Old Voice, New Voice

W-DeskLady2 Pat here, hastily stepping in for Anne who has been doing entirely too much playing lately!  She’ll be back next week to interview me while I’m at the RT Book Review convention in L.A., so I suppose I shouldn’t tease her about skipping out.

As many of you know, I’ve been converting some of my older books into digital format. For most authors, this is a basic process if they’re willing to throw a few dollars at it and let someone else do the work. But my inner control freak emerges when confronted with a manuscript I can change after all these years.

The contemporary romances I’ve already put up were relatively recent books and didn’t require a lot of work, but now I’m digging into twenty-year-old historicals created on prehistoric equipment. I have Paperroses been working on just four books for six months now. I like to think I’m closer to publishing them, but I may be kidding myself. Not only were the scans incredibly, horribly bad on these books, but my voice….  Argh! I can’t believe I wrote that way.

And I have to blame it on voice. There is nothing inherently incorrect in writing a paragraph where the hero “is going to” do something and if that doesn’t happen, he’s “going to do” something else. It gets a little iffier when he’s “got to go do” it but these are westerns. The language isn’t precise. But it starts piling up until after a while, the “gots” and “going tos” become an inescapable rhythm that causes modern day Pat to scream bloody murder.

And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”?  Want to take that one on?  Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.”  Double argh!!!!

How can I let these books loose into the wild? One of them was a Rita nominee! But I simply can’t Denim lace release the books in their original format. Sorry. The stories are fine, the characters are strong, I would have done a LOT of things differently today, but I don’t want to monkey with the original stories. But by golly gee, I can at least clarify which “he” or “him” is doing what so I don’t spend half an hour scratching my head wondering who is on the roof and who is setting the barn on fire!

Do any of you go back and read your older “keepers” and wonder what in heck you were thinking when you read and loved them the first time? I can remember comparing Kathleen Woodiwiss’s voice to Shakespeare in my early years. Now I can’t wade through all the extraneous prose. Do you have any romance books that you can still go back to and enjoy without noticing the idiosyncrasies of the period?

85 thoughts on “Old Voice, New Voice”

  1. After thinking about it a moment, the authors who have remained timeless (for me) are LyVyrle Spencer and Maggie Osborne. To this day, their writing holds up, and I think it’s because they didn’t use a lot of purple prose.
    Best of luck with editing those vintage books. Yee-ha! Westerns!
    Did you have a site long ago called “Denim & Lace?” Back before I had a computer, and therefore didn’t know any of you, someone printed some pages for me from a site with that title. The pages disappeared long ago, but I’ve always wondered since if that was you.

    Reply
  2. After thinking about it a moment, the authors who have remained timeless (for me) are LyVyrle Spencer and Maggie Osborne. To this day, their writing holds up, and I think it’s because they didn’t use a lot of purple prose.
    Best of luck with editing those vintage books. Yee-ha! Westerns!
    Did you have a site long ago called “Denim & Lace?” Back before I had a computer, and therefore didn’t know any of you, someone printed some pages for me from a site with that title. The pages disappeared long ago, but I’ve always wondered since if that was you.

    Reply
  3. After thinking about it a moment, the authors who have remained timeless (for me) are LyVyrle Spencer and Maggie Osborne. To this day, their writing holds up, and I think it’s because they didn’t use a lot of purple prose.
    Best of luck with editing those vintage books. Yee-ha! Westerns!
    Did you have a site long ago called “Denim & Lace?” Back before I had a computer, and therefore didn’t know any of you, someone printed some pages for me from a site with that title. The pages disappeared long ago, but I’ve always wondered since if that was you.

    Reply
  4. After thinking about it a moment, the authors who have remained timeless (for me) are LyVyrle Spencer and Maggie Osborne. To this day, their writing holds up, and I think it’s because they didn’t use a lot of purple prose.
    Best of luck with editing those vintage books. Yee-ha! Westerns!
    Did you have a site long ago called “Denim & Lace?” Back before I had a computer, and therefore didn’t know any of you, someone printed some pages for me from a site with that title. The pages disappeared long ago, but I’ve always wondered since if that was you.

    Reply
  5. After thinking about it a moment, the authors who have remained timeless (for me) are LyVyrle Spencer and Maggie Osborne. To this day, their writing holds up, and I think it’s because they didn’t use a lot of purple prose.
    Best of luck with editing those vintage books. Yee-ha! Westerns!
    Did you have a site long ago called “Denim & Lace?” Back before I had a computer, and therefore didn’t know any of you, someone printed some pages for me from a site with that title. The pages disappeared long ago, but I’ve always wondered since if that was you.

