Under the Umbrella

 

A_meeting_of_umbrellas_by_james_gillray-1782

1782 Parasols or umbrellas?
You be the judge

Consider that vexing question — was the umbrella manly or unmanly during the Regency? Can my hero carry one for his own use? For his lady’s?  To, y’know, keep dry?

Is it reasonable for him to knock some attackers galley west with a two-handed swing of the trusty umbrella in Chapter Twelve? They were heavy contraptions in those days and would probably account handily for a Regency ruffian.

Which brings us, by a roundabout way to parasols and umbrellas and the distinction between these two which is doubtless one of the troubling issues of our time.

A parasol (Italian para, protecting against. Latin sol, sun) or sunshade varies from a fixed shade over a bench, to a big thingum held out over mistress’s head by a servant, to a trivial, flirty, rufflely toy to be twirled in a playful manner while saving that white complexion from the harsh glare of England. (Those of you who actually live in England are probably giving me an eyeroll over that “harsh glare” bit. But then, the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I've come across.) 

The defining character of those silk and lace parasols was that they weren’t useful. They weren’t waterproof. When it starts to rain you fold ‘em up and run inside.

Drawing by j elwood 1790 to 1800 brit mus

1790-ish Two umbrellas held by men, one by a woman

 

An umbrella, (Latin umbra, shade,) on the other hand, is an altogether more serious, heavy, and substantial affair. In the Regency period they often came in pretty soft colors, but the cloth was oiled to keep the rain away and they were meant to stand up against rough winds and weathers. I image they were only moderately successful at that.

When did these parasols and umbrellas turn up in England?

Parasols came first. In the 1600s and up to the early 1700s it was parasols, parasols, parasols under the skies of

RANC  Jean French painter (b. 1674  Montpellier  d. 1735

A 1790 parasol. French

England, valiantly defending complexions from the scorching rays. Parasols continue right to the present, being a fashion accessory. They were and are woman’s territory. Men did not shelter under them.

 

 

Umbrella c18

roughly 1800. Bit of a caricature as to size of umbrella. That might be a clergyman

The considerably more useful, rainproof umbrella showed up 1700-ish it having taken that long for folks to hit upon the bright idea of waterproofing them. Kersey's Dictionary (1708) describes an Umbrella as a "screen commonly used by women to keep off rain."

 

As Gay offers us:

 "Good housewives all the winter's rage despise
Defended by the riding-hood's disguise:
Or underneath the umbrella's oily shed
Safe through the wet on clinking pattens tread."
                  Gay, Trivia, 1712

Though I'm going to say that "oily shed" wouldn't sell me on the idea just right off, so it's just as well Gay didn't earn a living writing ad copy.

In 1710, the umbrella was so well established even the veriest shop girl carried one.

Parasol 1803 with bending stem

parasol 1803 with a bendy stem

 

"The tucked up Semptress walks with hasty Strides
While Streams run down her oil’d Umbrella’s sides"

                Jonathan Swift,  Description of a City Shower, 1710


So we see women staying dry and safe from the storm. Good for them. Meanwhile, men …

What can one say?

Shall we count the example of Robinson Crusoe who constructed his umbrella in imitation of those he’d seen in Brazil? "I covered it with skins," he says, "the hair outwards, so that it cast off the rain like a pent-house, and kept off the sun so effectually, that I could walk out in the hottest of the weather with greater advantage than I could before in the coolest."

Problematic as social history, I guess.

So. Back on topic after a brief detour to desert islands.

It's mid-century 1700s in England and only women seem bright enough to get under umbrellas. Exceptions were male servants who are carrying the dreaded unmasculine things to cover their mistresses from carriage to door or along the streets, doubtless getting wet themselves, and the odd clergyman who kept one on hand for funerals held out in the open in the rain.

Mr hanway walks out

Mr Hanway, carrier of umbrellas, founder of hospitals, mistruster of tea

When did this change? When did men raise the umbrella overhead in pride?

Social changes sometimes come with dates, and it is possible we have a date.

The index case is Jonas Hanway, friend of chimney-sweeps and sworn foe to tea. He founded Magdalen Hospital. He is said to be the first man who braved reproach and ridicule by carrying an umbrella in public. It was about 1751 and we got images. All Englishmen afterwards follow, brolly in hand, in his footsteps.

You want more umbrella sightings?
Of course you want more:

 

"For some time Umbrellas were objects of derision, especially from the hackney coachmen, who saw in their use an invasion on the vested rights of the fraternity … John Macdonald, perhaps the only footman … who ever wrote a memoir of himself, relates that in 1770, he used to be greeted with the shout, "Frenchman, Frenchman! why don't you call a coach?" whenever he went out with his "fine silk umbrella, newly brought from Spain."

…  it is said that an old lady was living in Taunton who recollected when there were only two Umbrellas in the town, one of which belonged to the clergyman. When he went to church, he used to hang the Umbrella up in the porch, to the edification and delight of his parishioners.

Horace Walpole tells how Dr. Shebbeare (who was prosecuted for seditious writings in 1758) "stood in the pillory, having a footman holding an umbrella to keep off the rain." For permitting this indulgence to a malefactor, Beardman, the under-sheriff, was punished."

 

1820-the-umbrella-cruikshank

1820 late Regency period caricature. See the man in the background with his umbrella?

