United We Stand

Devilsh low res Pat Rice here:
As our regular readers know, I’ve been slowly scanning and digitalizing my backlist historicals. All the more recent ones have been English history but publishers control those. So I’ve started with the American historicals published right before the Magic series. I adore American history and wish we had more romances set amid the wonderful tumult and uproar that is our country.

One of the most fascinating aspects of American history is the development of our religious freedom. Back in jolly old England, ‘Enery the ‘Aighth raised a right bloody ruckus by overthrowing the Catholic church so he could divorce his barren wife. But essentially, in the 1600’s, Europe was Catholic and England was Anglican and anything else was viewed with skepticism at best, and with the wrath of bigotry at worst. They still hung witches. Any belief outside the state Witch religion could and often did send the believer to jail. Or gaol, as my copyeditors won’t let me say.

So the earliest American settlements were Catholic and Anglican, with one tiny little quirk—to encourage settlement of savage lands, most settlements agreed to religious freedom. Lord Baltimore was Catholic—an unhappy religious choice in England in that period—and he declared his land in Maryland to be open to all religions. In 1682, William Penn, a Quaker and no stranger to religious persecution, encouraged settlement in a large tract west of the Delaware River. He welcomed dissenters from all over Europe. Besides Quakers, he had Amish, Baptist, and Mennonite settlers. Everyone knows about the Puritans who arrived in 1630, bringing their strict Anglican reformist beliefs that aristocratic England couldn't tolerate.

From those humble origins grew a great cauldron of different beliefs. By 1730, roughly the start of the Great Awakening, America was ripe for an explosion of evangelicalism. The settlements had an increasing demand for churches and preachers, and evangelicals could go from town to town as they pleased in a country where all religion was welcome. With that kind of encouragement, anyone could call themselves a minister. Itinerant preachers spread far and wide and before long, Presbyterians, Baptists, and Methodists outnumbered the state churches of the old countries. (First Baptist)

Church  Just try denying all those preachers a pulpit! Admittedly, a few of our forefathers might have been more comfortable with a state religion. But the signers of the Declaration of Independence as well as those framing the new Constitution came from widely varied backgrounds.

So there we were, teetering on the brink of independence, needing to find agreement between aristocratic Anglicans, uptight Puritans, French and Spanish Catholics, freethinking Quakers, and Utopian societies like the Shakers (who encouraged feminism, pacifism, and abolitionism centuries before they were popular), and entire hoards of mule-riding, Bible-thumping itinerants who could rouse riots if called upon.

Separation of church and state was essential for excellent reason—divided by the dissension of religion, the new republic would fall, but united under the umbrella of freedom, we stand to this day. And so our government has survived for centuries on our right to believe any danged fool thing that makes us happy, as long as we don’t try to legislate our beliefs and enforce them on others.

America, the land where everyone agrees to disagree. Is it no wonder that I love writing about our history? Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? Is it a more comfortable era? Does the small world make it seem more familiar? Or does all that dissension in American history make us squirm?

100 thoughts on “United We Stand”

  1. “Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? ” It has to be that a land that was founded for the purpose of “religious” freedom would not tolerate the double standard the aristocracy allowed in the Regency period. It is human nature to desire the allure of the rake or hoyden, but we don’t want to be married to one, so romance novels allow us the fantasy of the allure with the end result being the transformation of the rake or hoyden, through eventual genuine love (we tend not to like promiscuous women very much so a hoyden seems to best describe the female version of a rake). Romance novels are a safe place to experience those forbidden desires while at the same time confirm that we made the right decision by marrying a dependable person since we know that it’s only in books that we can change our men.

    Reply
  2. “Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? ” It has to be that a land that was founded for the purpose of “religious” freedom would not tolerate the double standard the aristocracy allowed in the Regency period. It is human nature to desire the allure of the rake or hoyden, but we don’t want to be married to one, so romance novels allow us the fantasy of the allure with the end result being the transformation of the rake or hoyden, through eventual genuine love (we tend not to like promiscuous women very much so a hoyden seems to best describe the female version of a rake). Romance novels are a safe place to experience those forbidden desires while at the same time confirm that we made the right decision by marrying a dependable person since we know that it’s only in books that we can change our men.

    Reply
  3. “Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? ” It has to be that a land that was founded for the purpose of “religious” freedom would not tolerate the double standard the aristocracy allowed in the Regency period. It is human nature to desire the allure of the rake or hoyden, but we don’t want to be married to one, so romance novels allow us the fantasy of the allure with the end result being the transformation of the rake or hoyden, through eventual genuine love (we tend not to like promiscuous women very much so a hoyden seems to best describe the female version of a rake). Romance novels are a safe place to experience those forbidden desires while at the same time confirm that we made the right decision by marrying a dependable person since we know that it’s only in books that we can change our men.

    Reply
  4. “Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? ” It has to be that a land that was founded for the purpose of “religious” freedom would not tolerate the double standard the aristocracy allowed in the Regency period. It is human nature to desire the allure of the rake or hoyden, but we don’t want to be married to one, so romance novels allow us the fantasy of the allure with the end result being the transformation of the rake or hoyden, through eventual genuine love (we tend not to like promiscuous women very much so a hoyden seems to best describe the female version of a rake). Romance novels are a safe place to experience those forbidden desires while at the same time confirm that we made the right decision by marrying a dependable person since we know that it’s only in books that we can change our men.

