanwhile, thank you (!) for all the congratulations.
    Off to swill champagne–
    Eloisa

    Reply
  104. Hi all —
    Manda, I just imagine myself in the clothing. I’d love to claim I did research and had antique clothing and really knew what I was talking about — but I don’t. It’s all imagination!
    It’s been a lovely day with you all — thanks so much! I’ll check in tomorrow am and see if any more questions popped up. Meanwhile, thank you (!) for all the congratulations.
    Off to swill champagne–
    Eloisa

    Reply
  105. Hi all —
    Manda, I just imagine myself in the clothing. I’d love to claim I did research and had antique clothing and really knew what I was talking about — but I don’t. It’s all imagination!
    It’s been a lovely day with you all — thanks so much! I’ll check in tomorrow am and see if any more questions popped up. Meanwhile, thank you (!) for all the congratulations.
    Off to swill champagne–
    Eloisa

    Reply
  106. Hello friends,
    Late to posting but what a lovely interview. I adored DD and am so happy to see it’s doing so well.
    Eloisa, I recall your dressing as Marie Antoinette or a lady of the Georgian period and I’d say you pulled it off!
    As a steadfast Jeli I am holding out for that HEA, no matter what you say about grief. Please don’t go there!
    Enjoy your champagne!
    Santa

    Reply
  107. Hello friends,
    Late to posting but what a lovely interview. I adored DD and am so happy to see it’s doing so well.
    Eloisa, I recall your dressing as Marie Antoinette or a lady of the Georgian period and I’d say you pulled it off!
    As a steadfast Jeli I am holding out for that HEA, no matter what you say about grief. Please don’t go there!
    Enjoy your champagne!
    Santa

    Reply
  108. Hello friends,
    Late to posting but what a lovely interview. I adored DD and am so happy to see it’s doing so well.
    Eloisa, I recall your dressing as Marie Antoinette or a lady of the Georgian period and I’d say you pulled it off!
    As a steadfast Jeli I am holding out for that HEA, no matter what you say about grief. Please don’t go there!
    Enjoy your champagne!
    Santa

    Reply
  109. Hello friends,
    Late to posting but what a lovely interview. I adored DD and am so happy to see it’s doing so well.
    Eloisa, I recall your dressing as Marie Antoinette or a lady of the Georgian period and I’d say you pulled it off!
    As a steadfast Jeli I am holding out for that HEA, no matter what you say about grief. Please don’t go there!
    Enjoy your champagne!
    Santa

    Reply
  110. Hello friends,
    Late to posting but what a lovely interview. I adored DD and am so happy to see it’s doing so well.
    Eloisa, I recall your dressing as Marie Antoinette or a lady of the Georgian period and I’d say you pulled it off!
    As a steadfast Jeli I am holding out for that HEA, no matter what you say about grief. Please don’t go there!
    Enjoy your champagne!
    Santa

    Reply
  111. My favorite screen Georgians are Ross and Demelza from the old Masterpiece Theater Poldark Series.
    I loved that series so much I made paperdolls. With dresses, and fichus, and shoes. Every night the show was on I’d bake a special dessert for my mother and sisters and she’d let us sip a little sherry as we watched. (We were in high school.)
    Looking forward to Desperate Duchesses!

    Reply
  112. My favorite screen Georgians are Ross and Demelza from the old Masterpiece Theater Poldark Series.
    I loved that series so much I made paperdolls. With dresses, and fichus, and shoes. Every night the show was on I’d bake a special dessert for my mother and sisters and she’d let us sip a little sherry as we watched. (We were in high school.)
    Looking forward to Desperate Duchesses!

    Reply
  113. My favorite screen Georgians are Ross and Demelza from the old Masterpiece Theater Poldark Series.
    I loved that series so much I made paperdolls. With dresses, and fichus, and shoes. Every night the show was on I’d bake a special dessert for my mother and sisters and she’d let us sip a little sherry as we watched. (We were in high school.)
    Looking forward to Desperate Duchesses!

    Reply
  114. My favorite screen Georgians are Ross and Demelza from the old Masterpiece Theater Poldark Series.
    I loved that series so much I made paperdolls. With dresses, and fichus, and shoes. Every night the show was on I’d bake a special dessert for my mother and sisters and she’d let us sip a little sherry as we watched. (We were in high school.)
    Looking forward to Desperate Duchesses!

