Victorian Rail Travel

Pat here:

Ballater_station_-_the_interior_of_the_Victorian_railway_saloon_carriage_-_geograph.org.uk_-_787317I’ve written Victorian romances set in the US, but I’ve never tried Victorian Britain or more specifically, Scotland. So I have to research practically every page I write. When I needed to move my characters from York to Edinburgh—along with four young children—I had to do some digging. Yes, I created an imaginary train station in my Unexpected Magic books when my characters wanted to invest in their imaginary property. I used that imaginary track to take my characters to my imaginary castle owned by my imaginary duke. (And I vow to have only one duke in my series, thank you very much)  But if I’m putting my characters on the train, what can they expect to see? How long will it take them to reach their destination? At some point, I have to add history. (Image to left is how Queen Victoria traveled–a little fancier than most cars and a very royal blue!)

I wanted to know what kind of compartment my characters might book, but the answer seems to be—almost anything I can imagine. My time period is 1870 so I can skip the rail cars from earlier in the century with no roofs and holes in the floor for drainage, or the ones looking like stagecoaches, but the car was still probably made of wood. While the UK had sleeping berths before the US did, I wasn’t interested in squeezing my big hero into one of those tiny beds while four young children rolled around on the floor. Or vice versa.Travel

I wasn't able to find much in the way of free photos of the interiors of these old cars, but this site has tons of fascinating images. And the image to the right is probably a private compartment–not much room for children with those gowns!

My characters aren’t poor, so they probably traveled first class. In England, first class passengers could book private compartments with doors opening directly onto the station platform. There would be no walking up and down an outside corridor. Servants would be seated in second class and would jump out at every stop and run up to first class to see if their employers needed food or drink or aid in climbing out to use whatever restroom facilities might be available. In rural York, I assumed there would be little in the way of train stations, so I politely glided over that part, although my heroine remembered to bring a bucket for the brat with motion sickness. Some cars had private rooms with chamber pots, although I’m trying to imagine ladies lifting those enormous petticoats and skirts on a rocking, rattling railroad to squat over a pot. Really, do you want me to go there?

Victorian rail stationTrain stops weren’t necessarily fancy stations but often an outpost where the train simply added more coal and water. Vendors might set up carts for food and drink. A long journey would probably be tedious, but I think my characters might make this one in less than half a day—which beat the heck out of horse and carriage.

I learned that later European cars were more likely to have a corridor with closed compartments while the US cars leaned toward elegant open parlors or lines of seats. So my characters could probably have a private compartment on their imaginary train from York to Edinburgh and wouldn’t need to rein in kids who might run amok in an open parlor. But I also learned that at this period of time, there was no vestibule between cars. My restless hero could not easily walk from car to car.

Dining cars didn’t arrive until late in the 1870s. Until then, people were expected to buy at restaurants along the way. I’m pretty certain my route wouldn’t include a Harvey’s (the popular US train restaurant) so my characters packed picnic baskets—which one does while traveling anywhere, anytime, with small children. Steam engine 1850s

Have you ever been inside any of those elegant old rail cars? Some of them were well beyond opulent! But I like the idea of cooping everyone up in a small compartment to see what happens. I only torture my characters a little bit. <G> Have you traveled on a train?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

195 thoughts on “Victorian Rail Travel”

  1. I have vivid memories of traveling by steam train as a child, usually seaside resorts locally here in South West Wales. I can recall the excitement of boarding the train and walking down the corridor to sit in a compartment, I used to stand in the corridor and my Grandfather would lift me up so I could look through the carriage window. I can smell the coal and see the steam . I close my eyes and I can hear the hoot of the train whistle and the way the train moved as it went though a tunnel. Just a few weeks ago our town had the greatest treat as a newly restored old steam train was driven through our railway station. Oh the mer.
    M

    Reply
  2. I have vivid memories of traveling by steam train as a child, usually seaside resorts locally here in South West Wales. I can recall the excitement of boarding the train and walking down the corridor to sit in a compartment, I used to stand in the corridor and my Grandfather would lift me up so I could look through the carriage window. I can smell the coal and see the steam . I close my eyes and I can hear the hoot of the train whistle and the way the train moved as it went though a tunnel. Just a few weeks ago our town had the greatest treat as a newly restored old steam train was driven through our railway station. Oh the mer.
    M

    Reply
  3. I have vivid memories of traveling by steam train as a child, usually seaside resorts locally here in South West Wales. I can recall the excitement of boarding the train and walking down the corridor to sit in a compartment, I used to stand in the corridor and my Grandfather would lift me up so I could look through the carriage window. I can smell the coal and see the steam . I close my eyes and I can hear the hoot of the train whistle and the way the train moved as it went though a tunnel. Just a few weeks ago our town had the greatest treat as a newly restored old steam train was driven through our railway station. Oh the mer.
    M

    Reply
  4. I have vivid memories of traveling by steam train as a child, usually seaside resorts locally here in South West Wales. I can recall the excitement of boarding the train and walking down the corridor to sit in a compartment, I used to stand in the corridor and my Grandfather would lift me up so I could look through the carriage window. I can smell the coal and see the steam . I close my eyes and I can hear the hoot of the train whistle and the way the train moved as it went though a tunnel. Just a few weeks ago our town had the greatest treat as a newly restored old steam train was driven through our railway station. Oh the mer.
    M

    Reply
  5. I have vivid memories of traveling by steam train as a child, usually seaside resorts locally here in South West Wales. I can recall the excitement of boarding the train and walking down the corridor to sit in a compartment, I used to stand in the corridor and my Grandfather would lift me up so I could look through the carriage window. I can smell the coal and see the steam . I close my eyes and I can hear the hoot of the train whistle and the way the train moved as it went though a tunnel. Just a few weeks ago our town had the greatest treat as a newly restored old steam train was driven through our railway station. Oh the mer.
    M

    Reply
  6. I haven’t traveled much by train, but I do remember going alone to and from summer school. I know i slept, but now HOW I slept. (Probably Pullman, but the day travel part seemed to be open cars). Oh well, it was more than 70 years ago.
    i better remember a shorter trip from St. Louis to Wabash County Indiana with three small chidren, probably about 3-, 8-, and 9-years old. No overnighting. They were well behaved, but they DID need to run in the aisle to a limited extent.
    My strongest train memory is standing by the Big4 track to wave at my great-uncle as he tosssed and received the U. S. mail while the train slowed but did not stop. NOT travel, but my most vivid memory.

    Reply
  7. I haven’t traveled much by train, but I do remember going alone to and from summer school. I know i slept, but now HOW I slept. (Probably Pullman, but the day travel part seemed to be open cars). Oh well, it was more than 70 years ago.
    i better remember a shorter trip from St. Louis to Wabash County Indiana with three small chidren, probably about 3-, 8-, and 9-years old. No overnighting. They were well behaved, but they DID need to run in the aisle to a limited extent.
    My strongest train memory is standing by the Big4 track to wave at my great-uncle as he tosssed and received the U. S. mail while the train slowed but did not stop. NOT travel, but my most vivid memory.

    Reply
  8. I haven’t traveled much by train, but I do remember going alone to and from summer school. I know i slept, but now HOW I slept. (Probably Pullman, but the day travel part seemed to be open cars). Oh well, it was more than 70 years ago.
    i better remember a shorter trip from St. Louis to Wabash County Indiana with three small chidren, probably about 3-, 8-, and 9-years old. No overnighting. They were well behaved, but they DID need to run in the aisle to a limited extent.
    My strongest train memory is standing by the Big4 track to wave at my great-uncle as he tosssed and received the U. S. mail while the train slowed but did not stop. NOT travel, but my most vivid memory.

    Reply
  9. I haven’t traveled much by train, but I do remember going alone to and from summer school. I know i slept, but now HOW I slept. (Probably Pullman, but the day travel part seemed to be open cars). Oh well, it was more than 70 years ago.
    i better remember a shorter trip from St. Louis to Wabash County Indiana with three small chidren, probably about 3-, 8-, and 9-years old. No overnighting. They were well behaved, but they DID need to run in the aisle to a limited extent.
    My strongest train memory is standing by the Big4 track to wave at my great-uncle as he tosssed and received the U. S. mail while the train slowed but did not stop. NOT travel, but my most vivid memory.

