Dave Duncan

Candtap Hi, here's Charlie enjoying the latest rip roaring yarn by my guest, Dave Duncan, who's recent novels are a masterful blend of historical, fantasy, and mystery. You can visit his website here.

Jo: Welcome to Word Wenches, Dave. We haven't had a male author as guest before, but as a Scotsman, you would at least be entitled to wear a "skirt." Have you ever worn a kilt?Daveduncan

Dave: I did as a child.  It was common winter wear in Scotland.  Those cold winds off the North Sea get into everything.

Jo: You have over 40 books published after a successful career as a geologist. When did you start writing fiction and how did you get published?

Dave:  Even as a child, I wanted to be a writer, but not to the exclusion of wanting to earn a decent living, which is why I became a geologist.  I did take a creative writing course at the University of Calgary (from Myra Paperny) in 1970, and tried sending out some short stories, but without success.  I found I could not spare enough time from job and family, and gave up.

Jo: A lot of us have that problem. When did things change?

Dave: In the summer of 1984. I sat down at my computer and began writing a novel, more or less on the spur of the moment, thinking it would be a fun thing to try.  I rapidly became (a) hooked to the point where I began sneaking time away from my work, and (b) convinced I was producing the greatest literature since Chaucer.

Jo: I can remember that illusion well! What sort of novel was it?

Th_rose-red-city Dave: A huge fantasy novel. It won some interest but no contracts, so I tried a science fiction novel, but then I rewrote the fantasy as a trilogy.  After all that (the equivalent of about 5 books) I produced a standalone fantasy, A Rose-Red City.

Jo: And it sold?

Dave: Don’t get ahead of me.  In the spring of 1986 the oil business collapsed.  For the first time in thirty years I was out of work.  But, yes, two weeks after I completed my last consulting project, Del Rey phoned from New York and offered to buy City.  I followed with an SF novel (not the one I had written earlier, which never did see the light of day) and then a fourth or fifth rewrite of the trilogy, "The Seventh Sword", and it was that final version of my first attempt that began to attract serious attention from fans.
Th_reluctant-swordsman
Jo: Living proof of my saying that when our early books are rejected, it’s not a disaster; we’re just building our inventory. What were the titles of the trilogy?

Dave: The Reluctant Swordsman, The Coming of Wisdom, and The Destiny of the Sword. They are all available again in e-book or Print on Demand format.

Th-alfeo-cover Jo: And now you have forty-one novels to your credit. Congratulations. The three most recent books are The Alchemist's Apprentice, The Alchemist's Code, and The Alchemist's Pursuit, all historical/paranormal mysteries set in 16th century Venice. One reviewer described the series as "…rock 'em, sock 'em Renaissance skullduggery of the most compelling variety." (Rick Kleffel, The Agony Column).  Reviews have been very enthusiastic, including starred reviews in Kirkus (The Alchemist's Apprentice) and Publishers’ Weekly (The Alchemist’s Code). An excerpt of the first book is available here. I have thoroughly enjoyed all of these books, Dave. Why Venice? Why the 16th century?
Gondolaferry
Dave: Here’s the time line: In 1999, Janet and I went on a bus tour holiday in Italy , and Venice was one of the places we visited. (Jo here. The picture is one we took on our trip there, many years ago.) In November of 2001 we went back, stayed a week in Ravenna, and then had a week in Venice on an art tour run by the Smithsonian Institute.  I think it was the preparatory “homework” for that visit that cranked up my enthusiasm.  I began to think about writing a book set in Venice — did I dare, a stranger who could not even read the language?  Eventually I took it on as a personal challenge to myself, and I began The Alchemist’s Apprentice in May of 2004.  Ace bought it in February of 2006 and asked for two sequels.  (Happy to oblige, ma’am!)

(Jo again. The picture here is a Canaletto from the 18th century.)

Molo
In 2006 Janet and I went back again on our own.  We mostly just soaked up the atmosphere and more story ideas.  We writers are always told to write about what we know.  One of the many astonishing things about Venice is how much is knowable of its history and customs—mostly because it was never sacked, I suppose, and because it was a republic with voluminous governmental records that still exist.  Once I had devoured forty or so books about it, I might not be a qualified historian, but I knew I knew a lot more than any of my readers were likely to know, and in popular fiction that is all that really counts.

Jo: A great sanity saver in research. Otherwise we’d never stop! So, have you made any errors you know about? My fans occasionally point some out to me. I don’t mind. It means I won’t make that mistake again. (This is another picture, this time of the Grand Canal, showing the less picturesque side of Venice.)
Gcanalphoto
Dave: So far, I’ve only heard about one, an  anachronism.  Fencing masks in training, which were a later invention.  I still have a sneaky suspicion that they wore helmets with visors and just never said so.

Jo: That’s an interesting aspect of research, too. There are such huge holes in what we have, even when there are extensive records, as with Venice. I should perhaps point out that you admitted to fudging a bit on Alfeo’s clothing, giving me this picture of what a fashionable young man about Venice might actually have been wearing.
Alfeo
Dave: That drawing is an exact contemporary work by Vecellio, Titian’s nephew.   I did send it to my editor as a suitable model for cover art.  Needless to say, it didn’t fly.

Jo: Your protagonist is Alfeo Zeno, an impoverished member of the aristocracy and also hardworking apprentice to Maestro Nostradamus, your detective.  How would you describe him?  An astrologer? (Not the famous Nostradamus, I should mention, dear readers, but his nephew.) Tell us more about how you came up with your sleuths and how you see them.

Dave: I have been accused of basing Alfeo and Nostradamus on Archie Goodwin and Nero Wolfe.  Really!  One doesn’t say such things in polite company!  (Guilty, m’lud, but Rex Stout did not invent the immobile detective.)  Felipe Nostradamus was a real person, who carried on Michel de Nostradame’s work after this death, publishing in Italy.  He claimed to be the great man’s nephew, although Michel’s sons denied this, and nothing more was known about him until my own researches revealed him to be an elderly, cranky, Renaissance polymath: astrologer, alchemist, philosopher, friend of Galileo, &c &c.  He’s one of the few characters in my fiction that I based on an actual person, and no, I won’t say who.

Alfeo is a generic swashbuckling romantic, ironic, heroic, energetic, likable protagonist.  He is also the faithful lover of the most sought-after courtesan in Venice.  I think of him as my alter id.

Jo: LOL! I love his relationship with Violetta, and I love Violetta, too. Such a complex, strong, clever woman. I think she enhances Alfeo because a woman like that loves him, and he can respect her professional life. Did you hesitate about creating such a relationship?

Dave: It made Alfeo a little trickier to draw.  He claims that he has his jealousy under control, but he knows that he must share her with her clients, who are the rich men he envies.  At the same time, he fiercely denies being a pimp.  A courtesan, of course, was much more than just a prostitute.  Noblemen kept their wives uneducated and locked up in purdah, and so found them very dull.  The courtesans were skilled, cultured entertainers, like geisha girls.

Impossible-odds Jo: You write sword-wielding young men extremely well. I'm thinking also of your wonderful Blade books. (A series about the King's Blades, blood bound bodyguards. Highly recommended.) Were you once a warrior male, or is this pure research? If so, what sources have you used?

Dave: I read books.  I am amazed at how many people, even skilled fencers, say the sort of nice things you just said.  I have never fenced in my life.  I can’t recall ever being in a fight.  One thing that helps, I think, is that I am a lazy writer.  I write short, hurrying to get the ideas down; later I pad it out.  Some writers write long and have to cut.  If you check out my fight scenes, you will see that they are very short, just a terse paragraph or two from the harsh scrape of blades being drawn to the blood (villain), sweat (hero), and tears (of relief, from heroine). When you are moving all four limbs at once and watching an opponent doing the same thing while he tries to carve or skewer you with very sharp steel, you don’t have much time to think deep thoughts.  Also, modern Olympic fencing is not a fair comparison.  There are tales of expert fencing instructors who went completely to pieces when they had to fight real duels.

Jo: I love the way you present 16th century Venice to the reader. The books are first person in Alfeo's point of view, and he has that deep and easy familiarity with his city at all levels. There's never a feel of information dumping, even though the plots are based on the Venetian social, legal, and political system. How did you go about digesting your research so it feels so natural? (Next picture is Canaletto's view of the Grand Canal.)

GcanalDave: I dunno.  I think the key word there is “digesting”.  I don’t take detailed notes, although I may jot down ideas.  But I read a lot and the ideas float to the surface when they’re needed.  I may read up later on something I want to use—like the “War of Fists” that appears in the third book.  I did try to put some of Venice’s idiosyncrasies in every story, and even make the plot depend on them.  I can’t go into details on that without spoiling, of course.

Jo: What did you learn about Venice that surprised you?

Dave: Everything.  It is an incredible place, a republic for 1100 years. (Rome managed about 700 and the USA is coming up to 233.)  It won and lost three empires.  As a city of about 200,000 people it took on all the great powers of Europe at once and won.  It invented street lights and a department of health centuries before anywhere else had such things.  And on and on…

Jo: What are you working on now?

Dave: A more traditional fantasy trilogy, “The Brothers Magnus”.  It concerns a family famous for both its swordsmen and its sorcerers, and a heroine who loves one brother but is forced into marriage with another.

Jo: Sounds wonderful. Thanks, Dave, for a great interview. I've only been to Venice once, and I want to go back. It's a magical place.