    Reply
  5. “Why do you think romance has left that varied and fascinating history behind for the narrow parameters of the Regency era? ” It has to be that a land that was founded for the purpose of “religious” freedom would not tolerate the double standard the aristocracy allowed in the Regency period. It is human nature to desire the allure of the rake or hoyden, but we don’t want to be married to one, so romance novels allow us the fantasy of the allure with the end result being the transformation of the rake or hoyden, through eventual genuine love (we tend not to like promiscuous women very much so a hoyden seems to best describe the female version of a rake). Romance novels are a safe place to experience those forbidden desires while at the same time confirm that we made the right decision by marrying a dependable person since we know that it’s only in books that we can change our men.

    Reply
  6. I have a sneaky feeling that one reason readers are apt to avoid American history is that we all had it in school and it was taught so very badly. I can remember a high school textbook that presented American history as a series of tariff laws. My daughter’s high school text was written in language so dumbed down that everything had to be presented in an utterly simpleminded way.
    At the same time, many readers know the Regency era only from reading Romance novels. History consisting of balls and routs, rakes and ladies, duels and Almack’s is bound to be an improvement on the Smoot-Hawley tariff.

    Reply
  7. I have a sneaky feeling that one reason readers are apt to avoid American history is that we all had it in school and it was taught so very badly. I can remember a high school textbook that presented American history as a series of tariff laws. My daughter’s high school text was written in language so dumbed down that everything had to be presented in an utterly simpleminded way.
    At the same time, many readers know the Regency era only from reading Romance novels. History consisting of balls and routs, rakes and ladies, duels and Almack’s is bound to be an improvement on the Smoot-Hawley tariff.

    Reply
  8. I have a sneaky feeling that one reason readers are apt to avoid American history is that we all had it in school and it was taught so very badly. I can remember a high school textbook that presented American history as a series of tariff laws. My daughter’s high school text was written in language so dumbed down that everything had to be presented in an utterly simpleminded way.
    At the same time, many readers know the Regency era only from reading Romance novels. History consisting of balls and routs, rakes and ladies, duels and Almack’s is bound to be an improvement on the Smoot-Hawley tariff.

    Reply
  9. I have a sneaky feeling that one reason readers are apt to avoid American history is that we all had it in school and it was taught so very badly. I can remember a high school textbook that presented American history as a series of tariff laws. My daughter’s high school text was written in language so dumbed down that everything had to be presented in an utterly simpleminded way.
    At the same time, many readers know the Regency era only from reading Romance novels. History consisting of balls and routs, rakes and ladies, duels and Almack’s is bound to be an improvement on the Smoot-Hawley tariff.

    Reply
  10. I have a sneaky feeling that one reason readers are apt to avoid American history is that we all had it in school and it was taught so very badly. I can remember a high school textbook that presented American history as a series of tariff laws. My daughter’s high school text was written in language so dumbed down that everything had to be presented in an utterly simpleminded way.
    At the same time, many readers know the Regency era only from reading Romance novels. History consisting of balls and routs, rakes and ladies, duels and Almack’s is bound to be an improvement on the Smoot-Hawley tariff.

    Reply
  11. LOL, Jane, you certainly have that right. I remember writing song lyrics in my history books while the teacher prosed on. So I suppose my love of history came from my research after I started reading historicals.
    Cathy, I should think American history would be full of rakes, rogues, and hoydens. So it may be the distance of England that’s needed to give us the feeling of fantasy?

    Reply
  12. LOL, Jane, you certainly have that right. I remember writing song lyrics in my history books while the teacher prosed on. So I suppose my love of history came from my research after I started reading historicals.
    Cathy, I should think American history would be full of rakes, rogues, and hoydens. So it may be the distance of England that’s needed to give us the feeling of fantasy?

    Reply
  13. LOL, Jane, you certainly have that right. I remember writing song lyrics in my history books while the teacher prosed on. So I suppose my love of history came from my research after I started reading historicals.
    Cathy, I should think American history would be full of rakes, rogues, and hoydens. So it may be the distance of England that’s needed to give us the feeling of fantasy?

    Reply
  14. LOL, Jane, you certainly have that right. I remember writing song lyrics in my history books while the teacher prosed on. So I suppose my love of history came from my research after I started reading historicals.
    Cathy, I should think American history would be full of rakes, rogues, and hoydens. So it may be the distance of England that’s needed to give us the feeling of fantasy?

    Reply
  15. LOL, Jane, you certainly have that right. I remember writing song lyrics in my history books while the teacher prosed on. So I suppose my love of history came from my research after I started reading historicals.
    Cathy, I should think American history would be full of rakes, rogues, and hoydens. So it may be the distance of England that’s needed to give us the feeling of fantasy?

    Reply
  16. I think some of it has to do with guilt, Pat. Roger Williams and Anne Hutchison were banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is just one of the injustices pepetrated against Native Americans. Slavery is still a scar on the American conscience, and the Japanese internment camps of WW II are something many history books gloss over. Many readers don’t like being reminded of “unpleasantness.”
    That said, I love American historicals and still reread some on my keeper shelves. With the popularity of Amish romances, Westerns on the rise again, and the momentum of epublishing, maybe there’s hope that more Americana will be added to the romance mix.

    Reply
  17. I think some of it has to do with guilt, Pat. Roger Williams and Anne Hutchison were banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is just one of the injustices pepetrated against Native Americans. Slavery is still a scar on the American conscience, and the Japanese internment camps of WW II are something many history books gloss over. Many readers don’t like being reminded of “unpleasantness.”
    That said, I love American historicals and still reread some on my keeper shelves. With the popularity of Amish romances, Westerns on the rise again, and the momentum of epublishing, maybe there’s hope that more Americana will be added to the romance mix.