    Reply
  6. Patricia
    I have all my older books on my keeper shelf and I plan on re reading them one day but I have so many new books on the TBR pile that I think I would feel guilty not reading them but maybe there is another sub conscious reason I haven’t as yet re read them. I am not sure how I would feel re reading some of them I know my sister often re reads the older ones and loves them.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  7. Patricia
    I have all my older books on my keeper shelf and I plan on re reading them one day but I have so many new books on the TBR pile that I think I would feel guilty not reading them but maybe there is another sub conscious reason I haven’t as yet re read them. I am not sure how I would feel re reading some of them I know my sister often re reads the older ones and loves them.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  8. Patricia
    I have all my older books on my keeper shelf and I plan on re reading them one day but I have so many new books on the TBR pile that I think I would feel guilty not reading them but maybe there is another sub conscious reason I haven’t as yet re read them. I am not sure how I would feel re reading some of them I know my sister often re reads the older ones and loves them.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  9. Patricia
    I have all my older books on my keeper shelf and I plan on re reading them one day but I have so many new books on the TBR pile that I think I would feel guilty not reading them but maybe there is another sub conscious reason I haven’t as yet re read them. I am not sure how I would feel re reading some of them I know my sister often re reads the older ones and loves them.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  10. Patricia
    I have all my older books on my keeper shelf and I plan on re reading them one day but I have so many new books on the TBR pile that I think I would feel guilty not reading them but maybe there is another sub conscious reason I haven’t as yet re read them. I am not sure how I would feel re reading some of them I know my sister often re reads the older ones and loves them.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  11. Yep, I have some on my keeper shelves that go back in time to the 1930s. Zane Grey, Max Brand, Maurice Walsh, and a few others. More modern ones are JAK and her many other names. Jayne Castle and her flower series got me* started on romance. I just recently re-read some of Jo Beverley’s early books.
    Some of the language may be out of current vogue but I still enjoy re-reading and re-read often.

    Reply
  12. Yep, I have some on my keeper shelves that go back in time to the 1930s. Zane Grey, Max Brand, Maurice Walsh, and a few others. More modern ones are JAK and her many other names. Jayne Castle and her flower series got me* started on romance. I just recently re-read some of Jo Beverley’s early books.
    Some of the language may be out of current vogue but I still enjoy re-reading and re-read often.

    Reply
  13. Yep, I have some on my keeper shelves that go back in time to the 1930s. Zane Grey, Max Brand, Maurice Walsh, and a few others. More modern ones are JAK and her many other names. Jayne Castle and her flower series got me* started on romance. I just recently re-read some of Jo Beverley’s early books.
    Some of the language may be out of current vogue but I still enjoy re-reading and re-read often.

    Reply
  14. Yep, I have some on my keeper shelves that go back in time to the 1930s. Zane Grey, Max Brand, Maurice Walsh, and a few others. More modern ones are JAK and her many other names. Jayne Castle and her flower series got me* started on romance. I just recently re-read some of Jo Beverley’s early books.
    Some of the language may be out of current vogue but I still enjoy re-reading and re-read often.

    Reply
  15. Yep, I have some on my keeper shelves that go back in time to the 1930s. Zane Grey, Max Brand, Maurice Walsh, and a few others. More modern ones are JAK and her many other names. Jayne Castle and her flower series got me* started on romance. I just recently re-read some of Jo Beverley’s early books.
    Some of the language may be out of current vogue but I still enjoy re-reading and re-read often.

    Reply
  16. “And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”? Want to take that one on? Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.” Double argh!!!!”
    Oh,I don’t think that’s so terrible. The language conveys a nice sense of a person feeling a bit detached from reality due to overwhelming emotion and making such motions on autopilot, as it were. Several times after an argument with a loved one, I have been so stunned that I wasn’t quite in control of myself, and getting out of the room was a case of ‘feet don’t fail me now’.
    I don’t think you should be so hard and perfectionistic on your writing. The books were good as they stand, and if you did make mistakes, you learned from them. If it were up to me, I’d say spend the time telling a new story instead of polishing up the old ones.

    Reply
  17. “And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”? Want to take that one on? Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.” Double argh!!!!”
    Oh,I don’t think that’s so terrible. The language conveys a nice sense of a person feeling a bit detached from reality due to overwhelming emotion and making such motions on autopilot, as it were. Several times after an argument with a loved one, I have been so stunned that I wasn’t quite in control of myself, and getting out of the room was a case of ‘feet don’t fail me now’.
    I don’t think you should be so hard and perfectionistic on your writing. The books were good as they stand, and if you did make mistakes, you learned from them. If it were up to me, I’d say spend the time telling a new story instead of polishing up the old ones.

    Reply
  18. “And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”? Want to take that one on? Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.” Double argh!!!!”
    Oh,I don’t think that’s so terrible. The language conveys a nice sense of a person feeling a bit detached from reality due to overwhelming emotion and making such motions on autopilot, as it were. Several times after an argument with a loved one, I have been so stunned that I wasn’t quite in control of myself, and getting out of the room was a case of ‘feet don’t fail me now’.
    I don’t think you should be so hard and perfectionistic on your writing. The books were good as they stand, and if you did make mistakes, you learned from them. If it were up to me, I’d say spend the time telling a new story instead of polishing up the old ones.

    Reply
  19. “And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”? Want to take that one on? Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.” Double argh!!!!”
    Oh,I don’t think that’s so terrible. The language conveys a nice sense of a person feeling a bit detached from reality due to overwhelming emotion and making such motions on autopilot, as it were. Several times after an argument with a loved one, I have been so stunned that I wasn’t quite in control of myself, and getting out of the room was a case of ‘feet don’t fail me now’.
    I don’t think you should be so hard and perfectionistic on your writing. The books were good as they stand, and if you did make mistakes, you learned from them. If it were up to me, I’d say spend the time telling a new story instead of polishing up the old ones.

