WANT MAC WITH THAT?

ReadModernLadyTableCityGIG
Pat here:

One has to wonder what historians will do in the future in their attempts to piece together how twenty-first century writers wrote their classic tomes (or presidents commanded their triumphs and errors) when everything we do today is by computer and prone to disappearing.

Once upon a time I would make innumerable paper copies of the various drafts of my books. I would keep copies of the copy-edited manuscript and the final page proofs.  The University of Kentucky even requested that I donate all this "dead matter" (as publishing so lovingly calls it) to their archives, and they’ve stored a truckload of Archive
boxes of my immortal words. I don’t even want to imagine the number of documents in a presidential archive!

But these days, I might print a single draft copy so I can do a final read through and edit on paper. After typing in those changes, I send my final version by e-mail so I don’t have paper copy of the final, although I try hard to save it on CD as well as on my USB drive. I do all my revisions by computer, and now my publisher is doing copy edits electronically—unfortunately or not, depending on who you’re talking to on what day.

Apparently, I am one of my publisher’s guinea pigs.  The electronic copy edits are brand new for them, and everyone is struggling to find all the glitches. And boy, did they give it to the right person for Vegetable ellipsis
finding glitches!  I can destroy a computer simply by glaring at it.  Luckily for all concerned, the copy  edit was remarkably clean, so no glaring was involved. But ellipses take a special formatting, and I use a lot of them… The end result seems to have been a global delete of ellipses which I did not improve by stetting. (for a fun take on punctuation marks and the place I stole the vegetable ellipsis: http://corporatecartoons.blogspot.com/2007/11/lets-rate-punctuation-marks.html)

And then, of course, I worked the copy edit on my MacBook because it’s so much more comfy to sit in a recliner when working tedious tasks.  More complications set in. The final result is apparently gobbledygook and panic in New York.  So nice to know that I haven’t lost my touch.  And that Apple and Microsoft can still snarl at each other.Macbook

Wouldn’t it be lovely if Microsoft, in their infinite wisdom, would SIMPLIFY their software instead of constantly adding new gobbledygook that only makes it more difficult for different people to work on the same document?  I’ve seen the new Office Word and it has stuff in there only a cartoon artist on crack could use.  What makes them think that everyone in the world wants graphics and numbers and drawings and all this fancy technology?  Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming?  Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it.  Word for Artists.  Word for Business.  We all use different functions, different languages, comprende?

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And then, once I wave my wand and convert Microsoft to my way of thinking, I want a simple method of permanent document storage. According to my techie sources, neither CDs or USB drives are reliable for long-term storage. And I’m a trifle tired of copying all my old electronic files to every new format that comes along. If paper is good for a thousand years, why can’t technology beat that?

Anyone else want to get creative and send a message (or darts) to Bill Gates? 
And who wants to imagine what historians and archeologists in the future will have to do to uncover the secrets of the 21st century? Read minds?

And if we have anyone here from the future—will you please tell me the best way of preserving my files?

65 thoughts on “WANT MAC WITH THAT?”

