Welcome Eileen Dreyer!

Librariangraphic Pat here, playing librarian and introducing you to Eileen Dreyer, author of Barely a Lady, the first book in the Drake's Rakes Regency series. Eileen is a New York Times and USA Today Bestseller with 36 books in romance, suspense and paranormal written as Eileen Dreyer and
Kathleen Korbel. She was the


4th member inducted into the RWA Hall of Fame, so she's been winning the hearts of readers since the beginning of her career.
Eileen always has a lot of fun things to say, so let's dive right in–

How did you start writing?  Were you making up stories in kindergarten with a pencil clutched in one chubby fist, or did you come to the trade later? 

I can actually remember the exact day I started writing. I was ten, and I had just found out that not only
EileenDreyer had I read every Nancy Drew book in the library, but that there wouldn't be another one out for a year. I was devastated. What would I do without Nancy? (my mother wanted me to read Dickens. I was not enthusiastic). And then, the light literally went on. "Wait," I thought, just as millennia of writers did before me. "I can write my own book. And I can make it turn out the way I want." So I did. By seventh grade I figured out that if I wrote adventure stories about my friends and famous people(the Beatles), I would always have somebody looking for me in the morning.

 
2.  How did you become interested in writing Regency?

Actually, I came at it via Richard Sharpe.  Years ago I stumbled over the Sharpe series about the
Sharpe Peninsular Wars and was hooked on the period. (I know. Not the traditional route to Regency. I didn't read Heyer til I was 35. But it's important to remember that I was raised in a house with seven men. I can tell you every movie John Wayne died in. I had no idea who Shirley Temple was until she was delegate to the UN.) (Pat note–another wordwench gratuitous photo of Sean Bean as Sharpe!)


  I found it to be a fascinating era. The world was in turmoil, balanced on the edge of the industrial revolution, at war, but still with very definite rules and social mores to define society. There was frivolity, but there was also wit and passion and sacrifice. And they bathed. Very important to me in a romance. I've been wanting to write a book in the period since, but haven't had the chance til now.

3.  What was your first book, and how well do you think it characterizes your latest work? 

 
KorbelMy first book was a Silhouette Desire entitled Playing the Game that I wrote as Kathleen Korbel. I believe that the main thing that characterizes both that and my latest work is the strong heroine. She's in a different time period and facing different challenges, but she meets them head-on. She's the person I hope I would be in that situation.  And it has a hero I think worthy of my heroine, who doesn't just love her(madly), but respects her.

4.  What was the biggest mistake you made when you first began writing?

 Oh, I made them all. The two that are probably most common were beginning my book three chapters before it really began(I know you've heard it. "This book really starts at the beginning of chapter three, or four. The rest is backstory). I rewrote the opening of the first manuscript I attempted twelve times, until I'd whittled away all that excess exposition, and the book started with the action. The second mistake was that I didn't research enough about publishing before sending my stuff out there. I sent my proposals to the wrong houses, the wrong editors and in the wrong form. There was no RWA near me when I started, and so I was winging it on my own. It didn't take too many terse rejection letters to figure it out.
 

5.  Which of your characters is your favorite, and why?

  Oh, lord. There have been so many, and I can't even remember all their names. But I tend to love the characters in my most recent works the best, simply because they're fresh and alive, having just
Eileen's cover stepped out onto the page. And while I love Olivia, who I think is one of my most complex heroines, in fact, I just finished the second book in the trilogy, NEVER A GENTLEMAN, about Olivia's friend Grace Fairchild, and right now Grace is my favorite. She is a plain woman. Not the typical romance 'she is transformed into a beauty by a new hairstyle and dress' plain. Fatally and unrelievedly plain. The daughter of a general who's spent her life following the drum, she finds herself coerced  into an untenable marriage with dilettante Diccan Hilliard. She has such quiet courage, loyalty, and, yes, grace. And a surprising sense of humor(at least to me). (Pat note–Huzzah! A plain heroine, finally! Thank you, thank you…)


6.  Which book, if any, was the most difficult for you to write, and why?

All of my suspenses, because although they are also character-driven, they are much more plot intensive. Considering the fact that I only have a vestigial left brain, wherein the linear plot lives, it is much more difficult, especially the middle of the book, which I call, "laying out clues, picking up clues,
SinnersandSaints200h deciphering clues," which by necessity all has to be done with a certain amount of linear logic.
 

7.  What do you consider key elements of a great story?

Compelling characters caught in a compelling conflict (hmm. I seem to be having an alliterative moment). As Susan Elizabeth Phillips says, create characters you want to root for and put them into terrible trouble.

8.  Are there any trends you hope to see in romance in the next few years?

I love light, frothy romance. But there was a long time when that was all we got. I hope that the industry will support more of a  mix, so that we can also enjoy the more complex, deeper emotional books as well. (I'm sure that's not because that's what I write). After all, romance is a smörgåsbord. Don't limit us only to deviled eggs. (hear ye, hear ye, o gods of fate!–Pat)
 
9.  What is the best part about being a writer?  The most frustrating?

 Are you kidding? Do you know what my job is? I daydream for a living. And then, when I come up with an idea, I get to go learn about something I don't know, be it Tactical EMS (yes, I am trained to be a SWAT medic) or Waterloo.  And I've been able to travel to great places and learn things most tourists don't know, because I can say, "I'm an author, and I'm researching….". It continues to amaze me how generous people are with information and time.

The most frustrating? I think it's that nobody really understands what I do every day but another writer. Even my husband, who gives me unconditional support, really can't get his head around the fact that I often spend days just wandering aimlessly as words chase around in my head. Once he came home from work. "What did you do today?" he asked.
I was feeling full of myself. "I know why the bad guy did what he did!" I crowed.
He nodded. "What else did you do?"
My face fell. "That took me six weeks!"

When I called my critique partner Karyn Witmer-Gow and told her, her answer was. "Let's drink!"

So let's drink to creativity and writers and new books by giving away an autographed copy of Barely a Lady to a randomly drawn commenter. Does anyone have questions for Eileen while she's here?

 

175 thoughts on “Welcome Eileen Dreyer!”