    Reply
  20. “And that’s just the tip of the monstrous iceberg. How about “Her hands felt his chest”? Want to take that one on? Their hands and their eyes and their feet did a lot of things that would have been far easier to state had I just said “She rubbed his chest” or “She walked away” instead of “Her feet carried her to the door.” Double argh!!!!”
    Oh,I don’t think that’s so terrible. The language conveys a nice sense of a person feeling a bit detached from reality due to overwhelming emotion and making such motions on autopilot, as it were. Several times after an argument with a loved one, I have been so stunned that I wasn’t quite in control of myself, and getting out of the room was a case of ‘feet don’t fail me now’.
    I don’t think you should be so hard and perfectionistic on your writing. The books were good as they stand, and if you did make mistakes, you learned from them. If it were up to me, I’d say spend the time telling a new story instead of polishing up the old ones.

    Reply
  21. Irma, no, I was never so computer savvy as to create a website for one of my books. Denim and Lace was a line in a popular song back in the day, so it spread through the collective unconscious, I think. You’re right about Maggie, though. She’s timeless. Now I have to go back and look at Lavyrle again.
    Helen, I hear ya. See above. There are only so many hours in the day and way too many new books to read, so I don’t go back as often as I should.
    And Louis, if you can still go back and read Zane, I am much relieved. Maybe it is just me who is getting too picky with age, even though I’ve never been a strict grammarian.
    Janice, bless you! If I thought I actually put that much thinking into those lines, I would give you a halo for recognizing it. “G” But in my case, it was pure laziness, lack of time, and bad equipment. But I like the way you think. My writing was instinctive then, so maybe I’ll examine those passages a little closer.

    Reply
  22. Irma, no, I was never so computer savvy as to create a website for one of my books. Denim and Lace was a line in a popular song back in the day, so it spread through the collective unconscious, I think. You’re right about Maggie, though. She’s timeless. Now I have to go back and look at Lavyrle again.
    Helen, I hear ya. See above. There are only so many hours in the day and way too many new books to read, so I don’t go back as often as I should.
    And Louis, if you can still go back and read Zane, I am much relieved. Maybe it is just me who is getting too picky with age, even though I’ve never been a strict grammarian.
    Janice, bless you! If I thought I actually put that much thinking into those lines, I would give you a halo for recognizing it. “G” But in my case, it was pure laziness, lack of time, and bad equipment. But I like the way you think. My writing was instinctive then, so maybe I’ll examine those passages a little closer.

    Reply
  23. Irma, no, I was never so computer savvy as to create a website for one of my books. Denim and Lace was a line in a popular song back in the day, so it spread through the collective unconscious, I think. You’re right about Maggie, though. She’s timeless. Now I have to go back and look at Lavyrle again.
    Helen, I hear ya. See above. There are only so many hours in the day and way too many new books to read, so I don’t go back as often as I should.
    And Louis, if you can still go back and read Zane, I am much relieved. Maybe it is just me who is getting too picky with age, even though I’ve never been a strict grammarian.
    Janice, bless you! If I thought I actually put that much thinking into those lines, I would give you a halo for recognizing it. “G” But in my case, it was pure laziness, lack of time, and bad equipment. But I like the way you think. My writing was instinctive then, so maybe I’ll examine those passages a little closer.

    Reply
  24. Irma, no, I was never so computer savvy as to create a website for one of my books. Denim and Lace was a line in a popular song back in the day, so it spread through the collective unconscious, I think. You’re right about Maggie, though. She’s timeless. Now I have to go back and look at Lavyrle again.
    Helen, I hear ya. See above. There are only so many hours in the day and way too many new books to read, so I don’t go back as often as I should.
    And Louis, if you can still go back and read Zane, I am much relieved. Maybe it is just me who is getting too picky with age, even though I’ve never been a strict grammarian.
    Janice, bless you! If I thought I actually put that much thinking into those lines, I would give you a halo for recognizing it. “G” But in my case, it was pure laziness, lack of time, and bad equipment. But I like the way you think. My writing was instinctive then, so maybe I’ll examine those passages a little closer.

    Reply
  25. Irma, no, I was never so computer savvy as to create a website for one of my books. Denim and Lace was a line in a popular song back in the day, so it spread through the collective unconscious, I think. You’re right about Maggie, though. She’s timeless. Now I have to go back and look at Lavyrle again.
    Helen, I hear ya. See above. There are only so many hours in the day and way too many new books to read, so I don’t go back as often as I should.
    And Louis, if you can still go back and read Zane, I am much relieved. Maybe it is just me who is getting too picky with age, even though I’ve never been a strict grammarian.
    Janice, bless you! If I thought I actually put that much thinking into those lines, I would give you a halo for recognizing it. “G” But in my case, it was pure laziness, lack of time, and bad equipment. But I like the way you think. My writing was instinctive then, so maybe I’ll examine those passages a little closer.

    Reply
  26. Everyone wrote all those “is going to”‘s and “got”‘s, not just you, Pat. Now they tell us not to, but no one told you then.
    And readers don’t read the way authors do. Readers want a good story. If the story grabs them, they don’t care about all the “is”‘s and “got”‘s. Or the dreaded head-hopping the “experts” use to scare new authors nowadays.