  1. I’m hardly speaking from the future here (a librarian, archivist, and historian, I tend to keep my eyes focused on the past). My family keeps dragging me (not quite kicking and screaming) into the 21st century and new technological developments.
    My cousin is a computer geek extraordinaire & early adopter of every new technology he can get his hands on (including the theremin–a strange new electronic instrument that’s just flat-out weird) and on his advice I now store my documents in Open Document templates. The theory is that open source developers will ensure new word processing software variants (the open source, at least) work with the templates.
    Keeping my documents in these templates does mean, however, that I generally resave them as .doc before emailing them to people with Microsoft Office (which is really bad at recognizing non-proprietary document formats, not to mention the latest iteration of formats, the .docx & .xlsx aren’t stable & tend to lose important information). On the other hand, Neo Office (the open source version of MS Office for Macs) is still working on the comment feature.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  2. I’m hardly speaking from the future here (a librarian, archivist, and historian, I tend to keep my eyes focused on the past). My family keeps dragging me (not quite kicking and screaming) into the 21st century and new technological developments.
    My cousin is a computer geek extraordinaire & early adopter of every new technology he can get his hands on (including the theremin–a strange new electronic instrument that’s just flat-out weird) and on his advice I now store my documents in Open Document templates. The theory is that open source developers will ensure new word processing software variants (the open source, at least) work with the templates.
    Keeping my documents in these templates does mean, however, that I generally resave them as .doc before emailing them to people with Microsoft Office (which is really bad at recognizing non-proprietary document formats, not to mention the latest iteration of formats, the .docx & .xlsx aren’t stable & tend to lose important information). On the other hand, Neo Office (the open source version of MS Office for Macs) is still working on the comment feature.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  3. I’m hardly speaking from the future here (a librarian, archivist, and historian, I tend to keep my eyes focused on the past). My family keeps dragging me (not quite kicking and screaming) into the 21st century and new technological developments.
    My cousin is a computer geek extraordinaire & early adopter of every new technology he can get his hands on (including the theremin–a strange new electronic instrument that’s just flat-out weird) and on his advice I now store my documents in Open Document templates. The theory is that open source developers will ensure new word processing software variants (the open source, at least) work with the templates.
    Keeping my documents in these templates does mean, however, that I generally resave them as .doc before emailing them to people with Microsoft Office (which is really bad at recognizing non-proprietary document formats, not to mention the latest iteration of formats, the .docx & .xlsx aren’t stable & tend to lose important information). On the other hand, Neo Office (the open source version of MS Office for Macs) is still working on the comment feature.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  4. I’m hardly speaking from the future here (a librarian, archivist, and historian, I tend to keep my eyes focused on the past). My family keeps dragging me (not quite kicking and screaming) into the 21st century and new technological developments.
    My cousin is a computer geek extraordinaire & early adopter of every new technology he can get his hands on (including the theremin–a strange new electronic instrument that’s just flat-out weird) and on his advice I now store my documents in Open Document templates. The theory is that open source developers will ensure new word processing software variants (the open source, at least) work with the templates.
    Keeping my documents in these templates does mean, however, that I generally resave them as .doc before emailing them to people with Microsoft Office (which is really bad at recognizing non-proprietary document formats, not to mention the latest iteration of formats, the .docx & .xlsx aren’t stable & tend to lose important information). On the other hand, Neo Office (the open source version of MS Office for Macs) is still working on the comment feature.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  5. I’m hardly speaking from the future here (a librarian, archivist, and historian, I tend to keep my eyes focused on the past). My family keeps dragging me (not quite kicking and screaming) into the 21st century and new technological developments.
    My cousin is a computer geek extraordinaire & early adopter of every new technology he can get his hands on (including the theremin–a strange new electronic instrument that’s just flat-out weird) and on his advice I now store my documents in Open Document templates. The theory is that open source developers will ensure new word processing software variants (the open source, at least) work with the templates.
    Keeping my documents in these templates does mean, however, that I generally resave them as .doc before emailing them to people with Microsoft Office (which is really bad at recognizing non-proprietary document formats, not to mention the latest iteration of formats, the .docx & .xlsx aren’t stable & tend to lose important information). On the other hand, Neo Office (the open source version of MS Office for Macs) is still working on the comment feature.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  6. I took my pendrive and husband’s laptop to Las Vegas this summer, thinking I could tear myself away from the slot machines and swimming pool (where I read your latest Mystic book!). Alas, the old computer couldn’t read the pendrive and I had nothing but funky little squares and bizarre squiggles. So much for my ambition. Of course, first I thought the whole book was corrupted and had to fight down the nausea for a day.
    I have to convert my files to send chapters to my crit partners because they can’t read anything from my new Microsoft program. And then you get the warning: “Changes may not survive” or something equally deadly, making you think you’ve just screwed up everything forever.
    I do prefer to edit on paper, too. I catch more the old-fashioned way. I save everything to three (!!!) pendrives and one disk. If I ever get published I’ll lock up the books in my bank, whereupon I’ll probably lose the safe deposit key, LOL.
    As to long-term storage with USB drives, exactly how unrealiable is unreliable?

    Reply
  7. I took my pendrive and husband’s laptop to Las Vegas this summer, thinking I could tear myself away from the slot machines and swimming pool (where I read your latest Mystic book!). Alas, the old computer couldn’t read the pendrive and I had nothing but funky little squares and bizarre squiggles. So much for my ambition. Of course, first I thought the whole book was corrupted and had to fight down the nausea for a day.
    I have to convert my files to send chapters to my crit partners because they can’t read anything from my new Microsoft program. And then you get the warning: “Changes may not survive” or something equally deadly, making you think you’ve just screwed up everything forever.
    I do prefer to edit on paper, too. I catch more the old-fashioned way. I save everything to three (!!!) pendrives and one disk. If I ever get published I’ll lock up the books in my bank, whereupon I’ll probably lose the safe deposit key, LOL.
    As to long-term storage with USB drives, exactly how unrealiable is unreliable?