  1. Jo here.
    Hi Eileen,it’s great to see you here at the Wenches! And writing historicals.
    You haven’t told us much about the new book. I gather it’s about a broken marriage, which I think is a great thing to explore. Tell us more.
    Jo

    Reply
  2. Jo here.
    Hi Eileen,it’s great to see you here at the Wenches! And writing historicals.
    You haven’t told us much about the new book. I gather it’s about a broken marriage, which I think is a great thing to explore. Tell us more.
    Jo

    Reply
  3. Jo here.
    Hi Eileen,it’s great to see you here at the Wenches! And writing historicals.
    You haven’t told us much about the new book. I gather it’s about a broken marriage, which I think is a great thing to explore. Tell us more.
    Jo

    Reply
  4. Jo here.
    Hi Eileen,it’s great to see you here at the Wenches! And writing historicals.
    You haven’t told us much about the new book. I gather it’s about a broken marriage, which I think is a great thing to explore. Tell us more.
    Jo

    Reply
  5. Jo here.
    Hi Eileen,it’s great to see you here at the Wenches! And writing historicals.
    You haven’t told us much about the new book. I gather it’s about a broken marriage, which I think is a great thing to explore. Tell us more.
    Jo

    Reply
  6. *fan girl squeal* I remember meeting you! I remember being totally boggled that you wrote medical romantic suspense–because I thought the research would be crazy intensive, which I’m sure it was.
    I’m very excited you’re writing some regency set novels now!
    And I very much get the last bit about no one but another writer gets what we do all day. (Well, the all day I actually write instead of do my day job.) Me figuring out something about my character is earth-shattering to me, but to everyone else NOT a writer, they’re like, “That’s all? That’s not very deep. Did that take five minutes of your day? What did you do for the rest of it?” Annoying.
    And I knew there was more to Karen/Elizabeth Grayson than met the eye. I find her as intimidating as the Queen, but I knew she has a wild side!

    Reply
  7. *fan girl squeal* I remember meeting you! I remember being totally boggled that you wrote medical romantic suspense–because I thought the research would be crazy intensive, which I’m sure it was.
    I’m very excited you’re writing some regency set novels now!
    And I very much get the last bit about no one but another writer gets what we do all day. (Well, the all day I actually write instead of do my day job.) Me figuring out something about my character is earth-shattering to me, but to everyone else NOT a writer, they’re like, “That’s all? That’s not very deep. Did that take five minutes of your day? What did you do for the rest of it?” Annoying.
    And I knew there was more to Karen/Elizabeth Grayson than met the eye. I find her as intimidating as the Queen, but I knew she has a wild side!

    Reply
  8. *fan girl squeal* I remember meeting you! I remember being totally boggled that you wrote medical romantic suspense–because I thought the research would be crazy intensive, which I’m sure it was.
    I’m very excited you’re writing some regency set novels now!
    And I very much get the last bit about no one but another writer gets what we do all day. (Well, the all day I actually write instead of do my day job.) Me figuring out something about my character is earth-shattering to me, but to everyone else NOT a writer, they’re like, “That’s all? That’s not very deep. Did that take five minutes of your day? What did you do for the rest of it?” Annoying.
    And I knew there was more to Karen/Elizabeth Grayson than met the eye. I find her as intimidating as the Queen, but I knew she has a wild side!

    Reply
  9. *fan girl squeal* I remember meeting you! I remember being totally boggled that you wrote medical romantic suspense–because I thought the research would be crazy intensive, which I’m sure it was.
    I’m very excited you’re writing some regency set novels now!
    And I very much get the last bit about no one but another writer gets what we do all day. (Well, the all day I actually write instead of do my day job.) Me figuring out something about my character is earth-shattering to me, but to everyone else NOT a writer, they’re like, “That’s all? That’s not very deep. Did that take five minutes of your day? What did you do for the rest of it?” Annoying.
    And I knew there was more to Karen/Elizabeth Grayson than met the eye. I find her as intimidating as the Queen, but I knew she has a wild side!

    Reply
  10. *fan girl squeal* I remember meeting you! I remember being totally boggled that you wrote medical romantic suspense–because I thought the research would be crazy intensive, which I’m sure it was.
    I’m very excited you’re writing some regency set novels now!
    And I very much get the last bit about no one but another writer gets what we do all day. (Well, the all day I actually write instead of do my day job.) Me figuring out something about my character is earth-shattering to me, but to everyone else NOT a writer, they’re like, “That’s all? That’s not very deep. Did that take five minutes of your day? What did you do for the rest of it?” Annoying.
    And I knew there was more to Karen/Elizabeth Grayson than met the eye. I find her as intimidating as the Queen, but I knew she has a wild side!

    Reply
  11. Welcome to Word Wenches and Planet Regency, Eileen! I’m sure you’ll liven up the house. *g* The new book sounds great. I loved researching Waterloo–there’s so much great material there.

    Reply
  12. Welcome to Word Wenches and Planet Regency, Eileen! I’m sure you’ll liven up the house. *g* The new book sounds great. I loved researching Waterloo–there’s so much great material there.

    Reply
  13. Welcome to Word Wenches and Planet Regency, Eileen! I’m sure you’ll liven up the house. *g* The new book sounds great. I loved researching Waterloo–there’s so much great material there.

    Reply
  14. Welcome to Word Wenches and Planet Regency, Eileen! I’m sure you’ll liven up the house. *g* The new book sounds great. I loved researching Waterloo–there’s so much great material there.

    Reply
  15. Welcome to Word Wenches and Planet Regency, Eileen! I’m sure you’ll liven up the house. *g* The new book sounds great. I loved researching Waterloo–there’s so much great material there.

    Reply
  16. Another fan girl squeal! I’ve already announced to the world via my blog how eagerly I am awaiting BARELY A LADY. I’ve read nearly all your books, the mysteries and the romances, and I always include A ROSE FOR MAGGIE, A SOLDIER’S HEART, and SOME MEN’S DREAMS when I vote in a top-100 romances poll. I also received one of my favorite author freebies from you, a book bag promoting your first Daughters of Myth book. The thing I loved best was your note that it was for “an unannounced contest.” 🙂
    Thank you for your recent essay about our genre too. I stood up and cheered when I read it.

    Reply
  17. Another fan girl squeal! I’ve already announced to the world via my blog how eagerly I am awaiting BARELY A LADY. I’ve read nearly all your books, the mysteries and the romances, and I always include A ROSE FOR MAGGIE, A SOLDIER’S HEART, and SOME MEN’S DREAMS when I vote in a top-100 romances poll. I also received one of my favorite author freebies from you, a book bag promoting your first Daughters of Myth book. The thing I loved best was your note that it was for “an unannounced contest.” 🙂
    Thank you for your recent essay about our genre too. I stood up and cheered when I read it.

    Reply
  18. Another fan girl squeal! I’ve already announced to the world via my blog how eagerly I am awaiting BARELY A LADY. I’ve read nearly all your books, the mysteries and the romances, and I always include A ROSE FOR MAGGIE, A SOLDIER’S HEART, and SOME MEN’S DREAMS when I vote in a top-100 romances poll. I also received one of my favorite author freebies from you, a book bag promoting your first Daughters of Myth book. The thing I loved best was your note that it was for “an unannounced contest.” 🙂
    Thank you for your recent essay about our genre too. I stood up and cheered when I read it.