    Reply
  18. I think some of it has to do with guilt, Pat. Roger Williams and Anne Hutchison were banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is just one of the injustices pepetrated against Native Americans. Slavery is still a scar on the American conscience, and the Japanese internment camps of WW II are something many history books gloss over. Many readers don’t like being reminded of “unpleasantness.”
    That said, I love American historicals and still reread some on my keeper shelves. With the popularity of Amish romances, Westerns on the rise again, and the momentum of epublishing, maybe there’s hope that more Americana will be added to the romance mix.

    Reply
  19. I think some of it has to do with guilt, Pat. Roger Williams and Anne Hutchison were banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is just one of the injustices pepetrated against Native Americans. Slavery is still a scar on the American conscience, and the Japanese internment camps of WW II are something many history books gloss over. Many readers don’t like being reminded of “unpleasantness.”
    That said, I love American historicals and still reread some on my keeper shelves. With the popularity of Amish romances, Westerns on the rise again, and the momentum of epublishing, maybe there’s hope that more Americana will be added to the romance mix.

    Reply
  20. I think some of it has to do with guilt, Pat. Roger Williams and Anne Hutchison were banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is just one of the injustices pepetrated against Native Americans. Slavery is still a scar on the American conscience, and the Japanese internment camps of WW II are something many history books gloss over. Many readers don’t like being reminded of “unpleasantness.”
    That said, I love American historicals and still reread some on my keeper shelves. With the popularity of Amish romances, Westerns on the rise again, and the momentum of epublishing, maybe there’s hope that more Americana will be added to the romance mix.

    Reply
  21. England still supported slavery and persecuted Catholics, so I assume the Regency era isn’t entirely guilt free. So it’s ignorance of English history or physical distance that must be feeding our fantasies. Even cowboy movies promoting the glory of the Old West are blighted by our knowledge, so I guess we’re not entirely ignorant of history. But there’s so much good out there, too!

    Reply
  22. England still supported slavery and persecuted Catholics, so I assume the Regency era isn’t entirely guilt free. So it’s ignorance of English history or physical distance that must be feeding our fantasies. Even cowboy movies promoting the glory of the Old West are blighted by our knowledge, so I guess we’re not entirely ignorant of history. But there’s so much good out there, too!

    Reply
  23. England still supported slavery and persecuted Catholics, so I assume the Regency era isn’t entirely guilt free. So it’s ignorance of English history or physical distance that must be feeding our fantasies. Even cowboy movies promoting the glory of the Old West are blighted by our knowledge, so I guess we’re not entirely ignorant of history. But there’s so much good out there, too!

    Reply
  24. England still supported slavery and persecuted Catholics, so I assume the Regency era isn’t entirely guilt free. So it’s ignorance of English history or physical distance that must be feeding our fantasies. Even cowboy movies promoting the glory of the Old West are blighted by our knowledge, so I guess we’re not entirely ignorant of history. But there’s so much good out there, too!

    Reply
  25. England still supported slavery and persecuted Catholics, so I assume the Regency era isn’t entirely guilt free. So it’s ignorance of English history or physical distance that must be feeding our fantasies. Even cowboy movies promoting the glory of the Old West are blighted by our knowledge, so I guess we’re not entirely ignorant of history. But there’s so much good out there, too!

    Reply
  26. I don’t know why American history isn’t as popular. I mean, it was pretty popular 30 years ago in romances–lots of pirates, plantations, and westerns to be found. Now you have to know somebody who knows somebody to get a fix.
    Although I find everything you just described fascinating, I’m not sure how comfortable I would be reading it. I’m not a fan of inspirational romances. Not to say I’m not a fan of God–totally am–but I don’t like “preachy”. I think I’m more Quaker like, which would be disturbing news for my dad, since we’ve never been Quaker.
    And I love plantation set novels–or did as a kid–though now I suppose I can understand why they’re not comfortable to read now.
    I guess when we want our escapism, we want it to be as comfortable as possible. If we wanted a story about the nitty and the gritty, we’d look up something from Oprah’s bookclub (though I’d be hard pressed to find those topics there, or maybe I wouldn’t??)
    Still…I did read Dangerous in Diamonds and I appreciated Ms. Hunter including some history that’s probably glossed over: the Peterloo Massacre. Gritty, but still good.

    Reply
  27. I don’t know why American history isn’t as popular. I mean, it was pretty popular 30 years ago in romances–lots of pirates, plantations, and westerns to be found. Now you have to know somebody who knows somebody to get a fix.
    Although I find everything you just described fascinating, I’m not sure how comfortable I would be reading it. I’m not a fan of inspirational romances. Not to say I’m not a fan of God–totally am–but I don’t like “preachy”. I think I’m more Quaker like, which would be disturbing news for my dad, since we’ve never been Quaker.
    And I love plantation set novels–or did as a kid–though now I suppose I can understand why they’re not comfortable to read now.
    I guess when we want our escapism, we want it to be as comfortable as possible. If we wanted a story about the nitty and the gritty, we’d look up something from Oprah’s bookclub (though I’d be hard pressed to find those topics there, or maybe I wouldn’t??)
    Still…I did read Dangerous in Diamonds and I appreciated Ms. Hunter including some history that’s probably glossed over: the Peterloo Massacre. Gritty, but still good.