    Reply
  8. I took my pendrive and husband’s laptop to Las Vegas this summer, thinking I could tear myself away from the slot machines and swimming pool (where I read your latest Mystic book!). Alas, the old computer couldn’t read the pendrive and I had nothing but funky little squares and bizarre squiggles. So much for my ambition. Of course, first I thought the whole book was corrupted and had to fight down the nausea for a day.
    I have to convert my files to send chapters to my crit partners because they can’t read anything from my new Microsoft program. And then you get the warning: “Changes may not survive” or something equally deadly, making you think you’ve just screwed up everything forever.
    I do prefer to edit on paper, too. I catch more the old-fashioned way. I save everything to three (!!!) pendrives and one disk. If I ever get published I’ll lock up the books in my bank, whereupon I’ll probably lose the safe deposit key, LOL.
    As to long-term storage with USB drives, exactly how unrealiable is unreliable?

    Reply
  9. I took my pendrive and husband’s laptop to Las Vegas this summer, thinking I could tear myself away from the slot machines and swimming pool (where I read your latest Mystic book!). Alas, the old computer couldn’t read the pendrive and I had nothing but funky little squares and bizarre squiggles. So much for my ambition. Of course, first I thought the whole book was corrupted and had to fight down the nausea for a day.
    I have to convert my files to send chapters to my crit partners because they can’t read anything from my new Microsoft program. And then you get the warning: “Changes may not survive” or something equally deadly, making you think you’ve just screwed up everything forever.
    I do prefer to edit on paper, too. I catch more the old-fashioned way. I save everything to three (!!!) pendrives and one disk. If I ever get published I’ll lock up the books in my bank, whereupon I’ll probably lose the safe deposit key, LOL.
    As to long-term storage with USB drives, exactly how unrealiable is unreliable?

    Reply
  10. I took my pendrive and husband’s laptop to Las Vegas this summer, thinking I could tear myself away from the slot machines and swimming pool (where I read your latest Mystic book!). Alas, the old computer couldn’t read the pendrive and I had nothing but funky little squares and bizarre squiggles. So much for my ambition. Of course, first I thought the whole book was corrupted and had to fight down the nausea for a day.
    I have to convert my files to send chapters to my crit partners because they can’t read anything from my new Microsoft program. And then you get the warning: “Changes may not survive” or something equally deadly, making you think you’ve just screwed up everything forever.
    I do prefer to edit on paper, too. I catch more the old-fashioned way. I save everything to three (!!!) pendrives and one disk. If I ever get published I’ll lock up the books in my bank, whereupon I’ll probably lose the safe deposit key, LOL.
    As to long-term storage with USB drives, exactly how unrealiable is unreliable?

    Reply
  11. I’m an anachronism. I still write first drafts out longhand. I do save obsessively when I start transferring my paper draft to Word–two hard drives, a USB, and an emailed copy stored in my university account.
    Another thing that troubles me about the loss of paper copies is the sense of intimacy that’s lost as well. My brother, sister, and I read notes and letters from our mother, written in her hand, and it’s as if she has touched us again for a moment. I don’t think reading her words on a computer screen would have the same effect.

    Reply
  12. I’m an anachronism. I still write first drafts out longhand. I do save obsessively when I start transferring my paper draft to Word–two hard drives, a USB, and an emailed copy stored in my university account.
    Another thing that troubles me about the loss of paper copies is the sense of intimacy that’s lost as well. My brother, sister, and I read notes and letters from our mother, written in her hand, and it’s as if she has touched us again for a moment. I don’t think reading her words on a computer screen would have the same effect.

    Reply
  13. I’m an anachronism. I still write first drafts out longhand. I do save obsessively when I start transferring my paper draft to Word–two hard drives, a USB, and an emailed copy stored in my university account.
    Another thing that troubles me about the loss of paper copies is the sense of intimacy that’s lost as well. My brother, sister, and I read notes and letters from our mother, written in her hand, and it’s as if she has touched us again for a moment. I don’t think reading her words on a computer screen would have the same effect.

    Reply
  14. I’m an anachronism. I still write first drafts out longhand. I do save obsessively when I start transferring my paper draft to Word–two hard drives, a USB, and an emailed copy stored in my university account.
    Another thing that troubles me about the loss of paper copies is the sense of intimacy that’s lost as well. My brother, sister, and I read notes and letters from our mother, written in her hand, and it’s as if she has touched us again for a moment. I don’t think reading her words on a computer screen would have the same effect.