    Reply
  115. My favorite screen Georgians are Ross and Demelza from the old Masterpiece Theater Poldark Series.
    I loved that series so much I made paperdolls. With dresses, and fichus, and shoes. Every night the show was on I’d bake a special dessert for my mother and sisters and she’d let us sip a little sherry as we watched. (We were in high school.)
    Looking forward to Desperate Duchesses!

    Reply
  116. I loved your interview. I love history and I love reading about it. It’s so fascinating to see what the women had to wear throughout the times. What all do you do for your research to look for the right clothing and other items for the era you are writing about?

    Reply
  117. I loved your interview. I love history and I love reading about it. It’s so fascinating to see what the women had to wear throughout the times. What all do you do for your research to look for the right clothing and other items for the era you are writing about?

    Reply
  118. I loved your interview. I love history and I love reading about it. It’s so fascinating to see what the women had to wear throughout the times. What all do you do for your research to look for the right clothing and other items for the era you are writing about?

    Reply
  119. I loved your interview. I love history and I love reading about it. It’s so fascinating to see what the women had to wear throughout the times. What all do you do for your research to look for the right clothing and other items for the era you are writing about?

    Reply
  120. I loved your interview. I love history and I love reading about it. It’s so fascinating to see what the women had to wear throughout the times. What all do you do for your research to look for the right clothing and other items for the era you are writing about?

    Reply
  121. Lovely interview, Eloisa.
    Thanks for the “trust your own voice” reminder. That ought to be inscribed on every author’s computer.
    Congrats on the #5 🙂

    Reply
  122. Lovely interview, Eloisa.
    Thanks for the “trust your own voice” reminder. That ought to be inscribed on every author’s computer.
    Congrats on the #5 🙂

    Reply
  123. Lovely interview, Eloisa.
    Thanks for the “trust your own voice” reminder. That ought to be inscribed on every author’s computer.
    Congrats on the #5 🙂

    Reply
  124. Lovely interview, Eloisa.
    Thanks for the “trust your own voice” reminder. That ought to be inscribed on every author’s computer.
    Congrats on the #5 🙂

    Reply
  125. Lovely interview, Eloisa.
    Thanks for the “trust your own voice” reminder. That ought to be inscribed on every author’s computer.
    Congrats on the #5 🙂

    Reply
  126. Good to see you here, Eloisa:
    Romance has always appealed to women readers, but there have always been, I think closet male readers, (like myself~~and, I don’t mean, gay!)who have delved between the pages, and have learned many things about the women of yesterday, as well as today.
    Jane Austen, the Bronte Sisters, etc, etc,…
    What do you think is the percentage of Men reading what most think of as “Women’s books”??
    Thank you,
    WEnches, for the opportunity to ask a honest to God writer this Question.
    And, Hat’s off to the interviewee!!
    xx,Bill.

    Reply
  127. Good to see you here, Eloisa:
    Romance has always appealed to women readers, but there have always been, I think closet male readers, (like myself~~and, I don’t mean, gay!)who have delved between the pages, and have learned many things about the women of yesterday, as well as today.
    Jane Austen, the Bronte Sisters, etc, etc,…
    What do you think is the percentage of Men reading what most think of as “Women’s books”??
    Thank you,
    WEnches, for the opportunity to ask a honest to God writer this Question.
    And, Hat’s off to the interviewee!!
    xx,Bill.

    Reply
  128. Good to see you here, Eloisa:
    Romance has always appealed to women readers, but there have always been, I think closet male readers, (like myself~~and, I don’t mean, gay!)who have delved between the pages, and have learned many things about the women of yesterday, as well as today.
    Jane Austen, the Bronte Sisters, etc, etc,…
    What do you think is the percentage of Men reading what most think of as “Women’s books”??
    Thank you,
    WEnches, for the opportunity to ask a honest to God writer this Question.
    And, Hat’s off to the interviewee!!
    xx,Bill.