    Reply
  10. I haven’t traveled much by train, but I do remember going alone to and from summer school. I know i slept, but now HOW I slept. (Probably Pullman, but the day travel part seemed to be open cars). Oh well, it was more than 70 years ago.
    i better remember a shorter trip from St. Louis to Wabash County Indiana with three small chidren, probably about 3-, 8-, and 9-years old. No overnighting. They were well behaved, but they DID need to run in the aisle to a limited extent.
    My strongest train memory is standing by the Big4 track to wave at my great-uncle as he tosssed and received the U. S. mail while the train slowed but did not stop. NOT travel, but my most vivid memory.

    Reply
  11. All great memories, though! My only childhood experience with a train was one that ran from our town up to Cincinnati for a baseball game. Full of screaming fans… That’s all I recall. So you’re doing pretty darned good! One would have to be really good at tossing to hit a moving car I’d think!

    Reply
  12. All great memories, though! My only childhood experience with a train was one that ran from our town up to Cincinnati for a baseball game. Full of screaming fans… That’s all I recall. So you’re doing pretty darned good! One would have to be really good at tossing to hit a moving car I’d think!

    Reply
  13. All great memories, though! My only childhood experience with a train was one that ran from our town up to Cincinnati for a baseball game. Full of screaming fans… That’s all I recall. So you’re doing pretty darned good! One would have to be really good at tossing to hit a moving car I’d think!

    Reply
  14. All great memories, though! My only childhood experience with a train was one that ran from our town up to Cincinnati for a baseball game. Full of screaming fans… That’s all I recall. So you’re doing pretty darned good! One would have to be really good at tossing to hit a moving car I’d think!

    Reply
  15. All great memories, though! My only childhood experience with a train was one that ran from our town up to Cincinnati for a baseball game. Full of screaming fans… That’s all I recall. So you’re doing pretty darned good! One would have to be really good at tossing to hit a moving car I’d think!

    Reply
  16. When we came to Canada from the UK in 1967 we traveled from Montreal to Vancouver on the train. We spent 4 days on the train. 4 kids and 2 adults. Pity my mother. It was Easter and we ate all our Easter candy from our Aunt in the UK at once. We were all violently I’ll once we got on the train. Ahhh motion sickness… but even at 4 years old almost 5, it made an impression!

    Reply
  17. When we came to Canada from the UK in 1967 we traveled from Montreal to Vancouver on the train. We spent 4 days on the train. 4 kids and 2 adults. Pity my mother. It was Easter and we ate all our Easter candy from our Aunt in the UK at once. We were all violently I’ll once we got on the train. Ahhh motion sickness… but even at 4 years old almost 5, it made an impression!

    Reply
  18. When we came to Canada from the UK in 1967 we traveled from Montreal to Vancouver on the train. We spent 4 days on the train. 4 kids and 2 adults. Pity my mother. It was Easter and we ate all our Easter candy from our Aunt in the UK at once. We were all violently I’ll once we got on the train. Ahhh motion sickness… but even at 4 years old almost 5, it made an impression!

    Reply
  19. When we came to Canada from the UK in 1967 we traveled from Montreal to Vancouver on the train. We spent 4 days on the train. 4 kids and 2 adults. Pity my mother. It was Easter and we ate all our Easter candy from our Aunt in the UK at once. We were all violently I’ll once we got on the train. Ahhh motion sickness… but even at 4 years old almost 5, it made an impression!

    Reply
  20. When we came to Canada from the UK in 1967 we traveled from Montreal to Vancouver on the train. We spent 4 days on the train. 4 kids and 2 adults. Pity my mother. It was Easter and we ate all our Easter candy from our Aunt in the UK at once. We were all violently I’ll once we got on the train. Ahhh motion sickness… but even at 4 years old almost 5, it made an impression!

    Reply
  21. I remember coming home from college by train, traveling overnight in a sleeping compartment, because a blizzard had closed the airports.
    And I also took trains in England long enough ago to have ridden in those compartments with their own door to the corridor. Just like in The Lady Vanishes! I was thrilled.

    Reply
  22. I remember coming home from college by train, traveling overnight in a sleeping compartment, because a blizzard had closed the airports.
    And I also took trains in England long enough ago to have ridden in those compartments with their own door to the corridor. Just like in The Lady Vanishes! I was thrilled.

    Reply
  23. I remember coming home from college by train, traveling overnight in a sleeping compartment, because a blizzard had closed the airports.
    And I also took trains in England long enough ago to have ridden in those compartments with their own door to the corridor. Just like in The Lady Vanishes! I was thrilled.

    Reply
  24. I remember coming home from college by train, traveling overnight in a sleeping compartment, because a blizzard had closed the airports.
    And I also took trains in England long enough ago to have ridden in those compartments with their own door to the corridor. Just like in The Lady Vanishes! I was thrilled.

    Reply
  25. I remember coming home from college by train, traveling overnight in a sleeping compartment, because a blizzard had closed the airports.
    And I also took trains in England long enough ago to have ridden in those compartments with their own door to the corridor. Just like in The Lady Vanishes! I was thrilled.

    Reply
  26. I love train travel! My first experience was when I was in elementary school, and my grade went on a train field trip to a nearby city and came home on the school bus. I live in Ohio, and traveled by train for 3 vacations . . . one to New York ( we were met in New York City’s Penn Station, and returned there for the trip home), one to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and one to visit my Aunt and Uncle in the Saskatchewan Province (3 days and 2 nights with one car switch). I haven’t Traveled that way in years, and I would love the chance to do so one more time while I still can.

    Reply
  27. I love train travel! My first experience was when I was in elementary school, and my grade went on a train field trip to a nearby city and came home on the school bus. I live in Ohio, and traveled by train for 3 vacations . . . one to New York ( we were met in New York City’s Penn Station, and returned there for the trip home), one to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and one to visit my Aunt and Uncle in the Saskatchewan Province (3 days and 2 nights with one car switch). I haven’t Traveled that way in years, and I would love the chance to do so one more time while I still can.

    Reply
  28. I love train travel! My first experience was when I was in elementary school, and my grade went on a train field trip to a nearby city and came home on the school bus. I live in Ohio, and traveled by train for 3 vacations . . . one to New York ( we were met in New York City’s Penn Station, and returned there for the trip home), one to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and one to visit my Aunt and Uncle in the Saskatchewan Province (3 days and 2 nights with one car switch). I haven’t Traveled that way in years, and I would love the chance to do so one more time while I still can.

    Reply
  29. I love train travel! My first experience was when I was in elementary school, and my grade went on a train field trip to a nearby city and came home on the school bus. I live in Ohio, and traveled by train for 3 vacations . . . one to New York ( we were met in New York City’s Penn Station, and returned there for the trip home), one to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and one to visit my Aunt and Uncle in the Saskatchewan Province (3 days and 2 nights with one car switch). I haven’t Traveled that way in years, and I would love the chance to do so one more time while I still can.

    Reply
  30. I love train travel! My first experience was when I was in elementary school, and my grade went on a train field trip to a nearby city and came home on the school bus. I live in Ohio, and traveled by train for 3 vacations . . . one to New York ( we were met in New York City’s Penn Station, and returned there for the trip home), one to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and one to visit my Aunt and Uncle in the Saskatchewan Province (3 days and 2 nights with one car switch). I haven’t Traveled that way in years, and I would love the chance to do so one more time while I still can.

    Reply
  31. I love short trips, but I think I’d be bored out of mind doing it for days on end. I like to stop and explore. But how great that you could get around so easily that way. I’ve never lived places with trains that went anywhere.

    Reply
  32. I love short trips, but I think I’d be bored out of mind doing it for days on end. I like to stop and explore. But how great that you could get around so easily that way. I’ve never lived places with trains that went anywhere.

    Reply
  33. I love short trips, but I think I’d be bored out of mind doing it for days on end. I like to stop and explore. But how great that you could get around so easily that way. I’ve never lived places with trains that went anywhere.

    Reply
  34. I love short trips, but I think I’d be bored out of mind doing it for days on end. I like to stop and explore. But how great that you could get around so easily that way. I’ve never lived places with trains that went anywhere.

