Welcome, Baby

      Baby_in_crib Welcome to the world, Hugo Norbert!  Kudos, new Mama!  Congratulations, new Grandmama!      
      The arrival of of a Wench grandchild sent me to my research shelves, in search of advice to new mothers.
      These rules come from The New Female Instructor or Young Woman’s Guide to Domestic Happiness, first published in 1834.      
      Rules for the Management of Children:      
      1.  Let a parent be particularly on his guard against his faults and weaknesses when in the bosom of his family.      
      2.  Never make mere playthings of your children.       
      3.  In managing a child, let a parent always have the child’s good rather than his own ease in view.    
      4.  In correcting a fault, look to the heart rather than to the outward act.      
      5.  Be on your guard against the little wiles and artifices which children will soon employ to obtain their ends.      
      6.  Do all you can to secure a consistency of system in the management of children.      
      7.  Spend much time with your children; encourage them to be free before you; and carefully study their characters.

   
      There’s a lot of strange advice in this book but I think these are not such bad rules, even today.
      What do you think?
      
      

15 thoughts on “Welcome, Baby”

  1. My first time commenting here at Word Wenches, though I’ve been lurking for weeks.
    I loved these rules, Loretta. Each and every one of them is just as relevant today as the 19th century.

    Reply
  2. My first time commenting here at Word Wenches, though I’ve been lurking for weeks.
    I loved these rules, Loretta. Each and every one of them is just as relevant today as the 19th century.

    Reply
  3. My first time commenting here at Word Wenches, though I’ve been lurking for weeks.
    I loved these rules, Loretta. Each and every one of them is just as relevant today as the 19th century.

    Reply
  4. Most excellent rules, Loretta. They sure make more sense than those of a lot of contemporary childrearing “experts”, too.
    Is this book American, or English? Interesting from a historical pov, since this is about the time that childhood is “invented” as a concept. J.J.Rouseau’s noble savages invade the nursery! *g*

    Reply
  5. Most excellent rules, Loretta. They sure make more sense than those of a lot of contemporary childrearing “experts”, too.
    Is this book American, or English? Interesting from a historical pov, since this is about the time that childhood is “invented” as a concept. J.J.Rouseau’s noble savages invade the nursery! *g*

    Reply
  6. Most excellent rules, Loretta. They sure make more sense than those of a lot of contemporary childrearing “experts”, too.
    Is this book American, or English? Interesting from a historical pov, since this is about the time that childhood is “invented” as a concept. J.J.Rouseau’s noble savages invade the nursery! *g*

    Reply
  7. Susan/Miranda: The book says “First published 1834 by Thomas Kelly, London.” My reproduction edition (abridged) is also from a London publisher. Interesting indeed–I noticed that Rousseau is quoted, at length, in the section, “On Suckling” (author is strongly in favor of mothers nursing their progeny.)

    Reply
  8. Susan/Miranda: The book says “First published 1834 by Thomas Kelly, London.” My reproduction edition (abridged) is also from a London publisher. Interesting indeed–I noticed that Rousseau is quoted, at length, in the section, “On Suckling” (author is strongly in favor of mothers nursing their progeny.)

    Reply
  9. Susan/Miranda: The book says “First published 1834 by Thomas Kelly, London.” My reproduction edition (abridged) is also from a London publisher. Interesting indeed–I noticed that Rousseau is quoted, at length, in the section, “On Suckling” (author is strongly in favor of mothers nursing their progeny.)

    Reply
  10. Hah! I knew Jean-Jacques had to be in there somewhere! What a great resource…
    I wonder when “suckling” became the less graphic “nursing”? Even in our era where every precocious brat in TV sitcoms spouts “you suck!”, I have a hard time imagining young mothers saying “excuse me, I have to go suckle little Joshua.” Ahh, our ever-evolving semantics! *g*

    Reply
  11. Hah! I knew Jean-Jacques had to be in there somewhere! What a great resource…
    I wonder when “suckling” became the less graphic “nursing”? Even in our era where every precocious brat in TV sitcoms spouts “you suck!”, I have a hard time imagining young mothers saying “excuse me, I have to go suckle little Joshua.” Ahh, our ever-evolving semantics! *g*

    Reply
  12. Hah! I knew Jean-Jacques had to be in there somewhere! What a great resource…
    I wonder when “suckling” became the less graphic “nursing”? Even in our era where every precocious brat in TV sitcoms spouts “you suck!”, I have a hard time imagining young mothers saying “excuse me, I have to go suckle little Joshua.” Ahh, our ever-evolving semantics! *g*

    Reply

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