    Reply
  19. Another fan girl squeal! I’ve already announced to the world via my blog how eagerly I am awaiting BARELY A LADY. I’ve read nearly all your books, the mysteries and the romances, and I always include A ROSE FOR MAGGIE, A SOLDIER’S HEART, and SOME MEN’S DREAMS when I vote in a top-100 romances poll. I also received one of my favorite author freebies from you, a book bag promoting your first Daughters of Myth book. The thing I loved best was your note that it was for “an unannounced contest.” 🙂
    Thank you for your recent essay about our genre too. I stood up and cheered when I read it.

    Reply
  20. Another fan girl squeal! I’ve already announced to the world via my blog how eagerly I am awaiting BARELY A LADY. I’ve read nearly all your books, the mysteries and the romances, and I always include A ROSE FOR MAGGIE, A SOLDIER’S HEART, and SOME MEN’S DREAMS when I vote in a top-100 romances poll. I also received one of my favorite author freebies from you, a book bag promoting your first Daughters of Myth book. The thing I loved best was your note that it was for “an unannounced contest.” 🙂
    Thank you for your recent essay about our genre too. I stood up and cheered when I read it.

    Reply
  21. Aloha, Eileen! My fan girl moment happened last year when I met you at the Beau Monde Soiree -your sari was beautiful and a unique costume for the ball! We briefly chatted about new trends for historical romances, including exotic locales.
    I’ve read lots of positive buzz about Barely A Lady – the cover is hot!
    And my question for you – will your fans read about India (or other exotic locales) in upcoming books?

    Reply
  22. Aloha, Eileen! My fan girl moment happened last year when I met you at the Beau Monde Soiree -your sari was beautiful and a unique costume for the ball! We briefly chatted about new trends for historical romances, including exotic locales.
    I’ve read lots of positive buzz about Barely A Lady – the cover is hot!
    And my question for you – will your fans read about India (or other exotic locales) in upcoming books?

    Reply
  23. Aloha, Eileen! My fan girl moment happened last year when I met you at the Beau Monde Soiree -your sari was beautiful and a unique costume for the ball! We briefly chatted about new trends for historical romances, including exotic locales.
    I’ve read lots of positive buzz about Barely A Lady – the cover is hot!
    And my question for you – will your fans read about India (or other exotic locales) in upcoming books?

    Reply
  24. Aloha, Eileen! My fan girl moment happened last year when I met you at the Beau Monde Soiree -your sari was beautiful and a unique costume for the ball! We briefly chatted about new trends for historical romances, including exotic locales.
    I’ve read lots of positive buzz about Barely A Lady – the cover is hot!
    And my question for you – will your fans read about India (or other exotic locales) in upcoming books?

    Reply
  25. Aloha, Eileen! My fan girl moment happened last year when I met you at the Beau Monde Soiree -your sari was beautiful and a unique costume for the ball! We briefly chatted about new trends for historical romances, including exotic locales.
    I’ve read lots of positive buzz about Barely A Lady – the cover is hot!
    And my question for you – will your fans read about India (or other exotic locales) in upcoming books?

    Reply
  26. Thank you everyone for the wonderful welcome. Sorry I’m answering so late in the day. When working I usually get to bed around dawn.
    Anyway, Kim, we’ll absolutely see India in my books. I got to go for three weeks last year, and it left a real lasting impression on me(and a sari in the wardrobe). Grace Fairchild, the heroine of the second book NEVER A GENTLEMAN, spent a lot of time there, and Harry Lidge, the hero of the third book ALWAYS THE TEMPTRESS. And probably other characters along the way.

    Reply
  27. Thank you everyone for the wonderful welcome. Sorry I’m answering so late in the day. When working I usually get to bed around dawn.
    Anyway, Kim, we’ll absolutely see India in my books. I got to go for three weeks last year, and it left a real lasting impression on me(and a sari in the wardrobe). Grace Fairchild, the heroine of the second book NEVER A GENTLEMAN, spent a lot of time there, and Harry Lidge, the hero of the third book ALWAYS THE TEMPTRESS. And probably other characters along the way.

    Reply
  28. Thank you everyone for the wonderful welcome. Sorry I’m answering so late in the day. When working I usually get to bed around dawn.
    Anyway, Kim, we’ll absolutely see India in my books. I got to go for three weeks last year, and it left a real lasting impression on me(and a sari in the wardrobe). Grace Fairchild, the heroine of the second book NEVER A GENTLEMAN, spent a lot of time there, and Harry Lidge, the hero of the third book ALWAYS THE TEMPTRESS. And probably other characters along the way.

    Reply
  29. Thank you everyone for the wonderful welcome. Sorry I’m answering so late in the day. When working I usually get to bed around dawn.
    Anyway, Kim, we’ll absolutely see India in my books. I got to go for three weeks last year, and it left a real lasting impression on me(and a sari in the wardrobe). Grace Fairchild, the heroine of the second book NEVER A GENTLEMAN, spent a lot of time there, and Harry Lidge, the hero of the third book ALWAYS THE TEMPTRESS. And probably other characters along the way.

    Reply
  30. Thank you everyone for the wonderful welcome. Sorry I’m answering so late in the day. When working I usually get to bed around dawn.
    Anyway, Kim, we’ll absolutely see India in my books. I got to go for three weeks last year, and it left a real lasting impression on me(and a sari in the wardrobe). Grace Fairchild, the heroine of the second book NEVER A GENTLEMAN, spent a lot of time there, and Harry Lidge, the hero of the third book ALWAYS THE TEMPTRESS. And probably other characters along the way.

    Reply
  31. Hello, Eileen! I enjoyed your frank and funny interview : ) You obviously write with great relish. Did you ever consider another career? If so, what other career path would you have followed?

    Reply
  32. Hello, Eileen! I enjoyed your frank and funny interview : ) You obviously write with great relish. Did you ever consider another career? If so, what other career path would you have followed?

    Reply
  33. Hello, Eileen! I enjoyed your frank and funny interview : ) You obviously write with great relish. Did you ever consider another career? If so, what other career path would you have followed?

    Reply
  34. Hello, Eileen! I enjoyed your frank and funny interview : ) You obviously write with great relish. Did you ever consider another career? If so, what other career path would you have followed?

    Reply
  35. Hello, Eileen! I enjoyed your frank and funny interview : ) You obviously write with great relish. Did you ever consider another career? If so, what other career path would you have followed?

    Reply
  36. Jo, thank you sincerely for the welcome. It means a lot coming from you. You’re right. I forgot to mention the story. The best thumbnail I’ve seen of it is from LIbrary Journal(go figure). ” Olivia Grace is the betrayed, disgraced ex-wife of Jack Wyndham, the earl of Gracechurch. When Olivia finds Jack on the battlefield at Waterloo, inexplicably dressed in a French uniform and missing his memories of the past five years, they are taken in by Lady Kate, a dowager duchess who is no stranger to scandal. To aid Jack’s recovery, Olivia must bury her own anguish and anger over their divorce and pretend to still be his loving, passionate wife.”
    I wanted to do a book where the character has real, post-head-injury amnesia, not ‘hit him in the head with the skillet to get it back’ amnesia.