You can read an excerpt from one of Dave's most popular novels here. There are links in the text above to the other books mentioned.

***********************************************************************************************************************************

Now, everyone, Dave is giving away a copy of each of his Apprentice books, one to each of three winners.

Book one, The Alchemist's Apprentice, will go to a random pick of all commenters.

Book two, The Alchemist's Code, will go to a random pick from any questions or comments that Dave finds particularly interesting.

Book three, The Alchemist's Pursuit, will go to a random pick of comments on this specific topic: What do you think of genre-blending fiction? When does it work and when does it not? And — if you have any ideas on this — why?

So have at it! Talk among yourselves as well. Have fun.

Tswsmweb Jo 🙂

 

220 thoughts on “Dave Duncan”

  1. Thanks for bringing Dave’s name back to my attention (and his books back up on the ol’ TBR pile). I read several of the Blade books, then paused and didn’t get back to them. This series sounds like it has lots of elements I’ll like, including the uncommon setting.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for bringing Dave’s name back to my attention (and his books back up on the ol’ TBR pile). I read several of the Blade books, then paused and didn’t get back to them. This series sounds like it has lots of elements I’ll like, including the uncommon setting.

    Reply
  3. Thanks for bringing Dave’s name back to my attention (and his books back up on the ol’ TBR pile). I read several of the Blade books, then paused and didn’t get back to them. This series sounds like it has lots of elements I’ll like, including the uncommon setting.

    Reply
  4. Thanks for bringing Dave’s name back to my attention (and his books back up on the ol’ TBR pile). I read several of the Blade books, then paused and didn’t get back to them. This series sounds like it has lots of elements I’ll like, including the uncommon setting.

    Reply
  5. Thanks for bringing Dave’s name back to my attention (and his books back up on the ol’ TBR pile). I read several of the Blade books, then paused and didn’t get back to them. This series sounds like it has lots of elements I’ll like, including the uncommon setting.

    Reply
  6. What a fascinating interview! And I can so identify with how a place can make you want to write about it. I had that experience with Belize (and was lucky enough to sell that book) and Crete (that one’s still an “inventory book”).
    Jo, thanks for bringing Dave to my attention. I’m definitely going to check out his books.
    As for genre-bending, I think it’s wonderful. So long as no major conventions of a genre get broken so readers are disappointed (e.g., if a book is a paranormal historical romance, it still needs to have the happy ending that romance readers expect). Good genre-bending encourages readers to try different kinds of books (e.g., someone who’s a pure historical reader may try historical paranormal, and get excited and read other paranormals), and that’s good for everyone: the reader, the authors, the booksellers, and the publishers! I see more and more genre-benders being published these days, and it’s an exciting development in the publishing biz.

    Reply
  7. What a fascinating interview! And I can so identify with how a place can make you want to write about it. I had that experience with Belize (and was lucky enough to sell that book) and Crete (that one’s still an “inventory book”).
    Jo, thanks for bringing Dave to my attention. I’m definitely going to check out his books.
    As for genre-bending, I think it’s wonderful. So long as no major conventions of a genre get broken so readers are disappointed (e.g., if a book is a paranormal historical romance, it still needs to have the happy ending that romance readers expect). Good genre-bending encourages readers to try different kinds of books (e.g., someone who’s a pure historical reader may try historical paranormal, and get excited and read other paranormals), and that’s good for everyone: the reader, the authors, the booksellers, and the publishers! I see more and more genre-benders being published these days, and it’s an exciting development in the publishing biz.

    Reply
  8. What a fascinating interview! And I can so identify with how a place can make you want to write about it. I had that experience with Belize (and was lucky enough to sell that book) and Crete (that one’s still an “inventory book”).
    Jo, thanks for bringing Dave to my attention. I’m definitely going to check out his books.
    As for genre-bending, I think it’s wonderful. So long as no major conventions of a genre get broken so readers are disappointed (e.g., if a book is a paranormal historical romance, it still needs to have the happy ending that romance readers expect). Good genre-bending encourages readers to try different kinds of books (e.g., someone who’s a pure historical reader may try historical paranormal, and get excited and read other paranormals), and that’s good for everyone: the reader, the authors, the booksellers, and the publishers! I see more and more genre-benders being published these days, and it’s an exciting development in the publishing biz.

    Reply
  9. What a fascinating interview! And I can so identify with how a place can make you want to write about it. I had that experience with Belize (and was lucky enough to sell that book) and Crete (that one’s still an “inventory book”).
    Jo, thanks for bringing Dave to my attention. I’m definitely going to check out his books.
    As for genre-bending, I think it’s wonderful. So long as no major conventions of a genre get broken so readers are disappointed (e.g., if a book is a paranormal historical romance, it still needs to have the happy ending that romance readers expect). Good genre-bending encourages readers to try different kinds of books (e.g., someone who’s a pure historical reader may try historical paranormal, and get excited and read other paranormals), and that’s good for everyone: the reader, the authors, the booksellers, and the publishers! I see more and more genre-benders being published these days, and it’s an exciting development in the publishing biz.

    Reply
  10. What a fascinating interview! And I can so identify with how a place can make you want to write about it. I had that experience with Belize (and was lucky enough to sell that book) and Crete (that one’s still an “inventory book”).
    Jo, thanks for bringing Dave to my attention. I’m definitely going to check out his books.
    As for genre-bending, I think it’s wonderful. So long as no major conventions of a genre get broken so readers are disappointed (e.g., if a book is a paranormal historical romance, it still needs to have the happy ending that romance readers expect). Good genre-bending encourages readers to try different kinds of books (e.g., someone who’s a pure historical reader may try historical paranormal, and get excited and read other paranormals), and that’s good for everyone: the reader, the authors, the booksellers, and the publishers! I see more and more genre-benders being published these days, and it’s an exciting development in the publishing biz.

    Reply
  11. I love historicals and fantasy, so I may be in love! I recently read Elizabeth Moon’s Vatta series and thought it was great. The cool thing about fantasy based on real places and people is the twists that occur. As you get to know the characters, your fantasy becomes more real.

    Reply
  12. I love historicals and fantasy, so I may be in love! I recently read Elizabeth Moon’s Vatta series and thought it was great. The cool thing about fantasy based on real places and people is the twists that occur. As you get to know the characters, your fantasy becomes more real.

    Reply
  13. I love historicals and fantasy, so I may be in love! I recently read Elizabeth Moon’s Vatta series and thought it was great. The cool thing about fantasy based on real places and people is the twists that occur. As you get to know the characters, your fantasy becomes more real.

    Reply
  14. I love historicals and fantasy, so I may be in love! I recently read Elizabeth Moon’s Vatta series and thought it was great. The cool thing about fantasy based on real places and people is the twists that occur. As you get to know the characters, your fantasy becomes more real.

    Reply
  15. I love historicals and fantasy, so I may be in love! I recently read Elizabeth Moon’s Vatta series and thought it was great. The cool thing about fantasy based on real places and people is the twists that occur. As you get to know the characters, your fantasy becomes more real.

    Reply
  16. I’ve always loved swashbucklers, so I’ll give Dave’s books’s a try. The thing that’s always irritated me with swashbucklers was that only the man was involved. I really want to see women swashbucklers, like Andrea Pickens’s spies.
    As far as genre-bending, I’m with Susan Lyons. Don’t break the genre. I’ve read a few paranormal Regencies that were more paranormal than Regency, and modern paranormal, at that. No, thanks.
    If I’m going to read a genre-bender, I prefer a historical. I think contemporary genre-benders go completely off the top into some really weird stuff. Having the story as a historical seems to make the strange stuff fit in better.

    Reply
  17. I’ve always loved swashbucklers, so I’ll give Dave’s books’s a try. The thing that’s always irritated me with swashbucklers was that only the man was involved. I really want to see women swashbucklers, like Andrea Pickens’s spies.
    As far as genre-bending, I’m with Susan Lyons. Don’t break the genre. I’ve read a few paranormal Regencies that were more paranormal than Regency, and modern paranormal, at that. No, thanks.
    If I’m going to read a genre-bender, I prefer a historical. I think contemporary genre-benders go completely off the top into some really weird stuff. Having the story as a historical seems to make the strange stuff fit in better.

    Reply
  18. I’ve always loved swashbucklers, so I’ll give Dave’s books’s a try. The thing that’s always irritated me with swashbucklers was that only the man was involved. I really want to see women swashbucklers, like Andrea Pickens’s spies.
    As far as genre-bending, I’m with Susan Lyons. Don’t break the genre. I’ve read a few paranormal Regencies that were more paranormal than Regency, and modern paranormal, at that. No, thanks.
    If I’m going to read a genre-bender, I prefer a historical. I think contemporary genre-benders go completely off the top into some really weird stuff. Having the story as a historical seems to make the strange stuff fit in better.

    Reply
  19. I’ve always loved swashbucklers, so I’ll give Dave’s books’s a try. The thing that’s always irritated me with swashbucklers was that only the man was involved. I really want to see women swashbucklers, like Andrea Pickens’s spies.
    As far as genre-bending, I’m with Susan Lyons. Don’t break the genre. I’ve read a few paranormal Regencies that were more paranormal than Regency, and modern paranormal, at that. No, thanks.
    If I’m going to read a genre-bender, I prefer a historical. I think contemporary genre-benders go completely off the top into some really weird stuff. Having the story as a historical seems to make the strange stuff fit in better.