    Reply
  28. I don’t know why American history isn’t as popular. I mean, it was pretty popular 30 years ago in romances–lots of pirates, plantations, and westerns to be found. Now you have to know somebody who knows somebody to get a fix.
    Although I find everything you just described fascinating, I’m not sure how comfortable I would be reading it. I’m not a fan of inspirational romances. Not to say I’m not a fan of God–totally am–but I don’t like “preachy”. I think I’m more Quaker like, which would be disturbing news for my dad, since we’ve never been Quaker.
    And I love plantation set novels–or did as a kid–though now I suppose I can understand why they’re not comfortable to read now.
    I guess when we want our escapism, we want it to be as comfortable as possible. If we wanted a story about the nitty and the gritty, we’d look up something from Oprah’s bookclub (though I’d be hard pressed to find those topics there, or maybe I wouldn’t??)
    Still…I did read Dangerous in Diamonds and I appreciated Ms. Hunter including some history that’s probably glossed over: the Peterloo Massacre. Gritty, but still good.

    Reply
  29. I don’t know why American history isn’t as popular. I mean, it was pretty popular 30 years ago in romances–lots of pirates, plantations, and westerns to be found. Now you have to know somebody who knows somebody to get a fix.
    Although I find everything you just described fascinating, I’m not sure how comfortable I would be reading it. I’m not a fan of inspirational romances. Not to say I’m not a fan of God–totally am–but I don’t like “preachy”. I think I’m more Quaker like, which would be disturbing news for my dad, since we’ve never been Quaker.
    And I love plantation set novels–or did as a kid–though now I suppose I can understand why they’re not comfortable to read now.
    I guess when we want our escapism, we want it to be as comfortable as possible. If we wanted a story about the nitty and the gritty, we’d look up something from Oprah’s bookclub (though I’d be hard pressed to find those topics there, or maybe I wouldn’t??)
    Still…I did read Dangerous in Diamonds and I appreciated Ms. Hunter including some history that’s probably glossed over: the Peterloo Massacre. Gritty, but still good.

    Reply
  30. I don’t know why American history isn’t as popular. I mean, it was pretty popular 30 years ago in romances–lots of pirates, plantations, and westerns to be found. Now you have to know somebody who knows somebody to get a fix.
    Although I find everything you just described fascinating, I’m not sure how comfortable I would be reading it. I’m not a fan of inspirational romances. Not to say I’m not a fan of God–totally am–but I don’t like “preachy”. I think I’m more Quaker like, which would be disturbing news for my dad, since we’ve never been Quaker.
    And I love plantation set novels–or did as a kid–though now I suppose I can understand why they’re not comfortable to read now.
    I guess when we want our escapism, we want it to be as comfortable as possible. If we wanted a story about the nitty and the gritty, we’d look up something from Oprah’s bookclub (though I’d be hard pressed to find those topics there, or maybe I wouldn’t??)
    Still…I did read Dangerous in Diamonds and I appreciated Ms. Hunter including some history that’s probably glossed over: the Peterloo Massacre. Gritty, but still good.

    Reply
  31. For me reading a romance set in Regency England transports me to someplace unfamiliar and maybe a bit intriguing. I don’t have to feel a part of that history so I can enjoy it as pure fantasy and not have to feel anything over their politics and prejudices. I have been reading them since I was a teenager and never get sick of them 🙂
    Patricia, I got the book today and I love all the little goodies you tucked inside! I had no idea that Romance Trading cards existed! Thank you so much!! I can not wait to start reading. It is going on the top of my “To Be Read” list 🙂

    Reply
  32. For me reading a romance set in Regency England transports me to someplace unfamiliar and maybe a bit intriguing. I don’t have to feel a part of that history so I can enjoy it as pure fantasy and not have to feel anything over their politics and prejudices. I have been reading them since I was a teenager and never get sick of them 🙂
    Patricia, I got the book today and I love all the little goodies you tucked inside! I had no idea that Romance Trading cards existed! Thank you so much!! I can not wait to start reading. It is going on the top of my “To Be Read” list 🙂

    Reply
  33. For me reading a romance set in Regency England transports me to someplace unfamiliar and maybe a bit intriguing. I don’t have to feel a part of that history so I can enjoy it as pure fantasy and not have to feel anything over their politics and prejudices. I have been reading them since I was a teenager and never get sick of them 🙂
    Patricia, I got the book today and I love all the little goodies you tucked inside! I had no idea that Romance Trading cards existed! Thank you so much!! I can not wait to start reading. It is going on the top of my “To Be Read” list 🙂

    Reply
  34. For me reading a romance set in Regency England transports me to someplace unfamiliar and maybe a bit intriguing. I don’t have to feel a part of that history so I can enjoy it as pure fantasy and not have to feel anything over their politics and prejudices. I have been reading them since I was a teenager and never get sick of them 🙂
    Patricia, I got the book today and I love all the little goodies you tucked inside! I had no idea that Romance Trading cards existed! Thank you so much!! I can not wait to start reading. It is going on the top of my “To Be Read” list 🙂

    Reply
  35. For me reading a romance set in Regency England transports me to someplace unfamiliar and maybe a bit intriguing. I don’t have to feel a part of that history so I can enjoy it as pure fantasy and not have to feel anything over their politics and prejudices. I have been reading them since I was a teenager and never get sick of them 🙂
    Patricia, I got the book today and I love all the little goodies you tucked inside! I had no idea that Romance Trading cards existed! Thank you so much!! I can not wait to start reading. It is going on the top of my “To Be Read” list 🙂

    Reply
  36. I fear you’re all very right and I’m very old fashioned. I think there are some American fantasies that don’t go away. My Texas Lily with a half blood far outsells the other ebooks with plantation or Victorian backgrounds. But so far nothing does as well as the Regencies.
    I’m glad I introduced you to a fun new toy, Marie! Did you find the Romance Trading card website?