 

Is it worth pointing out that women had been squelching through the London streets under umbrellas for thirty or forty years at this point?

No. I don’t think we need to mention this.

And umbrellas in the snow? What is it with umbrellas in the snow? Victorian Christmas cards are full of this, as are Japanese prints. Who carries an umbrella in the snow?

Snow umbrella 1825 b Kitagawa Utamaro (Japanese  1753?–1806). Geisha Walking through the Snow

 

Anyhow. Returning to the original question … Did our Regency hero carry an umbrella?

I think we can say,  "Yes. He did. or, at least, he could have."  Probably — being a hero — he flaunted it. He gloried in it. And he whacked villains over the noggin with it when the occasion was right.

 

And you? Any fashion statements you’ve made? Wonderful, mad clothing choices? Stubborn traditions? Practical but weird old comfortable clothes? Anything you cling onto after years and still love?

Some lucky reader will win a copy of a book of mine. Any book, of their choosing.

190 thoughts on “Under the Umbrella”

  1. ++the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I’ve come across.) ++
    ROFL laughing, Joanna! As for practical but weird comfortable old clothes–you have just described most of my wardrobe. *G*

    Reply
  2. ++the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I’ve come across.) ++
    ROFL laughing, Joanna! As for practical but weird comfortable old clothes–you have just described most of my wardrobe. *G*

    Reply
  3. ++the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I’ve come across.) ++
    ROFL laughing, Joanna! As for practical but weird comfortable old clothes–you have just described most of my wardrobe. *G*

    Reply
  4. ++the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I’ve come across.) ++
    ROFL laughing, Joanna! As for practical but weird comfortable old clothes–you have just described most of my wardrobe. *G*

    Reply
  5. ++the car I owned in London had one of those retractable sunroofs which had to be the most perfect example of hope over reality I’ve come across.) ++
    ROFL laughing, Joanna! As for practical but weird comfortable old clothes–you have just described most of my wardrobe. *G*

    Reply
  6. That’s me. That’s me.
    I have five pricey outfits stored in their plastic dry cleaning bags to wear to conferences.
    Everything else is old, worn in, cotton hang-about-the house clothing. Tee shirts with flamingos on them. Floppy soft jeans.
    Writers’ privilege. Painters poets stable owners, independent car mechanics, market gardeners, goat herders, house cleaners, contract assassins, freelance copyeditors, wildlife photographers, day traders … some of us get to dress pretty much as we please.

    Reply
  7. That’s me. That’s me.
    I have five pricey outfits stored in their plastic dry cleaning bags to wear to conferences.
    Everything else is old, worn in, cotton hang-about-the house clothing. Tee shirts with flamingos on them. Floppy soft jeans.
    Writers’ privilege. Painters poets stable owners, independent car mechanics, market gardeners, goat herders, house cleaners, contract assassins, freelance copyeditors, wildlife photographers, day traders … some of us get to dress pretty much as we please.

    Reply
  8. That’s me. That’s me.
    I have five pricey outfits stored in their plastic dry cleaning bags to wear to conferences.
    Everything else is old, worn in, cotton hang-about-the house clothing. Tee shirts with flamingos on them. Floppy soft jeans.
    Writers’ privilege. Painters poets stable owners, independent car mechanics, market gardeners, goat herders, house cleaners, contract assassins, freelance copyeditors, wildlife photographers, day traders … some of us get to dress pretty much as we please.

    Reply
  9. That’s me. That’s me.
    I have five pricey outfits stored in their plastic dry cleaning bags to wear to conferences.
    Everything else is old, worn in, cotton hang-about-the house clothing. Tee shirts with flamingos on them. Floppy soft jeans.
    Writers’ privilege. Painters poets stable owners, independent car mechanics, market gardeners, goat herders, house cleaners, contract assassins, freelance copyeditors, wildlife photographers, day traders … some of us get to dress pretty much as we please.

    Reply
  10. That’s me. That’s me.
    I have five pricey outfits stored in their plastic dry cleaning bags to wear to conferences.
    Everything else is old, worn in, cotton hang-about-the house clothing. Tee shirts with flamingos on them. Floppy soft jeans.
    Writers’ privilege. Painters poets stable owners, independent car mechanics, market gardeners, goat herders, house cleaners, contract assassins, freelance copyeditors, wildlife photographers, day traders … some of us get to dress pretty much as we please.

    Reply
  11. Until a couple of years ago, I used a golf umbrella. It was much better than the normal size – really good for keeping you dry. But I use a cane to help me walk now, and it is a little bit tricky trying to use a cane with one hand and the umbrella with the other. It can be done, but it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to me. I just let myself get wet (smile)!
    Actually, even in my younger days, the umbrella never seemed to be where I needed. It was in the car when I needed it leaving the office or vice versa.
    What a fun, funny, and informative post. Love the pictures.

    Reply
  12. Until a couple of years ago, I used a golf umbrella. It was much better than the normal size – really good for keeping you dry. But I use a cane to help me walk now, and it is a little bit tricky trying to use a cane with one hand and the umbrella with the other. It can be done, but it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to me. I just let myself get wet (smile)!
    Actually, even in my younger days, the umbrella never seemed to be where I needed. It was in the car when I needed it leaving the office or vice versa.
    What a fun, funny, and informative post. Love the pictures.