    Reply
  35. I love short trips, but I think I’d be bored out of mind doing it for days on end. I like to stop and explore. But how great that you could get around so easily that way. I’ve never lived places with trains that went anywhere.

    Reply
  36. I love train travel and I’ve made quite a few trips by train. When I was a little girl w took the train from Southampton to Scotland — I’m not sure where we got off. All I remember was that I slept on the floor, and that my father and one of my sisters were waiting to meet us. And that on the way the train had stopped in the middle of the night for snow to be cleared off the tracks. And my older brother and I jumped out and made snowballs.
    As teen I did a number of long train trips from Melbourne up to Brisbane, to my older sister’s place, which took two days — part of which was an 8 hour stop in Sydney. I remember lying in my bunk and gazing out onto the shadowy moonlit scenery passing by my window. I also read a stack of books. I did those trips on my own, so I guess Mum and Dad thought train travel was pretty safe. I don’t think they thought about those 8 hours in Sydney, where I explored the city on my own. And I sure wasn’t going to tell them. LOL
    Later when I was a backpacker, I bought a Eurail pass and did as many as I could of the journeys that were listed in the Thomas Cook “Most scenic train trips” travel guide.That was spectacular.
    I also took a train from Vancouver up to Prince George and Prince Rupert and loved it. I saw my first bears in the wild from that train. And read a lot of books.
    I still have a number of train journeys I want to make — across the Nullabor Desert in the south of Australia, and on the Ghan, which bisects Australia from south to North. And then, of course, there is the Orient Express . . .

    Reply
  37. I love train travel and I’ve made quite a few trips by train. When I was a little girl w took the train from Southampton to Scotland — I’m not sure where we got off. All I remember was that I slept on the floor, and that my father and one of my sisters were waiting to meet us. And that on the way the train had stopped in the middle of the night for snow to be cleared off the tracks. And my older brother and I jumped out and made snowballs.
    As teen I did a number of long train trips from Melbourne up to Brisbane, to my older sister’s place, which took two days — part of which was an 8 hour stop in Sydney. I remember lying in my bunk and gazing out onto the shadowy moonlit scenery passing by my window. I also read a stack of books. I did those trips on my own, so I guess Mum and Dad thought train travel was pretty safe. I don’t think they thought about those 8 hours in Sydney, where I explored the city on my own. And I sure wasn’t going to tell them. LOL
    Later when I was a backpacker, I bought a Eurail pass and did as many as I could of the journeys that were listed in the Thomas Cook “Most scenic train trips” travel guide.That was spectacular.
    I also took a train from Vancouver up to Prince George and Prince Rupert and loved it. I saw my first bears in the wild from that train. And read a lot of books.
    I still have a number of train journeys I want to make — across the Nullabor Desert in the south of Australia, and on the Ghan, which bisects Australia from south to North. And then, of course, there is the Orient Express . . .

    Reply
  38. I love train travel and I’ve made quite a few trips by train. When I was a little girl w took the train from Southampton to Scotland — I’m not sure where we got off. All I remember was that I slept on the floor, and that my father and one of my sisters were waiting to meet us. And that on the way the train had stopped in the middle of the night for snow to be cleared off the tracks. And my older brother and I jumped out and made snowballs.
    As teen I did a number of long train trips from Melbourne up to Brisbane, to my older sister’s place, which took two days — part of which was an 8 hour stop in Sydney. I remember lying in my bunk and gazing out onto the shadowy moonlit scenery passing by my window. I also read a stack of books. I did those trips on my own, so I guess Mum and Dad thought train travel was pretty safe. I don’t think they thought about those 8 hours in Sydney, where I explored the city on my own. And I sure wasn’t going to tell them. LOL
    Later when I was a backpacker, I bought a Eurail pass and did as many as I could of the journeys that were listed in the Thomas Cook “Most scenic train trips” travel guide.That was spectacular.
    I also took a train from Vancouver up to Prince George and Prince Rupert and loved it. I saw my first bears in the wild from that train. And read a lot of books.
    I still have a number of train journeys I want to make — across the Nullabor Desert in the south of Australia, and on the Ghan, which bisects Australia from south to North. And then, of course, there is the Orient Express . . .

    Reply
  39. I love train travel and I’ve made quite a few trips by train. When I was a little girl w took the train from Southampton to Scotland — I’m not sure where we got off. All I remember was that I slept on the floor, and that my father and one of my sisters were waiting to meet us. And that on the way the train had stopped in the middle of the night for snow to be cleared off the tracks. And my older brother and I jumped out and made snowballs.
    As teen I did a number of long train trips from Melbourne up to Brisbane, to my older sister’s place, which took two days — part of which was an 8 hour stop in Sydney. I remember lying in my bunk and gazing out onto the shadowy moonlit scenery passing by my window. I also read a stack of books. I did those trips on my own, so I guess Mum and Dad thought train travel was pretty safe. I don’t think they thought about those 8 hours in Sydney, where I explored the city on my own. And I sure wasn’t going to tell them. LOL
    Later when I was a backpacker, I bought a Eurail pass and did as many as I could of the journeys that were listed in the Thomas Cook “Most scenic train trips” travel guide.That was spectacular.
    I also took a train from Vancouver up to Prince George and Prince Rupert and loved it. I saw my first bears in the wild from that train. And read a lot of books.
    I still have a number of train journeys I want to make — across the Nullabor Desert in the south of Australia, and on the Ghan, which bisects Australia from south to North. And then, of course, there is the Orient Express . . .

    Reply
  40. I love train travel and I’ve made quite a few trips by train. When I was a little girl w took the train from Southampton to Scotland — I’m not sure where we got off. All I remember was that I slept on the floor, and that my father and one of my sisters were waiting to meet us. And that on the way the train had stopped in the middle of the night for snow to be cleared off the tracks. And my older brother and I jumped out and made snowballs.
    As teen I did a number of long train trips from Melbourne up to Brisbane, to my older sister’s place, which took two days — part of which was an 8 hour stop in Sydney. I remember lying in my bunk and gazing out onto the shadowy moonlit scenery passing by my window. I also read a stack of books. I did those trips on my own, so I guess Mum and Dad thought train travel was pretty safe. I don’t think they thought about those 8 hours in Sydney, where I explored the city on my own. And I sure wasn’t going to tell them. LOL
    Later when I was a backpacker, I bought a Eurail pass and did as many as I could of the journeys that were listed in the Thomas Cook “Most scenic train trips” travel guide.That was spectacular.
    I also took a train from Vancouver up to Prince George and Prince Rupert and loved it. I saw my first bears in the wild from that train. And read a lot of books.
    I still have a number of train journeys I want to make — across the Nullabor Desert in the south of Australia, and on the Ghan, which bisects Australia from south to North. And then, of course, there is the Orient Express . . .

    Reply
  41. In 1999 we did take the Ghan from Adelaide to Alice Springs. My husband says the farther away we get from the trip the more I enjoyed it! Two nights in a plush velvet compartment that converted to bunk beds with an en-suite bathroom, where the sink and toilet folded into the wall and shower was overhead. The train cars seem to have been from the 1950s. It was an experience to say the least. Riding through the outback and seeing Uluru (Ayers Rock) was a dream of mine and I was so fortunate to experience it although in three days of travel I did expect to see more than one kangaroo.

    Reply
  42. In 1999 we did take the Ghan from Adelaide to Alice Springs. My husband says the farther away we get from the trip the more I enjoyed it! Two nights in a plush velvet compartment that converted to bunk beds with an en-suite bathroom, where the sink and toilet folded into the wall and shower was overhead. The train cars seem to have been from the 1950s. It was an experience to say the least. Riding through the outback and seeing Uluru (Ayers Rock) was a dream of mine and I was so fortunate to experience it although in three days of travel I did expect to see more than one kangaroo.

    Reply
  43. In 1999 we did take the Ghan from Adelaide to Alice Springs. My husband says the farther away we get from the trip the more I enjoyed it! Two nights in a plush velvet compartment that converted to bunk beds with an en-suite bathroom, where the sink and toilet folded into the wall and shower was overhead. The train cars seem to have been from the 1950s. It was an experience to say the least. Riding through the outback and seeing Uluru (Ayers Rock) was a dream of mine and I was so fortunate to experience it although in three days of travel I did expect to see more than one kangaroo.