    Reply
  27. Everyone wrote all those “is going to”‘s and “got”‘s, not just you, Pat. Now they tell us not to, but no one told you then.
    And readers don’t read the way authors do. Readers want a good story. If the story grabs them, they don’t care about all the “is”‘s and “got”‘s. Or the dreaded head-hopping the “experts” use to scare new authors nowadays.

    Reply
  28. Everyone wrote all those “is going to”‘s and “got”‘s, not just you, Pat. Now they tell us not to, but no one told you then.
    And readers don’t read the way authors do. Readers want a good story. If the story grabs them, they don’t care about all the “is”‘s and “got”‘s. Or the dreaded head-hopping the “experts” use to scare new authors nowadays.

    Reply
  29. Everyone wrote all those “is going to”‘s and “got”‘s, not just you, Pat. Now they tell us not to, but no one told you then.
    And readers don’t read the way authors do. Readers want a good story. If the story grabs them, they don’t care about all the “is”‘s and “got”‘s. Or the dreaded head-hopping the “experts” use to scare new authors nowadays.

    Reply
  30. Everyone wrote all those “is going to”‘s and “got”‘s, not just you, Pat. Now they tell us not to, but no one told you then.
    And readers don’t read the way authors do. Readers want a good story. If the story grabs them, they don’t care about all the “is”‘s and “got”‘s. Or the dreaded head-hopping the “experts” use to scare new authors nowadays.

    Reply
  31. Must respectfully disagree with Linda B as to how readers read. While it may be true that readers in general care less about language than authors in general (a not unexpected situation), I think there is a fairly large subset of readers who care very much about language. Plot and character may still be more important, but when I think of all of the online posts about how this person was pulled out of the story by an anachronistic or clumsy term or that person put the book back on the shelf because of the purple prose, the impression remains that language matters. Or the overall impression may be lowered because the voice was too passive (or whatever). For myself, I’d say I cared about the writing as writing, but I also know I’ve got favorite books which don’t quite measure up to any number of theoretical standards but which I love anyway.

    Reply
  32. Must respectfully disagree with Linda B as to how readers read. While it may be true that readers in general care less about language than authors in general (a not unexpected situation), I think there is a fairly large subset of readers who care very much about language. Plot and character may still be more important, but when I think of all of the online posts about how this person was pulled out of the story by an anachronistic or clumsy term or that person put the book back on the shelf because of the purple prose, the impression remains that language matters. Or the overall impression may be lowered because the voice was too passive (or whatever). For myself, I’d say I cared about the writing as writing, but I also know I’ve got favorite books which don’t quite measure up to any number of theoretical standards but which I love anyway.

    Reply
  33. Must respectfully disagree with Linda B as to how readers read. While it may be true that readers in general care less about language than authors in general (a not unexpected situation), I think there is a fairly large subset of readers who care very much about language. Plot and character may still be more important, but when I think of all of the online posts about how this person was pulled out of the story by an anachronistic or clumsy term or that person put the book back on the shelf because of the purple prose, the impression remains that language matters. Or the overall impression may be lowered because the voice was too passive (or whatever). For myself, I’d say I cared about the writing as writing, but I also know I’ve got favorite books which don’t quite measure up to any number of theoretical standards but which I love anyway.

    Reply
  34. Must respectfully disagree with Linda B as to how readers read. While it may be true that readers in general care less about language than authors in general (a not unexpected situation), I think there is a fairly large subset of readers who care very much about language. Plot and character may still be more important, but when I think of all of the online posts about how this person was pulled out of the story by an anachronistic or clumsy term or that person put the book back on the shelf because of the purple prose, the impression remains that language matters. Or the overall impression may be lowered because the voice was too passive (or whatever). For myself, I’d say I cared about the writing as writing, but I also know I’ve got favorite books which don’t quite measure up to any number of theoretical standards but which I love anyway.

    Reply
  35. Must respectfully disagree with Linda B as to how readers read. While it may be true that readers in general care less about language than authors in general (a not unexpected situation), I think there is a fairly large subset of readers who care very much about language. Plot and character may still be more important, but when I think of all of the online posts about how this person was pulled out of the story by an anachronistic or clumsy term or that person put the book back on the shelf because of the purple prose, the impression remains that language matters. Or the overall impression may be lowered because the voice was too passive (or whatever). For myself, I’d say I cared about the writing as writing, but I also know I’ve got favorite books which don’t quite measure up to any number of theoretical standards but which I love anyway.

    Reply
  36. Susan, I’ll agree there are people out there who get thrown out of the story by anachronistic terms. I do, too–I hate “OK”‘s in Regencies, and I hate “off of” in any book. And I pick up on title errors and some historical errors. But if I like the story enough, I ignore the errors and keep going.
    The main reason I toss a book is if I hate the story. I can hate a story for many reasons, but the only language that causes me to throw a book against the wall is coarse or foul language.

    Reply
  37. Susan, I’ll agree there are people out there who get thrown out of the story by anachronistic terms. I do, too–I hate “OK”‘s in Regencies, and I hate “off of” in any book. And I pick up on title errors and some historical errors. But if I like the story enough, I ignore the errors and keep going.
    The main reason I toss a book is if I hate the story. I can hate a story for many reasons, but the only language that causes me to throw a book against the wall is coarse or foul language.