    Reply
  129. Good to see you here, Eloisa:
    Romance has always appealed to women readers, but there have always been, I think closet male readers, (like myself~~and, I don’t mean, gay!)who have delved between the pages, and have learned many things about the women of yesterday, as well as today.
    Jane Austen, the Bronte Sisters, etc, etc,…
    What do you think is the percentage of Men reading what most think of as “Women’s books”??
    Thank you,
    WEnches, for the opportunity to ask a honest to God writer this Question.
    And, Hat’s off to the interviewee!!
    xx,Bill.

    Reply
  130. Good to see you here, Eloisa:
    Romance has always appealed to women readers, but there have always been, I think closet male readers, (like myself~~and, I don’t mean, gay!)who have delved between the pages, and have learned many things about the women of yesterday, as well as today.
    Jane Austen, the Bronte Sisters, etc, etc,…
    What do you think is the percentage of Men reading what most think of as “Women’s books”??
    Thank you,
    WEnches, for the opportunity to ask a honest to God writer this Question.
    And, Hat’s off to the interviewee!!
    xx,Bill.

    Reply
  131. So grand to have you visiting us, Eloisa, and CONGRATULATIONS on the PW list!
    Though I know the Regency era has many, many fans, I agree with you that earlier England — Georgian, and Stuart — was a lot more rollicking and, well, fun. *g* Hope you get to stay there for a few books.
    Also–I love that you’re re-reading Sheridan and Etheredge as background for language and “attitude”. That era certainly did understand wit and wordplay. My next heroine is Nell Gwyn, and I’m currently deep into Restoration plays & players, as well as keeping research-company with that ultimate bad boy Lord Rochester (though Loretta can make a pretty good case for Byron.)
    Looking forward to reading DD!
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  132. So grand to have you visiting us, Eloisa, and CONGRATULATIONS on the PW list!
    Though I know the Regency era has many, many fans, I agree with you that earlier England — Georgian, and Stuart — was a lot more rollicking and, well, fun. *g* Hope you get to stay there for a few books.
    Also–I love that you’re re-reading Sheridan and Etheredge as background for language and “attitude”. That era certainly did understand wit and wordplay. My next heroine is Nell Gwyn, and I’m currently deep into Restoration plays & players, as well as keeping research-company with that ultimate bad boy Lord Rochester (though Loretta can make a pretty good case for Byron.)
    Looking forward to reading DD!
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  133. So grand to have you visiting us, Eloisa, and CONGRATULATIONS on the PW list!
    Though I know the Regency era has many, many fans, I agree with you that earlier England — Georgian, and Stuart — was a lot more rollicking and, well, fun. *g* Hope you get to stay there for a few books.
    Also–I love that you’re re-reading Sheridan and Etheredge as background for language and “attitude”. That era certainly did understand wit and wordplay. My next heroine is Nell Gwyn, and I’m currently deep into Restoration plays & players, as well as keeping research-company with that ultimate bad boy Lord Rochester (though Loretta can make a pretty good case for Byron.)
    Looking forward to reading DD!
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  134. So grand to have you visiting us, Eloisa, and CONGRATULATIONS on the PW list!
    Though I know the Regency era has many, many fans, I agree with you that earlier England — Georgian, and Stuart — was a lot more rollicking and, well, fun. *g* Hope you get to stay there for a few books.
    Also–I love that you’re re-reading Sheridan and Etheredge as background for language and “attitude”. That era certainly did understand wit and wordplay. My next heroine is Nell Gwyn, and I’m currently deep into Restoration plays & players, as well as keeping research-company with that ultimate bad boy Lord Rochester (though Loretta can make a pretty good case for Byron.)
    Looking forward to reading DD!
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  135. So grand to have you visiting us, Eloisa, and CONGRATULATIONS on the PW list!
    Though I know the Regency era has many, many fans, I agree with you that earlier England — Georgian, and Stuart — was a lot more rollicking and, well, fun. *g* Hope you get to stay there for a few books.
    Also–I love that you’re re-reading Sheridan and Etheredge as background for language and “attitude”. That era certainly did understand wit and wordplay. My next heroine is Nell Gwyn, and I’m currently deep into Restoration plays & players, as well as keeping research-company with that ultimate bad boy Lord Rochester (though Loretta can make a pretty good case for Byron.)
    Looking forward to reading DD!
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  136. Oh, how could I forget Poldark! That was such a great series.
    Kimmy, I’m not sure if the “all” in your message was addressed to all the Wenches (Forgive me. I’m English/Canadian, and there are all kinds of nuances.)
    But there are many wonderful books on costumes. Perhaps we Wenches should have some sort of booklist accessible from here. Have to see how to do that.
    This Colonial Williamsburg one is fun and shows layers.
    http://www.history.org/history/clothing/intro/index.cfm
    That’s a great place to visit for 18th century research and they have luscious books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  137. Oh, how could I forget Poldark! That was such a great series.
    Kimmy, I’m not sure if the “all” in your message was addressed to all the Wenches (Forgive me. I’m English/Canadian, and there are all kinds of nuances.)
    But there are many wonderful books on costumes. Perhaps we Wenches should have some sort of booklist accessible from here. Have to see how to do that.
    This Colonial Williamsburg one is fun and shows layers.
    http://www.history.org/history/clothing/intro/index.cfm
    That’s a great place to visit for 18th century research and they have luscious books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  138. Oh, how could I forget Poldark! That was such a great series.
    Kimmy, I’m not sure if the “all” in your message was addressed to all the Wenches (Forgive me. I’m English/Canadian, and there are all kinds of nuances.)
    But there are many wonderful books on costumes. Perhaps we Wenches should have some sort of booklist accessible from here. Have to see how to do that.
    This Colonial Williamsburg one is fun and shows layers.
    http://www.history.org/history/clothing/intro/index.cfm
    That’s a great place to visit for 18th century research and they have luscious books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  139. Oh, how could I forget Poldark! That was such a great series.
    Kimmy, I’m not sure if the “all” in your message was addressed to all the Wenches (Forgive me. I’m English/Canadian, and there are all kinds of nuances.)
    But there are many wonderful books on costumes. Perhaps we Wenches should have some sort of booklist accessible from here. Have to see how to do that.
    This Colonial Williamsburg one is fun and shows layers.
    http://www.history.org/history/clothing/intro/index.cfm
    That’s a great place to visit for 18th century research and they have luscious books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  140. Oh, how could I forget Poldark! That was such a great series.
    Kimmy, I’m not sure if the “all” in your message was addressed to all the Wenches (Forgive me. I’m English/Canadian, and there are all kinds of nuances.)
    But there are many wonderful books on costumes. Perhaps we Wenches should have some sort of booklist accessible from here. Have to see how to do that.
    This Colonial Williamsburg one is fun and shows layers.
    http://www.history.org/history/clothing/intro/index.cfm
    That’s a great place to visit for 18th century research and they have luscious books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  141. Hi and welcome Eloisa. Congrats on the Pw list.
    I find it astonishing that men and women were allowed to play chess games in private and often times in a bedchamber. Talk about opportunity…