    Reply
  15. I’m an anachronism. I still write first drafts out longhand. I do save obsessively when I start transferring my paper draft to Word–two hard drives, a USB, and an emailed copy stored in my university account.
    Another thing that troubles me about the loss of paper copies is the sense of intimacy that’s lost as well. My brother, sister, and I read notes and letters from our mother, written in her hand, and it’s as if she has touched us again for a moment. I don’t think reading her words on a computer screen would have the same effect.

    Reply
  16. I knew our fearless readers would understand my ramblings! I shall ask my in-house techie about Open Documents, since that’s meaningless to me. Like Maggie, I get squares and squiggles just transferring material from Word 08 for Mac to my Word 03 on PC. Seamless transfers of any sort would be loverly.
    And Janga, yes, yes, yes! I have boxes of irreplaceable letters and diaries, some perfumed, some on that fragile air mail paper, all historical treasures to me. Although I suppose a moldering old floppy disk might have sentimental value to our children!

    Reply
  17. I knew our fearless readers would understand my ramblings! I shall ask my in-house techie about Open Documents, since that’s meaningless to me. Like Maggie, I get squares and squiggles just transferring material from Word 08 for Mac to my Word 03 on PC. Seamless transfers of any sort would be loverly.
    And Janga, yes, yes, yes! I have boxes of irreplaceable letters and diaries, some perfumed, some on that fragile air mail paper, all historical treasures to me. Although I suppose a moldering old floppy disk might have sentimental value to our children!

    Reply
  18. I knew our fearless readers would understand my ramblings! I shall ask my in-house techie about Open Documents, since that’s meaningless to me. Like Maggie, I get squares and squiggles just transferring material from Word 08 for Mac to my Word 03 on PC. Seamless transfers of any sort would be loverly.
    And Janga, yes, yes, yes! I have boxes of irreplaceable letters and diaries, some perfumed, some on that fragile air mail paper, all historical treasures to me. Although I suppose a moldering old floppy disk might have sentimental value to our children!

    Reply
  19. I knew our fearless readers would understand my ramblings! I shall ask my in-house techie about Open Documents, since that’s meaningless to me. Like Maggie, I get squares and squiggles just transferring material from Word 08 for Mac to my Word 03 on PC. Seamless transfers of any sort would be loverly.
    And Janga, yes, yes, yes! I have boxes of irreplaceable letters and diaries, some perfumed, some on that fragile air mail paper, all historical treasures to me. Although I suppose a moldering old floppy disk might have sentimental value to our children!

    Reply
  20. I knew our fearless readers would understand my ramblings! I shall ask my in-house techie about Open Documents, since that’s meaningless to me. Like Maggie, I get squares and squiggles just transferring material from Word 08 for Mac to my Word 03 on PC. Seamless transfers of any sort would be loverly.
    And Janga, yes, yes, yes! I have boxes of irreplaceable letters and diaries, some perfumed, some on that fragile air mail paper, all historical treasures to me. Although I suppose a moldering old floppy disk might have sentimental value to our children!

    Reply
  21. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  22. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  23. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  24. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  25. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  26. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  27. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  28. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  29. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  30. For a great laugh on how the future will interpret us without written documents, locate a copy of the book, “Motel of the Mysteries”, I think it was by David McCauley. Especially great if you have read some of the early interpretations of Troy…..

    Reply
  31. One small correction — I meant to write Open Source Document templates. They still require saving in word documents for use in MS Office, but the format should be more reliable for the long haul. Rich Text Format (.rtf) sometimes works going between word processing software, but its better for people without particular format needs (it tends to change the spacing, for example). Neo Office does a good job at opening Windows word documents, though. Again, good luck.

    Reply
  32. One small correction — I meant to write Open Source Document templates. They still require saving in word documents for use in MS Office, but the format should be more reliable for the long haul. Rich Text Format (.rtf) sometimes works going between word processing software, but its better for people without particular format needs (it tends to change the spacing, for example). Neo Office does a good job at opening Windows word documents, though. Again, good luck.

    Reply
  33. One small correction — I meant to write Open Source Document templates. They still require saving in word documents for use in MS Office, but the format should be more reliable for the long haul. Rich Text Format (.rtf) sometimes works going between word processing software, but its better for people without particular format needs (it tends to change the spacing, for example). Neo Office does a good job at opening Windows word documents, though. Again, good luck.

    Reply
  34. One small correction — I meant to write Open Source Document templates. They still require saving in word documents for use in MS Office, but the format should be more reliable for the long haul. Rich Text Format (.rtf) sometimes works going between word processing software, but its better for people without particular format needs (it tends to change the spacing, for example). Neo Office does a good job at opening Windows word documents, though. Again, good luck.