    Reply
  37. Jo, thank you sincerely for the welcome. It means a lot coming from you. You’re right. I forgot to mention the story. The best thumbnail I’ve seen of it is from LIbrary Journal(go figure). ” Olivia Grace is the betrayed, disgraced ex-wife of Jack Wyndham, the earl of Gracechurch. When Olivia finds Jack on the battlefield at Waterloo, inexplicably dressed in a French uniform and missing his memories of the past five years, they are taken in by Lady Kate, a dowager duchess who is no stranger to scandal. To aid Jack’s recovery, Olivia must bury her own anguish and anger over their divorce and pretend to still be his loving, passionate wife.”
    I wanted to do a book where the character has real, post-head-injury amnesia, not ‘hit him in the head with the skillet to get it back’ amnesia.

    Reply
  38. Jo, thank you sincerely for the welcome. It means a lot coming from you. You’re right. I forgot to mention the story. The best thumbnail I’ve seen of it is from LIbrary Journal(go figure). ” Olivia Grace is the betrayed, disgraced ex-wife of Jack Wyndham, the earl of Gracechurch. When Olivia finds Jack on the battlefield at Waterloo, inexplicably dressed in a French uniform and missing his memories of the past five years, they are taken in by Lady Kate, a dowager duchess who is no stranger to scandal. To aid Jack’s recovery, Olivia must bury her own anguish and anger over their divorce and pretend to still be his loving, passionate wife.”
    I wanted to do a book where the character has real, post-head-injury amnesia, not ‘hit him in the head with the skillet to get it back’ amnesia.

    Reply
  39. Jo, thank you sincerely for the welcome. It means a lot coming from you. You’re right. I forgot to mention the story. The best thumbnail I’ve seen of it is from LIbrary Journal(go figure). ” Olivia Grace is the betrayed, disgraced ex-wife of Jack Wyndham, the earl of Gracechurch. When Olivia finds Jack on the battlefield at Waterloo, inexplicably dressed in a French uniform and missing his memories of the past five years, they are taken in by Lady Kate, a dowager duchess who is no stranger to scandal. To aid Jack’s recovery, Olivia must bury her own anguish and anger over their divorce and pretend to still be his loving, passionate wife.”
    I wanted to do a book where the character has real, post-head-injury amnesia, not ‘hit him in the head with the skillet to get it back’ amnesia.

    Reply
  40. Jo, thank you sincerely for the welcome. It means a lot coming from you. You’re right. I forgot to mention the story. The best thumbnail I’ve seen of it is from LIbrary Journal(go figure). ” Olivia Grace is the betrayed, disgraced ex-wife of Jack Wyndham, the earl of Gracechurch. When Olivia finds Jack on the battlefield at Waterloo, inexplicably dressed in a French uniform and missing his memories of the past five years, they are taken in by Lady Kate, a dowager duchess who is no stranger to scandal. To aid Jack’s recovery, Olivia must bury her own anguish and anger over their divorce and pretend to still be his loving, passionate wife.”
    I wanted to do a book where the character has real, post-head-injury amnesia, not ‘hit him in the head with the skillet to get it back’ amnesia.

    Reply
  41. Eileen is not shy, just sleep deprived, and I didn’t ask all the right questions. She’s also a trauma nurse, which used up some of her high-octane energy during the child-raising years. “G”
    Just listening to her talk about these characters for this past year or more has me salivating to get my hands on the book!

    Reply
  42. Eileen is not shy, just sleep deprived, and I didn’t ask all the right questions. She’s also a trauma nurse, which used up some of her high-octane energy during the child-raising years. “G”
    Just listening to her talk about these characters for this past year or more has me salivating to get my hands on the book!

    Reply
  43. Eileen is not shy, just sleep deprived, and I didn’t ask all the right questions. She’s also a trauma nurse, which used up some of her high-octane energy during the child-raising years. “G”
    Just listening to her talk about these characters for this past year or more has me salivating to get my hands on the book!

    Reply
  44. Eileen is not shy, just sleep deprived, and I didn’t ask all the right questions. She’s also a trauma nurse, which used up some of her high-octane energy during the child-raising years. “G”
    Just listening to her talk about these characters for this past year or more has me salivating to get my hands on the book!

    Reply
  45. Eileen is not shy, just sleep deprived, and I didn’t ask all the right questions. She’s also a trauma nurse, which used up some of her high-octane energy during the child-raising years. “G”
    Just listening to her talk about these characters for this past year or more has me salivating to get my hands on the book!

    Reply
  46. Eileen, another person who goes to bed at dawn! I sometimes think I’m the only person in the world awake at 4:30 in the morning.
    I confess to being one of who unfortunates who haven’t yet read your books, but that will now change. I loved your interview (and Pat’s asides!) and have since found out how popular you are as a writer. How could I have missed you?!! I’ve been introduced to many wonderful writers from this blog, and now I can add you to my list.
    I also visited your Web site and see that you were involved in SWAT activities, too! I’ll bet you have some great stories to tell about that!

    Reply
  47. Eileen, another person who goes to bed at dawn! I sometimes think I’m the only person in the world awake at 4:30 in the morning.
    I confess to being one of who unfortunates who haven’t yet read your books, but that will now change. I loved your interview (and Pat’s asides!) and have since found out how popular you are as a writer. How could I have missed you?!! I’ve been introduced to many wonderful writers from this blog, and now I can add you to my list.
    I also visited your Web site and see that you were involved in SWAT activities, too! I’ll bet you have some great stories to tell about that!

    Reply
  48. Eileen, another person who goes to bed at dawn! I sometimes think I’m the only person in the world awake at 4:30 in the morning.
    I confess to being one of who unfortunates who haven’t yet read your books, but that will now change. I loved your interview (and Pat’s asides!) and have since found out how popular you are as a writer. How could I have missed you?!! I’ve been introduced to many wonderful writers from this blog, and now I can add you to my list.
    I also visited your Web site and see that you were involved in SWAT activities, too! I’ll bet you have some great stories to tell about that!

    Reply
  49. Eileen, another person who goes to bed at dawn! I sometimes think I’m the only person in the world awake at 4:30 in the morning.
    I confess to being one of who unfortunates who haven’t yet read your books, but that will now change. I loved your interview (and Pat’s asides!) and have since found out how popular you are as a writer. How could I have missed you?!! I’ve been introduced to many wonderful writers from this blog, and now I can add you to my list.
    I also visited your Web site and see that you were involved in SWAT activities, too! I’ll bet you have some great stories to tell about that!