    Reply
  142. Hi and welcome Eloisa. Congrats on the Pw list.
    I find it astonishing that men and women were allowed to play chess games in private and often times in a bedchamber. Talk about opportunity…

    Reply
  143. Hi and welcome Eloisa. Congrats on the Pw list.
    I find it astonishing that men and women were allowed to play chess games in private and often times in a bedchamber. Talk about opportunity…

    Reply
  144. Hi and welcome Eloisa. Congrats on the Pw list.
    I find it astonishing that men and women were allowed to play chess games in private and often times in a bedchamber. Talk about opportunity…

    Reply
  145. Hi and welcome Eloisa. Congrats on the Pw list.
    I find it astonishing that men and women were allowed to play chess games in private and often times in a bedchamber. Talk about opportunity…

    Reply
  146. I’m not sure I have anything to add. You could have left off with a cliff hanger and I’d have been perfectly happy. I’ve more butter than boats to pour it with. I’m in love with the Spinster Sister, myself. I think “The duchess doesn’t understand him” (or along those lines) is the best single line I’ve read in romance since “but still, as though he were dancing” One of those moments where you completely forget you’re reading a book or sitting in a room at all. And the family dynamics of the poet and his daughter! See, all butter, all the time.
    Which means, no doubt, that I’ll be weeping bitterly, gnashing teeth and rending garments come fall. Because I can’t be content two books in a row, can I? (Surely not.) Chess, who knew? Yay for this selling a bajillionity copies and other authors getting the green light to go where their imagination takes them.