    Reply
  35. One small correction — I meant to write Open Source Document templates. They still require saving in word documents for use in MS Office, but the format should be more reliable for the long haul. Rich Text Format (.rtf) sometimes works going between word processing software, but its better for people without particular format needs (it tends to change the spacing, for example). Neo Office does a good job at opening Windows word documents, though. Again, good luck.

    Reply
  36. This all sounds scary to me I have a usb and never used it and I have a couple of E books on my computer but still love my real books have heaps of those and wouldn’t part with them, and I too love to read old letters and things hand written they are just really personal.
    I hope that one day all the modern technology becomes easy for me to use.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  37. This all sounds scary to me I have a usb and never used it and I have a couple of E books on my computer but still love my real books have heaps of those and wouldn’t part with them, and I too love to read old letters and things hand written they are just really personal.
    I hope that one day all the modern technology becomes easy for me to use.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  38. This all sounds scary to me I have a usb and never used it and I have a couple of E books on my computer but still love my real books have heaps of those and wouldn’t part with them, and I too love to read old letters and things hand written they are just really personal.
    I hope that one day all the modern technology becomes easy for me to use.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  39. This all sounds scary to me I have a usb and never used it and I have a couple of E books on my computer but still love my real books have heaps of those and wouldn’t part with them, and I too love to read old letters and things hand written they are just really personal.
    I hope that one day all the modern technology becomes easy for me to use.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  40. This all sounds scary to me I have a usb and never used it and I have a couple of E books on my computer but still love my real books have heaps of those and wouldn’t part with them, and I too love to read old letters and things hand written they are just really personal.
    I hope that one day all the modern technology becomes easy for me to use.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Alea, I’m writing that down now. And I’ll look for the McCauley. There are days when a good laugh is my sanity!
    Helen, there is nothing scary about usbs. I utterly adore mine. It’s so easy to copy things to it. And fast. But apparently there are cheaply made ones that deteriorate, and they can be scrambled by other things. And of course, a thousand years from now, computers will probably be in our heads and USBs will be difficult to plug in. “G”

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Alea, I’m writing that down now. And I’ll look for the McCauley. There are days when a good laugh is my sanity!
    Helen, there is nothing scary about usbs. I utterly adore mine. It’s so easy to copy things to it. And fast. But apparently there are cheaply made ones that deteriorate, and they can be scrambled by other things. And of course, a thousand years from now, computers will probably be in our heads and USBs will be difficult to plug in. “G”

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Alea, I’m writing that down now. And I’ll look for the McCauley. There are days when a good laugh is my sanity!
    Helen, there is nothing scary about usbs. I utterly adore mine. It’s so easy to copy things to it. And fast. But apparently there are cheaply made ones that deteriorate, and they can be scrambled by other things. And of course, a thousand years from now, computers will probably be in our heads and USBs will be difficult to plug in. “G”

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Alea, I’m writing that down now. And I’ll look for the McCauley. There are days when a good laugh is my sanity!
    Helen, there is nothing scary about usbs. I utterly adore mine. It’s so easy to copy things to it. And fast. But apparently there are cheaply made ones that deteriorate, and they can be scrambled by other things. And of course, a thousand years from now, computers will probably be in our heads and USBs will be difficult to plug in. “G”

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Alea, I’m writing that down now. And I’ll look for the McCauley. There are days when a good laugh is my sanity!
    Helen, there is nothing scary about usbs. I utterly adore mine. It’s so easy to copy things to it. And fast. But apparently there are cheaply made ones that deteriorate, and they can be scrambled by other things. And of course, a thousand years from now, computers will probably be in our heads and USBs will be difficult to plug in. “G”

    Reply
  46. “Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming? Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it. Word for Artists. Word for Business.”
    Exactly. That way, writers who don’t want their workspaces cluttered with useless icons can just buy Word for Writers. The first thing I did when I got Word was to customize my toolbar, ditching all those unnecessary icons and adding ones that I need, such as word count, headers and footers, thesaurus, etc. Yes, they’re available under Format or Tools, etc., but I wanted a button on the toolbar. One click vs. many clicks (and you don’t have to go searching for them, either.)
    Now, if someone would just develop a Word for Writers program . . .