    Reply
  50. Eileen, another person who goes to bed at dawn! I sometimes think I’m the only person in the world awake at 4:30 in the morning.
    I confess to being one of who unfortunates who haven’t yet read your books, but that will now change. I loved your interview (and Pat’s asides!) and have since found out how popular you are as a writer. How could I have missed you?!! I’ve been introduced to many wonderful writers from this blog, and now I can add you to my list.
    I also visited your Web site and see that you were involved in SWAT activities, too! I’ll bet you have some great stories to tell about that!

    Reply
  51. Virginia,
    Yes, I do love writing. It’s better than working for a living. I’ve done that(now all my writer friend are going to smack me). I was a trauma nurse for sixteen years, worked in hospitals since I was 16. If I had another choice though? Chanteuse. I can see myself perched on a piano singing Someone To Watch Over Me….or tucked in the corner of an Irish pub in Dingle singing Shule Aroon…oh, wait. I’ve done that.

    Reply
  52. Virginia,
    Yes, I do love writing. It’s better than working for a living. I’ve done that(now all my writer friend are going to smack me). I was a trauma nurse for sixteen years, worked in hospitals since I was 16. If I had another choice though? Chanteuse. I can see myself perched on a piano singing Someone To Watch Over Me….or tucked in the corner of an Irish pub in Dingle singing Shule Aroon…oh, wait. I’ve done that.

    Reply
  53. Virginia,
    Yes, I do love writing. It’s better than working for a living. I’ve done that(now all my writer friend are going to smack me). I was a trauma nurse for sixteen years, worked in hospitals since I was 16. If I had another choice though? Chanteuse. I can see myself perched on a piano singing Someone To Watch Over Me….or tucked in the corner of an Irish pub in Dingle singing Shule Aroon…oh, wait. I’ve done that.

    Reply
  54. Virginia,
    Yes, I do love writing. It’s better than working for a living. I’ve done that(now all my writer friend are going to smack me). I was a trauma nurse for sixteen years, worked in hospitals since I was 16. If I had another choice though? Chanteuse. I can see myself perched on a piano singing Someone To Watch Over Me….or tucked in the corner of an Irish pub in Dingle singing Shule Aroon…oh, wait. I’ve done that.

    Reply
  55. Virginia,
    Yes, I do love writing. It’s better than working for a living. I’ve done that(now all my writer friend are going to smack me). I was a trauma nurse for sixteen years, worked in hospitals since I was 16. If I had another choice though? Chanteuse. I can see myself perched on a piano singing Someone To Watch Over Me….or tucked in the corner of an Irish pub in Dingle singing Shule Aroon…oh, wait. I’ve done that.

    Reply
  56. Eileen understates her diva qualities. “G” She’ll sing (and beautifully) at the drop of an Irish ballad, and the stories she tells will have you rolling on the floor. Sherrie, the only excuse I can think of for missing Eileen is that until now, she’s written contemps. A whole new world is opening…

    Reply
  57. Eileen understates her diva qualities. “G” She’ll sing (and beautifully) at the drop of an Irish ballad, and the stories she tells will have you rolling on the floor. Sherrie, the only excuse I can think of for missing Eileen is that until now, she’s written contemps. A whole new world is opening…

    Reply
  58. Eileen understates her diva qualities. “G” She’ll sing (and beautifully) at the drop of an Irish ballad, and the stories she tells will have you rolling on the floor. Sherrie, the only excuse I can think of for missing Eileen is that until now, she’s written contemps. A whole new world is opening…

    Reply
  59. Eileen understates her diva qualities. “G” She’ll sing (and beautifully) at the drop of an Irish ballad, and the stories she tells will have you rolling on the floor. Sherrie, the only excuse I can think of for missing Eileen is that until now, she’s written contemps. A whole new world is opening…

    Reply
  60. Eileen understates her diva qualities. “G” She’ll sing (and beautifully) at the drop of an Irish ballad, and the stories she tells will have you rolling on the floor. Sherrie, the only excuse I can think of for missing Eileen is that until now, she’s written contemps. A whole new world is opening…

    Reply
  61. Thank you, Chey. I really hope you like it. And Sherrie, my sister of the night. Please don’t worry that you haven’t read me. I’m just happy you will now. (and yes. The SWAT stories are great. I have pictures at the bottom of my Scrapbook page.

    Reply
  62. Thank you, Chey. I really hope you like it. And Sherrie, my sister of the night. Please don’t worry that you haven’t read me. I’m just happy you will now. (and yes. The SWAT stories are great. I have pictures at the bottom of my Scrapbook page.

    Reply
  63. Thank you, Chey. I really hope you like it. And Sherrie, my sister of the night. Please don’t worry that you haven’t read me. I’m just happy you will now. (and yes. The SWAT stories are great. I have pictures at the bottom of my Scrapbook page.

    Reply
  64. Thank you, Chey. I really hope you like it. And Sherrie, my sister of the night. Please don’t worry that you haven’t read me. I’m just happy you will now. (and yes. The SWAT stories are great. I have pictures at the bottom of my Scrapbook page.

    Reply
  65. Thank you, Chey. I really hope you like it. And Sherrie, my sister of the night. Please don’t worry that you haven’t read me. I’m just happy you will now. (and yes. The SWAT stories are great. I have pictures at the bottom of my Scrapbook page.

    Reply
  66. A grown woman behaving like a girl. Yes, eye-rolling, but here goes… SQUUUeeeeeeeeeeee!!! Eileen lovely to see you here at the Wenches. I adored your orange saree and the conversation we had at the Beau Monde soiree last year. Brava once again for your piece in CNN on the value of romance.
    I’m very pleased that you have a historical coming out!!!
    Looking forward to seeing you in Orlando.

    Reply
  67. A grown woman behaving like a girl. Yes, eye-rolling, but here goes… SQUUUeeeeeeeeeeee!!! Eileen lovely to see you here at the Wenches. I adored your orange saree and the conversation we had at the Beau Monde soiree last year. Brava once again for your piece in CNN on the value of romance.
    I’m very pleased that you have a historical coming out!!!
    Looking forward to seeing you in Orlando.

    Reply
  68. A grown woman behaving like a girl. Yes, eye-rolling, but here goes… SQUUUeeeeeeeeeeee!!! Eileen lovely to see you here at the Wenches. I adored your orange saree and the conversation we had at the Beau Monde soiree last year. Brava once again for your piece in CNN on the value of romance.
    I’m very pleased that you have a historical coming out!!!
    Looking forward to seeing you in Orlando.

    Reply
  69. A grown woman behaving like a girl. Yes, eye-rolling, but here goes… SQUUUeeeeeeeeeeee!!! Eileen lovely to see you here at the Wenches. I adored your orange saree and the conversation we had at the Beau Monde soiree last year. Brava once again for your piece in CNN on the value of romance.
    I’m very pleased that you have a historical coming out!!!
    Looking forward to seeing you in Orlando.