    Reply
  13. Until a couple of years ago, I used a golf umbrella. It was much better than the normal size – really good for keeping you dry. But I use a cane to help me walk now, and it is a little bit tricky trying to use a cane with one hand and the umbrella with the other. It can be done, but it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to me. I just let myself get wet (smile)!
    Actually, even in my younger days, the umbrella never seemed to be where I needed. It was in the car when I needed it leaving the office or vice versa.
    What a fun, funny, and informative post. Love the pictures.

    Reply
  14. Until a couple of years ago, I used a golf umbrella. It was much better than the normal size – really good for keeping you dry. But I use a cane to help me walk now, and it is a little bit tricky trying to use a cane with one hand and the umbrella with the other. It can be done, but it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to me. I just let myself get wet (smile)!
    Actually, even in my younger days, the umbrella never seemed to be where I needed. It was in the car when I needed it leaving the office or vice versa.
    What a fun, funny, and informative post. Love the pictures.

    Reply
  15. Until a couple of years ago, I used a golf umbrella. It was much better than the normal size – really good for keeping you dry. But I use a cane to help me walk now, and it is a little bit tricky trying to use a cane with one hand and the umbrella with the other. It can be done, but it doesn’t seem worth the trouble to me. I just let myself get wet (smile)!
    Actually, even in my younger days, the umbrella never seemed to be where I needed. It was in the car when I needed it leaving the office or vice versa.
    What a fun, funny, and informative post. Love the pictures.

    Reply
  16. I recently saw some childhood pictures of me at Easter with the new shoes and purse, gloves, and a spring hat. I was definitely more stylish back then! I am a more casual dresser these days with only occasional dress-ups.

    Reply
  17. I recently saw some childhood pictures of me at Easter with the new shoes and purse, gloves, and a spring hat. I was definitely more stylish back then! I am a more casual dresser these days with only occasional dress-ups.

    Reply
  18. I recently saw some childhood pictures of me at Easter with the new shoes and purse, gloves, and a spring hat. I was definitely more stylish back then! I am a more casual dresser these days with only occasional dress-ups.

    Reply
  19. I recently saw some childhood pictures of me at Easter with the new shoes and purse, gloves, and a spring hat. I was definitely more stylish back then! I am a more casual dresser these days with only occasional dress-ups.

    Reply
  20. I recently saw some childhood pictures of me at Easter with the new shoes and purse, gloves, and a spring hat. I was definitely more stylish back then! I am a more casual dresser these days with only occasional dress-ups.

    Reply
  21. I had an old shrug I wore when it was chilly in dance classes. I wore it from high school. It ended up being more and more threadbare as I had to wash it so often over the years. I loved the comfort, but it just wasn’t there anymore to be worn.
    I replaced it recently with a soft black shrug that goes with everything dance related or otherwise.

    Reply
  22. I had an old shrug I wore when it was chilly in dance classes. I wore it from high school. It ended up being more and more threadbare as I had to wash it so often over the years. I loved the comfort, but it just wasn’t there anymore to be worn.
    I replaced it recently with a soft black shrug that goes with everything dance related or otherwise.

    Reply
  23. I had an old shrug I wore when it was chilly in dance classes. I wore it from high school. It ended up being more and more threadbare as I had to wash it so often over the years. I loved the comfort, but it just wasn’t there anymore to be worn.
    I replaced it recently with a soft black shrug that goes with everything dance related or otherwise.

    Reply
  24. I had an old shrug I wore when it was chilly in dance classes. I wore it from high school. It ended up being more and more threadbare as I had to wash it so often over the years. I loved the comfort, but it just wasn’t there anymore to be worn.
    I replaced it recently with a soft black shrug that goes with everything dance related or otherwise.

    Reply
  25. I had an old shrug I wore when it was chilly in dance classes. I wore it from high school. It ended up being more and more threadbare as I had to wash it so often over the years. I loved the comfort, but it just wasn’t there anymore to be worn.
    I replaced it recently with a soft black shrug that goes with everything dance related or otherwise.

    Reply
  26. I had a cotton sweater the color of sea glass that I wore until there were no elbows and lots of holes over the bra area. One good tug on a bit of yarn and all would have been revealed. I’m still sorry I threw it away.It would go great with the dog-haired covered yoga pants I wear to write.
    I have numerous colorful umbrellas in my hallway umbrella stand I always seem to buy out of necessity when we’re in London.I never use them in Maine!Now I just have to remember to pack one when I go again.

    Reply
  27. I had a cotton sweater the color of sea glass that I wore until there were no elbows and lots of holes over the bra area. One good tug on a bit of yarn and all would have been revealed. I’m still sorry I threw it away.It would go great with the dog-haired covered yoga pants I wear to write.
    I have numerous colorful umbrellas in my hallway umbrella stand I always seem to buy out of necessity when we’re in London.I never use them in Maine!Now I just have to remember to pack one when I go again.

    Reply
  28. I had a cotton sweater the color of sea glass that I wore until there were no elbows and lots of holes over the bra area. One good tug on a bit of yarn and all would have been revealed. I’m still sorry I threw it away.It would go great with the dog-haired covered yoga pants I wear to write.
    I have numerous colorful umbrellas in my hallway umbrella stand I always seem to buy out of necessity when we’re in London.I never use them in Maine!Now I just have to remember to pack one when I go again.