    Reply
  47. “Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming? Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it. Word for Artists. Word for Business.”
    Exactly. That way, writers who don’t want their workspaces cluttered with useless icons can just buy Word for Writers. The first thing I did when I got Word was to customize my toolbar, ditching all those unnecessary icons and adding ones that I need, such as word count, headers and footers, thesaurus, etc. Yes, they’re available under Format or Tools, etc., but I wanted a button on the toolbar. One click vs. many clicks (and you don’t have to go searching for them, either.)
    Now, if someone would just develop a Word for Writers program . . .

    Reply
  48. “Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming? Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it. Word for Artists. Word for Business.”
    Exactly. That way, writers who don’t want their workspaces cluttered with useless icons can just buy Word for Writers. The first thing I did when I got Word was to customize my toolbar, ditching all those unnecessary icons and adding ones that I need, such as word count, headers and footers, thesaurus, etc. Yes, they’re available under Format or Tools, etc., but I wanted a button on the toolbar. One click vs. many clicks (and you don’t have to go searching for them, either.)
    Now, if someone would just develop a Word for Writers program . . .

    Reply
  49. “Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming? Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it. Word for Artists. Word for Business.”
    Exactly. That way, writers who don’t want their workspaces cluttered with useless icons can just buy Word for Writers. The first thing I did when I got Word was to customize my toolbar, ditching all those unnecessary icons and adding ones that I need, such as word count, headers and footers, thesaurus, etc. Yes, they’re available under Format or Tools, etc., but I wanted a button on the toolbar. One click vs. many clicks (and you don’t have to go searching for them, either.)
    Now, if someone would just develop a Word for Writers program . . .

    Reply
  50. “Has it not occurred to them that SPECIALIZING is the next wave of programming? Word for Writers has a lovely ring to it. Word for Artists. Word for Business.”
    Exactly. That way, writers who don’t want their workspaces cluttered with useless icons can just buy Word for Writers. The first thing I did when I got Word was to customize my toolbar, ditching all those unnecessary icons and adding ones that I need, such as word count, headers and footers, thesaurus, etc. Yes, they’re available under Format or Tools, etc., but I wanted a button on the toolbar. One click vs. many clicks (and you don’t have to go searching for them, either.)
    Now, if someone would just develop a Word for Writers program . . .

    Reply
  51. Anything that requires technology to access it is going to be a neglected asset, I think. In some dim future, who’s going to hunt up the equipment needed to view a bunch of old disks that might contain nothing of interest? And when you have the hardware, will you have the software to read it? Who’s going to remember to update their computer files so they can still be read? I have disks from 20 years ago — no way can I read them now. They’re just bits of plastic junk.
    I’m for hard copy –good old paper. Take my family photos. My father loved photography so there’s a lot of his stuff that my sisters and I have. I have some rolls of film from when I was a kid, but we don’t have a projector, and it’s a bit of an effort getting the film transferred onto disk or dvd or whatever, so they’re still sitting there, unviewed. Plus there are loads of slides–boxes and boxes. Again, it’s a chore going through them, even though I have a slide projector. And if I want to keep them I have to put them onto disk and get them printed out. Time, effort and and money.
    On the other hand I have a large box of photographs from my grandmother’s youth and and beyond, some of them dating back to the earliest days of photography. Over a hundred years old and we can just open the box or the album and enjoy them.

    Reply
  52. Anything that requires technology to access it is going to be a neglected asset, I think. In some dim future, who’s going to hunt up the equipment needed to view a bunch of old disks that might contain nothing of interest? And when you have the hardware, will you have the software to read it? Who’s going to remember to update their computer files so they can still be read? I have disks from 20 years ago — no way can I read them now. They’re just bits of plastic junk.
    I’m for hard copy –good old paper. Take my family photos. My father loved photography so there’s a lot of his stuff that my sisters and I have. I have some rolls of film from when I was a kid, but we don’t have a projector, and it’s a bit of an effort getting the film transferred onto disk or dvd or whatever, so they’re still sitting there, unviewed. Plus there are loads of slides–boxes and boxes. Again, it’s a chore going through them, even though I have a slide projector. And if I want to keep them I have to put them onto disk and get them printed out. Time, effort and and money.
    On the other hand I have a large box of photographs from my grandmother’s youth and and beyond, some of them dating back to the earliest days of photography. Over a hundred years old and we can just open the box or the album and enjoy them.