    Reply
  37. I fear you’re all very right and I’m very old fashioned. I think there are some American fantasies that don’t go away. My Texas Lily with a half blood far outsells the other ebooks with plantation or Victorian backgrounds. But so far nothing does as well as the Regencies.
    I’m glad I introduced you to a fun new toy, Marie! Did you find the Romance Trading card website?

    Reply
  38. I fear you’re all very right and I’m very old fashioned. I think there are some American fantasies that don’t go away. My Texas Lily with a half blood far outsells the other ebooks with plantation or Victorian backgrounds. But so far nothing does as well as the Regencies.
    I’m glad I introduced you to a fun new toy, Marie! Did you find the Romance Trading card website?

    Reply
  39. I fear you’re all very right and I’m very old fashioned. I think there are some American fantasies that don’t go away. My Texas Lily with a half blood far outsells the other ebooks with plantation or Victorian backgrounds. But so far nothing does as well as the Regencies.
    I’m glad I introduced you to a fun new toy, Marie! Did you find the Romance Trading card website?

    Reply
  40. I fear you’re all very right and I’m very old fashioned. I think there are some American fantasies that don’t go away. My Texas Lily with a half blood far outsells the other ebooks with plantation or Victorian backgrounds. But so far nothing does as well as the Regencies.
    I’m glad I introduced you to a fun new toy, Marie! Did you find the Romance Trading card website?

    Reply
  41. I agree that American history just doesn’t have the same escapist/fantasy power as Regency England. Why not? No lords and ladies and too much bad plumbing. Since I grew up on a farm, I find ranch and farm setting totally unromantic. Farming is hard work!

    Reply
  42. I agree that American history just doesn’t have the same escapist/fantasy power as Regency England. Why not? No lords and ladies and too much bad plumbing. Since I grew up on a farm, I find ranch and farm setting totally unromantic. Farming is hard work!

    Reply
  43. I agree that American history just doesn’t have the same escapist/fantasy power as Regency England. Why not? No lords and ladies and too much bad plumbing. Since I grew up on a farm, I find ranch and farm setting totally unromantic. Farming is hard work!

    Reply
  44. I agree that American history just doesn’t have the same escapist/fantasy power as Regency England. Why not? No lords and ladies and too much bad plumbing. Since I grew up on a farm, I find ranch and farm setting totally unromantic. Farming is hard work!

    Reply
  45. I agree that American history just doesn’t have the same escapist/fantasy power as Regency England. Why not? No lords and ladies and too much bad plumbing. Since I grew up on a farm, I find ranch and farm setting totally unromantic. Farming is hard work!

    Reply
  46. I occasionally read a romance set in America. I love Jennifer Blake’s Louisiana historicals. But, in general, American history is too close to home for fantasy. I know of at least once British author who writes native American stories and does Native American re-enactments, while here in the States, we have Regency parties. May have something to do with the grass is greener.
    The Regency wasn’t a totally wonderful time. I probably would have been an overworked servant rather than the rich lady of the house. But the glitz of the era appeals to some people, just at today people like reading People Magazine for glimpses of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. I never did like reading about the contemporary rich, and lately, rich Regency folks leave me cold. Maybe too much of a good thing. *g*

    Reply
  47. I occasionally read a romance set in America. I love Jennifer Blake’s Louisiana historicals. But, in general, American history is too close to home for fantasy. I know of at least once British author who writes native American stories and does Native American re-enactments, while here in the States, we have Regency parties. May have something to do with the grass is greener.
    The Regency wasn’t a totally wonderful time. I probably would have been an overworked servant rather than the rich lady of the house. But the glitz of the era appeals to some people, just at today people like reading People Magazine for glimpses of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. I never did like reading about the contemporary rich, and lately, rich Regency folks leave me cold. Maybe too much of a good thing. *g*

    Reply
  48. I occasionally read a romance set in America. I love Jennifer Blake’s Louisiana historicals. But, in general, American history is too close to home for fantasy. I know of at least once British author who writes native American stories and does Native American re-enactments, while here in the States, we have Regency parties. May have something to do with the grass is greener.
    The Regency wasn’t a totally wonderful time. I probably would have been an overworked servant rather than the rich lady of the house. But the glitz of the era appeals to some people, just at today people like reading People Magazine for glimpses of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. I never did like reading about the contemporary rich, and lately, rich Regency folks leave me cold. Maybe too much of a good thing. *g*

    Reply
  49. I occasionally read a romance set in America. I love Jennifer Blake’s Louisiana historicals. But, in general, American history is too close to home for fantasy. I know of at least once British author who writes native American stories and does Native American re-enactments, while here in the States, we have Regency parties. May have something to do with the grass is greener.
    The Regency wasn’t a totally wonderful time. I probably would have been an overworked servant rather than the rich lady of the house. But the glitz of the era appeals to some people, just at today people like reading People Magazine for glimpses of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. I never did like reading about the contemporary rich, and lately, rich Regency folks leave me cold. Maybe too much of a good thing. *g*

    Reply
  50. I occasionally read a romance set in America. I love Jennifer Blake’s Louisiana historicals. But, in general, American history is too close to home for fantasy. I know of at least once British author who writes native American stories and does Native American re-enactments, while here in the States, we have Regency parties. May have something to do with the grass is greener.
    The Regency wasn’t a totally wonderful time. I probably would have been an overworked servant rather than the rich lady of the house. But the glitz of the era appeals to some people, just at today people like reading People Magazine for glimpses of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. I never did like reading about the contemporary rich, and lately, rich Regency folks leave me cold. Maybe too much of a good thing. *g*

    Reply
  51. Way, way back when I was a teenager our library had some books by Robert W. Chambers set in the Revolutionary War. There was a series of about 3-4 books set in the New York area. Read them several times. I think I learned more about what happened during the Revolutionary War than I was taught in school.