    Reply
  44. In 1999 we did take the Ghan from Adelaide to Alice Springs. My husband says the farther away we get from the trip the more I enjoyed it! Two nights in a plush velvet compartment that converted to bunk beds with an en-suite bathroom, where the sink and toilet folded into the wall and shower was overhead. The train cars seem to have been from the 1950s. It was an experience to say the least. Riding through the outback and seeing Uluru (Ayers Rock) was a dream of mine and I was so fortunate to experience it although in three days of travel I did expect to see more than one kangaroo.

    Reply
  45. In 1999 we did take the Ghan from Adelaide to Alice Springs. My husband says the farther away we get from the trip the more I enjoyed it! Two nights in a plush velvet compartment that converted to bunk beds with an en-suite bathroom, where the sink and toilet folded into the wall and shower was overhead. The train cars seem to have been from the 1950s. It was an experience to say the least. Riding through the outback and seeing Uluru (Ayers Rock) was a dream of mine and I was so fortunate to experience it although in three days of travel I did expect to see more than one kangaroo.

    Reply
  46. I’ve traveled by train several times over the years. Depending on the circumstances and the length of the journey, the trip could be very nice or very tedious.
    When I was a sweet young thing, many, many years ago, I was in the army and stationed in Germany. I took a trip (by train) to Paris to visit a friend. I was seated in a compartment with one other person when we were joined by an American Army Sargent and his French wife. They had been traveling for about 24 hours and were totally exhausted. Outside our compartment some young boys were running up and down the corridor playing. As they ran through the car, the door at the end of the car would slam shut with a loud bang. After they did that several times the poor tired French woman stated that if they did that ONE MORE TIME she would scream ….. Yeah, they did that one more time and the next thing I knew, she was on the floor having a screaming fit. Her husband got her calmed down after a few minutes. You can meet the most interesting people when traveling.

    Reply
  47. I’ve traveled by train several times over the years. Depending on the circumstances and the length of the journey, the trip could be very nice or very tedious.
    When I was a sweet young thing, many, many years ago, I was in the army and stationed in Germany. I took a trip (by train) to Paris to visit a friend. I was seated in a compartment with one other person when we were joined by an American Army Sargent and his French wife. They had been traveling for about 24 hours and were totally exhausted. Outside our compartment some young boys were running up and down the corridor playing. As they ran through the car, the door at the end of the car would slam shut with a loud bang. After they did that several times the poor tired French woman stated that if they did that ONE MORE TIME she would scream ….. Yeah, they did that one more time and the next thing I knew, she was on the floor having a screaming fit. Her husband got her calmed down after a few minutes. You can meet the most interesting people when traveling.

    Reply
  48. I’ve traveled by train several times over the years. Depending on the circumstances and the length of the journey, the trip could be very nice or very tedious.
    When I was a sweet young thing, many, many years ago, I was in the army and stationed in Germany. I took a trip (by train) to Paris to visit a friend. I was seated in a compartment with one other person when we were joined by an American Army Sargent and his French wife. They had been traveling for about 24 hours and were totally exhausted. Outside our compartment some young boys were running up and down the corridor playing. As they ran through the car, the door at the end of the car would slam shut with a loud bang. After they did that several times the poor tired French woman stated that if they did that ONE MORE TIME she would scream ….. Yeah, they did that one more time and the next thing I knew, she was on the floor having a screaming fit. Her husband got her calmed down after a few minutes. You can meet the most interesting people when traveling.

    Reply
  49. I’ve traveled by train several times over the years. Depending on the circumstances and the length of the journey, the trip could be very nice or very tedious.
    When I was a sweet young thing, many, many years ago, I was in the army and stationed in Germany. I took a trip (by train) to Paris to visit a friend. I was seated in a compartment with one other person when we were joined by an American Army Sargent and his French wife. They had been traveling for about 24 hours and were totally exhausted. Outside our compartment some young boys were running up and down the corridor playing. As they ran through the car, the door at the end of the car would slam shut with a loud bang. After they did that several times the poor tired French woman stated that if they did that ONE MORE TIME she would scream ….. Yeah, they did that one more time and the next thing I knew, she was on the floor having a screaming fit. Her husband got her calmed down after a few minutes. You can meet the most interesting people when traveling.

    Reply
  50. I’ve traveled by train several times over the years. Depending on the circumstances and the length of the journey, the trip could be very nice or very tedious.
    When I was a sweet young thing, many, many years ago, I was in the army and stationed in Germany. I took a trip (by train) to Paris to visit a friend. I was seated in a compartment with one other person when we were joined by an American Army Sargent and his French wife. They had been traveling for about 24 hours and were totally exhausted. Outside our compartment some young boys were running up and down the corridor playing. As they ran through the car, the door at the end of the car would slam shut with a loud bang. After they did that several times the poor tired French woman stated that if they did that ONE MORE TIME she would scream ….. Yeah, they did that one more time and the next thing I knew, she was on the floor having a screaming fit. Her husband got her calmed down after a few minutes. You can meet the most interesting people when traveling.

    Reply
  51. I used to regularly travel four hours in a train from Sydney, Australia, up to Newcastle or down to the Southern Highlands over five hours. Many of the compartments were old ones that were now being hooked up to electric engines. I love train travel. Old leather seats, old wood and a cafeteria on board. Plus I could walked from carriage to carriage by stepping outside and navigating my way across the rattling connection to the next car. It seemed very romantic in the sense that I was following in the footsteps of the ‘old days’. Plus I got to sit and read with no one asking me to do anything. And you get to meet the most fascinating people. But they weren’t air conditioned so they could be very hot or get cold. Plus the toilets emptied straight onto the track which could be breezy in uncomfortable spots! But definitely better than a chamber pot!

    Reply
  52. I used to regularly travel four hours in a train from Sydney, Australia, up to Newcastle or down to the Southern Highlands over five hours. Many of the compartments were old ones that were now being hooked up to electric engines. I love train travel. Old leather seats, old wood and a cafeteria on board. Plus I could walked from carriage to carriage by stepping outside and navigating my way across the rattling connection to the next car. It seemed very romantic in the sense that I was following in the footsteps of the ‘old days’. Plus I got to sit and read with no one asking me to do anything. And you get to meet the most fascinating people. But they weren’t air conditioned so they could be very hot or get cold. Plus the toilets emptied straight onto the track which could be breezy in uncomfortable spots! But definitely better than a chamber pot!

    Reply
  53. I used to regularly travel four hours in a train from Sydney, Australia, up to Newcastle or down to the Southern Highlands over five hours. Many of the compartments were old ones that were now being hooked up to electric engines. I love train travel. Old leather seats, old wood and a cafeteria on board. Plus I could walked from carriage to carriage by stepping outside and navigating my way across the rattling connection to the next car. It seemed very romantic in the sense that I was following in the footsteps of the ‘old days’. Plus I got to sit and read with no one asking me to do anything. And you get to meet the most fascinating people. But they weren’t air conditioned so they could be very hot or get cold. Plus the toilets emptied straight onto the track which could be breezy in uncomfortable spots! But definitely better than a chamber pot!

    Reply
  54. I used to regularly travel four hours in a train from Sydney, Australia, up to Newcastle or down to the Southern Highlands over five hours. Many of the compartments were old ones that were now being hooked up to electric engines. I love train travel. Old leather seats, old wood and a cafeteria on board. Plus I could walked from carriage to carriage by stepping outside and navigating my way across the rattling connection to the next car. It seemed very romantic in the sense that I was following in the footsteps of the ‘old days’. Plus I got to sit and read with no one asking me to do anything. And you get to meet the most fascinating people. But they weren’t air conditioned so they could be very hot or get cold. Plus the toilets emptied straight onto the track which could be breezy in uncomfortable spots! But definitely better than a chamber pot!