    Reply
  20. I’ve always loved swashbucklers, so I’ll give Dave’s books’s a try. The thing that’s always irritated me with swashbucklers was that only the man was involved. I really want to see women swashbucklers, like Andrea Pickens’s spies.
    As far as genre-bending, I’m with Susan Lyons. Don’t break the genre. I’ve read a few paranormal Regencies that were more paranormal than Regency, and modern paranormal, at that. No, thanks.
    If I’m going to read a genre-bender, I prefer a historical. I think contemporary genre-benders go completely off the top into some really weird stuff. Having the story as a historical seems to make the strange stuff fit in better.

    Reply
  21. I was holding off buying book three of the Alchemist series, but now I don’t think I can hold off any longer. Rats! I love Dave’s blend of adventure, humour, and world-building.
    On genre bending: I tend to think of it more as genre-blending, and I like it. Mysteries, fantasies, and romances — when confined tightly within their genres — can become predictable in plot, character, and sensibility. Adding a touch of romance to a fantasy, or a thrill of mystery to a romance, is refreshing, at least to me. In addition, complex stories or characters can rarely be contained by a narrow definition of genre. What genre a book belongs to is often in the eye of the beholder, Austen being a fine example.

    Reply
  22. I was holding off buying book three of the Alchemist series, but now I don’t think I can hold off any longer. Rats! I love Dave’s blend of adventure, humour, and world-building.
    On genre bending: I tend to think of it more as genre-blending, and I like it. Mysteries, fantasies, and romances — when confined tightly within their genres — can become predictable in plot, character, and sensibility. Adding a touch of romance to a fantasy, or a thrill of mystery to a romance, is refreshing, at least to me. In addition, complex stories or characters can rarely be contained by a narrow definition of genre. What genre a book belongs to is often in the eye of the beholder, Austen being a fine example.

    Reply
  23. I was holding off buying book three of the Alchemist series, but now I don’t think I can hold off any longer. Rats! I love Dave’s blend of adventure, humour, and world-building.
    On genre bending: I tend to think of it more as genre-blending, and I like it. Mysteries, fantasies, and romances — when confined tightly within their genres — can become predictable in plot, character, and sensibility. Adding a touch of romance to a fantasy, or a thrill of mystery to a romance, is refreshing, at least to me. In addition, complex stories or characters can rarely be contained by a narrow definition of genre. What genre a book belongs to is often in the eye of the beholder, Austen being a fine example.

    Reply
  24. I was holding off buying book three of the Alchemist series, but now I don’t think I can hold off any longer. Rats! I love Dave’s blend of adventure, humour, and world-building.
    On genre bending: I tend to think of it more as genre-blending, and I like it. Mysteries, fantasies, and romances — when confined tightly within their genres — can become predictable in plot, character, and sensibility. Adding a touch of romance to a fantasy, or a thrill of mystery to a romance, is refreshing, at least to me. In addition, complex stories or characters can rarely be contained by a narrow definition of genre. What genre a book belongs to is often in the eye of the beholder, Austen being a fine example.

    Reply
  25. I was holding off buying book three of the Alchemist series, but now I don’t think I can hold off any longer. Rats! I love Dave’s blend of adventure, humour, and world-building.
    On genre bending: I tend to think of it more as genre-blending, and I like it. Mysteries, fantasies, and romances — when confined tightly within their genres — can become predictable in plot, character, and sensibility. Adding a touch of romance to a fantasy, or a thrill of mystery to a romance, is refreshing, at least to me. In addition, complex stories or characters can rarely be contained by a narrow definition of genre. What genre a book belongs to is often in the eye of the beholder, Austen being a fine example.

    Reply
  26. I’m delighted that Dave is new to some of you. 🙂
    Linda, did you know that Andrea Pickens is now a Wench? It was in our May newsletter and her name and pic will be up soon. We’re thrilled to have her join us.
    Anyone, to join the newsletter list, look up to the right and click on the link. No chat, no spam. Just the monthly newsletter alerting you to upcoming treats and with links to recent posts you might have missed.
    Jo

    Reply
  27. I’m delighted that Dave is new to some of you. 🙂
    Linda, did you know that Andrea Pickens is now a Wench? It was in our May newsletter and her name and pic will be up soon. We’re thrilled to have her join us.
    Anyone, to join the newsletter list, look up to the right and click on the link. No chat, no spam. Just the monthly newsletter alerting you to upcoming treats and with links to recent posts you might have missed.
    Jo

    Reply
  28. I’m delighted that Dave is new to some of you. 🙂
    Linda, did you know that Andrea Pickens is now a Wench? It was in our May newsletter and her name and pic will be up soon. We’re thrilled to have her join us.
    Anyone, to join the newsletter list, look up to the right and click on the link. No chat, no spam. Just the monthly newsletter alerting you to upcoming treats and with links to recent posts you might have missed.
    Jo

    Reply
  29. I’m delighted that Dave is new to some of you. 🙂
    Linda, did you know that Andrea Pickens is now a Wench? It was in our May newsletter and her name and pic will be up soon. We’re thrilled to have her join us.
    Anyone, to join the newsletter list, look up to the right and click on the link. No chat, no spam. Just the monthly newsletter alerting you to upcoming treats and with links to recent posts you might have missed.
    Jo

    Reply
  30. I’m delighted that Dave is new to some of you. 🙂
    Linda, did you know that Andrea Pickens is now a Wench? It was in our May newsletter and her name and pic will be up soon. We’re thrilled to have her join us.
    Anyone, to join the newsletter list, look up to the right and click on the link. No chat, no spam. Just the monthly newsletter alerting you to upcoming treats and with links to recent posts you might have missed.
    Jo

    Reply
  31. Thanks for all the comments so far, especially the developing discussion on genre-blending (and bending). Of course genre boundaries are often hard to pin down, so one person’s blend may be another’s single malt. I remember thinking that my first book, A Rose-Red City, was a pure fantasy and being shocked when it was hailed a mixture of Fantasy, SF, and Horror.
    Dave

    Reply
  32. Thanks for all the comments so far, especially the developing discussion on genre-blending (and bending). Of course genre boundaries are often hard to pin down, so one person’s blend may be another’s single malt. I remember thinking that my first book, A Rose-Red City, was a pure fantasy and being shocked when it was hailed a mixture of Fantasy, SF, and Horror.
    Dave

    Reply
  33. Thanks for all the comments so far, especially the developing discussion on genre-blending (and bending). Of course genre boundaries are often hard to pin down, so one person’s blend may be another’s single malt. I remember thinking that my first book, A Rose-Red City, was a pure fantasy and being shocked when it was hailed a mixture of Fantasy, SF, and Horror.
    Dave

    Reply
  34. Thanks for all the comments so far, especially the developing discussion on genre-blending (and bending). Of course genre boundaries are often hard to pin down, so one person’s blend may be another’s single malt. I remember thinking that my first book, A Rose-Red City, was a pure fantasy and being shocked when it was hailed a mixture of Fantasy, SF, and Horror.
    Dave

    Reply
  35. Thanks for all the comments so far, especially the developing discussion on genre-blending (and bending). Of course genre boundaries are often hard to pin down, so one person’s blend may be another’s single malt. I remember thinking that my first book, A Rose-Red City, was a pure fantasy and being shocked when it was hailed a mixture of Fantasy, SF, and Horror.
    Dave

    Reply
  36. Dave, you’ve made me want to go read a history of Venice right NOW. 🙂 What’s here is immensely intriguing, so I’ll be looking forward to what you’ve created in your books.
    I’m a reader who started with fantasy as a wee lassie, and added romance to my palate in my 20s. So I happen to love books that blend those well. That said, I think a lot of how you view these hybrids depends on your particular angle of approach to them.
    Since I started with fantasy, I always view hybrids from that angle. The world-building is *key*. If I get a sketchy indication of a pseudo-medieval world, I sigh with frustration. I want to see the elements that make that world what it is, that make it unique from what I know in our world. Then I need the richness of the characters endemic to romance layered onto that.
    I would suspect that a genre-blender coming from romance would search for the characters first, then put the world over that. Or a mystery fan would put that first, then layer the world on that,and so on.
    So, as Milo said in _The Phantom Tollbooth_, “it’s all in how you look at things.”
    ml

    Reply
  37. Dave, you’ve made me want to go read a history of Venice right NOW. 🙂 What’s here is immensely intriguing, so I’ll be looking forward to what you’ve created in your books.
    I’m a reader who started with fantasy as a wee lassie, and added romance to my palate in my 20s. So I happen to love books that blend those well. That said, I think a lot of how you view these hybrids depends on your particular angle of approach to them.
    Since I started with fantasy, I always view hybrids from that angle. The world-building is *key*. If I get a sketchy indication of a pseudo-medieval world, I sigh with frustration. I want to see the elements that make that world what it is, that make it unique from what I know in our world. Then I need the richness of the characters endemic to romance layered onto that.
    I would suspect that a genre-blender coming from romance would search for the characters first, then put the world over that. Or a mystery fan would put that first, then layer the world on that,and so on.
    So, as Milo said in _The Phantom Tollbooth_, “it’s all in how you look at things.”
    ml