    Reply
  70. A grown woman behaving like a girl. Yes, eye-rolling, but here goes… SQUUUeeeeeeeeeeee!!! Eileen lovely to see you here at the Wenches. I adored your orange saree and the conversation we had at the Beau Monde soiree last year. Brava once again for your piece in CNN on the value of romance.
    I’m very pleased that you have a historical coming out!!!
    Looking forward to seeing you in Orlando.

    Reply
  71. Being Eileen’s critique partner for the last mumble-mumble years, I’ve read a lot of her work, and I must say that these stories are really special. BARELY A LADY will introduce you to the Three Graces, women of courage, heart and humor that you will love as much as I do. And to the men who actually prove themselves worthy of their love. (Though you’ll wonder about that in places.) I have lived with Olivia, Grace, and Kate for more than a year now, and I can’t wait for you to meet them, too.
    And if you’ll notice, Eileen’s her continuity in these books is excellent. That’s this critique partner’s specialty. And Eileen – in turn – has taught me the beauty of the simple declarative sentence.
    Best of luck, Eileen, in your historical romance debut. (Let’s drink!)

    Reply
  72. Being Eileen’s critique partner for the last mumble-mumble years, I’ve read a lot of her work, and I must say that these stories are really special. BARELY A LADY will introduce you to the Three Graces, women of courage, heart and humor that you will love as much as I do. And to the men who actually prove themselves worthy of their love. (Though you’ll wonder about that in places.) I have lived with Olivia, Grace, and Kate for more than a year now, and I can’t wait for you to meet them, too.
    And if you’ll notice, Eileen’s her continuity in these books is excellent. That’s this critique partner’s specialty. And Eileen – in turn – has taught me the beauty of the simple declarative sentence.
    Best of luck, Eileen, in your historical romance debut. (Let’s drink!)

    Reply
  73. Being Eileen’s critique partner for the last mumble-mumble years, I’ve read a lot of her work, and I must say that these stories are really special. BARELY A LADY will introduce you to the Three Graces, women of courage, heart and humor that you will love as much as I do. And to the men who actually prove themselves worthy of their love. (Though you’ll wonder about that in places.) I have lived with Olivia, Grace, and Kate for more than a year now, and I can’t wait for you to meet them, too.
    And if you’ll notice, Eileen’s her continuity in these books is excellent. That’s this critique partner’s specialty. And Eileen – in turn – has taught me the beauty of the simple declarative sentence.
    Best of luck, Eileen, in your historical romance debut. (Let’s drink!)

    Reply
  74. Being Eileen’s critique partner for the last mumble-mumble years, I’ve read a lot of her work, and I must say that these stories are really special. BARELY A LADY will introduce you to the Three Graces, women of courage, heart and humor that you will love as much as I do. And to the men who actually prove themselves worthy of their love. (Though you’ll wonder about that in places.) I have lived with Olivia, Grace, and Kate for more than a year now, and I can’t wait for you to meet them, too.
    And if you’ll notice, Eileen’s her continuity in these books is excellent. That’s this critique partner’s specialty. And Eileen – in turn – has taught me the beauty of the simple declarative sentence.
    Best of luck, Eileen, in your historical romance debut. (Let’s drink!)

    Reply
  75. Being Eileen’s critique partner for the last mumble-mumble years, I’ve read a lot of her work, and I must say that these stories are really special. BARELY A LADY will introduce you to the Three Graces, women of courage, heart and humor that you will love as much as I do. And to the men who actually prove themselves worthy of their love. (Though you’ll wonder about that in places.) I have lived with Olivia, Grace, and Kate for more than a year now, and I can’t wait for you to meet them, too.
    And if you’ll notice, Eileen’s her continuity in these books is excellent. That’s this critique partner’s specialty. And Eileen – in turn – has taught me the beauty of the simple declarative sentence.
    Best of luck, Eileen, in your historical romance debut. (Let’s drink!)

    Reply
  76. Great interview! I’m a big regency reader and have been looking forward to this book.
    I love what you said about that light bulb moment when you figured out why the bad guy did what he did. When a story flows together so well for the reader, it’s easy to forget how much work it takes to make things seem so simple. 😉

    Reply
  77. Great interview! I’m a big regency reader and have been looking forward to this book.
    I love what you said about that light bulb moment when you figured out why the bad guy did what he did. When a story flows together so well for the reader, it’s easy to forget how much work it takes to make things seem so simple. 😉

    Reply
  78. Great interview! I’m a big regency reader and have been looking forward to this book.
    I love what you said about that light bulb moment when you figured out why the bad guy did what he did. When a story flows together so well for the reader, it’s easy to forget how much work it takes to make things seem so simple. 😉

    Reply
  79. Great interview! I’m a big regency reader and have been looking forward to this book.
    I love what you said about that light bulb moment when you figured out why the bad guy did what he did. When a story flows together so well for the reader, it’s easy to forget how much work it takes to make things seem so simple. 😉

    Reply
  80. Great interview! I’m a big regency reader and have been looking forward to this book.
    I love what you said about that light bulb moment when you figured out why the bad guy did what he did. When a story flows together so well for the reader, it’s easy to forget how much work it takes to make things seem so simple. 😉

    Reply
  81. Keira, you’re on. Drinks at the soiree.
    Karyn, the check is in the mail;-}. There is no way to overstate how important a great critique partner is, and Karyn is one of the best(and no. You can’t have her. She’s mine.)

    Reply
  82. Keira, you’re on. Drinks at the soiree.
    Karyn, the check is in the mail;-}. There is no way to overstate how important a great critique partner is, and Karyn is one of the best(and no. You can’t have her. She’s mine.)

    Reply
  83. Keira, you’re on. Drinks at the soiree.
    Karyn, the check is in the mail;-}. There is no way to overstate how important a great critique partner is, and Karyn is one of the best(and no. You can’t have her. She’s mine.)

    Reply
  84. Keira, you’re on. Drinks at the soiree.
    Karyn, the check is in the mail;-}. There is no way to overstate how important a great critique partner is, and Karyn is one of the best(and no. You can’t have her. She’s mine.)

    Reply
  85. Keira, you’re on. Drinks at the soiree.
    Karyn, the check is in the mail;-}. There is no way to overstate how important a great critique partner is, and Karyn is one of the best(and no. You can’t have her. She’s mine.)

    Reply
  86. Great interview Pat and Eileen. Add me to the list of Sharpe fans. Loved the best and most frustrating thing about being a writer, especially.
    I’ve just ordered Eileen’s book. I can’t wait to read it. I do love a plain heroine and a meaty tale.
    And waving to Karyn who I met at NINC.