    Reply
  55. I used to regularly travel four hours in a train from Sydney, Australia, up to Newcastle or down to the Southern Highlands over five hours. Many of the compartments were old ones that were now being hooked up to electric engines. I love train travel. Old leather seats, old wood and a cafeteria on board. Plus I could walked from carriage to carriage by stepping outside and navigating my way across the rattling connection to the next car. It seemed very romantic in the sense that I was following in the footsteps of the ‘old days’. Plus I got to sit and read with no one asking me to do anything. And you get to meet the most fascinating people. But they weren’t air conditioned so they could be very hot or get cold. Plus the toilets emptied straight onto the track which could be breezy in uncomfortable spots! But definitely better than a chamber pot!

    Reply
  56. Ah, trains trigger some of my best memories of childhood.
    From the late ’40s through the mid-’50s, my mother and I would several times a year travel from our home in lower Michigan by steam train to Chicago, switch train depots via big ol’ black cab, and ride overnight through Wisconsin, back into the upper peninsula of Michigan. White-table-clothed dining car, sleeping compartment with tiny but efficient toilet area, and that upoer bunk that magically appeared while we were in the dining car. It might be a lazy fall day at the start, but I’d wake up to frosted windows and swirling snow in northern Wisconsin. Quite an adventure for a young un!
    And at my grandmother’s house, set on a bluff above Lake Superior, twice a day the train would come by on a ledge below the bluff. We could feel it as the train approached—the china would rattle in the hutch—and then we’d hear the roar and watch the steam puff puff puff as the train pumped its way past, one way in the morning, back again in mid-afternoon. Couldn’t see the train, just the steam. It seemed quite mysterious to me. I just loved it.
    As a college student in Chicago, my trains became diesel, with bus-style seating, no dining car, no compartment. But in later years I had the pleasure of a historic train tour in Colorado (five different types of trains/tracks, lots of fun), a rail tour of India (disappointingly boring trains, actually, but the destinations were worth it), and the trains of England and Scotland including via the Chunnel to Paris (all efficient but not exciting). I was terribly disappointed that an overnight train tour in Thailand was canceled because a mudslide had wiped out the tracks.
    I’ve always loved trains, but I guess nothing can ever compete with my starry-eyed memories of those childhood trips to Grandmom’s house.

    Reply
  57. Ah, trains trigger some of my best memories of childhood.
    From the late ’40s through the mid-’50s, my mother and I would several times a year travel from our home in lower Michigan by steam train to Chicago, switch train depots via big ol’ black cab, and ride overnight through Wisconsin, back into the upper peninsula of Michigan. White-table-clothed dining car, sleeping compartment with tiny but efficient toilet area, and that upoer bunk that magically appeared while we were in the dining car. It might be a lazy fall day at the start, but I’d wake up to frosted windows and swirling snow in northern Wisconsin. Quite an adventure for a young un!
    And at my grandmother’s house, set on a bluff above Lake Superior, twice a day the train would come by on a ledge below the bluff. We could feel it as the train approached—the china would rattle in the hutch—and then we’d hear the roar and watch the steam puff puff puff as the train pumped its way past, one way in the morning, back again in mid-afternoon. Couldn’t see the train, just the steam. It seemed quite mysterious to me. I just loved it.
    As a college student in Chicago, my trains became diesel, with bus-style seating, no dining car, no compartment. But in later years I had the pleasure of a historic train tour in Colorado (five different types of trains/tracks, lots of fun), a rail tour of India (disappointingly boring trains, actually, but the destinations were worth it), and the trains of England and Scotland including via the Chunnel to Paris (all efficient but not exciting). I was terribly disappointed that an overnight train tour in Thailand was canceled because a mudslide had wiped out the tracks.
    I’ve always loved trains, but I guess nothing can ever compete with my starry-eyed memories of those childhood trips to Grandmom’s house.

    Reply
  58. Ah, trains trigger some of my best memories of childhood.
    From the late ’40s through the mid-’50s, my mother and I would several times a year travel from our home in lower Michigan by steam train to Chicago, switch train depots via big ol’ black cab, and ride overnight through Wisconsin, back into the upper peninsula of Michigan. White-table-clothed dining car, sleeping compartment with tiny but efficient toilet area, and that upoer bunk that magically appeared while we were in the dining car. It might be a lazy fall day at the start, but I’d wake up to frosted windows and swirling snow in northern Wisconsin. Quite an adventure for a young un!
    And at my grandmother’s house, set on a bluff above Lake Superior, twice a day the train would come by on a ledge below the bluff. We could feel it as the train approached—the china would rattle in the hutch—and then we’d hear the roar and watch the steam puff puff puff as the train pumped its way past, one way in the morning, back again in mid-afternoon. Couldn’t see the train, just the steam. It seemed quite mysterious to me. I just loved it.
    As a college student in Chicago, my trains became diesel, with bus-style seating, no dining car, no compartment. But in later years I had the pleasure of a historic train tour in Colorado (five different types of trains/tracks, lots of fun), a rail tour of India (disappointingly boring trains, actually, but the destinations were worth it), and the trains of England and Scotland including via the Chunnel to Paris (all efficient but not exciting). I was terribly disappointed that an overnight train tour in Thailand was canceled because a mudslide had wiped out the tracks.
    I’ve always loved trains, but I guess nothing can ever compete with my starry-eyed memories of those childhood trips to Grandmom’s house.

    Reply
  59. Ah, trains trigger some of my best memories of childhood.
    From the late ’40s through the mid-’50s, my mother and I would several times a year travel from our home in lower Michigan by steam train to Chicago, switch train depots via big ol’ black cab, and ride overnight through Wisconsin, back into the upper peninsula of Michigan. White-table-clothed dining car, sleeping compartment with tiny but efficient toilet area, and that upoer bunk that magically appeared while we were in the dining car. It might be a lazy fall day at the start, but I’d wake up to frosted windows and swirling snow in northern Wisconsin. Quite an adventure for a young un!
    And at my grandmother’s house, set on a bluff above Lake Superior, twice a day the train would come by on a ledge below the bluff. We could feel it as the train approached—the china would rattle in the hutch—and then we’d hear the roar and watch the steam puff puff puff as the train pumped its way past, one way in the morning, back again in mid-afternoon. Couldn’t see the train, just the steam. It seemed quite mysterious to me. I just loved it.
    As a college student in Chicago, my trains became diesel, with bus-style seating, no dining car, no compartment. But in later years I had the pleasure of a historic train tour in Colorado (five different types of trains/tracks, lots of fun), a rail tour of India (disappointingly boring trains, actually, but the destinations were worth it), and the trains of England and Scotland including via the Chunnel to Paris (all efficient but not exciting). I was terribly disappointed that an overnight train tour in Thailand was canceled because a mudslide had wiped out the tracks.
    I’ve always loved trains, but I guess nothing can ever compete with my starry-eyed memories of those childhood trips to Grandmom’s house.

    Reply
  60. Ah, trains trigger some of my best memories of childhood.
    From the late ’40s through the mid-’50s, my mother and I would several times a year travel from our home in lower Michigan by steam train to Chicago, switch train depots via big ol’ black cab, and ride overnight through Wisconsin, back into the upper peninsula of Michigan. White-table-clothed dining car, sleeping compartment with tiny but efficient toilet area, and that upoer bunk that magically appeared while we were in the dining car. It might be a lazy fall day at the start, but I’d wake up to frosted windows and swirling snow in northern Wisconsin. Quite an adventure for a young un!
    And at my grandmother’s house, set on a bluff above Lake Superior, twice a day the train would come by on a ledge below the bluff. We could feel it as the train approached—the china would rattle in the hutch—and then we’d hear the roar and watch the steam puff puff puff as the train pumped its way past, one way in the morning, back again in mid-afternoon. Couldn’t see the train, just the steam. It seemed quite mysterious to me. I just loved it.
    As a college student in Chicago, my trains became diesel, with bus-style seating, no dining car, no compartment. But in later years I had the pleasure of a historic train tour in Colorado (five different types of trains/tracks, lots of fun), a rail tour of India (disappointingly boring trains, actually, but the destinations were worth it), and the trains of England and Scotland including via the Chunnel to Paris (all efficient but not exciting). I was terribly disappointed that an overnight train tour in Thailand was canceled because a mudslide had wiped out the tracks.
    I’ve always loved trains, but I guess nothing can ever compete with my starry-eyed memories of those childhood trips to Grandmom’s house.