    Reply
  29. I had a cotton sweater the color of sea glass that I wore until there were no elbows and lots of holes over the bra area. One good tug on a bit of yarn and all would have been revealed. I’m still sorry I threw it away.It would go great with the dog-haired covered yoga pants I wear to write.
    I have numerous colorful umbrellas in my hallway umbrella stand I always seem to buy out of necessity when we’re in London.I never use them in Maine!Now I just have to remember to pack one when I go again.

    Reply
  30. I had a cotton sweater the color of sea glass that I wore until there were no elbows and lots of holes over the bra area. One good tug on a bit of yarn and all would have been revealed. I’m still sorry I threw it away.It would go great with the dog-haired covered yoga pants I wear to write.
    I have numerous colorful umbrellas in my hallway umbrella stand I always seem to buy out of necessity when we’re in London.I never use them in Maine!Now I just have to remember to pack one when I go again.

    Reply
  31. On the subject of umbrellas:
    Can we take a moment to applaud the genius who figured out how to make umbrellas open automatically? One of the unsung inventions of the modern age, in my opinion. I am a black umbrella fanatic & have them stashed in each of the cars and there’s probably some inside the house too. I’m still in mourning for my favorite one that got left somewhere.

    Reply
  32. On the subject of umbrellas:
    Can we take a moment to applaud the genius who figured out how to make umbrellas open automatically? One of the unsung inventions of the modern age, in my opinion. I am a black umbrella fanatic & have them stashed in each of the cars and there’s probably some inside the house too. I’m still in mourning for my favorite one that got left somewhere.

    Reply
  33. On the subject of umbrellas:
    Can we take a moment to applaud the genius who figured out how to make umbrellas open automatically? One of the unsung inventions of the modern age, in my opinion. I am a black umbrella fanatic & have them stashed in each of the cars and there’s probably some inside the house too. I’m still in mourning for my favorite one that got left somewhere.

    Reply
  34. On the subject of umbrellas:
    Can we take a moment to applaud the genius who figured out how to make umbrellas open automatically? One of the unsung inventions of the modern age, in my opinion. I am a black umbrella fanatic & have them stashed in each of the cars and there’s probably some inside the house too. I’m still in mourning for my favorite one that got left somewhere.

    Reply
  35. On the subject of umbrellas:
    Can we take a moment to applaud the genius who figured out how to make umbrellas open automatically? One of the unsung inventions of the modern age, in my opinion. I am a black umbrella fanatic & have them stashed in each of the cars and there’s probably some inside the house too. I’m still in mourning for my favorite one that got left somewhere.

    Reply
  36. I still have a t-shirt from freshman year of high school. (That makes it a quarter of a century old!) I can’t wear it in public because of the giant hole around the entire collar, but it’s so thin and soft I can’t bear to part with it!

    Reply
  37. I still have a t-shirt from freshman year of high school. (That makes it a quarter of a century old!) I can’t wear it in public because of the giant hole around the entire collar, but it’s so thin and soft I can’t bear to part with it!

    Reply
  38. I still have a t-shirt from freshman year of high school. (That makes it a quarter of a century old!) I can’t wear it in public because of the giant hole around the entire collar, but it’s so thin and soft I can’t bear to part with it!

    Reply
  39. I still have a t-shirt from freshman year of high school. (That makes it a quarter of a century old!) I can’t wear it in public because of the giant hole around the entire collar, but it’s so thin and soft I can’t bear to part with it!

    Reply
  40. I still have a t-shirt from freshman year of high school. (That makes it a quarter of a century old!) I can’t wear it in public because of the giant hole around the entire collar, but it’s so thin and soft I can’t bear to part with it!

    Reply
  41. I actually have an umbrella that I love. It has Gustave Caillebotte’s painting of Paris in the rain running around it, and I have managed to not lose it now for at least ten years. One day I was meeting my daughter in Manhattan for lunch, and since it was raining, I had my umbrella with me. In the restaurant, the waitress said to me, “Excuse me, but were you just on 72nd street?” I was a bit taken aback. It felt kind of like “Big Brother is watching you!” But I nervously said yes, and she said, “It’s your umbrella—I was walking behind you and I just love it!”

    Reply
  42. I actually have an umbrella that I love. It has Gustave Caillebotte’s painting of Paris in the rain running around it, and I have managed to not lose it now for at least ten years. One day I was meeting my daughter in Manhattan for lunch, and since it was raining, I had my umbrella with me. In the restaurant, the waitress said to me, “Excuse me, but were you just on 72nd street?” I was a bit taken aback. It felt kind of like “Big Brother is watching you!” But I nervously said yes, and she said, “It’s your umbrella—I was walking behind you and I just love it!”

    Reply
  43. I actually have an umbrella that I love. It has Gustave Caillebotte’s painting of Paris in the rain running around it, and I have managed to not lose it now for at least ten years. One day I was meeting my daughter in Manhattan for lunch, and since it was raining, I had my umbrella with me. In the restaurant, the waitress said to me, “Excuse me, but were you just on 72nd street?” I was a bit taken aback. It felt kind of like “Big Brother is watching you!” But I nervously said yes, and she said, “It’s your umbrella—I was walking behind you and I just love it!”