    Reply
  52. Way, way back when I was a teenager our library had some books by Robert W. Chambers set in the Revolutionary War. There was a series of about 3-4 books set in the New York area. Read them several times. I think I learned more about what happened during the Revolutionary War than I was taught in school.

    Reply
  53. Way, way back when I was a teenager our library had some books by Robert W. Chambers set in the Revolutionary War. There was a series of about 3-4 books set in the New York area. Read them several times. I think I learned more about what happened during the Revolutionary War than I was taught in school.

    Reply
  54. Way, way back when I was a teenager our library had some books by Robert W. Chambers set in the Revolutionary War. There was a series of about 3-4 books set in the New York area. Read them several times. I think I learned more about what happened during the Revolutionary War than I was taught in school.

    Reply
  55. Way, way back when I was a teenager our library had some books by Robert W. Chambers set in the Revolutionary War. There was a series of about 3-4 books set in the New York area. Read them several times. I think I learned more about what happened during the Revolutionary War than I was taught in school.

    Reply
  56. The grass is greener syndrome may be at work. I’m also thinking we’re more comfortable with conflicts involving wealth and social status than we are with those involving religion and politics.
    And Louis, I learned a LOT about all kinds of history from reading novels. I wish our kids had more accessible historical novels.

    Reply
  57. The grass is greener syndrome may be at work. I’m also thinking we’re more comfortable with conflicts involving wealth and social status than we are with those involving religion and politics.
    And Louis, I learned a LOT about all kinds of history from reading novels. I wish our kids had more accessible historical novels.

    Reply
  58. The grass is greener syndrome may be at work. I’m also thinking we’re more comfortable with conflicts involving wealth and social status than we are with those involving religion and politics.
    And Louis, I learned a LOT about all kinds of history from reading novels. I wish our kids had more accessible historical novels.

    Reply
  59. The grass is greener syndrome may be at work. I’m also thinking we’re more comfortable with conflicts involving wealth and social status than we are with those involving religion and politics.
    And Louis, I learned a LOT about all kinds of history from reading novels. I wish our kids had more accessible historical novels.

    Reply
  60. The grass is greener syndrome may be at work. I’m also thinking we’re more comfortable with conflicts involving wealth and social status than we are with those involving religion and politics.
    And Louis, I learned a LOT about all kinds of history from reading novels. I wish our kids had more accessible historical novels.

    Reply
  61. Well, there’s plenty of wealth and social status conflict available in the hotbeds of America (my birthplace of Charleston SC., NYC, Philly and Boston to name a few). Not to mention in places where the rich summered, like Cape Cod, the Catskills and Maine.
    Could it be that editors don’t like it, but there’s an untapped reader love waiting to be found? The Civil War seemed like a great topic back when I was newly discovering historical romance. And the Revolutionary War, too.

    Reply
  62. Well, there’s plenty of wealth and social status conflict available in the hotbeds of America (my birthplace of Charleston SC., NYC, Philly and Boston to name a few). Not to mention in places where the rich summered, like Cape Cod, the Catskills and Maine.
    Could it be that editors don’t like it, but there’s an untapped reader love waiting to be found? The Civil War seemed like a great topic back when I was newly discovering historical romance. And the Revolutionary War, too.

    Reply
  63. Well, there’s plenty of wealth and social status conflict available in the hotbeds of America (my birthplace of Charleston SC., NYC, Philly and Boston to name a few). Not to mention in places where the rich summered, like Cape Cod, the Catskills and Maine.
    Could it be that editors don’t like it, but there’s an untapped reader love waiting to be found? The Civil War seemed like a great topic back when I was newly discovering historical romance. And the Revolutionary War, too.

    Reply
  64. Well, there’s plenty of wealth and social status conflict available in the hotbeds of America (my birthplace of Charleston SC., NYC, Philly and Boston to name a few). Not to mention in places where the rich summered, like Cape Cod, the Catskills and Maine.
    Could it be that editors don’t like it, but there’s an untapped reader love waiting to be found? The Civil War seemed like a great topic back when I was newly discovering historical romance. And the Revolutionary War, too.

    Reply
  65. Well, there’s plenty of wealth and social status conflict available in the hotbeds of America (my birthplace of Charleston SC., NYC, Philly and Boston to name a few). Not to mention in places where the rich summered, like Cape Cod, the Catskills and Maine.
    Could it be that editors don’t like it, but there’s an untapped reader love waiting to be found? The Civil War seemed like a great topic back when I was newly discovering historical romance. And the Revolutionary War, too.

    Reply
  66. Wealth and status are a fascinating conflict anywhere, I agree. The American historicals I’ve been e-publishing reflect those conflicts and play down the religious and political. (Although Wayward Angel does brush against Quaker beliefs and abolition in a Civil War setting) So I daresay it wasn’t religion that killed American historicals. “G” I’ll wait to see how the ebooks do before deciding whether the category is dead!

    Reply
  67. Wealth and status are a fascinating conflict anywhere, I agree. The American historicals I’ve been e-publishing reflect those conflicts and play down the religious and political. (Although Wayward Angel does brush against Quaker beliefs and abolition in a Civil War setting) So I daresay it wasn’t religion that killed American historicals. “G” I’ll wait to see how the ebooks do before deciding whether the category is dead!