    Reply
  61. snowball fights! I hadn’t thought about that. Now I want to add snow…
    And just exactly what did your parents think you did for EIGHT hours? Sit in the station? So very cool.
    Trains are certainly better for viewing scenery than driving and trying to watch all around… the Orient Express, sigh.

    Reply
  62. snowball fights! I hadn’t thought about that. Now I want to add snow…
    And just exactly what did your parents think you did for EIGHT hours? Sit in the station? So very cool.
    Trains are certainly better for viewing scenery than driving and trying to watch all around… the Orient Express, sigh.

    Reply
  63. snowball fights! I hadn’t thought about that. Now I want to add snow…
    And just exactly what did your parents think you did for EIGHT hours? Sit in the station? So very cool.
    Trains are certainly better for viewing scenery than driving and trying to watch all around… the Orient Express, sigh.

    Reply
  64. snowball fights! I hadn’t thought about that. Now I want to add snow…
    And just exactly what did your parents think you did for EIGHT hours? Sit in the station? So very cool.
    Trains are certainly better for viewing scenery than driving and trying to watch all around… the Orient Express, sigh.

    Reply
  65. snowball fights! I hadn’t thought about that. Now I want to add snow…
    And just exactly what did your parents think you did for EIGHT hours? Sit in the station? So very cool.
    Trains are certainly better for viewing scenery than driving and trying to watch all around… the Orient Express, sigh.

    Reply
  66. yes, I think the memories may be sweeter than the actuality, but everything is so new and exciting when we were kids! I fear efficiency has robbed us of the romanticism of train travel, but I’m going to guess that we wouldn’t be happy with wooden seats and five different tracks very long these days.

    Reply
  67. yes, I think the memories may be sweeter than the actuality, but everything is so new and exciting when we were kids! I fear efficiency has robbed us of the romanticism of train travel, but I’m going to guess that we wouldn’t be happy with wooden seats and five different tracks very long these days.

    Reply
  68. yes, I think the memories may be sweeter than the actuality, but everything is so new and exciting when we were kids! I fear efficiency has robbed us of the romanticism of train travel, but I’m going to guess that we wouldn’t be happy with wooden seats and five different tracks very long these days.

    Reply
  69. yes, I think the memories may be sweeter than the actuality, but everything is so new and exciting when we were kids! I fear efficiency has robbed us of the romanticism of train travel, but I’m going to guess that we wouldn’t be happy with wooden seats and five different tracks very long these days.

    Reply
  70. yes, I think the memories may be sweeter than the actuality, but everything is so new and exciting when we were kids! I fear efficiency has robbed us of the romanticism of train travel, but I’m going to guess that we wouldn’t be happy with wooden seats and five different tracks very long these days.

    Reply
  71. I traveled on trains when I was so young I don’t remember the trips. Recently I have been on two tourist trains which used cars from the 40’s and 50’s.
    We didn’t go a long distance, but the trip was lovely and meeting people was even lovelier.
    I would jump on that train to Scotland. I would pack my picnic hamper and smile all the way….and if the seats were wooden, I would be certain to bring a very soft cushion.

    Reply
  72. I traveled on trains when I was so young I don’t remember the trips. Recently I have been on two tourist trains which used cars from the 40’s and 50’s.
    We didn’t go a long distance, but the trip was lovely and meeting people was even lovelier.
    I would jump on that train to Scotland. I would pack my picnic hamper and smile all the way….and if the seats were wooden, I would be certain to bring a very soft cushion.

    Reply
  73. I traveled on trains when I was so young I don’t remember the trips. Recently I have been on two tourist trains which used cars from the 40’s and 50’s.
    We didn’t go a long distance, but the trip was lovely and meeting people was even lovelier.
    I would jump on that train to Scotland. I would pack my picnic hamper and smile all the way….and if the seats were wooden, I would be certain to bring a very soft cushion.

    Reply
  74. I traveled on trains when I was so young I don’t remember the trips. Recently I have been on two tourist trains which used cars from the 40’s and 50’s.
    We didn’t go a long distance, but the trip was lovely and meeting people was even lovelier.
    I would jump on that train to Scotland. I would pack my picnic hamper and smile all the way….and if the seats were wooden, I would be certain to bring a very soft cushion.

    Reply
  75. I traveled on trains when I was so young I don’t remember the trips. Recently I have been on two tourist trains which used cars from the 40’s and 50’s.
    We didn’t go a long distance, but the trip was lovely and meeting people was even lovelier.
    I would jump on that train to Scotland. I would pack my picnic hamper and smile all the way….and if the seats were wooden, I would be certain to bring a very soft cushion.

    Reply
  76. I recently wstched a TV programme here in the UK about the Australian railway which featured the Ghan it looked an amazing journey especially on a train that is a mile long.

    Reply
  77. I recently wstched a TV programme here in the UK about the Australian railway which featured the Ghan it looked an amazing journey especially on a train that is a mile long.

    Reply
  78. I recently wstched a TV programme here in the UK about the Australian railway which featured the Ghan it looked an amazing journey especially on a train that is a mile long.

    Reply
  79. I recently wstched a TV programme here in the UK about the Australian railway which featured the Ghan it looked an amazing journey especially on a train that is a mile long.

    Reply
  80. I recently wstched a TV programme here in the UK about the Australian railway which featured the Ghan it looked an amazing journey especially on a train that is a mile long.

    Reply
  81. Some memories never leave you especially the good ones. Traveling by modern diesel train isn’t the same how. Shall I just say it lacks that certain ambience that steam trains had.

    Reply
  82. Some memories never leave you especially the good ones. Traveling by modern diesel train isn’t the same how. Shall I just say it lacks that certain ambience that steam trains had.

    Reply
  83. Some memories never leave you especially the good ones. Traveling by modern diesel train isn’t the same how. Shall I just say it lacks that certain ambience that steam trains had.

    Reply
  84. Some memories never leave you especially the good ones. Traveling by modern diesel train isn’t the same how. Shall I just say it lacks that certain ambience that steam trains had.

    Reply
  85. Some memories never leave you especially the good ones. Traveling by modern diesel train isn’t the same how. Shall I just say it lacks that certain ambience that steam trains had.

    Reply
  86. It’s much later, but Constance’s Spry’s cookery book has a page on ‘Train Food’ and her descriptions of the luncheon baskets are fabulous. For instance: “A small spring chicken was cooked in a pan with butter, a little white sauce, and a small bunch of tarragon. When cold it had a light covering of jelly. It was split in four and wrapped in lettuce leaves. With this there were bread and butter sandwiches (French bread), lettuce and carefully picked watercress, salted water-biscuits, Camembert cheese, ripe pears, and a bottle of claret.”
    I want to live in that world.

    Reply
  87. It’s much later, but Constance’s Spry’s cookery book has a page on ‘Train Food’ and her descriptions of the luncheon baskets are fabulous. For instance: “A small spring chicken was cooked in a pan with butter, a little white sauce, and a small bunch of tarragon. When cold it had a light covering of jelly. It was split in four and wrapped in lettuce leaves. With this there were bread and butter sandwiches (French bread), lettuce and carefully picked watercress, salted water-biscuits, Camembert cheese, ripe pears, and a bottle of claret.”
    I want to live in that world.

    Reply
  88. It’s much later, but Constance’s Spry’s cookery book has a page on ‘Train Food’ and her descriptions of the luncheon baskets are fabulous. For instance: “A small spring chicken was cooked in a pan with butter, a little white sauce, and a small bunch of tarragon. When cold it had a light covering of jelly. It was split in four and wrapped in lettuce leaves. With this there were bread and butter sandwiches (French bread), lettuce and carefully picked watercress, salted water-biscuits, Camembert cheese, ripe pears, and a bottle of claret.”
    I want to live in that world.