    Reply
  44. I actually have an umbrella that I love. It has Gustave Caillebotte’s painting of Paris in the rain running around it, and I have managed to not lose it now for at least ten years. One day I was meeting my daughter in Manhattan for lunch, and since it was raining, I had my umbrella with me. In the restaurant, the waitress said to me, “Excuse me, but were you just on 72nd street?” I was a bit taken aback. It felt kind of like “Big Brother is watching you!” But I nervously said yes, and she said, “It’s your umbrella—I was walking behind you and I just love it!”

    Reply
  45. I actually have an umbrella that I love. It has Gustave Caillebotte’s painting of Paris in the rain running around it, and I have managed to not lose it now for at least ten years. One day I was meeting my daughter in Manhattan for lunch, and since it was raining, I had my umbrella with me. In the restaurant, the waitress said to me, “Excuse me, but were you just on 72nd street?” I was a bit taken aback. It felt kind of like “Big Brother is watching you!” But I nervously said yes, and she said, “It’s your umbrella—I was walking behind you and I just love it!”

    Reply
  46. Y’know — it’s really difficult to handle an umbrella plus
    Umbrella plus purse. Umbrella plus toddler. Umbrella plus keeping your skirts out of the mud.
    Did men eschew umbrellas because they needed their hands free to be helpful? To defend a fair maiden. To offer assistance getting out of the carriage?
    Or — on the other hand (so to speak) — did they insist on keeping their hands free because they were privileged enough never to have to carry anything utilitarian or care for children …
    And so much yes on the umbrella never being where you need it when the skies open.

    Reply
  47. Y’know — it’s really difficult to handle an umbrella plus
    Umbrella plus purse. Umbrella plus toddler. Umbrella plus keeping your skirts out of the mud.
    Did men eschew umbrellas because they needed their hands free to be helpful? To defend a fair maiden. To offer assistance getting out of the carriage?
    Or — on the other hand (so to speak) — did they insist on keeping their hands free because they were privileged enough never to have to carry anything utilitarian or care for children …
    And so much yes on the umbrella never being where you need it when the skies open.

    Reply
  48. Y’know — it’s really difficult to handle an umbrella plus
    Umbrella plus purse. Umbrella plus toddler. Umbrella plus keeping your skirts out of the mud.
    Did men eschew umbrellas because they needed their hands free to be helpful? To defend a fair maiden. To offer assistance getting out of the carriage?
    Or — on the other hand (so to speak) — did they insist on keeping their hands free because they were privileged enough never to have to carry anything utilitarian or care for children …
    And so much yes on the umbrella never being where you need it when the skies open.

    Reply
  49. Y’know — it’s really difficult to handle an umbrella plus
    Umbrella plus purse. Umbrella plus toddler. Umbrella plus keeping your skirts out of the mud.
    Did men eschew umbrellas because they needed their hands free to be helpful? To defend a fair maiden. To offer assistance getting out of the carriage?
    Or — on the other hand (so to speak) — did they insist on keeping their hands free because they were privileged enough never to have to carry anything utilitarian or care for children …
    And so much yes on the umbrella never being where you need it when the skies open.

    Reply
  50. Y’know — it’s really difficult to handle an umbrella plus
    Umbrella plus purse. Umbrella plus toddler. Umbrella plus keeping your skirts out of the mud.
    Did men eschew umbrellas because they needed their hands free to be helpful? To defend a fair maiden. To offer assistance getting out of the carriage?
    Or — on the other hand (so to speak) — did they insist on keeping their hands free because they were privileged enough never to have to carry anything utilitarian or care for children …
    And so much yes on the umbrella never being where you need it when the skies open.

    Reply
  51. Those lovely pictures of all five of us lined up in our Easter bonnets and shiny black patent leather shoes …
    Who patents shoes, anyway?
    (I actually went back and looked it up. It was patented back in early C19.)

    Reply
  52. Those lovely pictures of all five of us lined up in our Easter bonnets and shiny black patent leather shoes …
    Who patents shoes, anyway?
    (I actually went back and looked it up. It was patented back in early C19.)

    Reply
  53. Those lovely pictures of all five of us lined up in our Easter bonnets and shiny black patent leather shoes …
    Who patents shoes, anyway?
    (I actually went back and looked it up. It was patented back in early C19.)

    Reply
  54. Those lovely pictures of all five of us lined up in our Easter bonnets and shiny black patent leather shoes …
    Who patents shoes, anyway?
    (I actually went back and looked it up. It was patented back in early C19.)

    Reply
  55. Those lovely pictures of all five of us lined up in our Easter bonnets and shiny black patent leather shoes …
    Who patents shoes, anyway?
    (I actually went back and looked it up. It was patented back in early C19.)