    Reply
  38. Susan, I’ll agree there are people out there who get thrown out of the story by anachronistic terms. I do, too–I hate “OK”‘s in Regencies, and I hate “off of” in any book. And I pick up on title errors and some historical errors. But if I like the story enough, I ignore the errors and keep going.
    The main reason I toss a book is if I hate the story. I can hate a story for many reasons, but the only language that causes me to throw a book against the wall is coarse or foul language.

    Reply
  39. Susan, I’ll agree there are people out there who get thrown out of the story by anachronistic terms. I do, too–I hate “OK”‘s in Regencies, and I hate “off of” in any book. And I pick up on title errors and some historical errors. But if I like the story enough, I ignore the errors and keep going.
    The main reason I toss a book is if I hate the story. I can hate a story for many reasons, but the only language that causes me to throw a book against the wall is coarse or foul language.

    Reply
  40. Susan, I’ll agree there are people out there who get thrown out of the story by anachronistic terms. I do, too–I hate “OK”‘s in Regencies, and I hate “off of” in any book. And I pick up on title errors and some historical errors. But if I like the story enough, I ignore the errors and keep going.
    The main reason I toss a book is if I hate the story. I can hate a story for many reasons, but the only language that causes me to throw a book against the wall is coarse or foul language.

    Reply
  41. It’s possible that “voice” covers both language and the author’s ability to pull in readers even if the language isn’t perfect. But I’m not that sure of myself that I want to put off readers by too much repetition and too much passivity. Even if the story is strong, it can be diluted by the language, IMO. But yeah, I suspect if the story is strong enough, I’ll ignore a lot.

    Reply
  42. It’s possible that “voice” covers both language and the author’s ability to pull in readers even if the language isn’t perfect. But I’m not that sure of myself that I want to put off readers by too much repetition and too much passivity. Even if the story is strong, it can be diluted by the language, IMO. But yeah, I suspect if the story is strong enough, I’ll ignore a lot.

    Reply
  43. It’s possible that “voice” covers both language and the author’s ability to pull in readers even if the language isn’t perfect. But I’m not that sure of myself that I want to put off readers by too much repetition and too much passivity. Even if the story is strong, it can be diluted by the language, IMO. But yeah, I suspect if the story is strong enough, I’ll ignore a lot.

    Reply
  44. It’s possible that “voice” covers both language and the author’s ability to pull in readers even if the language isn’t perfect. But I’m not that sure of myself that I want to put off readers by too much repetition and too much passivity. Even if the story is strong, it can be diluted by the language, IMO. But yeah, I suspect if the story is strong enough, I’ll ignore a lot.

    Reply
  45. It’s possible that “voice” covers both language and the author’s ability to pull in readers even if the language isn’t perfect. But I’m not that sure of myself that I want to put off readers by too much repetition and too much passivity. Even if the story is strong, it can be diluted by the language, IMO. But yeah, I suspect if the story is strong enough, I’ll ignore a lot.

    Reply
  46. Pat, thanks for standing in for me while I’m away on writing retreat – working hard, please note — not playing! 😉 Right now I have a tiny window of opportunity to go on line, so i’m just dashing in to say I still have my original copy of Denim and Lace. Loved it. I also have a lot of old keepers that I still enjoy, regardless of the language. Heaps of La Vyrle Spencer, Amanda Quick/JAK, Johanna Lindsey and all my MJPs.
    I think the thing that’s most likely to drag me to the world of e-book reading is the republishing of beloved out-of-print books or out-of-print books by beloved authors.
    As for early mistakes in writing, I think we all made them — and no doubt I’m still making some of them. But as long as the story and characters shine and catch me emotionally, I can forgive almost anything.

    Reply
  47. Pat, thanks for standing in for me while I’m away on writing retreat – working hard, please note — not playing! 😉 Right now I have a tiny window of opportunity to go on line, so i’m just dashing in to say I still have my original copy of Denim and Lace. Loved it. I also have a lot of old keepers that I still enjoy, regardless of the language. Heaps of La Vyrle Spencer, Amanda Quick/JAK, Johanna Lindsey and all my MJPs.
    I think the thing that’s most likely to drag me to the world of e-book reading is the republishing of beloved out-of-print books or out-of-print books by beloved authors.
    As for early mistakes in writing, I think we all made them — and no doubt I’m still making some of them. But as long as the story and characters shine and catch me emotionally, I can forgive almost anything.

    Reply
  48. Pat, thanks for standing in for me while I’m away on writing retreat – working hard, please note — not playing! 😉 Right now I have a tiny window of opportunity to go on line, so i’m just dashing in to say I still have my original copy of Denim and Lace. Loved it. I also have a lot of old keepers that I still enjoy, regardless of the language. Heaps of La Vyrle Spencer, Amanda Quick/JAK, Johanna Lindsey and all my MJPs.
    I think the thing that’s most likely to drag me to the world of e-book reading is the republishing of beloved out-of-print books or out-of-print books by beloved authors.
    As for early mistakes in writing, I think we all made them — and no doubt I’m still making some of them. But as long as the story and characters shine and catch me emotionally, I can forgive almost anything.