    Reply
  68. Wealth and status are a fascinating conflict anywhere, I agree. The American historicals I’ve been e-publishing reflect those conflicts and play down the religious and political. (Although Wayward Angel does brush against Quaker beliefs and abolition in a Civil War setting) So I daresay it wasn’t religion that killed American historicals. “G” I’ll wait to see how the ebooks do before deciding whether the category is dead!

    Reply
  69. Wealth and status are a fascinating conflict anywhere, I agree. The American historicals I’ve been e-publishing reflect those conflicts and play down the religious and political. (Although Wayward Angel does brush against Quaker beliefs and abolition in a Civil War setting) So I daresay it wasn’t religion that killed American historicals. “G” I’ll wait to see how the ebooks do before deciding whether the category is dead!

    Reply
  70. Wealth and status are a fascinating conflict anywhere, I agree. The American historicals I’ve been e-publishing reflect those conflicts and play down the religious and political. (Although Wayward Angel does brush against Quaker beliefs and abolition in a Civil War setting) So I daresay it wasn’t religion that killed American historicals. “G” I’ll wait to see how the ebooks do before deciding whether the category is dead!

    Reply
  71. I have to agree with Marie. I want to be transported to something I haven’t ‘lived’ meaning, I’ve studied our history or…it was forced upon me in degrees and sections throughout school. My World History courses centered more on the overview and major events that shaped our world, but not the day to day, year to year intimate details. I get those from historicals set in various eras in England/Europe and I find it fascinating.
    Besides, rabbit trails are so much more fun when I’m researching a Regency story I’m writing than to remember my old history lessons ;o)

    Reply
  72. I have to agree with Marie. I want to be transported to something I haven’t ‘lived’ meaning, I’ve studied our history or…it was forced upon me in degrees and sections throughout school. My World History courses centered more on the overview and major events that shaped our world, but not the day to day, year to year intimate details. I get those from historicals set in various eras in England/Europe and I find it fascinating.
    Besides, rabbit trails are so much more fun when I’m researching a Regency story I’m writing than to remember my old history lessons ;o)

    Reply
  73. I have to agree with Marie. I want to be transported to something I haven’t ‘lived’ meaning, I’ve studied our history or…it was forced upon me in degrees and sections throughout school. My World History courses centered more on the overview and major events that shaped our world, but not the day to day, year to year intimate details. I get those from historicals set in various eras in England/Europe and I find it fascinating.
    Besides, rabbit trails are so much more fun when I’m researching a Regency story I’m writing than to remember my old history lessons ;o)

    Reply
  74. I have to agree with Marie. I want to be transported to something I haven’t ‘lived’ meaning, I’ve studied our history or…it was forced upon me in degrees and sections throughout school. My World History courses centered more on the overview and major events that shaped our world, but not the day to day, year to year intimate details. I get those from historicals set in various eras in England/Europe and I find it fascinating.
    Besides, rabbit trails are so much more fun when I’m researching a Regency story I’m writing than to remember my old history lessons ;o)

    Reply
  75. I have to agree with Marie. I want to be transported to something I haven’t ‘lived’ meaning, I’ve studied our history or…it was forced upon me in degrees and sections throughout school. My World History courses centered more on the overview and major events that shaped our world, but not the day to day, year to year intimate details. I get those from historicals set in various eras in England/Europe and I find it fascinating.
    Besides, rabbit trails are so much more fun when I’m researching a Regency story I’m writing than to remember my old history lessons ;o)

    Reply
  76. I think we have reached a consensus that a story set in the United States in the past doesn’t have the distance in time and space most of us require for a fantasy.
    This is a great country and the making of a country like this was often violent, wrong-headed and messy. But then again, most births are!
    I tend to stay away from American historicals as many of them feature Native Americans. The history of my people after the advent of Columbus does not lend itself to romance. My ancestors were forced to walk to Oklahoma. Family legend has it they didn’t like it so they walked back and settled in the swamps and forests of what is now Lower Alabama and Florida. Doesn’t sound very romantic to me.
    I’ll stick with the Regency. The clothes are nicer!

    Reply
  77. I think we have reached a consensus that a story set in the United States in the past doesn’t have the distance in time and space most of us require for a fantasy.
    This is a great country and the making of a country like this was often violent, wrong-headed and messy. But then again, most births are!
    I tend to stay away from American historicals as many of them feature Native Americans. The history of my people after the advent of Columbus does not lend itself to romance. My ancestors were forced to walk to Oklahoma. Family legend has it they didn’t like it so they walked back and settled in the swamps and forests of what is now Lower Alabama and Florida. Doesn’t sound very romantic to me.
    I’ll stick with the Regency. The clothes are nicer!

    Reply
  78. I think we have reached a consensus that a story set in the United States in the past doesn’t have the distance in time and space most of us require for a fantasy.
    This is a great country and the making of a country like this was often violent, wrong-headed and messy. But then again, most births are!
    I tend to stay away from American historicals as many of them feature Native Americans. The history of my people after the advent of Columbus does not lend itself to romance. My ancestors were forced to walk to Oklahoma. Family legend has it they didn’t like it so they walked back and settled in the swamps and forests of what is now Lower Alabama and Florida. Doesn’t sound very romantic to me.
    I’ll stick with the Regency. The clothes are nicer!

    Reply
  79. I think we have reached a consensus that a story set in the United States in the past doesn’t have the distance in time and space most of us require for a fantasy.
    This is a great country and the making of a country like this was often violent, wrong-headed and messy. But then again, most births are!
    I tend to stay away from American historicals as many of them feature Native Americans. The history of my people after the advent of Columbus does not lend itself to romance. My ancestors were forced to walk to Oklahoma. Family legend has it they didn’t like it so they walked back and settled in the swamps and forests of what is now Lower Alabama and Florida. Doesn’t sound very romantic to me.
    I’ll stick with the Regency. The clothes are nicer!