    Reply
  56. It is the nature of favorite umbrellas that those are the ones that get left behind somewhere.
    It is also true of favorite sweaters. I still miss mine so much.
    I join you in celebrating automatic umbrellas. As my fingers get older and less clever and the chllly winds of a good rain blow harder every year, I am more and more grateful for umbrellas that go “Whoop” and open like magic.
    Sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Reply
  57. It is the nature of favorite umbrellas that those are the ones that get left behind somewhere.
    It is also true of favorite sweaters. I still miss mine so much.
    I join you in celebrating automatic umbrellas. As my fingers get older and less clever and the chllly winds of a good rain blow harder every year, I am more and more grateful for umbrellas that go “Whoop” and open like magic.
    Sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Reply
  58. It is the nature of favorite umbrellas that those are the ones that get left behind somewhere.
    It is also true of favorite sweaters. I still miss mine so much.
    I join you in celebrating automatic umbrellas. As my fingers get older and less clever and the chllly winds of a good rain blow harder every year, I am more and more grateful for umbrellas that go “Whoop” and open like magic.
    Sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Reply
  59. It is the nature of favorite umbrellas that those are the ones that get left behind somewhere.
    It is also true of favorite sweaters. I still miss mine so much.
    I join you in celebrating automatic umbrellas. As my fingers get older and less clever and the chllly winds of a good rain blow harder every year, I am more and more grateful for umbrellas that go “Whoop” and open like magic.
    Sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Reply
  60. It is the nature of favorite umbrellas that those are the ones that get left behind somewhere.
    It is also true of favorite sweaters. I still miss mine so much.
    I join you in celebrating automatic umbrellas. As my fingers get older and less clever and the chllly winds of a good rain blow harder every year, I am more and more grateful for umbrellas that go “Whoop” and open like magic.
    Sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Reply
  61. Long ago I made a quilt of such treasured things. Even the quilt has disappeared, swiped in one of my many moves.
    “Time you thief who loves to get sweets into your list, put that in.”

    Reply
  62. Long ago I made a quilt of such treasured things. Even the quilt has disappeared, swiped in one of my many moves.
    “Time you thief who loves to get sweets into your list, put that in.”

    Reply
  63. Long ago I made a quilt of such treasured things. Even the quilt has disappeared, swiped in one of my many moves.
    “Time you thief who loves to get sweets into your list, put that in.”

    Reply
  64. Long ago I made a quilt of such treasured things. Even the quilt has disappeared, swiped in one of my many moves.
    “Time you thief who loves to get sweets into your list, put that in.”

    Reply
  65. Long ago I made a quilt of such treasured things. Even the quilt has disappeared, swiped in one of my many moves.
    “Time you thief who loves to get sweets into your list, put that in.”

    Reply
  66. My best use of an umbrella – I worked for FEMA and after Hurricane Ike we were working in a parking lot in hot sun. I could not see my computer screen, so I got my umbrella and propped it up to shade my applicant and computer at the same time. It happened to be an umbrella from World Wildlife Fund so it had wonderful pictures of animals. It did not keep the love bugs from gumming up the computer, the printer, my cars windshield and grill, but it did keep the sun off.

    Reply
  67. My best use of an umbrella – I worked for FEMA and after Hurricane Ike we were working in a parking lot in hot sun. I could not see my computer screen, so I got my umbrella and propped it up to shade my applicant and computer at the same time. It happened to be an umbrella from World Wildlife Fund so it had wonderful pictures of animals. It did not keep the love bugs from gumming up the computer, the printer, my cars windshield and grill, but it did keep the sun off.

    Reply
  68. My best use of an umbrella – I worked for FEMA and after Hurricane Ike we were working in a parking lot in hot sun. I could not see my computer screen, so I got my umbrella and propped it up to shade my applicant and computer at the same time. It happened to be an umbrella from World Wildlife Fund so it had wonderful pictures of animals. It did not keep the love bugs from gumming up the computer, the printer, my cars windshield and grill, but it did keep the sun off.

    Reply
  69. My best use of an umbrella – I worked for FEMA and after Hurricane Ike we were working in a parking lot in hot sun. I could not see my computer screen, so I got my umbrella and propped it up to shade my applicant and computer at the same time. It happened to be an umbrella from World Wildlife Fund so it had wonderful pictures of animals. It did not keep the love bugs from gumming up the computer, the printer, my cars windshield and grill, but it did keep the sun off.

    Reply
  70. My best use of an umbrella – I worked for FEMA and after Hurricane Ike we were working in a parking lot in hot sun. I could not see my computer screen, so I got my umbrella and propped it up to shade my applicant and computer at the same time. It happened to be an umbrella from World Wildlife Fund so it had wonderful pictures of animals. It did not keep the love bugs from gumming up the computer, the printer, my cars windshield and grill, but it did keep the sun off.

    Reply
  71. If something I wear is old and I really treasure it, I tend to put it in keepsake boxes.
    The thing I still have? My leg warmers from the late 70s–but now my daughter has absconded with them and wears them at college!! What goes around comes around….

    Reply
  72. If something I wear is old and I really treasure it, I tend to put it in keepsake boxes.
    The thing I still have? My leg warmers from the late 70s–but now my daughter has absconded with them and wears them at college!! What goes around comes around….

    Reply
  73. If something I wear is old and I really treasure it, I tend to put it in keepsake boxes.
    The thing I still have? My leg warmers from the late 70s–but now my daughter has absconded with them and wears them at college!! What goes around comes around….

    Reply
  74. If something I wear is old and I really treasure it, I tend to put it in keepsake boxes.
    The thing I still have? My leg warmers from the late 70s–but now my daughter has absconded with them and wears them at college!! What goes around comes around….