    Reply
  38. Dave, you’ve made me want to go read a history of Venice right NOW. 🙂 What’s here is immensely intriguing, so I’ll be looking forward to what you’ve created in your books.
    I’m a reader who started with fantasy as a wee lassie, and added romance to my palate in my 20s. So I happen to love books that blend those well. That said, I think a lot of how you view these hybrids depends on your particular angle of approach to them.
    Since I started with fantasy, I always view hybrids from that angle. The world-building is *key*. If I get a sketchy indication of a pseudo-medieval world, I sigh with frustration. I want to see the elements that make that world what it is, that make it unique from what I know in our world. Then I need the richness of the characters endemic to romance layered onto that.
    I would suspect that a genre-blender coming from romance would search for the characters first, then put the world over that. Or a mystery fan would put that first, then layer the world on that,and so on.
    So, as Milo said in _The Phantom Tollbooth_, “it’s all in how you look at things.”
    ml

    Reply
  39. Dave, you’ve made me want to go read a history of Venice right NOW. 🙂 What’s here is immensely intriguing, so I’ll be looking forward to what you’ve created in your books.
    I’m a reader who started with fantasy as a wee lassie, and added romance to my palate in my 20s. So I happen to love books that blend those well. That said, I think a lot of how you view these hybrids depends on your particular angle of approach to them.
    Since I started with fantasy, I always view hybrids from that angle. The world-building is *key*. If I get a sketchy indication of a pseudo-medieval world, I sigh with frustration. I want to see the elements that make that world what it is, that make it unique from what I know in our world. Then I need the richness of the characters endemic to romance layered onto that.
    I would suspect that a genre-blender coming from romance would search for the characters first, then put the world over that. Or a mystery fan would put that first, then layer the world on that,and so on.
    So, as Milo said in _The Phantom Tollbooth_, “it’s all in how you look at things.”
    ml

    Reply
  40. Dave, you’ve made me want to go read a history of Venice right NOW. 🙂 What’s here is immensely intriguing, so I’ll be looking forward to what you’ve created in your books.
    I’m a reader who started with fantasy as a wee lassie, and added romance to my palate in my 20s. So I happen to love books that blend those well. That said, I think a lot of how you view these hybrids depends on your particular angle of approach to them.
    Since I started with fantasy, I always view hybrids from that angle. The world-building is *key*. If I get a sketchy indication of a pseudo-medieval world, I sigh with frustration. I want to see the elements that make that world what it is, that make it unique from what I know in our world. Then I need the richness of the characters endemic to romance layered onto that.
    I would suspect that a genre-blender coming from romance would search for the characters first, then put the world over that. Or a mystery fan would put that first, then layer the world on that,and so on.
    So, as Milo said in _The Phantom Tollbooth_, “it’s all in how you look at things.”
    ml

    Reply
  41. I have read a few of the Blade books, but like another commenter, I was in and out of them a few times. Still have the intention to read the ones I have missed, but just haven’t gotten around to it.
    As to genre bending/blending, I enjoy it greatly, but it does seem to work somewhat better either in a historical or completely out of this world setting. For example, the Vatta series that was mentioned, and the 1632 series are excellent examples. One that works very well as novels, but has a problem with time line is Robb’s In Death series. Since this is 2009, a series set in circa 2059 is too close to this time to be truly effective. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the books, but those Urban Wars that were supposed to be a foundation for all kinds of societal changes just don’t seem likely to happen in the comparatively near future!

    Reply
  42. I have read a few of the Blade books, but like another commenter, I was in and out of them a few times. Still have the intention to read the ones I have missed, but just haven’t gotten around to it.
    As to genre bending/blending, I enjoy it greatly, but it does seem to work somewhat better either in a historical or completely out of this world setting. For example, the Vatta series that was mentioned, and the 1632 series are excellent examples. One that works very well as novels, but has a problem with time line is Robb’s In Death series. Since this is 2009, a series set in circa 2059 is too close to this time to be truly effective. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the books, but those Urban Wars that were supposed to be a foundation for all kinds of societal changes just don’t seem likely to happen in the comparatively near future!

    Reply
  43. I have read a few of the Blade books, but like another commenter, I was in and out of them a few times. Still have the intention to read the ones I have missed, but just haven’t gotten around to it.
    As to genre bending/blending, I enjoy it greatly, but it does seem to work somewhat better either in a historical or completely out of this world setting. For example, the Vatta series that was mentioned, and the 1632 series are excellent examples. One that works very well as novels, but has a problem with time line is Robb’s In Death series. Since this is 2009, a series set in circa 2059 is too close to this time to be truly effective. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the books, but those Urban Wars that were supposed to be a foundation for all kinds of societal changes just don’t seem likely to happen in the comparatively near future!

    Reply
  44. I have read a few of the Blade books, but like another commenter, I was in and out of them a few times. Still have the intention to read the ones I have missed, but just haven’t gotten around to it.
    As to genre bending/blending, I enjoy it greatly, but it does seem to work somewhat better either in a historical or completely out of this world setting. For example, the Vatta series that was mentioned, and the 1632 series are excellent examples. One that works very well as novels, but has a problem with time line is Robb’s In Death series. Since this is 2009, a series set in circa 2059 is too close to this time to be truly effective. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the books, but those Urban Wars that were supposed to be a foundation for all kinds of societal changes just don’t seem likely to happen in the comparatively near future!

    Reply
  45. I have read a few of the Blade books, but like another commenter, I was in and out of them a few times. Still have the intention to read the ones I have missed, but just haven’t gotten around to it.
    As to genre bending/blending, I enjoy it greatly, but it does seem to work somewhat better either in a historical or completely out of this world setting. For example, the Vatta series that was mentioned, and the 1632 series are excellent examples. One that works very well as novels, but has a problem with time line is Robb’s In Death series. Since this is 2009, a series set in circa 2059 is too close to this time to be truly effective. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the books, but those Urban Wars that were supposed to be a foundation for all kinds of societal changes just don’t seem likely to happen in the comparatively near future!

    Reply
  46. Dave, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As soon as Jo invited you, I went out and got THE ALCHEMIST’S APPRENTICE. I loved it, so now it’s time to scarf up the next two books.
    I love the combination of richly detailed setting and very accessible prose and characters. Venice is a place I’ve always wanted to visit (and I’ll get there some day!), but I haven’t made is yet. So all the wonderful, convincing detail you use so easily is enthralling.
    I’m also intrigued to find that you based your Nostradamus on a real-ish character. Great fun.
    I also picked up a King’s Blade book, and I look forward to reading that soon.
    Thanks again for coming by–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  47. Dave, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As soon as Jo invited you, I went out and got THE ALCHEMIST’S APPRENTICE. I loved it, so now it’s time to scarf up the next two books.
    I love the combination of richly detailed setting and very accessible prose and characters. Venice is a place I’ve always wanted to visit (and I’ll get there some day!), but I haven’t made is yet. So all the wonderful, convincing detail you use so easily is enthralling.
    I’m also intrigued to find that you based your Nostradamus on a real-ish character. Great fun.
    I also picked up a King’s Blade book, and I look forward to reading that soon.
    Thanks again for coming by–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  48. Dave, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As soon as Jo invited you, I went out and got THE ALCHEMIST’S APPRENTICE. I loved it, so now it’s time to scarf up the next two books.
    I love the combination of richly detailed setting and very accessible prose and characters. Venice is a place I’ve always wanted to visit (and I’ll get there some day!), but I haven’t made is yet. So all the wonderful, convincing detail you use so easily is enthralling.
    I’m also intrigued to find that you based your Nostradamus on a real-ish character. Great fun.
    I also picked up a King’s Blade book, and I look forward to reading that soon.
    Thanks again for coming by–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  49. Dave, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As soon as Jo invited you, I went out and got THE ALCHEMIST’S APPRENTICE. I loved it, so now it’s time to scarf up the next two books.
    I love the combination of richly detailed setting and very accessible prose and characters. Venice is a place I’ve always wanted to visit (and I’ll get there some day!), but I haven’t made is yet. So all the wonderful, convincing detail you use so easily is enthralling.
    I’m also intrigued to find that you based your Nostradamus on a real-ish character. Great fun.
    I also picked up a King’s Blade book, and I look forward to reading that soon.
    Thanks again for coming by–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  50. Dave, thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! As soon as Jo invited you, I went out and got THE ALCHEMIST’S APPRENTICE. I loved it, so now it’s time to scarf up the next two books.
    I love the combination of richly detailed setting and very accessible prose and characters. Venice is a place I’ve always wanted to visit (and I’ll get there some day!), but I haven’t made is yet. So all the wonderful, convincing detail you use so easily is enthralling.
    I’m also intrigued to find that you based your Nostradamus on a real-ish character. Great fun.
    I also picked up a King’s Blade book, and I look forward to reading that soon.
    Thanks again for coming by–
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  51. Hi Dave!
    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Word Wenches! Nina, here.
    I love genre-bending books. Straight anything is, well, just boring, IMHO. My life is a jaunty mix of fantasy, romance and freak show, so why should my books be too?
    Like other wenchlings posting today, I have a genre-bending book under the bed, too, written before I “knew better.” 🙂 My mind often floats back to that world, the First Love of my heart, and I can only bring myself to depart upon vowing that, someday, I will make it fit into some Publisher’s idea of publishable.
    Which leads to my question… “What do you think; (based upon your experience with agents and/or publishers’ acceptance/rejection) the right blend/bend is for now? Have you noticed a shift in the last years, or do you see one sitting on the horizon? (Sorry, that was two questions, wasn’t it? :-)) Oh no! that makes three… better go.
    Thank you, Dave, for your time. I am looking forward to picking up one of your books.
    Nina, a diehard fan of Young Blades.