    Reply
  49. Pat, thanks for standing in for me while I’m away on writing retreat – working hard, please note — not playing! 😉 Right now I have a tiny window of opportunity to go on line, so i’m just dashing in to say I still have my original copy of Denim and Lace. Loved it. I also have a lot of old keepers that I still enjoy, regardless of the language. Heaps of La Vyrle Spencer, Amanda Quick/JAK, Johanna Lindsey and all my MJPs.
    I think the thing that’s most likely to drag me to the world of e-book reading is the republishing of beloved out-of-print books or out-of-print books by beloved authors.
    As for early mistakes in writing, I think we all made them — and no doubt I’m still making some of them. But as long as the story and characters shine and catch me emotionally, I can forgive almost anything.

    Reply
  50. Pat, thanks for standing in for me while I’m away on writing retreat – working hard, please note — not playing! 😉 Right now I have a tiny window of opportunity to go on line, so i’m just dashing in to say I still have my original copy of Denim and Lace. Loved it. I also have a lot of old keepers that I still enjoy, regardless of the language. Heaps of La Vyrle Spencer, Amanda Quick/JAK, Johanna Lindsey and all my MJPs.
    I think the thing that’s most likely to drag me to the world of e-book reading is the republishing of beloved out-of-print books or out-of-print books by beloved authors.
    As for early mistakes in writing, I think we all made them — and no doubt I’m still making some of them. But as long as the story and characters shine and catch me emotionally, I can forgive almost anything.

    Reply
  51. Aloha, Pat! Congrats on your RITA nomination! Like Anne, I can reread Amanda Quick over and over – her humor is funny every time!
    Looking forward to seeing you at RT!

    Reply
  52. Aloha, Pat! Congrats on your RITA nomination! Like Anne, I can reread Amanda Quick over and over – her humor is funny every time!
    Looking forward to seeing you at RT!

    Reply
  53. Aloha, Pat! Congrats on your RITA nomination! Like Anne, I can reread Amanda Quick over and over – her humor is funny every time!
    Looking forward to seeing you at RT!

    Reply
  54. Aloha, Pat! Congrats on your RITA nomination! Like Anne, I can reread Amanda Quick over and over – her humor is funny every time!
    Looking forward to seeing you at RT!

    Reply
  55. Aloha, Pat! Congrats on your RITA nomination! Like Anne, I can reread Amanda Quick over and over – her humor is funny every time!
    Looking forward to seeing you at RT!

    Reply
  56. She says she’s on retreat, but we all know she’s sitting there in glorious sunshine, admiring the cabana boys. “G” But it’s good to know Denim and Lace is still out there in paper somewhere.
    Thank you, Kim. And yes, JAK/Quick has a voice that was strong from the start and never changed. Extreme talent there!

    Reply
  57. She says she’s on retreat, but we all know she’s sitting there in glorious sunshine, admiring the cabana boys. “G” But it’s good to know Denim and Lace is still out there in paper somewhere.
    Thank you, Kim. And yes, JAK/Quick has a voice that was strong from the start and never changed. Extreme talent there!

    Reply
  58. She says she’s on retreat, but we all know she’s sitting there in glorious sunshine, admiring the cabana boys. “G” But it’s good to know Denim and Lace is still out there in paper somewhere.
    Thank you, Kim. And yes, JAK/Quick has a voice that was strong from the start and never changed. Extreme talent there!

    Reply
  59. She says she’s on retreat, but we all know she’s sitting there in glorious sunshine, admiring the cabana boys. “G” But it’s good to know Denim and Lace is still out there in paper somewhere.
    Thank you, Kim. And yes, JAK/Quick has a voice that was strong from the start and never changed. Extreme talent there!

    Reply
  60. She says she’s on retreat, but we all know she’s sitting there in glorious sunshine, admiring the cabana boys. “G” But it’s good to know Denim and Lace is still out there in paper somewhere.
    Thank you, Kim. And yes, JAK/Quick has a voice that was strong from the start and never changed. Extreme talent there!

    Reply
  61. Oh, so guilty as charged. I thought I could rework one of my first under the bed books but find it pretty impossible. And if I’m going to write something basically from scratch, I might as well pick new characters who will surprise me. My voice only dates from 2003ish but it’s amazing how it’s changed (not that it’s perfect, LOL).

    Reply
  62. Oh, so guilty as charged. I thought I could rework one of my first under the bed books but find it pretty impossible. And if I’m going to write something basically from scratch, I might as well pick new characters who will surprise me. My voice only dates from 2003ish but it’s amazing how it’s changed (not that it’s perfect, LOL).

    Reply
  63. Oh, so guilty as charged. I thought I could rework one of my first under the bed books but find it pretty impossible. And if I’m going to write something basically from scratch, I might as well pick new characters who will surprise me. My voice only dates from 2003ish but it’s amazing how it’s changed (not that it’s perfect, LOL).

    Reply
  64. Oh, so guilty as charged. I thought I could rework one of my first under the bed books but find it pretty impossible. And if I’m going to write something basically from scratch, I might as well pick new characters who will surprise me. My voice only dates from 2003ish but it’s amazing how it’s changed (not that it’s perfect, LOL).

    Reply
  65. Oh, so guilty as charged. I thought I could rework one of my first under the bed books but find it pretty impossible. And if I’m going to write something basically from scratch, I might as well pick new characters who will surprise me. My voice only dates from 2003ish but it’s amazing how it’s changed (not that it’s perfect, LOL).