    Reply
  87. Great interview Pat and Eileen. Add me to the list of Sharpe fans. Loved the best and most frustrating thing about being a writer, especially.
    I’ve just ordered Eileen’s book. I can’t wait to read it. I do love a plain heroine and a meaty tale.
    And waving to Karyn who I met at NINC.

    Reply
  88. Great interview Pat and Eileen. Add me to the list of Sharpe fans. Loved the best and most frustrating thing about being a writer, especially.
    I’ve just ordered Eileen’s book. I can’t wait to read it. I do love a plain heroine and a meaty tale.
    And waving to Karyn who I met at NINC.

    Reply
  89. Great interview Pat and Eileen. Add me to the list of Sharpe fans. Loved the best and most frustrating thing about being a writer, especially.
    I’ve just ordered Eileen’s book. I can’t wait to read it. I do love a plain heroine and a meaty tale.
    And waving to Karyn who I met at NINC.

    Reply
  90. Great interview Pat and Eileen. Add me to the list of Sharpe fans. Loved the best and most frustrating thing about being a writer, especially.
    I’ve just ordered Eileen’s book. I can’t wait to read it. I do love a plain heroine and a meaty tale.
    And waving to Karyn who I met at NINC.

    Reply
  91. Thanks so much for visiting WW, Eileen. I always love reading about how a writer thinks . . . always makes me feel a little less bizarre! Love the explanation of being so happy at discovering the bad guy’s motivation. I swear—only another writer can appreciate that moment! Drinks, indeed!

    Reply
  92. Thanks so much for visiting WW, Eileen. I always love reading about how a writer thinks . . . always makes me feel a little less bizarre! Love the explanation of being so happy at discovering the bad guy’s motivation. I swear—only another writer can appreciate that moment! Drinks, indeed!

    Reply
  93. Thanks so much for visiting WW, Eileen. I always love reading about how a writer thinks . . . always makes me feel a little less bizarre! Love the explanation of being so happy at discovering the bad guy’s motivation. I swear—only another writer can appreciate that moment! Drinks, indeed!

    Reply
  94. Thanks so much for visiting WW, Eileen. I always love reading about how a writer thinks . . . always makes me feel a little less bizarre! Love the explanation of being so happy at discovering the bad guy’s motivation. I swear—only another writer can appreciate that moment! Drinks, indeed!

    Reply
  95. Thanks so much for visiting WW, Eileen. I always love reading about how a writer thinks . . . always makes me feel a little less bizarre! Love the explanation of being so happy at discovering the bad guy’s motivation. I swear—only another writer can appreciate that moment! Drinks, indeed!

    Reply
  96. This is so cool. I boarded in college with a widow who was a shut in until her husband’s death and got every Harlequin and Silhouette. I had an entire bedroom full of books to read after I finished Biology. I would read about 2 a night. My favorite was The Princess and the Pea, which I spent years haunting used book stores until I found again — and then found it had a sequel. Loved the bit about the oreos and Garmisch. My family thought I was nuts when I oohed and ahhed over the drug store in downtown Garmisch. So glad you are going to delight me with Regency stories. And I agree with Pat any excuse to show Sharpe is great. Welcome, welcome, welcome.

    Reply
  97. This is so cool. I boarded in college with a widow who was a shut in until her husband’s death and got every Harlequin and Silhouette. I had an entire bedroom full of books to read after I finished Biology. I would read about 2 a night. My favorite was The Princess and the Pea, which I spent years haunting used book stores until I found again — and then found it had a sequel. Loved the bit about the oreos and Garmisch. My family thought I was nuts when I oohed and ahhed over the drug store in downtown Garmisch. So glad you are going to delight me with Regency stories. And I agree with Pat any excuse to show Sharpe is great. Welcome, welcome, welcome.

    Reply
  98. This is so cool. I boarded in college with a widow who was a shut in until her husband’s death and got every Harlequin and Silhouette. I had an entire bedroom full of books to read after I finished Biology. I would read about 2 a night. My favorite was The Princess and the Pea, which I spent years haunting used book stores until I found again — and then found it had a sequel. Loved the bit about the oreos and Garmisch. My family thought I was nuts when I oohed and ahhed over the drug store in downtown Garmisch. So glad you are going to delight me with Regency stories. And I agree with Pat any excuse to show Sharpe is great. Welcome, welcome, welcome.

    Reply
  99. This is so cool. I boarded in college with a widow who was a shut in until her husband’s death and got every Harlequin and Silhouette. I had an entire bedroom full of books to read after I finished Biology. I would read about 2 a night. My favorite was The Princess and the Pea, which I spent years haunting used book stores until I found again — and then found it had a sequel. Loved the bit about the oreos and Garmisch. My family thought I was nuts when I oohed and ahhed over the drug store in downtown Garmisch. So glad you are going to delight me with Regency stories. And I agree with Pat any excuse to show Sharpe is great. Welcome, welcome, welcome.

    Reply
  100. This is so cool. I boarded in college with a widow who was a shut in until her husband’s death and got every Harlequin and Silhouette. I had an entire bedroom full of books to read after I finished Biology. I would read about 2 a night. My favorite was The Princess and the Pea, which I spent years haunting used book stores until I found again — and then found it had a sequel. Loved the bit about the oreos and Garmisch. My family thought I was nuts when I oohed and ahhed over the drug store in downtown Garmisch. So glad you are going to delight me with Regency stories. And I agree with Pat any excuse to show Sharpe is great. Welcome, welcome, welcome.

    Reply
  101. Lyn, thank you so much. Ah, the oreos. Great story. I had a New Year’s Eve party once. I had just finished writing that scene, and wanted to show it to Karyn. Unfortunately she passed it around. Fifteen minutes later there wasn’t a couple left in my house ;-}

    Reply
  102. Lyn, thank you so much. Ah, the oreos. Great story. I had a New Year’s Eve party once. I had just finished writing that scene, and wanted to show it to Karyn. Unfortunately she passed it around. Fifteen minutes later there wasn’t a couple left in my house ;-}

    Reply
  103. Lyn, thank you so much. Ah, the oreos. Great story. I had a New Year’s Eve party once. I had just finished writing that scene, and wanted to show it to Karyn. Unfortunately she passed it around. Fifteen minutes later there wasn’t a couple left in my house ;-}

    Reply
  104. Lyn, thank you so much. Ah, the oreos. Great story. I had a New Year’s Eve party once. I had just finished writing that scene, and wanted to show it to Karyn. Unfortunately she passed it around. Fifteen minutes later there wasn’t a couple left in my house ;-}

    Reply
  105. Lyn, thank you so much. Ah, the oreos. Great story. I had a New Year’s Eve party once. I had just finished writing that scene, and wanted to show it to Karyn. Unfortunately she passed it around. Fifteen minutes later there wasn’t a couple left in my house ;-}

    Reply
  106. LOL, I think we need story hour at the wenches for Eileen to tell tall tales!
    Okay, folks, the drawing takes place when night owl Sherrie pulls the plug around midnight. Get your comments in!