    Reply
  80. I think we have reached a consensus that a story set in the United States in the past doesn’t have the distance in time and space most of us require for a fantasy.
    This is a great country and the making of a country like this was often violent, wrong-headed and messy. But then again, most births are!
    I tend to stay away from American historicals as many of them feature Native Americans. The history of my people after the advent of Columbus does not lend itself to romance. My ancestors were forced to walk to Oklahoma. Family legend has it they didn’t like it so they walked back and settled in the swamps and forests of what is now Lower Alabama and Florida. Doesn’t sound very romantic to me.
    I’ll stick with the Regency. The clothes are nicer!

    Reply
  81. While I agree with your summation, Louisa, I can’t think that ignoring our history will improve our future. Yes, the painful parts don’t make good romantic fantasy. But there are lives worth celebrating as well. It’s like reading the newspaper–we only get the horrific news, not the wonderful day-to-day happenings of ordinary people. The Native Americans have a marvelous history that should be cherished, respected, and remembered. But apparently romance isn’t the place for it.

    Reply
  82. While I agree with your summation, Louisa, I can’t think that ignoring our history will improve our future. Yes, the painful parts don’t make good romantic fantasy. But there are lives worth celebrating as well. It’s like reading the newspaper–we only get the horrific news, not the wonderful day-to-day happenings of ordinary people. The Native Americans have a marvelous history that should be cherished, respected, and remembered. But apparently romance isn’t the place for it.

    Reply
  83. While I agree with your summation, Louisa, I can’t think that ignoring our history will improve our future. Yes, the painful parts don’t make good romantic fantasy. But there are lives worth celebrating as well. It’s like reading the newspaper–we only get the horrific news, not the wonderful day-to-day happenings of ordinary people. The Native Americans have a marvelous history that should be cherished, respected, and remembered. But apparently romance isn’t the place for it.

    Reply
  84. While I agree with your summation, Louisa, I can’t think that ignoring our history will improve our future. Yes, the painful parts don’t make good romantic fantasy. But there are lives worth celebrating as well. It’s like reading the newspaper–we only get the horrific news, not the wonderful day-to-day happenings of ordinary people. The Native Americans have a marvelous history that should be cherished, respected, and remembered. But apparently romance isn’t the place for it.

    Reply
  85. While I agree with your summation, Louisa, I can’t think that ignoring our history will improve our future. Yes, the painful parts don’t make good romantic fantasy. But there are lives worth celebrating as well. It’s like reading the newspaper–we only get the horrific news, not the wonderful day-to-day happenings of ordinary people. The Native Americans have a marvelous history that should be cherished, respected, and remembered. But apparently romance isn’t the place for it.

    Reply
  86. I personally enjoy books set in early America. I just finished three Pamela Clare books set during the French and Indian War. To me such a backdrop offers many more options for adventure and romance. The Regency is a safe period in England. Society’s rules were well delineated, the period was elegant, and there was an upper class that partied, and traveled. There was war, but it was elsewhere, and the country itself didn’t have to suffer. Life in the American colonies and West was dangerous, hard, and dirty. Not a difficult choice when thinking who you would really like to change places with – rugged chaos or wealthy elegance.
    Thanks for a thought provoking post.

    Reply
  87. I personally enjoy books set in early America. I just finished three Pamela Clare books set during the French and Indian War. To me such a backdrop offers many more options for adventure and romance. The Regency is a safe period in England. Society’s rules were well delineated, the period was elegant, and there was an upper class that partied, and traveled. There was war, but it was elsewhere, and the country itself didn’t have to suffer. Life in the American colonies and West was dangerous, hard, and dirty. Not a difficult choice when thinking who you would really like to change places with – rugged chaos or wealthy elegance.
    Thanks for a thought provoking post.

    Reply
  88. I personally enjoy books set in early America. I just finished three Pamela Clare books set during the French and Indian War. To me such a backdrop offers many more options for adventure and romance. The Regency is a safe period in England. Society’s rules were well delineated, the period was elegant, and there was an upper class that partied, and traveled. There was war, but it was elsewhere, and the country itself didn’t have to suffer. Life in the American colonies and West was dangerous, hard, and dirty. Not a difficult choice when thinking who you would really like to change places with – rugged chaos or wealthy elegance.
    Thanks for a thought provoking post.

    Reply
  89. I personally enjoy books set in early America. I just finished three Pamela Clare books set during the French and Indian War. To me such a backdrop offers many more options for adventure and romance. The Regency is a safe period in England. Society’s rules were well delineated, the period was elegant, and there was an upper class that partied, and traveled. There was war, but it was elsewhere, and the country itself didn’t have to suffer. Life in the American colonies and West was dangerous, hard, and dirty. Not a difficult choice when thinking who you would really like to change places with – rugged chaos or wealthy elegance.
    Thanks for a thought provoking post.

    Reply
  90. I personally enjoy books set in early America. I just finished three Pamela Clare books set during the French and Indian War. To me such a backdrop offers many more options for adventure and romance. The Regency is a safe period in England. Society’s rules were well delineated, the period was elegant, and there was an upper class that partied, and traveled. There was war, but it was elsewhere, and the country itself didn’t have to suffer. Life in the American colonies and West was dangerous, hard, and dirty. Not a difficult choice when thinking who you would really like to change places with – rugged chaos or wealthy elegance.
    Thanks for a thought provoking post.

    Reply

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