    Reply
  52. Hi Dave!
    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Word Wenches! Nina, here.
    I love genre-bending books. Straight anything is, well, just boring, IMHO. My life is a jaunty mix of fantasy, romance and freak show, so why should my books be too?
    Like other wenchlings posting today, I have a genre-bending book under the bed, too, written before I “knew better.” 🙂 My mind often floats back to that world, the First Love of my heart, and I can only bring myself to depart upon vowing that, someday, I will make it fit into some Publisher’s idea of publishable.
    Which leads to my question… “What do you think; (based upon your experience with agents and/or publishers’ acceptance/rejection) the right blend/bend is for now? Have you noticed a shift in the last years, or do you see one sitting on the horizon? (Sorry, that was two questions, wasn’t it? :-)) Oh no! that makes three… better go.
    Thank you, Dave, for your time. I am looking forward to picking up one of your books.
    Nina, a diehard fan of Young Blades.

    Reply
  53. Hi Dave!
    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Word Wenches! Nina, here.
    I love genre-bending books. Straight anything is, well, just boring, IMHO. My life is a jaunty mix of fantasy, romance and freak show, so why should my books be too?
    Like other wenchlings posting today, I have a genre-bending book under the bed, too, written before I “knew better.” 🙂 My mind often floats back to that world, the First Love of my heart, and I can only bring myself to depart upon vowing that, someday, I will make it fit into some Publisher’s idea of publishable.
    Which leads to my question… “What do you think; (based upon your experience with agents and/or publishers’ acceptance/rejection) the right blend/bend is for now? Have you noticed a shift in the last years, or do you see one sitting on the horizon? (Sorry, that was two questions, wasn’t it? :-)) Oh no! that makes three… better go.
    Thank you, Dave, for your time. I am looking forward to picking up one of your books.
    Nina, a diehard fan of Young Blades.

    Reply
  54. Hi Dave!
    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Word Wenches! Nina, here.
    I love genre-bending books. Straight anything is, well, just boring, IMHO. My life is a jaunty mix of fantasy, romance and freak show, so why should my books be too?
    Like other wenchlings posting today, I have a genre-bending book under the bed, too, written before I “knew better.” 🙂 My mind often floats back to that world, the First Love of my heart, and I can only bring myself to depart upon vowing that, someday, I will make it fit into some Publisher’s idea of publishable.
    Which leads to my question… “What do you think; (based upon your experience with agents and/or publishers’ acceptance/rejection) the right blend/bend is for now? Have you noticed a shift in the last years, or do you see one sitting on the horizon? (Sorry, that was two questions, wasn’t it? :-)) Oh no! that makes three… better go.
    Thank you, Dave, for your time. I am looking forward to picking up one of your books.
    Nina, a diehard fan of Young Blades.

    Reply
  55. Hi Dave!
    Welcome to the Wonderful World of Word Wenches! Nina, here.
    I love genre-bending books. Straight anything is, well, just boring, IMHO. My life is a jaunty mix of fantasy, romance and freak show, so why should my books be too?
    Like other wenchlings posting today, I have a genre-bending book under the bed, too, written before I “knew better.” 🙂 My mind often floats back to that world, the First Love of my heart, and I can only bring myself to depart upon vowing that, someday, I will make it fit into some Publisher’s idea of publishable.
    Which leads to my question… “What do you think; (based upon your experience with agents and/or publishers’ acceptance/rejection) the right blend/bend is for now? Have you noticed a shift in the last years, or do you see one sitting on the horizon? (Sorry, that was two questions, wasn’t it? :-)) Oh no! that makes three… better go.
    Thank you, Dave, for your time. I am looking forward to picking up one of your books.
    Nina, a diehard fan of Young Blades.

    Reply
  56. Hi Dave,
    Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! I just finished The Alchemist’s Apprentice and thoroughly enjoyed it! I agree with Jo the relationship between Alfeo and Violetta is so well done. I also loved the way you created the ambiance of 16th century Venice.
    I have to admit that I don’t usually pick up sci-fi and fantasy books, but as we are talking about genre-blending, you your books really worked for me, a historical fan. I’m really looking forward to reading more of Alfeo’s adventures.
    Thanks again for penning such great stories, and for sharing your thoughts with us.

    Reply
  57. Hi Dave,
    Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! I just finished The Alchemist’s Apprentice and thoroughly enjoyed it! I agree with Jo the relationship between Alfeo and Violetta is so well done. I also loved the way you created the ambiance of 16th century Venice.
    I have to admit that I don’t usually pick up sci-fi and fantasy books, but as we are talking about genre-blending, you your books really worked for me, a historical fan. I’m really looking forward to reading more of Alfeo’s adventures.
    Thanks again for penning such great stories, and for sharing your thoughts with us.

    Reply
  58. Hi Dave,
    Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! I just finished The Alchemist’s Apprentice and thoroughly enjoyed it! I agree with Jo the relationship between Alfeo and Violetta is so well done. I also loved the way you created the ambiance of 16th century Venice.
    I have to admit that I don’t usually pick up sci-fi and fantasy books, but as we are talking about genre-blending, you your books really worked for me, a historical fan. I’m really looking forward to reading more of Alfeo’s adventures.
    Thanks again for penning such great stories, and for sharing your thoughts with us.

    Reply
  59. Hi Dave,
    Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! I just finished The Alchemist’s Apprentice and thoroughly enjoyed it! I agree with Jo the relationship between Alfeo and Violetta is so well done. I also loved the way you created the ambiance of 16th century Venice.
    I have to admit that I don’t usually pick up sci-fi and fantasy books, but as we are talking about genre-blending, you your books really worked for me, a historical fan. I’m really looking forward to reading more of Alfeo’s adventures.
    Thanks again for penning such great stories, and for sharing your thoughts with us.

    Reply
  60. Hi Dave,
    Thanks so much for visiting the Wenches! I just finished The Alchemist’s Apprentice and thoroughly enjoyed it! I agree with Jo the relationship between Alfeo and Violetta is so well done. I also loved the way you created the ambiance of 16th century Venice.
    I have to admit that I don’t usually pick up sci-fi and fantasy books, but as we are talking about genre-blending, you your books really worked for me, a historical fan. I’m really looking forward to reading more of Alfeo’s adventures.
    Thanks again for penning such great stories, and for sharing your thoughts with us.

    Reply
  61. I normally don’t read fantasy although I do read historical fiction.
    But I do love Venice and its history and have been there half a dozen times, a couple times in the company of a Venetian who took me places a tourist normally would not go.
    So I will be very happy to read this series and maybe I will become a convert to historical fantasy, or at least to Dave Duncan.
    Thanks for introducing me to him Jo.

    Reply
  62. I normally don’t read fantasy although I do read historical fiction.
    But I do love Venice and its history and have been there half a dozen times, a couple times in the company of a Venetian who took me places a tourist normally would not go.
    So I will be very happy to read this series and maybe I will become a convert to historical fantasy, or at least to Dave Duncan.
    Thanks for introducing me to him Jo.

    Reply
  63. I normally don’t read fantasy although I do read historical fiction.
    But I do love Venice and its history and have been there half a dozen times, a couple times in the company of a Venetian who took me places a tourist normally would not go.
    So I will be very happy to read this series and maybe I will become a convert to historical fantasy, or at least to Dave Duncan.
    Thanks for introducing me to him Jo.

    Reply
  64. I normally don’t read fantasy although I do read historical fiction.
    But I do love Venice and its history and have been there half a dozen times, a couple times in the company of a Venetian who took me places a tourist normally would not go.
    So I will be very happy to read this series and maybe I will become a convert to historical fantasy, or at least to Dave Duncan.
    Thanks for introducing me to him Jo.

    Reply
  65. I normally don’t read fantasy although I do read historical fiction.
    But I do love Venice and its history and have been there half a dozen times, a couple times in the company of a Venetian who took me places a tourist normally would not go.
    So I will be very happy to read this series and maybe I will become a convert to historical fantasy, or at least to Dave Duncan.
    Thanks for introducing me to him Jo.

    Reply
  66. As for Nina’s question I am the worst person to ask what works just now. Living on Vancouver Island (just down the road from Jo, by the way) I feel a million miles away from NY, and I don’t get to conventions the way I used to. I write what I feel like writing and just hope it gets published. And it (almost) always does! In my experience, books that got bounced have turned out to be my best successes, so never give up.
    Dave

    Reply
  67. As for Nina’s question I am the worst person to ask what works just now. Living on Vancouver Island (just down the road from Jo, by the way) I feel a million miles away from NY, and I don’t get to conventions the way I used to. I write what I feel like writing and just hope it gets published. And it (almost) always does! In my experience, books that got bounced have turned out to be my best successes, so never give up.
    Dave

    Reply
  68. As for Nina’s question I am the worst person to ask what works just now. Living on Vancouver Island (just down the road from Jo, by the way) I feel a million miles away from NY, and I don’t get to conventions the way I used to. I write what I feel like writing and just hope it gets published. And it (almost) always does! In my experience, books that got bounced have turned out to be my best successes, so never give up.
    Dave

    Reply
  69. As for Nina’s question I am the worst person to ask what works just now. Living on Vancouver Island (just down the road from Jo, by the way) I feel a million miles away from NY, and I don’t get to conventions the way I used to. I write what I feel like writing and just hope it gets published. And it (almost) always does! In my experience, books that got bounced have turned out to be my best successes, so never give up.
    Dave

    Reply
  70. As for Nina’s question I am the worst person to ask what works just now. Living on Vancouver Island (just down the road from Jo, by the way) I feel a million miles away from NY, and I don’t get to conventions the way I used to. I write what I feel like writing and just hope it gets published. And it (almost) always does! In my experience, books that got bounced have turned out to be my best successes, so never give up.
    Dave

    Reply
  71. I like a combination of SF, Historical, and a little paranormal added. Gives a bit of added “sparkle” to reading.
    Dave, now I’ll have to find your books and add to the TBR pile.