    Reply
  53. Anything that requires technology to access it is going to be a neglected asset, I think. In some dim future, who’s going to hunt up the equipment needed to view a bunch of old disks that might contain nothing of interest? And when you have the hardware, will you have the software to read it? Who’s going to remember to update their computer files so they can still be read? I have disks from 20 years ago — no way can I read them now. They’re just bits of plastic junk.
    I’m for hard copy –good old paper. Take my family photos. My father loved photography so there’s a lot of his stuff that my sisters and I have. I have some rolls of film from when I was a kid, but we don’t have a projector, and it’s a bit of an effort getting the film transferred onto disk or dvd or whatever, so they’re still sitting there, unviewed. Plus there are loads of slides–boxes and boxes. Again, it’s a chore going through them, even though I have a slide projector. And if I want to keep them I have to put them onto disk and get them printed out. Time, effort and and money.
    On the other hand I have a large box of photographs from my grandmother’s youth and and beyond, some of them dating back to the earliest days of photography. Over a hundred years old and we can just open the box or the album and enjoy them.

    Reply
  54. Anything that requires technology to access it is going to be a neglected asset, I think. In some dim future, who’s going to hunt up the equipment needed to view a bunch of old disks that might contain nothing of interest? And when you have the hardware, will you have the software to read it? Who’s going to remember to update their computer files so they can still be read? I have disks from 20 years ago — no way can I read them now. They’re just bits of plastic junk.
    I’m for hard copy –good old paper. Take my family photos. My father loved photography so there’s a lot of his stuff that my sisters and I have. I have some rolls of film from when I was a kid, but we don’t have a projector, and it’s a bit of an effort getting the film transferred onto disk or dvd or whatever, so they’re still sitting there, unviewed. Plus there are loads of slides–boxes and boxes. Again, it’s a chore going through them, even though I have a slide projector. And if I want to keep them I have to put them onto disk and get them printed out. Time, effort and and money.
    On the other hand I have a large box of photographs from my grandmother’s youth and and beyond, some of them dating back to the earliest days of photography. Over a hundred years old and we can just open the box or the album and enjoy them.

    Reply
  55. Anything that requires technology to access it is going to be a neglected asset, I think. In some dim future, who’s going to hunt up the equipment needed to view a bunch of old disks that might contain nothing of interest? And when you have the hardware, will you have the software to read it? Who’s going to remember to update their computer files so they can still be read? I have disks from 20 years ago — no way can I read them now. They’re just bits of plastic junk.
    I’m for hard copy –good old paper. Take my family photos. My father loved photography so there’s a lot of his stuff that my sisters and I have. I have some rolls of film from when I was a kid, but we don’t have a projector, and it’s a bit of an effort getting the film transferred onto disk or dvd or whatever, so they’re still sitting there, unviewed. Plus there are loads of slides–boxes and boxes. Again, it’s a chore going through them, even though I have a slide projector. And if I want to keep them I have to put them onto disk and get them printed out. Time, effort and and money.
    On the other hand I have a large box of photographs from my grandmother’s youth and and beyond, some of them dating back to the earliest days of photography. Over a hundred years old and we can just open the box or the album and enjoy them.

    Reply
  56. Sherrie, do you have Word 08? There’s a new bunch of buttons on my Mac version that I can’t get rid, stupid stuff I have utterly no use for. I like to customize my screen to minimize everything to just the most important buttons, and it annoys me to lose a whole line!
    Anne, I agree that so far, paper is certainly the most convenient format for people like us. But if people are willing to dig through archives of microfiche and whatnot to do research, then ultimately one assumes there will be archives that can read or copy all media.
    But if we ever want to copy those old books and sell them as e-books, they have to be in electronic format! You want to type them in?

    Reply
  57. Sherrie, do you have Word 08? There’s a new bunch of buttons on my Mac version that I can’t get rid, stupid stuff I have utterly no use for. I like to customize my screen to minimize everything to just the most important buttons, and it annoys me to lose a whole line!
    Anne, I agree that so far, paper is certainly the most convenient format for people like us. But if people are willing to dig through archives of microfiche and whatnot to do research, then ultimately one assumes there will be archives that can read or copy all media.
    But if we ever want to copy those old books and sell them as e-books, they have to be in electronic format! You want to type them in?

    Reply
  58. Sherrie, do you have Word 08? There’s a new bunch of buttons on my Mac version that I can’t get rid, stupid stuff I have utterly no use for. I like to customize my screen to minimize everything to just the most important buttons, and it annoys me to lose a whole line!
    Anne, I agree that so far, paper is certainly the most convenient format for people like us. But if people are willing to dig through archives of microfiche and whatnot to do research, then ultimately one assumes there will be archives that can read or copy all media.
    But if we ever want to copy those old books and sell them as e-books, they have to be in electronic format! You want to type them in?