    Reply
  75. If something I wear is old and I really treasure it, I tend to put it in keepsake boxes.
    The thing I still have? My leg warmers from the late 70s–but now my daughter has absconded with them and wears them at college!! What goes around comes around….

    Reply
  76. Thanks for another informative and entertaining post, Joanna.
    I have a Van Gogh iris print on my umbrella which was a gift from my mother. It’s a wonderful way of brightening up a dreary wet day.
    I remember when my sister and I were about five and seven. Our grandmother made us matching outfits for travel between Australia and New Zealand. (This was in the sixties at a time when one dressed to travel!) The dresses had matching hats and umbrellas.
    The French word for umbrella is a good one — parapluie (against the rain) versus parasol (against the sun).

    Reply
  77. Thanks for another informative and entertaining post, Joanna.
    I have a Van Gogh iris print on my umbrella which was a gift from my mother. It’s a wonderful way of brightening up a dreary wet day.
    I remember when my sister and I were about five and seven. Our grandmother made us matching outfits for travel between Australia and New Zealand. (This was in the sixties at a time when one dressed to travel!) The dresses had matching hats and umbrellas.
    The French word for umbrella is a good one — parapluie (against the rain) versus parasol (against the sun).

    Reply
  78. Thanks for another informative and entertaining post, Joanna.
    I have a Van Gogh iris print on my umbrella which was a gift from my mother. It’s a wonderful way of brightening up a dreary wet day.
    I remember when my sister and I were about five and seven. Our grandmother made us matching outfits for travel between Australia and New Zealand. (This was in the sixties at a time when one dressed to travel!) The dresses had matching hats and umbrellas.
    The French word for umbrella is a good one — parapluie (against the rain) versus parasol (against the sun).

    Reply
  79. Thanks for another informative and entertaining post, Joanna.
    I have a Van Gogh iris print on my umbrella which was a gift from my mother. It’s a wonderful way of brightening up a dreary wet day.
    I remember when my sister and I were about five and seven. Our grandmother made us matching outfits for travel between Australia and New Zealand. (This was in the sixties at a time when one dressed to travel!) The dresses had matching hats and umbrellas.
    The French word for umbrella is a good one — parapluie (against the rain) versus parasol (against the sun).

    Reply
  80. Thanks for another informative and entertaining post, Joanna.
    I have a Van Gogh iris print on my umbrella which was a gift from my mother. It’s a wonderful way of brightening up a dreary wet day.
    I remember when my sister and I were about five and seven. Our grandmother made us matching outfits for travel between Australia and New Zealand. (This was in the sixties at a time when one dressed to travel!) The dresses had matching hats and umbrellas.
    The French word for umbrella is a good one — parapluie (against the rain) versus parasol (against the sun).

    Reply
  81. In mid_Missouri there are only 2 “real” uses for umbrellas: 1) as a superstitious aid to hold off the rain; 2) to lose so you must buy another one! Our rains are usually either drizzles you can run between without being slowed down by the umbrella or else they’re gully-washers that splash back up. Even with the umbrella you’re soaking wet, so why slow yourself down with one. About 3 times a year we have a rain I actually USE the umbrella for!
    As to old clothes, except for 3 or 4 “go-to-meetin” outfits; old clothes are what I wear!
    And Joanna, you left “retired folk” off your privileged list. But since I’m retired from copy-editing, I guess you had me on there anyway.

    Reply
  82. In mid_Missouri there are only 2 “real” uses for umbrellas: 1) as a superstitious aid to hold off the rain; 2) to lose so you must buy another one! Our rains are usually either drizzles you can run between without being slowed down by the umbrella or else they’re gully-washers that splash back up. Even with the umbrella you’re soaking wet, so why slow yourself down with one. About 3 times a year we have a rain I actually USE the umbrella for!
    As to old clothes, except for 3 or 4 “go-to-meetin” outfits; old clothes are what I wear!
    And Joanna, you left “retired folk” off your privileged list. But since I’m retired from copy-editing, I guess you had me on there anyway.

    Reply
  83. In mid_Missouri there are only 2 “real” uses for umbrellas: 1) as a superstitious aid to hold off the rain; 2) to lose so you must buy another one! Our rains are usually either drizzles you can run between without being slowed down by the umbrella or else they’re gully-washers that splash back up. Even with the umbrella you’re soaking wet, so why slow yourself down with one. About 3 times a year we have a rain I actually USE the umbrella for!
    As to old clothes, except for 3 or 4 “go-to-meetin” outfits; old clothes are what I wear!
    And Joanna, you left “retired folk” off your privileged list. But since I’m retired from copy-editing, I guess you had me on there anyway.

    Reply
  84. In mid_Missouri there are only 2 “real” uses for umbrellas: 1) as a superstitious aid to hold off the rain; 2) to lose so you must buy another one! Our rains are usually either drizzles you can run between without being slowed down by the umbrella or else they’re gully-washers that splash back up. Even with the umbrella you’re soaking wet, so why slow yourself down with one. About 3 times a year we have a rain I actually USE the umbrella for!
    As to old clothes, except for 3 or 4 “go-to-meetin” outfits; old clothes are what I wear!
    And Joanna, you left “retired folk” off your privileged list. But since I’m retired from copy-editing, I guess you had me on there anyway.