    Reply
  72. I like a combination of SF, Historical, and a little paranormal added. Gives a bit of added “sparkle” to reading.
    Dave, now I’ll have to find your books and add to the TBR pile.

    Reply
  73. I like a combination of SF, Historical, and a little paranormal added. Gives a bit of added “sparkle” to reading.
    Dave, now I’ll have to find your books and add to the TBR pile.

    Reply
  74. I like a combination of SF, Historical, and a little paranormal added. Gives a bit of added “sparkle” to reading.
    Dave, now I’ll have to find your books and add to the TBR pile.

    Reply
  75. I like a combination of SF, Historical, and a little paranormal added. Gives a bit of added “sparkle” to reading.
    Dave, now I’ll have to find your books and add to the TBR pile.

    Reply
  76. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Jo and Dave. I haven’t read Dave yet, but I’m certainly intrigued enough to order The Alchemist’s Apprentice.
    I enjoy genre combinations that are done well, and as long as my favorite characters don’t get eaten or skewered, I’m happy 😉

    Reply
  77. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Jo and Dave. I haven’t read Dave yet, but I’m certainly intrigued enough to order The Alchemist’s Apprentice.
    I enjoy genre combinations that are done well, and as long as my favorite characters don’t get eaten or skewered, I’m happy 😉

    Reply
  78. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Jo and Dave. I haven’t read Dave yet, but I’m certainly intrigued enough to order The Alchemist’s Apprentice.
    I enjoy genre combinations that are done well, and as long as my favorite characters don’t get eaten or skewered, I’m happy 😉

    Reply
  79. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Jo and Dave. I haven’t read Dave yet, but I’m certainly intrigued enough to order The Alchemist’s Apprentice.
    I enjoy genre combinations that are done well, and as long as my favorite characters don’t get eaten or skewered, I’m happy 😉

    Reply
  80. I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Jo and Dave. I haven’t read Dave yet, but I’m certainly intrigued enough to order The Alchemist’s Apprentice.
    I enjoy genre combinations that are done well, and as long as my favorite characters don’t get eaten or skewered, I’m happy 😉

    Reply
  81. All three books are independent, so it matters not in what order you read them. The last one (Pursuit)is my favorite, but it is only available in trade size just now, so it costs a little more.
    Dave

    Reply
  82. All three books are independent, so it matters not in what order you read them. The last one (Pursuit)is my favorite, but it is only available in trade size just now, so it costs a little more.
    Dave

    Reply
  83. All three books are independent, so it matters not in what order you read them. The last one (Pursuit)is my favorite, but it is only available in trade size just now, so it costs a little more.
    Dave

    Reply
  84. All three books are independent, so it matters not in what order you read them. The last one (Pursuit)is my favorite, but it is only available in trade size just now, so it costs a little more.
    Dave

    Reply
  85. All three books are independent, so it matters not in what order you read them. The last one (Pursuit)is my favorite, but it is only available in trade size just now, so it costs a little more.
    Dave

    Reply
  86. Greetings Dave,
    I’ve two teenage sons son who thrive on blended genre fiction. Dragons within a historical context? Give them the Naomi Novik Temeraire series. Satire within the macabre? Neil Gaiman’s short stories satisfy. Humour and fantasy? Terry Pratchett please. Russian action fantasy horror? I swear it exists – try Sergei Lukyanenko.
    As a mum I feel it my duty to interfere and I try to broaden the reading base but seriously, I think their base is plenty broad enough. I’ve this theory that when it comes to acceptance of genre blended fiction my boys are way ahead of me. The divisions that publishers so love just don’t seem to exist.

    Reply
  87. Greetings Dave,
    I’ve two teenage sons son who thrive on blended genre fiction. Dragons within a historical context? Give them the Naomi Novik Temeraire series. Satire within the macabre? Neil Gaiman’s short stories satisfy. Humour and fantasy? Terry Pratchett please. Russian action fantasy horror? I swear it exists – try Sergei Lukyanenko.
    As a mum I feel it my duty to interfere and I try to broaden the reading base but seriously, I think their base is plenty broad enough. I’ve this theory that when it comes to acceptance of genre blended fiction my boys are way ahead of me. The divisions that publishers so love just don’t seem to exist.

    Reply
  88. Greetings Dave,
    I’ve two teenage sons son who thrive on blended genre fiction. Dragons within a historical context? Give them the Naomi Novik Temeraire series. Satire within the macabre? Neil Gaiman’s short stories satisfy. Humour and fantasy? Terry Pratchett please. Russian action fantasy horror? I swear it exists – try Sergei Lukyanenko.
    As a mum I feel it my duty to interfere and I try to broaden the reading base but seriously, I think their base is plenty broad enough. I’ve this theory that when it comes to acceptance of genre blended fiction my boys are way ahead of me. The divisions that publishers so love just don’t seem to exist.

    Reply
  89. Greetings Dave,
    I’ve two teenage sons son who thrive on blended genre fiction. Dragons within a historical context? Give them the Naomi Novik Temeraire series. Satire within the macabre? Neil Gaiman’s short stories satisfy. Humour and fantasy? Terry Pratchett please. Russian action fantasy horror? I swear it exists – try Sergei Lukyanenko.
    As a mum I feel it my duty to interfere and I try to broaden the reading base but seriously, I think their base is plenty broad enough. I’ve this theory that when it comes to acceptance of genre blended fiction my boys are way ahead of me. The divisions that publishers so love just don’t seem to exist.

    Reply
  90. Greetings Dave,
    I’ve two teenage sons son who thrive on blended genre fiction. Dragons within a historical context? Give them the Naomi Novik Temeraire series. Satire within the macabre? Neil Gaiman’s short stories satisfy. Humour and fantasy? Terry Pratchett please. Russian action fantasy horror? I swear it exists – try Sergei Lukyanenko.
    As a mum I feel it my duty to interfere and I try to broaden the reading base but seriously, I think their base is plenty broad enough. I’ve this theory that when it comes to acceptance of genre blended fiction my boys are way ahead of me. The divisions that publishers so love just don’t seem to exist.

    Reply
  91. Kelly:
    I agree, BUT nobody says you can’t browse around the whole store, and most people want to know roughly what they’re going to get. So publishers’ genres are a sort of rough sort. I picked up a hard copy war history in a 2-hand store the other day and when I looked closer, it was a novel. I was furious!
    Dave

    Reply
  92. Kelly:
    I agree, BUT nobody says you can’t browse around the whole store, and most people want to know roughly what they’re going to get. So publishers’ genres are a sort of rough sort. I picked up a hard copy war history in a 2-hand store the other day and when I looked closer, it was a novel. I was furious!
    Dave

    Reply
  93. Kelly:
    I agree, BUT nobody says you can’t browse around the whole store, and most people want to know roughly what they’re going to get. So publishers’ genres are a sort of rough sort. I picked up a hard copy war history in a 2-hand store the other day and when I looked closer, it was a novel. I was furious!
    Dave

    Reply
  94. Kelly:
    I agree, BUT nobody says you can’t browse around the whole store, and most people want to know roughly what they’re going to get. So publishers’ genres are a sort of rough sort. I picked up a hard copy war history in a 2-hand store the other day and when I looked closer, it was a novel. I was furious!
    Dave

    Reply
  95. Kelly:
    I agree, BUT nobody says you can’t browse around the whole store, and most people want to know roughly what they’re going to get. So publishers’ genres are a sort of rough sort. I picked up a hard copy war history in a 2-hand store the other day and when I looked closer, it was a novel. I was furious!
    Dave

    Reply
  96. I love genre blending simply because I enjoy many different genres of fiction.
    It works when neither genre seems “tacked on” as an afterthought and it blends well to advance the story.

    Reply
  97. I love genre blending simply because I enjoy many different genres of fiction.
    It works when neither genre seems “tacked on” as an afterthought and it blends well to advance the story.

    Reply
  98. I love genre blending simply because I enjoy many different genres of fiction.
    It works when neither genre seems “tacked on” as an afterthought and it blends well to advance the story.

    Reply
  99. I love genre blending simply because I enjoy many different genres of fiction.
    It works when neither genre seems “tacked on” as an afterthought and it blends well to advance the story.

    Reply
  100. I love genre blending simply because I enjoy many different genres of fiction.
    It works when neither genre seems “tacked on” as an afterthought and it blends well to advance the story.

    Reply
  101. I don’t read genre as such.
    I read books that have an interesting story and are well written across all genres, so what critics say the genre of a book is, is of little consequence to me.
    My bookshelf is full of Fantasy, Sc-FI, Crime, Thriller, Historical, romance etc. Cross-genre by all means, if it is a good read then it is a good read.