    Reply
  147. I’m not sure I have anything to add. You could have left off with a cliff hanger and I’d have been perfectly happy. I’ve more butter than boats to pour it with. I’m in love with the Spinster Sister, myself. I think “The duchess doesn’t understand him” (or along those lines) is the best single line I’ve read in romance since “but still, as though he were dancing” One of those moments where you completely forget you’re reading a book or sitting in a room at all. And the family dynamics of the poet and his daughter! See, all butter, all the time.
    Which means, no doubt, that I’ll be weeping bitterly, gnashing teeth and rending garments come fall. Because I can’t be content two books in a row, can I? (Surely not.) Chess, who knew? Yay for this selling a bajillionity copies and other authors getting the green light to go where their imagination takes them.

    Reply
  148. I’m not sure I have anything to add. You could have left off with a cliff hanger and I’d have been perfectly happy. I’ve more butter than boats to pour it with. I’m in love with the Spinster Sister, myself. I think “The duchess doesn’t understand him” (or along those lines) is the best single line I’ve read in romance since “but still, as though he were dancing” One of those moments where you completely forget you’re reading a book or sitting in a room at all. And the family dynamics of the poet and his daughter! See, all butter, all the time.
    Which means, no doubt, that I’ll be weeping bitterly, gnashing teeth and rending garments come fall. Because I can’t be content two books in a row, can I? (Surely not.) Chess, who knew? Yay for this selling a bajillionity copies and other authors getting the green light to go where their imagination takes them.

    Reply
  149. I’m not sure I have anything to add. You could have left off with a cliff hanger and I’d have been perfectly happy. I’ve more butter than boats to pour it with. I’m in love with the Spinster Sister, myself. I think “The duchess doesn’t understand him” (or along those lines) is the best single line I’ve read in romance since “but still, as though he were dancing” One of those moments where you completely forget you’re reading a book or sitting in a room at all. And the family dynamics of the poet and his daughter! See, all butter, all the time.
    Which means, no doubt, that I’ll be weeping bitterly, gnashing teeth and rending garments come fall. Because I can’t be content two books in a row, can I? (Surely not.) Chess, who knew? Yay for this selling a bajillionity copies and other authors getting the green light to go where their imagination takes them.

    Reply
  150. I’m not sure I have anything to add. You could have left off with a cliff hanger and I’d have been perfectly happy. I’ve more butter than boats to pour it with. I’m in love with the Spinster Sister, myself. I think “The duchess doesn’t understand him” (or along those lines) is the best single line I’ve read in romance since “but still, as though he were dancing” One of those moments where you completely forget you’re reading a book or sitting in a room at all. And the family dynamics of the poet and his daughter! See, all butter, all the time.
    Which means, no doubt, that I’ll be weeping bitterly, gnashing teeth and rending garments come fall. Because I can’t be content two books in a row, can I? (Surely not.) Chess, who knew? Yay for this selling a bajillionity copies and other authors getting the green light to go where their imagination takes them.

    Reply
  151. Hi Eloisa,
    I look forward to reading your latest book! I do have a question: Are there any plans to issue your books in audio? I have little time to read but spend too much time on the road. I would love to be able to listen to them!

    Reply
  152. Hi Eloisa,
    I look forward to reading your latest book! I do have a question: Are there any plans to issue your books in audio? I have little time to read but spend too much time on the road. I would love to be able to listen to them!

    Reply
  153. Hi Eloisa,
    I look forward to reading your latest book! I do have a question: Are there any plans to issue your books in audio? I have little time to read but spend too much time on the road. I would love to be able to listen to them!

    Reply
  154. Hi Eloisa,
    I look forward to reading your latest book! I do have a question: Are there any plans to issue your books in audio? I have little time to read but spend too much time on the road. I would love to be able to listen to them!

    Reply
  155. Hi Eloisa,
    I look forward to reading your latest book! I do have a question: Are there any plans to issue your books in audio? I have little time to read but spend too much time on the road. I would love to be able to listen to them!

    Reply
  156. Hi Eloise! I don’t know if you will get to see this post, but congrats on your release! After having read your book, DUCHESS IN LOVE with a historical romance group of readers for a montly read, I so looked forward to every one of those Duchess Quartet books! I do have to get your new one and read these together! I love when I can read the related books all together sometimes! But you have a beautiful voice.