    Reply
  66. I reread my books with one exception. My first romance novel was Sweet Savage Love. As a 15 year old it was WOW. Rereading it after 20+ years of marriage, I skipped most of it, too much sex and angst. That is not the way two people who love each other act. But the characters are still compelling, I just wish they acted as grown ups. I gather the reader’s experience is just as important as the author’s words. A good book is a true partnership.
    And I did marry a man with dark hair and light eyes.

    Reply
  67. I reread my books with one exception. My first romance novel was Sweet Savage Love. As a 15 year old it was WOW. Rereading it after 20+ years of marriage, I skipped most of it, too much sex and angst. That is not the way two people who love each other act. But the characters are still compelling, I just wish they acted as grown ups. I gather the reader’s experience is just as important as the author’s words. A good book is a true partnership.
    And I did marry a man with dark hair and light eyes.

    Reply
  68. I reread my books with one exception. My first romance novel was Sweet Savage Love. As a 15 year old it was WOW. Rereading it after 20+ years of marriage, I skipped most of it, too much sex and angst. That is not the way two people who love each other act. But the characters are still compelling, I just wish they acted as grown ups. I gather the reader’s experience is just as important as the author’s words. A good book is a true partnership.
    And I did marry a man with dark hair and light eyes.

    Reply
  69. I reread my books with one exception. My first romance novel was Sweet Savage Love. As a 15 year old it was WOW. Rereading it after 20+ years of marriage, I skipped most of it, too much sex and angst. That is not the way two people who love each other act. But the characters are still compelling, I just wish they acted as grown ups. I gather the reader’s experience is just as important as the author’s words. A good book is a true partnership.
    And I did marry a man with dark hair and light eyes.

    Reply
  70. I reread my books with one exception. My first romance novel was Sweet Savage Love. As a 15 year old it was WOW. Rereading it after 20+ years of marriage, I skipped most of it, too much sex and angst. That is not the way two people who love each other act. But the characters are still compelling, I just wish they acted as grown ups. I gather the reader’s experience is just as important as the author’s words. A good book is a true partnership.
    And I did marry a man with dark hair and light eyes.

    Reply
  71. When I first got my ereader, I actually bought all my ‘old’ favorites, and read them. While I can remember these books as being some of my most favorites at the time when I rad them, the writing is so different than the books that I read today that seem to flow more naturally and allow you as the reader to have some flexibility in your own imagination as to what is going on rather than ever single detail being laid out for you. I found myself flipping forward, sometimes several pages at a time to get to where the action or conversing was going on.

    Reply
  72. When I first got my ereader, I actually bought all my ‘old’ favorites, and read them. While I can remember these books as being some of my most favorites at the time when I rad them, the writing is so different than the books that I read today that seem to flow more naturally and allow you as the reader to have some flexibility in your own imagination as to what is going on rather than ever single detail being laid out for you. I found myself flipping forward, sometimes several pages at a time to get to where the action or conversing was going on.

    Reply
  73. When I first got my ereader, I actually bought all my ‘old’ favorites, and read them. While I can remember these books as being some of my most favorites at the time when I rad them, the writing is so different than the books that I read today that seem to flow more naturally and allow you as the reader to have some flexibility in your own imagination as to what is going on rather than ever single detail being laid out for you. I found myself flipping forward, sometimes several pages at a time to get to where the action or conversing was going on.

    Reply
  74. When I first got my ereader, I actually bought all my ‘old’ favorites, and read them. While I can remember these books as being some of my most favorites at the time when I rad them, the writing is so different than the books that I read today that seem to flow more naturally and allow you as the reader to have some flexibility in your own imagination as to what is going on rather than ever single detail being laid out for you. I found myself flipping forward, sometimes several pages at a time to get to where the action or conversing was going on.

    Reply
  75. When I first got my ereader, I actually bought all my ‘old’ favorites, and read them. While I can remember these books as being some of my most favorites at the time when I rad them, the writing is so different than the books that I read today that seem to flow more naturally and allow you as the reader to have some flexibility in your own imagination as to what is going on rather than ever single detail being laid out for you. I found myself flipping forward, sometimes several pages at a time to get to where the action or conversing was going on.

    Reply
  76. Ahh, this is very interesting. I don’t even want to think of the effect of Sweet Savage Love on a 15-year old! Glad you found the right guy though. “G” But in the case of that book, it wasn’t just the voice, but the entire story that’s offputting to the modern reader.
    And I’m glad you said that, Wendy. I know I started transitioning from that heavy physical description to lighter, more dialogue-centric stories in the early 90s. These are the books I’m working on now. The ones prior to the 90s… I just don’t know. I believe Marsha Canham and Shirl Henke are doing very well with their older backlist, but I’m not sure what dates those books were originally printed.
    And Maggie, I’m looking at books I’d written after TEN YEARS of publication. I don’t even want to look at those early ones!

    Reply
  77. Ahh, this is very interesting. I don’t even want to think of the effect of Sweet Savage Love on a 15-year old! Glad you found the right guy though. “G” But in the case of that book, it wasn’t just the voice, but the entire story that’s offputting to the modern reader.
    And I’m glad you said that, Wendy. I know I started transitioning from that heavy physical description to lighter, more dialogue-centric stories in the early 90s. These are the books I’m working on now. The ones prior to the 90s… I just don’t know. I believe Marsha Canham and Shirl Henke are doing very well with their older backlist, but I’m not sure what dates those books were originally printed.
    And Maggie, I’m looking at books I’d written after TEN YEARS of publication. I don’t even want to look at those early ones!