    Reply
  102. I don’t read genre as such.
    I read books that have an interesting story and are well written across all genres, so what critics say the genre of a book is, is of little consequence to me.
    My bookshelf is full of Fantasy, Sc-FI, Crime, Thriller, Historical, romance etc. Cross-genre by all means, if it is a good read then it is a good read.

    Reply
  103. I don’t read genre as such.
    I read books that have an interesting story and are well written across all genres, so what critics say the genre of a book is, is of little consequence to me.
    My bookshelf is full of Fantasy, Sc-FI, Crime, Thriller, Historical, romance etc. Cross-genre by all means, if it is a good read then it is a good read.

    Reply
  104. I don’t read genre as such.
    I read books that have an interesting story and are well written across all genres, so what critics say the genre of a book is, is of little consequence to me.
    My bookshelf is full of Fantasy, Sc-FI, Crime, Thriller, Historical, romance etc. Cross-genre by all means, if it is a good read then it is a good read.

    Reply
  105. I don’t read genre as such.
    I read books that have an interesting story and are well written across all genres, so what critics say the genre of a book is, is of little consequence to me.
    My bookshelf is full of Fantasy, Sc-FI, Crime, Thriller, Historical, romance etc. Cross-genre by all means, if it is a good read then it is a good read.

    Reply
  106. Thanks everyone for your interesting comments. Prize selection shall begin and the winners will be announced on Sunday. So watch the Wenches!
    Dave, thank you so much for being a guest here. We have a tradition of giving our guests gifts without a care for cost or mundane reality. So, being sure that a pied a terre in Venice would suit, I have acquired for you not just an apartment in the Palazzo Mocenigo Casa Vecchia on the Grand Canal, but the entire place.
    http://www.venice-estates.com/prestige/va195/index.html
    Everyone, do have a look because this real estate listing has pictures of the rooms and it’s probably a good idea of the sort of houses Dave shows us in his books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  107. Thanks everyone for your interesting comments. Prize selection shall begin and the winners will be announced on Sunday. So watch the Wenches!
    Dave, thank you so much for being a guest here. We have a tradition of giving our guests gifts without a care for cost or mundane reality. So, being sure that a pied a terre in Venice would suit, I have acquired for you not just an apartment in the Palazzo Mocenigo Casa Vecchia on the Grand Canal, but the entire place.
    http://www.venice-estates.com/prestige/va195/index.html
    Everyone, do have a look because this real estate listing has pictures of the rooms and it’s probably a good idea of the sort of houses Dave shows us in his books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  108. Thanks everyone for your interesting comments. Prize selection shall begin and the winners will be announced on Sunday. So watch the Wenches!
    Dave, thank you so much for being a guest here. We have a tradition of giving our guests gifts without a care for cost or mundane reality. So, being sure that a pied a terre in Venice would suit, I have acquired for you not just an apartment in the Palazzo Mocenigo Casa Vecchia on the Grand Canal, but the entire place.
    http://www.venice-estates.com/prestige/va195/index.html
    Everyone, do have a look because this real estate listing has pictures of the rooms and it’s probably a good idea of the sort of houses Dave shows us in his books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  109. Thanks everyone for your interesting comments. Prize selection shall begin and the winners will be announced on Sunday. So watch the Wenches!
    Dave, thank you so much for being a guest here. We have a tradition of giving our guests gifts without a care for cost or mundane reality. So, being sure that a pied a terre in Venice would suit, I have acquired for you not just an apartment in the Palazzo Mocenigo Casa Vecchia on the Grand Canal, but the entire place.
    http://www.venice-estates.com/prestige/va195/index.html
    Everyone, do have a look because this real estate listing has pictures of the rooms and it’s probably a good idea of the sort of houses Dave shows us in his books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  110. Thanks everyone for your interesting comments. Prize selection shall begin and the winners will be announced on Sunday. So watch the Wenches!
    Dave, thank you so much for being a guest here. We have a tradition of giving our guests gifts without a care for cost or mundane reality. So, being sure that a pied a terre in Venice would suit, I have acquired for you not just an apartment in the Palazzo Mocenigo Casa Vecchia on the Grand Canal, but the entire place.
    http://www.venice-estates.com/prestige/va195/index.html
    Everyone, do have a look because this real estate listing has pictures of the rooms and it’s probably a good idea of the sort of houses Dave shows us in his books.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  111. Well, what a delightful surprise! Thanks you all for having me as a guest and giving me such a wonderful gift. I do hope you all buy lots of my books, because I have a feeling that the restoration work and future upkeep are going to be pricey.
    Happy reading!
    Dave

    Reply
  112. Well, what a delightful surprise! Thanks you all for having me as a guest and giving me such a wonderful gift. I do hope you all buy lots of my books, because I have a feeling that the restoration work and future upkeep are going to be pricey.
    Happy reading!
    Dave

    Reply
  113. Well, what a delightful surprise! Thanks you all for having me as a guest and giving me such a wonderful gift. I do hope you all buy lots of my books, because I have a feeling that the restoration work and future upkeep are going to be pricey.
    Happy reading!
    Dave

    Reply
  114. Well, what a delightful surprise! Thanks you all for having me as a guest and giving me such a wonderful gift. I do hope you all buy lots of my books, because I have a feeling that the restoration work and future upkeep are going to be pricey.
    Happy reading!
    Dave

    Reply
  115. Well, what a delightful surprise! Thanks you all for having me as a guest and giving me such a wonderful gift. I do hope you all buy lots of my books, because I have a feeling that the restoration work and future upkeep are going to be pricey.
    Happy reading!
    Dave

    Reply
  116. Hi Dave
    I enjoyed the interview and looked at your website. The books sound great!
    I never thought about what makes genre-blending fiction work or not before. When they work they are wonderful. Maybe it’s how well blended it is. I have gotten to a part, in a book, that just doesn’t seem to fit in the story. It distracts me.

    Reply
  117. Hi Dave
    I enjoyed the interview and looked at your website. The books sound great!
    I never thought about what makes genre-blending fiction work or not before. When they work they are wonderful. Maybe it’s how well blended it is. I have gotten to a part, in a book, that just doesn’t seem to fit in the story. It distracts me.

    Reply
  118. Hi Dave
    I enjoyed the interview and looked at your website. The books sound great!
    I never thought about what makes genre-blending fiction work or not before. When they work they are wonderful. Maybe it’s how well blended it is. I have gotten to a part, in a book, that just doesn’t seem to fit in the story. It distracts me.

    Reply
  119. Hi Dave
    I enjoyed the interview and looked at your website. The books sound great!
    I never thought about what makes genre-blending fiction work or not before. When they work they are wonderful. Maybe it’s how well blended it is. I have gotten to a part, in a book, that just doesn’t seem to fit in the story. It distracts me.

    Reply
  120. Hi Dave
    I enjoyed the interview and looked at your website. The books sound great!
    I never thought about what makes genre-blending fiction work or not before. When they work they are wonderful. Maybe it’s how well blended it is. I have gotten to a part, in a book, that just doesn’t seem to fit in the story. It distracts me.

    Reply
  121. Having a young (imitation)sword-wielding man in the house myself, I’m interested in a series that would be of interest to same. My 12 y.o. recently for the first time EVER accepted and liked my recommendation (‘Ninjas, Piranhas, and Galileo’) so I’m looking all over for further books to tempt him with. This sounds like just the ticket.
    Q: what words would the author recommend to lure a young reader who is usually by star wars type ‘sword’ fights to fantasy sword fights?

    Reply
  122. Having a young (imitation)sword-wielding man in the house myself, I’m interested in a series that would be of interest to same. My 12 y.o. recently for the first time EVER accepted and liked my recommendation (‘Ninjas, Piranhas, and Galileo’) so I’m looking all over for further books to tempt him with. This sounds like just the ticket.
    Q: what words would the author recommend to lure a young reader who is usually by star wars type ‘sword’ fights to fantasy sword fights?

    Reply
  123. Having a young (imitation)sword-wielding man in the house myself, I’m interested in a series that would be of interest to same. My 12 y.o. recently for the first time EVER accepted and liked my recommendation (‘Ninjas, Piranhas, and Galileo’) so I’m looking all over for further books to tempt him with. This sounds like just the ticket.
    Q: what words would the author recommend to lure a young reader who is usually by star wars type ‘sword’ fights to fantasy sword fights?

    Reply
  124. Having a young (imitation)sword-wielding man in the house myself, I’m interested in a series that would be of interest to same. My 12 y.o. recently for the first time EVER accepted and liked my recommendation (‘Ninjas, Piranhas, and Galileo’) so I’m looking all over for further books to tempt him with. This sounds like just the ticket.
    Q: what words would the author recommend to lure a young reader who is usually by star wars type ‘sword’ fights to fantasy sword fights?

    Reply
  125. Having a young (imitation)sword-wielding man in the house myself, I’m interested in a series that would be of interest to same. My 12 y.o. recently for the first time EVER accepted and liked my recommendation (‘Ninjas, Piranhas, and Galileo’) so I’m looking all over for further books to tempt him with. This sounds like just the ticket.
    Q: what words would the author recommend to lure a young reader who is usually by star wars type ‘sword’ fights to fantasy sword fights?