    Reply
  107. LOL, I think we need story hour at the wenches for Eileen to tell tall tales!
    Okay, folks, the drawing takes place when night owl Sherrie pulls the plug around midnight. Get your comments in!

    Reply
  108. LOL, I think we need story hour at the wenches for Eileen to tell tall tales!
    Okay, folks, the drawing takes place when night owl Sherrie pulls the plug around midnight. Get your comments in!

    Reply
  109. LOL, I think we need story hour at the wenches for Eileen to tell tall tales!
    Okay, folks, the drawing takes place when night owl Sherrie pulls the plug around midnight. Get your comments in!

    Reply
  110. LOL, I think we need story hour at the wenches for Eileen to tell tall tales!
    Okay, folks, the drawing takes place when night owl Sherrie pulls the plug around midnight. Get your comments in!

    Reply
  111. I enjoyed the post and getting to know a bit more about Eileen and her books. I’m looking forward to reading Barely A Lady.

    Reply
  112. I enjoyed the post and getting to know a bit more about Eileen and her books. I’m looking forward to reading Barely A Lady.

    Reply
  113. I enjoyed the post and getting to know a bit more about Eileen and her books. I’m looking forward to reading Barely A Lady.

    Reply
  114. I enjoyed the post and getting to know a bit more about Eileen and her books. I’m looking forward to reading Barely A Lady.

    Reply
  115. I enjoyed the post and getting to know a bit more about Eileen and her books. I’m looking forward to reading Barely A Lady.

    Reply
  116. Hi Eileen, I don’t have a new ? but was fasinated by your intereview which was great. I do not think I read any of your first books and I know I did not when writing as Eileen but I do know I want to read your books now. You are a new author for me and I have added you to my new author list and your books to my wish list. I have been an avid reader for over 55 yrs and love romance with a little mystery or suspense along with humor. I do believe I will enjoy reading your books. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

    Reply
  117. Hi Eileen, I don’t have a new ? but was fasinated by your intereview which was great. I do not think I read any of your first books and I know I did not when writing as Eileen but I do know I want to read your books now. You are a new author for me and I have added you to my new author list and your books to my wish list. I have been an avid reader for over 55 yrs and love romance with a little mystery or suspense along with humor. I do believe I will enjoy reading your books. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

    Reply
  118. Hi Eileen, I don’t have a new ? but was fasinated by your intereview which was great. I do not think I read any of your first books and I know I did not when writing as Eileen but I do know I want to read your books now. You are a new author for me and I have added you to my new author list and your books to my wish list. I have been an avid reader for over 55 yrs and love romance with a little mystery or suspense along with humor. I do believe I will enjoy reading your books. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

    Reply
  119. Hi Eileen, I don’t have a new ? but was fasinated by your intereview which was great. I do not think I read any of your first books and I know I did not when writing as Eileen but I do know I want to read your books now. You are a new author for me and I have added you to my new author list and your books to my wish list. I have been an avid reader for over 55 yrs and love romance with a little mystery or suspense along with humor. I do believe I will enjoy reading your books. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

    Reply
  120. Hi Eileen, I don’t have a new ? but was fasinated by your intereview which was great. I do not think I read any of your first books and I know I did not when writing as Eileen but I do know I want to read your books now. You are a new author for me and I have added you to my new author list and your books to my wish list. I have been an avid reader for over 55 yrs and love romance with a little mystery or suspense along with humor. I do believe I will enjoy reading your books. Thanks for stopping by to chat.

    Reply
  121. A final thank you to you all; to the wonderful wenches and everyone who stopped by to say hi. It was wonderful to read all the comments. And Robin, of course I know who you are. I thought the release date was June 29, but I just heard that somebody found it today.

    Reply
  122. A final thank you to you all; to the wonderful wenches and everyone who stopped by to say hi. It was wonderful to read all the comments. And Robin, of course I know who you are. I thought the release date was June 29, but I just heard that somebody found it today.

    Reply
  123. A final thank you to you all; to the wonderful wenches and everyone who stopped by to say hi. It was wonderful to read all the comments. And Robin, of course I know who you are. I thought the release date was June 29, but I just heard that somebody found it today.

    Reply
  124. A final thank you to you all; to the wonderful wenches and everyone who stopped by to say hi. It was wonderful to read all the comments. And Robin, of course I know who you are. I thought the release date was June 29, but I just heard that somebody found it today.

    Reply
  125. A final thank you to you all; to the wonderful wenches and everyone who stopped by to say hi. It was wonderful to read all the comments. And Robin, of course I know who you are. I thought the release date was June 29, but I just heard that somebody found it today.

    Reply
  126. Somehow, after reading about her new Regency book, I thought Eileen might be the new “wench.” I don’t know if I can actually welcome you; I’ve been a very infrequent guest myself. However, since I subscribed to the feed, I’ve become much more aware of what’s going on here. This is definitely the way to go.
    You are another of the authors here whose books I have, and thus have a particular interest in. Now I want to read at least a few books by the other two.

    Reply
  127. Somehow, after reading about her new Regency book, I thought Eileen might be the new “wench.” I don’t know if I can actually welcome you; I’ve been a very infrequent guest myself. However, since I subscribed to the feed, I’ve become much more aware of what’s going on here. This is definitely the way to go.
    You are another of the authors here whose books I have, and thus have a particular interest in. Now I want to read at least a few books by the other two.

    Reply
  128. Somehow, after reading about her new Regency book, I thought Eileen might be the new “wench.” I don’t know if I can actually welcome you; I’ve been a very infrequent guest myself. However, since I subscribed to the feed, I’ve become much more aware of what’s going on here. This is definitely the way to go.
    You are another of the authors here whose books I have, and thus have a particular interest in. Now I want to read at least a few books by the other two.

    Reply
  129. Somehow, after reading about her new Regency book, I thought Eileen might be the new “wench.” I don’t know if I can actually welcome you; I’ve been a very infrequent guest myself. However, since I subscribed to the feed, I’ve become much more aware of what’s going on here. This is definitely the way to go.
    You are another of the authors here whose books I have, and thus have a particular interest in. Now I want to read at least a few books by the other two.

    Reply
  130. Somehow, after reading about her new Regency book, I thought Eileen might be the new “wench.” I don’t know if I can actually welcome you; I’ve been a very infrequent guest myself. However, since I subscribed to the feed, I’ve become much more aware of what’s going on here. This is definitely the way to go.
    You are another of the authors here whose books I have, and thus have a particular interest in. Now I want to read at least a few books by the other two.

    Reply

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