    Reply
  78. Ahh, this is very interesting. I don’t even want to think of the effect of Sweet Savage Love on a 15-year old! Glad you found the right guy though. “G” But in the case of that book, it wasn’t just the voice, but the entire story that’s offputting to the modern reader.
    And I’m glad you said that, Wendy. I know I started transitioning from that heavy physical description to lighter, more dialogue-centric stories in the early 90s. These are the books I’m working on now. The ones prior to the 90s… I just don’t know. I believe Marsha Canham and Shirl Henke are doing very well with their older backlist, but I’m not sure what dates those books were originally printed.
    And Maggie, I’m looking at books I’d written after TEN YEARS of publication. I don’t even want to look at those early ones!

    Reply
  79. Ahh, this is very interesting. I don’t even want to think of the effect of Sweet Savage Love on a 15-year old! Glad you found the right guy though. “G” But in the case of that book, it wasn’t just the voice, but the entire story that’s offputting to the modern reader.
    And I’m glad you said that, Wendy. I know I started transitioning from that heavy physical description to lighter, more dialogue-centric stories in the early 90s. These are the books I’m working on now. The ones prior to the 90s… I just don’t know. I believe Marsha Canham and Shirl Henke are doing very well with their older backlist, but I’m not sure what dates those books were originally printed.
    And Maggie, I’m looking at books I’d written after TEN YEARS of publication. I don’t even want to look at those early ones!

    Reply
  80. Ahh, this is very interesting. I don’t even want to think of the effect of Sweet Savage Love on a 15-year old! Glad you found the right guy though. “G” But in the case of that book, it wasn’t just the voice, but the entire story that’s offputting to the modern reader.
    And I’m glad you said that, Wendy. I know I started transitioning from that heavy physical description to lighter, more dialogue-centric stories in the early 90s. These are the books I’m working on now. The ones prior to the 90s… I just don’t know. I believe Marsha Canham and Shirl Henke are doing very well with their older backlist, but I’m not sure what dates those books were originally printed.
    And Maggie, I’m looking at books I’d written after TEN YEARS of publication. I don’t even want to look at those early ones!

    Reply
  81. There aren’t too many books that I’ve reread. Those that I have, were never rewritten and issued in altered form. However, I’m just reading Iris Johansen’s A Summer Smile (1985) for the first time and can see how some of the writing conventions of the time affect this book. But I keep that in mind and don’t worry about how it sounds now. It can be argued that these have become “historical” artifacts of their time. I don’t much care for having books rewritten. Then I feel that I’d like both books for comparison and want to find out every word that has been changed. Mary Balogh has said that she doesn’t want to change her books–even ones with errors in them. She’d rather have them stay the way the are, flaws and all.

    Reply
  82. There aren’t too many books that I’ve reread. Those that I have, were never rewritten and issued in altered form. However, I’m just reading Iris Johansen’s A Summer Smile (1985) for the first time and can see how some of the writing conventions of the time affect this book. But I keep that in mind and don’t worry about how it sounds now. It can be argued that these have become “historical” artifacts of their time. I don’t much care for having books rewritten. Then I feel that I’d like both books for comparison and want to find out every word that has been changed. Mary Balogh has said that she doesn’t want to change her books–even ones with errors in them. She’d rather have them stay the way the are, flaws and all.

    Reply
  83. There aren’t too many books that I’ve reread. Those that I have, were never rewritten and issued in altered form. However, I’m just reading Iris Johansen’s A Summer Smile (1985) for the first time and can see how some of the writing conventions of the time affect this book. But I keep that in mind and don’t worry about how it sounds now. It can be argued that these have become “historical” artifacts of their time. I don’t much care for having books rewritten. Then I feel that I’d like both books for comparison and want to find out every word that has been changed. Mary Balogh has said that she doesn’t want to change her books–even ones with errors in them. She’d rather have them stay the way the are, flaws and all.

    Reply
  84. There aren’t too many books that I’ve reread. Those that I have, were never rewritten and issued in altered form. However, I’m just reading Iris Johansen’s A Summer Smile (1985) for the first time and can see how some of the writing conventions of the time affect this book. But I keep that in mind and don’t worry about how it sounds now. It can be argued that these have become “historical” artifacts of their time. I don’t much care for having books rewritten. Then I feel that I’d like both books for comparison and want to find out every word that has been changed. Mary Balogh has said that she doesn’t want to change her books–even ones with errors in them. She’d rather have them stay the way the are, flaws and all.

    Reply
  85. There aren’t too many books that I’ve reread. Those that I have, were never rewritten and issued in altered form. However, I’m just reading Iris Johansen’s A Summer Smile (1985) for the first time and can see how some of the writing conventions of the time affect this book. But I keep that in mind and don’t worry about how it sounds now. It can be argued that these have become “historical” artifacts of their time. I don’t much care for having books rewritten. Then I feel that I’d like both books for comparison and want to find out every word that has been changed. Mary Balogh has said that she doesn’t want to change her books–even ones with errors in them. She’d rather have them stay the way the are, flaws and all.

    Reply

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