    Reply
  126. I would keep Alfeo on a high shelf if I had a 12 yo around. I wrote a YA series a few years ago, “The King’s Daggers”, as a spin-off from my adult series, “The King’s Blades”. They would do, but they’re very hard to find now. The first one was called “Sir Stalwart” and you can find it on USED.ADDALL.com My reading grandson liked them at that age. (I have 2 other g’sons who picked up some bad genes from somewhere and aren’t readers.)
    Thanks for asking
    Dave

    Reply
  127. I would keep Alfeo on a high shelf if I had a 12 yo around. I wrote a YA series a few years ago, “The King’s Daggers”, as a spin-off from my adult series, “The King’s Blades”. They would do, but they’re very hard to find now. The first one was called “Sir Stalwart” and you can find it on USED.ADDALL.com My reading grandson liked them at that age. (I have 2 other g’sons who picked up some bad genes from somewhere and aren’t readers.)
    Thanks for asking
    Dave

    Reply
  128. I would keep Alfeo on a high shelf if I had a 12 yo around. I wrote a YA series a few years ago, “The King’s Daggers”, as a spin-off from my adult series, “The King’s Blades”. They would do, but they’re very hard to find now. The first one was called “Sir Stalwart” and you can find it on USED.ADDALL.com My reading grandson liked them at that age. (I have 2 other g’sons who picked up some bad genes from somewhere and aren’t readers.)
    Thanks for asking
    Dave

    Reply
  129. I would keep Alfeo on a high shelf if I had a 12 yo around. I wrote a YA series a few years ago, “The King’s Daggers”, as a spin-off from my adult series, “The King’s Blades”. They would do, but they’re very hard to find now. The first one was called “Sir Stalwart” and you can find it on USED.ADDALL.com My reading grandson liked them at that age. (I have 2 other g’sons who picked up some bad genes from somewhere and aren’t readers.)
    Thanks for asking
    Dave

    Reply
  130. I would keep Alfeo on a high shelf if I had a 12 yo around. I wrote a YA series a few years ago, “The King’s Daggers”, as a spin-off from my adult series, “The King’s Blades”. They would do, but they’re very hard to find now. The first one was called “Sir Stalwart” and you can find it on USED.ADDALL.com My reading grandson liked them at that age. (I have 2 other g’sons who picked up some bad genes from somewhere and aren’t readers.)
    Thanks for asking
    Dave

    Reply
  131. How are you. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
    I am from Sao and know bad English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Imitrex is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that fights pain by making the.”
    Thank 😎 Eitan.

    Reply
  132. How are you. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
    I am from Sao and know bad English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Imitrex is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that fights pain by making the.”
    Thank 😎 Eitan.

    Reply
  133. How are you. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
    I am from Sao and know bad English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Imitrex is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that fights pain by making the.”
    Thank 😎 Eitan.

    Reply
  134. How are you. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
    I am from Sao and know bad English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Imitrex is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that fights pain by making the.”
    Thank 😎 Eitan.

    Reply
  135. How are you. Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.
    I am from Sao and know bad English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Imitrex is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that fights pain by making the.”
    Thank 😎 Eitan.

    Reply
  136. Good morning. It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.
    I am from Bahamas and , too, and now am writing in English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Terbinafine, the generic version, is now available through wal mart.”
    Thanks for the help 8), Enola.

    Reply
  137. Good morning. It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.
    I am from Bahamas and , too, and now am writing in English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Terbinafine, the generic version, is now available through wal mart.”
    Thanks for the help 8), Enola.

    Reply
  138. Good morning. It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.
    I am from Bahamas and , too, and now am writing in English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Terbinafine, the generic version, is now available through wal mart.”
    Thanks for the help 8), Enola.

    Reply
  139. Good morning. It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.
    I am from Bahamas and , too, and now am writing in English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Terbinafine, the generic version, is now available through wal mart.”
    Thanks for the help 8), Enola.

    Reply
  140. Good morning. It is easier to exclude harmful passions than to rule them, and to deny them admittance than to control them after they have been admitted.
    I am from Bahamas and , too, and now am writing in English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Terbinafine, the generic version, is now available through wal mart.”
    Thanks for the help 8), Enola.

    Reply
  141. Hi guys. Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience. Help me! Can not find sites on the: Auto dealers thailand dodge. I found only this – indiana dodge dealer. Ford dealers ankeny dodge dealers ankeny jeep dealers ankeny ford dealers iowa dodge dealers iowa jeep dealers iowa ford I twurled news beta. Dodge avenger driver falls short of winning first canadian nascar race by anthony fontanelledodge avenger driver mark dilley failed in his bid to win the first nascar race in canada at the dodge dealers. Thank you very much :mad:. Ringo from Panama.

    Reply
  142. Hi guys. Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience. Help me! Can not find sites on the: Auto dealers thailand dodge. I found only this – indiana dodge dealer. Ford dealers ankeny dodge dealers ankeny jeep dealers ankeny ford dealers iowa dodge dealers iowa jeep dealers iowa ford I twurled news beta. Dodge avenger driver falls short of winning first canadian nascar race by anthony fontanelledodge avenger driver mark dilley failed in his bid to win the first nascar race in canada at the dodge dealers. Thank you very much :mad:. Ringo from Panama.

    Reply
  143. Hi guys. Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience. Help me! Can not find sites on the: Auto dealers thailand dodge. I found only this – indiana dodge dealer. Ford dealers ankeny dodge dealers ankeny jeep dealers ankeny ford dealers iowa dodge dealers iowa jeep dealers iowa ford I twurled news beta. Dodge avenger driver falls short of winning first canadian nascar race by anthony fontanelledodge avenger driver mark dilley failed in his bid to win the first nascar race in canada at the dodge dealers. Thank you very much :mad:. Ringo from Panama.

    Reply
  144. Hi guys. Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience. Help me! Can not find sites on the: Auto dealers thailand dodge. I found only this – indiana dodge dealer. Ford dealers ankeny dodge dealers ankeny jeep dealers ankeny ford dealers iowa dodge dealers iowa jeep dealers iowa ford I twurled news beta. Dodge avenger driver falls short of winning first canadian nascar race by anthony fontanelledodge avenger driver mark dilley failed in his bid to win the first nascar race in canada at the dodge dealers. Thank you very much :mad:. Ringo from Panama.

    Reply
  145. Hi guys. Talking with you is sort of the conversational equivalent of an out of body experience. Help me! Can not find sites on the: Auto dealers thailand dodge. I found only this – indiana dodge dealer. Ford dealers ankeny dodge dealers ankeny jeep dealers ankeny ford dealers iowa dodge dealers iowa jeep dealers iowa ford I twurled news beta. Dodge avenger driver falls short of winning first canadian nascar race by anthony fontanelledodge avenger driver mark dilley failed in his bid to win the first nascar race in canada at the dodge dealers. Thank you very much :mad:. Ringo from Panama.

    Reply
  146. I have just found your website great.
    I am from Colombia and learning to write in English, give please true I wrote the following sentence: “Some activities pay this again.”
    Thanks :o. Luna.

    Reply
  147. I have just found your website great.
    I am from Colombia and learning to write in English, give please true I wrote the following sentence: “Some activities pay this again.”
    Thanks :o. Luna.

    Reply
  148. I have just found your website great.
    I am from Colombia and learning to write in English, give please true I wrote the following sentence: “Some activities pay this again.”
    Thanks :o. Luna.

    Reply
  149. I have just found your website great.
    I am from Colombia and learning to write in English, give please true I wrote the following sentence: “Some activities pay this again.”
    Thanks :o. Luna.

    Reply
  150. I have just found your website great.
    I am from Colombia and learning to write in English, give please true I wrote the following sentence: “Some activities pay this again.”
    Thanks :o. Luna.

    Reply
  151. Hello. Howard Hughes was able to afford the luxury of madness, like a man who not only thinks he is Napoleon but hires an army to prove it.
    I am from Kiribati and also am speaking English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Over the short, jordanians and multiple shares can be compiled or owned by any bank of secondary inflation commodities, managing the public event stock new to trade.”
    Thanks for the help :-(, Ava.

    Reply
  152. Hello. Howard Hughes was able to afford the luxury of madness, like a man who not only thinks he is Napoleon but hires an army to prove it.
    I am from Kiribati and also am speaking English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Over the short, jordanians and multiple shares can be compiled or owned by any bank of secondary inflation commodities, managing the public event stock new to trade.”
    Thanks for the help :-(, Ava.

    Reply
  153. Hello. Howard Hughes was able to afford the luxury of madness, like a man who not only thinks he is Napoleon but hires an army to prove it.
    I am from Kiribati and also am speaking English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Over the short, jordanians and multiple shares can be compiled or owned by any bank of secondary inflation commodities, managing the public event stock new to trade.”
    Thanks for the help :-(, Ava.

    Reply
  154. Hello. Howard Hughes was able to afford the luxury of madness, like a man who not only thinks he is Napoleon but hires an army to prove it.
    I am from Kiribati and also am speaking English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Over the short, jordanians and multiple shares can be compiled or owned by any bank of secondary inflation commodities, managing the public event stock new to trade.”
    Thanks for the help :-(, Ava.

    Reply
  155. Hello. Howard Hughes was able to afford the luxury of madness, like a man who not only thinks he is Napoleon but hires an army to prove it.
    I am from Kiribati and also am speaking English, give true I wrote the following sentence: “Over the short, jordanians and multiple shares can be compiled or owned by any bank of secondary inflation commodities, managing the public event stock new to trade.”
    Thanks for the help :-(, Ava.

    Reply

Leave a Comment