    Reply
  59. Sherrie, do you have Word 08? There’s a new bunch of buttons on my Mac version that I can’t get rid, stupid stuff I have utterly no use for. I like to customize my screen to minimize everything to just the most important buttons, and it annoys me to lose a whole line!
    Anne, I agree that so far, paper is certainly the most convenient format for people like us. But if people are willing to dig through archives of microfiche and whatnot to do research, then ultimately one assumes there will be archives that can read or copy all media.
    But if we ever want to copy those old books and sell them as e-books, they have to be in electronic format! You want to type them in?

    Reply
  60. Sherrie, do you have Word 08? There’s a new bunch of buttons on my Mac version that I can’t get rid, stupid stuff I have utterly no use for. I like to customize my screen to minimize everything to just the most important buttons, and it annoys me to lose a whole line!
    Anne, I agree that so far, paper is certainly the most convenient format for people like us. But if people are willing to dig through archives of microfiche and whatnot to do research, then ultimately one assumes there will be archives that can read or copy all media.
    But if we ever want to copy those old books and sell them as e-books, they have to be in electronic format! You want to type them in?

    Reply
  61. It’s not so much that I doubt archivists will have the equipment to read stuff — they will have. But first the stuff has to get to the archivists.
    When cleaning out attics or cupboards or old boxes, someone needs to look and say, Oh, this looks interesting.
    With hard copy you can tell at a glance what you have ans whether it’s interesting (and even so a lot of interesting stuff gets tossed because relatives can’t be bothered looking). But who’s going to take a pile of dusty old computer disks and chase up specialist equipment on the off-chance they’ll contain something interesting? Not many, I bet. Not unless the person is already famous.
    And what about email? Gone will be the fascinating letter collections of the past. Email is ephemeral unless someone makes a point of keeping copies.

    Reply
  62. It’s not so much that I doubt archivists will have the equipment to read stuff — they will have. But first the stuff has to get to the archivists.
    When cleaning out attics or cupboards or old boxes, someone needs to look and say, Oh, this looks interesting.
    With hard copy you can tell at a glance what you have ans whether it’s interesting (and even so a lot of interesting stuff gets tossed because relatives can’t be bothered looking). But who’s going to take a pile of dusty old computer disks and chase up specialist equipment on the off-chance they’ll contain something interesting? Not many, I bet. Not unless the person is already famous.
    And what about email? Gone will be the fascinating letter collections of the past. Email is ephemeral unless someone makes a point of keeping copies.

    Reply
  63. It’s not so much that I doubt archivists will have the equipment to read stuff — they will have. But first the stuff has to get to the archivists.
    When cleaning out attics or cupboards or old boxes, someone needs to look and say, Oh, this looks interesting.
    With hard copy you can tell at a glance what you have ans whether it’s interesting (and even so a lot of interesting stuff gets tossed because relatives can’t be bothered looking). But who’s going to take a pile of dusty old computer disks and chase up specialist equipment on the off-chance they’ll contain something interesting? Not many, I bet. Not unless the person is already famous.
    And what about email? Gone will be the fascinating letter collections of the past. Email is ephemeral unless someone makes a point of keeping copies.

    Reply
  64. It’s not so much that I doubt archivists will have the equipment to read stuff — they will have. But first the stuff has to get to the archivists.
    When cleaning out attics or cupboards or old boxes, someone needs to look and say, Oh, this looks interesting.
    With hard copy you can tell at a glance what you have ans whether it’s interesting (and even so a lot of interesting stuff gets tossed because relatives can’t be bothered looking). But who’s going to take a pile of dusty old computer disks and chase up specialist equipment on the off-chance they’ll contain something interesting? Not many, I bet. Not unless the person is already famous.
    And what about email? Gone will be the fascinating letter collections of the past. Email is ephemeral unless someone makes a point of keeping copies.

    Reply
  65. It’s not so much that I doubt archivists will have the equipment to read stuff — they will have. But first the stuff has to get to the archivists.
    When cleaning out attics or cupboards or old boxes, someone needs to look and say, Oh, this looks interesting.
    With hard copy you can tell at a glance what you have ans whether it’s interesting (and even so a lot of interesting stuff gets tossed because relatives can’t be bothered looking). But who’s going to take a pile of dusty old computer disks and chase up specialist equipment on the off-chance they’ll contain something interesting? Not many, I bet. Not unless the person is already famous.
    And what about email? Gone will be the fascinating letter collections of the past. Email is ephemeral unless someone makes a point of keeping copies.

    Reply

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