    Reply
  157. Hi Eloise! I don’t know if you will get to see this post, but congrats on your release! After having read your book, DUCHESS IN LOVE with a historical romance group of readers for a montly read, I so looked forward to every one of those Duchess Quartet books! I do have to get your new one and read these together! I love when I can read the related books all together sometimes! But you have a beautiful voice.

    Reply
  158. Hi Eloise! I don’t know if you will get to see this post, but congrats on your release! After having read your book, DUCHESS IN LOVE with a historical romance group of readers for a montly read, I so looked forward to every one of those Duchess Quartet books! I do have to get your new one and read these together! I love when I can read the related books all together sometimes! But you have a beautiful voice.

    Reply
  159. Hi Eloise! I don’t know if you will get to see this post, but congrats on your release! After having read your book, DUCHESS IN LOVE with a historical romance group of readers for a montly read, I so looked forward to every one of those Duchess Quartet books! I do have to get your new one and read these together! I love when I can read the related books all together sometimes! But you have a beautiful voice.

    Reply
  160. Hi Eloise! I don’t know if you will get to see this post, but congrats on your release! After having read your book, DUCHESS IN LOVE with a historical romance group of readers for a montly read, I so looked forward to every one of those Duchess Quartet books! I do have to get your new one and read these together! I love when I can read the related books all together sometimes! But you have a beautiful voice.

    Reply
  161. Hi everyone —
    I got swept into life and forgot to come back until now…my apologies! (If you’ve ever tried to get a family off to Italy for 2 months, one of whom is a teenager, you’ll understand.)
    At any rate… no plans on having an Italian hero (Alexander, in Potent Pleasures, was my closest).
    And Cathie…I’m about to post an “extra” chapter on my website for Duchess in Love! It’s a chapter that was cut during revision — I always liked it, and now it’s going up! So do check my website around July 5th.
    And everyone else — thank you! This is a lovely, cheerful place to hang out!!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  162. Hi everyone —
    I got swept into life and forgot to come back until now…my apologies! (If you’ve ever tried to get a family off to Italy for 2 months, one of whom is a teenager, you’ll understand.)
    At any rate… no plans on having an Italian hero (Alexander, in Potent Pleasures, was my closest).
    And Cathie…I’m about to post an “extra” chapter on my website for Duchess in Love! It’s a chapter that was cut during revision — I always liked it, and now it’s going up! So do check my website around July 5th.
    And everyone else — thank you! This is a lovely, cheerful place to hang out!!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  163. Hi everyone —
    I got swept into life and forgot to come back until now…my apologies! (If you’ve ever tried to get a family off to Italy for 2 months, one of whom is a teenager, you’ll understand.)
    At any rate… no plans on having an Italian hero (Alexander, in Potent Pleasures, was my closest).
    And Cathie…I’m about to post an “extra” chapter on my website for Duchess in Love! It’s a chapter that was cut during revision — I always liked it, and now it’s going up! So do check my website around July 5th.
    And everyone else — thank you! This is a lovely, cheerful place to hang out!!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  164. Hi everyone —
    I got swept into life and forgot to come back until now…my apologies! (If you’ve ever tried to get a family off to Italy for 2 months, one of whom is a teenager, you’ll understand.)
    At any rate… no plans on having an Italian hero (Alexander, in Potent Pleasures, was my closest).
    And Cathie…I’m about to post an “extra” chapter on my website for Duchess in Love! It’s a chapter that was cut during revision — I always liked it, and now it’s going up! So do check my website around July 5th.
    And everyone else — thank you! This is a lovely, cheerful place to hang out!!
    Eloisa

    Reply
  165. Hi everyone —
    I got swept into life and forgot to come back until now…my apologies! (If you’ve ever tried to get a family off to Italy for 2 months, one of whom is a teenager, you’ll understand.)
    At any rate… no plans on having an Italian hero (Alexander, in Potent Pleasures, was my closest).
    And Cathie…I’m about to post an “extra” chapter on my website for Duchess in Love! It’s a chapter that was cut during revision — I always liked it, and now it’s going up! So do check my website around July 5th.
    And everyone else — thank you! This is a lovely, cheerful place to hang out!!
    Eloisa

    Reply

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