    Reply
  89. It’s much later, but Constance’s Spry’s cookery book has a page on ‘Train Food’ and her descriptions of the luncheon baskets are fabulous. For instance: “A small spring chicken was cooked in a pan with butter, a little white sauce, and a small bunch of tarragon. When cold it had a light covering of jelly. It was split in four and wrapped in lettuce leaves. With this there were bread and butter sandwiches (French bread), lettuce and carefully picked watercress, salted water-biscuits, Camembert cheese, ripe pears, and a bottle of claret.”
    I want to live in that world.

    Reply
  90. It’s much later, but Constance’s Spry’s cookery book has a page on ‘Train Food’ and her descriptions of the luncheon baskets are fabulous. For instance: “A small spring chicken was cooked in a pan with butter, a little white sauce, and a small bunch of tarragon. When cold it had a light covering of jelly. It was split in four and wrapped in lettuce leaves. With this there were bread and butter sandwiches (French bread), lettuce and carefully picked watercress, salted water-biscuits, Camembert cheese, ripe pears, and a bottle of claret.”
    I want to live in that world.

    Reply
  91. About 40 years ago, I took a trip to Kenya, one of the highlights of my life. We took the train from Nairobi to Mombasa on a train designed for the British, probably sometime in the 1800s when the rail line was built. I have never traveled on the Orient Express, but when I picture it, it looks like this train. We dined with silver in our linen covered,four-person tables in the paneled dining room, with windows overlooking the savanna. We were all students, so it really couldn’t have been that expensive–Africa was very cheap then. We slept on a bunk bed–one kind soul let me have the lower. When we pulled up the window shade the next morning, we looked out to see “the real” Africa (at least, the Africa of movies) of houses made of savanna grass, with little kids waving as we went by. It was like traveling duringthe style of Victorian England and the ease of the 1950s with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly. I loved every minute and hope the train is still as graceful today, but doubt it.

    Reply
  92. About 40 years ago, I took a trip to Kenya, one of the highlights of my life. We took the train from Nairobi to Mombasa on a train designed for the British, probably sometime in the 1800s when the rail line was built. I have never traveled on the Orient Express, but when I picture it, it looks like this train. We dined with silver in our linen covered,four-person tables in the paneled dining room, with windows overlooking the savanna. We were all students, so it really couldn’t have been that expensive–Africa was very cheap then. We slept on a bunk bed–one kind soul let me have the lower. When we pulled up the window shade the next morning, we looked out to see “the real” Africa (at least, the Africa of movies) of houses made of savanna grass, with little kids waving as we went by. It was like traveling duringthe style of Victorian England and the ease of the 1950s with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly. I loved every minute and hope the train is still as graceful today, but doubt it.

    Reply
  93. About 40 years ago, I took a trip to Kenya, one of the highlights of my life. We took the train from Nairobi to Mombasa on a train designed for the British, probably sometime in the 1800s when the rail line was built. I have never traveled on the Orient Express, but when I picture it, it looks like this train. We dined with silver in our linen covered,four-person tables in the paneled dining room, with windows overlooking the savanna. We were all students, so it really couldn’t have been that expensive–Africa was very cheap then. We slept on a bunk bed–one kind soul let me have the lower. When we pulled up the window shade the next morning, we looked out to see “the real” Africa (at least, the Africa of movies) of houses made of savanna grass, with little kids waving as we went by. It was like traveling duringthe style of Victorian England and the ease of the 1950s with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly. I loved every minute and hope the train is still as graceful today, but doubt it.

    Reply
  94. About 40 years ago, I took a trip to Kenya, one of the highlights of my life. We took the train from Nairobi to Mombasa on a train designed for the British, probably sometime in the 1800s when the rail line was built. I have never traveled on the Orient Express, but when I picture it, it looks like this train. We dined with silver in our linen covered,four-person tables in the paneled dining room, with windows overlooking the savanna. We were all students, so it really couldn’t have been that expensive–Africa was very cheap then. We slept on a bunk bed–one kind soul let me have the lower. When we pulled up the window shade the next morning, we looked out to see “the real” Africa (at least, the Africa of movies) of houses made of savanna grass, with little kids waving as we went by. It was like traveling duringthe style of Victorian England and the ease of the 1950s with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly. I loved every minute and hope the train is still as graceful today, but doubt it.

    Reply
  95. About 40 years ago, I took a trip to Kenya, one of the highlights of my life. We took the train from Nairobi to Mombasa on a train designed for the British, probably sometime in the 1800s when the rail line was built. I have never traveled on the Orient Express, but when I picture it, it looks like this train. We dined with silver in our linen covered,four-person tables in the paneled dining room, with windows overlooking the savanna. We were all students, so it really couldn’t have been that expensive–Africa was very cheap then. We slept on a bunk bed–one kind soul let me have the lower. When we pulled up the window shade the next morning, we looked out to see “the real” Africa (at least, the Africa of movies) of houses made of savanna grass, with little kids waving as we went by. It was like traveling duringthe style of Victorian England and the ease of the 1950s with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly. I loved every minute and hope the train is still as graceful today, but doubt it.

    Reply
  96. I’ve had a lifelong love affair with train travel! Even the Metroliner from New York to Washington D.C. gives me pleasure. Even the NJ Transit commuter trains. When I was 17, I took an overnight train from London to Edinburgh-the one and only time I had a sleeper compartment. If I recall correctly, a porter brought tea in the morning. Wonderful.
    And later on, in my 20’s I took many train trips in Europe. They still had steam trains in Eastern Europe at the time, and there is something so mesmerizing and powerful about the movement of the locomotive wheels.
    Just recently, I rewatched “The Train” with Burt Lancaster. A great movie, but even if it wasn’t I would have watched it just for all the train action.

    Reply
  97. I’ve had a lifelong love affair with train travel! Even the Metroliner from New York to Washington D.C. gives me pleasure. Even the NJ Transit commuter trains. When I was 17, I took an overnight train from London to Edinburgh-the one and only time I had a sleeper compartment. If I recall correctly, a porter brought tea in the morning. Wonderful.
    And later on, in my 20’s I took many train trips in Europe. They still had steam trains in Eastern Europe at the time, and there is something so mesmerizing and powerful about the movement of the locomotive wheels.
    Just recently, I rewatched “The Train” with Burt Lancaster. A great movie, but even if it wasn’t I would have watched it just for all the train action.

    Reply
  98. I’ve had a lifelong love affair with train travel! Even the Metroliner from New York to Washington D.C. gives me pleasure. Even the NJ Transit commuter trains. When I was 17, I took an overnight train from London to Edinburgh-the one and only time I had a sleeper compartment. If I recall correctly, a porter brought tea in the morning. Wonderful.
    And later on, in my 20’s I took many train trips in Europe. They still had steam trains in Eastern Europe at the time, and there is something so mesmerizing and powerful about the movement of the locomotive wheels.
    Just recently, I rewatched “The Train” with Burt Lancaster. A great movie, but even if it wasn’t I would have watched it just for all the train action.

    Reply
  99. I’ve had a lifelong love affair with train travel! Even the Metroliner from New York to Washington D.C. gives me pleasure. Even the NJ Transit commuter trains. When I was 17, I took an overnight train from London to Edinburgh-the one and only time I had a sleeper compartment. If I recall correctly, a porter brought tea in the morning. Wonderful.
    And later on, in my 20’s I took many train trips in Europe. They still had steam trains in Eastern Europe at the time, and there is something so mesmerizing and powerful about the movement of the locomotive wheels.
    Just recently, I rewatched “The Train” with Burt Lancaster. A great movie, but even if it wasn’t I would have watched it just for all the train action.

    Reply
  100. I’ve had a lifelong love affair with train travel! Even the Metroliner from New York to Washington D.C. gives me pleasure. Even the NJ Transit commuter trains. When I was 17, I took an overnight train from London to Edinburgh-the one and only time I had a sleeper compartment. If I recall correctly, a porter brought tea in the morning. Wonderful.
    And later on, in my 20’s I took many train trips in Europe. They still had steam trains in Eastern Europe at the time, and there is something so mesmerizing and powerful about the movement of the locomotive wheels.
    Just recently, I rewatched “The Train” with Burt Lancaster. A great movie, but even if it wasn’t I would have watched it just for all the train action.

    Reply
  101. I don’t know why it is, but there is something a little more civilized about stepping on a train and being transported to a different place. Airports and planes just don’t have the same nostalgic feel, I guess. You were so fortunate to have those experiences!

    Reply
  102. I don’t know why it is, but there is something a little more civilized about stepping on a train and being transported to a different place. Airports and planes just don’t have the same nostalgic feel, I guess. You were so fortunate to have those experiences!

    Reply
  103. I don’t know why it is, but there is something a little more civilized about stepping on a train and being transported to a different place. Airports and planes just don’t have the same nostalgic feel, I guess. You were so fortunate to have those experiences!

    Reply
  104. I don’t know why it is, but there is something a little more civilized about stepping on a train and being transported to a different place. Airports and planes just don’t have the same nostalgic feel, I guess. You were so fortunate to have those experiences!

    Reply
  105. I don’t know why it is, but there is something a little more civilized about stepping on a train and being transported to a different place. Airports and planes just don’t have the same nostalgic feel, I guess. You were so fortunate to have those experiences!

    Reply
  106. My husband had always wished to travel cross country (US) by train. After delivering our daughter to college, we traveled home on the train; the trip took about four days and we had a sleeper when possible. We had fun, but there was a lot of sitting!

    Reply
  107. My husband had always wished to travel cross country (US) by train. After delivering our daughter to college, we traveled home on the train; the trip took about four days and we had a sleeper when possible. We had fun, but there was a lot of sitting!

    Reply
  108. My husband had always wished to travel cross country (US) by train. After delivering our daughter to college, we traveled home on the train; the trip took about four days and we had a sleeper when possible. We had fun, but there was a lot of sitting!

    Reply
  109. My husband had always wished to travel cross country (US) by train. After delivering our daughter to college, we traveled home on the train; the trip took about four days and we had a sleeper when possible. We had fun, but there was a lot of sitting!

    Reply
  110. My husband had always wished to travel cross country (US) by train. After delivering our daughter to college, we traveled home on the train; the trip took about four days and we had a sleeper when possible. We had fun, but there was a lot of sitting!

    Reply
  111. I enjoyed this posting as my husband (who is no longer here) was a train lover. We rode many trains in countries we visited, went to many museums, watched many movies and videos, had a large collections of RR books, had a model RR in the basement. and attended RR shows. He loved sleepers despite knowing he would have to get up several times due to claustrophobia. He probably would have been able to help you in your research and enjoyed doing so. I now miss trains, but miss him so much more.
    Thanks for the memories.
    I was off on a short vacation when this came up so I am a little late in responding.

    Reply
  112. I enjoyed this posting as my husband (who is no longer here) was a train lover. We rode many trains in countries we visited, went to many museums, watched many movies and videos, had a large collections of RR books, had a model RR in the basement. and attended RR shows. He loved sleepers despite knowing he would have to get up several times due to claustrophobia. He probably would have been able to help you in your research and enjoyed doing so. I now miss trains, but miss him so much more.
    Thanks for the memories.
    I was off on a short vacation when this came up so I am a little late in responding.

    Reply
  113. I enjoyed this posting as my husband (who is no longer here) was a train lover. We rode many trains in countries we visited, went to many museums, watched many movies and videos, had a large collections of RR books, had a model RR in the basement. and attended RR shows. He loved sleepers despite knowing he would have to get up several times due to claustrophobia. He probably would have been able to help you in your research and enjoyed doing so. I now miss trains, but miss him so much more.
    Thanks for the memories.
    I was off on a short vacation when this came up so I am a little late in responding.

    Reply
  114. I enjoyed this posting as my husband (who is no longer here) was a train lover. We rode many trains in countries we visited, went to many museums, watched many movies and videos, had a large collections of RR books, had a model RR in the basement. and attended RR shows. He loved sleepers despite knowing he would have to get up several times due to claustrophobia. He probably would have been able to help you in your research and enjoyed doing so. I now miss trains, but miss him so much more.
    Thanks for the memories.
    I was off on a short vacation when this came up so I am a little late in responding.

    Reply
  115. I enjoyed this posting as my husband (who is no longer here) was a train lover. We rode many trains in countries we visited, went to many museums, watched many movies and videos, had a large collections of RR books, had a model RR in the basement. and attended RR shows. He loved sleepers despite knowing he would have to get up several times due to claustrophobia. He probably would have been able to help you in your research and enjoyed doing so. I now miss trains, but miss him so much more.
    Thanks for the memories.
    I was off on a short vacation when this came up so I am a little late in responding.

    Reply
  116. Hugs, Margot! My guy is a train lover too, although he has nothing of your husbands background. Memories are sweet but not quite the same as having him beside you, is it? Im glad you stopped by, thank you!

    Reply
  117. Hugs, Margot! My guy is a train lover too, although he has nothing of your husbands background. Memories are sweet but not quite the same as having him beside you, is it? Im glad you stopped by, thank you!

    Reply
  118. Hugs, Margot! My guy is a train lover too, although he has nothing of your husbands background. Memories are sweet but not quite the same as having him beside you, is it? Im glad you stopped by, thank you!

    Reply
  119. Hugs, Margot! My guy is a train lover too, although he has nothing of your husbands background. Memories are sweet but not quite the same as having him beside you, is it? Im glad you stopped by, thank you!

    Reply
  120. Hugs, Margot! My guy is a train lover too, although he has nothing of your husbands background. Memories are sweet but not quite the same as having him beside you, is it? Im glad you stopped by, thank you!

    Reply
  121. I remember traveling from NYC, leaving from the old Penn Station, to travel out to Denver, where my brother and sister in law lived. We had private compartments until Chicago, where we had to change trains with a layover. You could smell the stockyards an hour before we got there! The rest of the way, we had to sit up the whole way, but I remember going up to the observatory car to see the Mississippi River and the continental divide.i think it was perhaps around 1960-61, and I was 11-12. I remember how hot it was in Chicago during the layover. The air just rippled from the heat, and of course, we were “dressed” for tract, me in a good dress, and my dad in a suit!.

    Reply
  122. I remember traveling from NYC, leaving from the old Penn Station, to travel out to Denver, where my brother and sister in law lived. We had private compartments until Chicago, where we had to change trains with a layover. You could smell the stockyards an hour before we got there! The rest of the way, we had to sit up the whole way, but I remember going up to the observatory car to see the Mississippi River and the continental divide.i think it was perhaps around 1960-61, and I was 11-12. I remember how hot it was in Chicago during the layover. The air just rippled from the heat, and of course, we were “dressed” for tract, me in a good dress, and my dad in a suit!.

    Reply
  123. I remember traveling from NYC, leaving from the old Penn Station, to travel out to Denver, where my brother and sister in law lived. We had private compartments until Chicago, where we had to change trains with a layover. You could smell the stockyards an hour before we got there! The rest of the way, we had to sit up the whole way, but I remember going up to the observatory car to see the Mississippi River and the continental divide.i think it was perhaps around 1960-61, and I was 11-12. I remember how hot it was in Chicago during the layover. The air just rippled from the heat, and of course, we were “dressed” for tract, me in a good dress, and my dad in a suit!.

    Reply
  124. I remember traveling from NYC, leaving from the old Penn Station, to travel out to Denver, where my brother and sister in law lived. We had private compartments until Chicago, where we had to change trains with a layover. You could smell the stockyards an hour before we got there! The rest of the way, we had to sit up the whole way, but I remember going up to the observatory car to see the Mississippi River and the continental divide.i think it was perhaps around 1960-61, and I was 11-12. I remember how hot it was in Chicago during the layover. The air just rippled from the heat, and of course, we were “dressed” for tract, me in a good dress, and my dad in a suit!.

    Reply
  125. I remember traveling from NYC, leaving from the old Penn Station, to travel out to Denver, where my brother and sister in law lived. We had private compartments until Chicago, where we had to change trains with a layover. You could smell the stockyards an hour before we got there! The rest of the way, we had to sit up the whole way, but I remember going up to the observatory car to see the Mississippi River and the continental divide.i think it was perhaps around 1960-61, and I was 11-12. I remember how hot it was in Chicago during the layover. The air just rippled from the heat, and of course, we were “dressed” for tract, me in a good dress, and my dad in a suit!.

    Reply

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