    Reply
  85. In mid_Missouri there are only 2 “real” uses for umbrellas: 1) as a superstitious aid to hold off the rain; 2) to lose so you must buy another one! Our rains are usually either drizzles you can run between without being slowed down by the umbrella or else they’re gully-washers that splash back up. Even with the umbrella you’re soaking wet, so why slow yourself down with one. About 3 times a year we have a rain I actually USE the umbrella for!
    As to old clothes, except for 3 or 4 “go-to-meetin” outfits; old clothes are what I wear!
    And Joanna, you left “retired folk” off your privileged list. But since I’m retired from copy-editing, I guess you had me on there anyway.

    Reply
  86. I gave away most of my dresses, skirt suits and heels when I gave up office work. I also ditched all the pantyhose. Nowadays when I dress up I favor long, swirly skirts that are so much more comfortable and no one knows what you’ve got on underneath! I’ve also got drawers full of t-shirts, from practically every state I’ve ever visited, and that’s a lot. Some of the New Orleans Jazz Fest ones date back to the 1980’s, but I’m never giving them up!
    I also have a few umbrellas, but I find a hooded raincoat or jacket to be better for staying dry.

    Reply
  87. I gave away most of my dresses, skirt suits and heels when I gave up office work. I also ditched all the pantyhose. Nowadays when I dress up I favor long, swirly skirts that are so much more comfortable and no one knows what you’ve got on underneath! I’ve also got drawers full of t-shirts, from practically every state I’ve ever visited, and that’s a lot. Some of the New Orleans Jazz Fest ones date back to the 1980’s, but I’m never giving them up!
    I also have a few umbrellas, but I find a hooded raincoat or jacket to be better for staying dry.

    Reply
  88. I gave away most of my dresses, skirt suits and heels when I gave up office work. I also ditched all the pantyhose. Nowadays when I dress up I favor long, swirly skirts that are so much more comfortable and no one knows what you’ve got on underneath! I’ve also got drawers full of t-shirts, from practically every state I’ve ever visited, and that’s a lot. Some of the New Orleans Jazz Fest ones date back to the 1980’s, but I’m never giving them up!
    I also have a few umbrellas, but I find a hooded raincoat or jacket to be better for staying dry.

    Reply
  89. I gave away most of my dresses, skirt suits and heels when I gave up office work. I also ditched all the pantyhose. Nowadays when I dress up I favor long, swirly skirts that are so much more comfortable and no one knows what you’ve got on underneath! I’ve also got drawers full of t-shirts, from practically every state I’ve ever visited, and that’s a lot. Some of the New Orleans Jazz Fest ones date back to the 1980’s, but I’m never giving them up!
    I also have a few umbrellas, but I find a hooded raincoat or jacket to be better for staying dry.

    Reply
  90. I gave away most of my dresses, skirt suits and heels when I gave up office work. I also ditched all the pantyhose. Nowadays when I dress up I favor long, swirly skirts that are so much more comfortable and no one knows what you’ve got on underneath! I’ve also got drawers full of t-shirts, from practically every state I’ve ever visited, and that’s a lot. Some of the New Orleans Jazz Fest ones date back to the 1980’s, but I’m never giving them up!
    I also have a few umbrellas, but I find a hooded raincoat or jacket to be better for staying dry.

    Reply
  91. I have this working theory that people pretty much pick a style decade and stick with it throughout their lives. It’s not necessarily related to their actual age; it’s what looks and feels “right” to them. I have friends who are back in the 1950s and 1960s; they do full makeup first thing in the morning, they go to a beauty salon rather than Supercuts, they always have prominent jewelry on, and they change into “good” clothes before going out. I have other friends who froze into the 1970s; they favor that yellow/orange/lime green palette, they wear long dresses and flowy tops, and sandals unless it’s freezing.
    I froze in the 1980s, I think because that was when it became okay to wear jeans to the office I worked in. I like jeans with tees or sweaters, depending on season, and sneakers or boots. I feel like a Harlequin American cover of those years, when I still read them.
    Umbrellas? This is LA. We don’t need no stinkin’ umbrellas. At least not very often. I think I have one in the glove compartment, and an old semi-broken one in the closet.

    Reply
  92. I have this working theory that people pretty much pick a style decade and stick with it throughout their lives. It’s not necessarily related to their actual age; it’s what looks and feels “right” to them. I have friends who are back in the 1950s and 1960s; they do full makeup first thing in the morning, they go to a beauty salon rather than Supercuts, they always have prominent jewelry on, and they change into “good” clothes before going out. I have other friends who froze into the 1970s; they favor that yellow/orange/lime green palette, they wear long dresses and flowy tops, and sandals unless it’s freezing.
    I froze in the 1980s, I think because that was when it became okay to wear jeans to the office I worked in. I like jeans with tees or sweaters, depending on season, and sneakers or boots. I feel like a Harlequin American cover of those years, when I still read them.
    Umbrellas? This is LA. We don’t need no stinkin’ umbrellas. At least not very often. I think I have one in the glove compartment, and an old semi-broken one in the closet.

    Reply
  93. I have this working theory that people pretty much pick a style decade and stick with it throughout their lives. It’s not necessarily related to their actual age; it’s what looks and feels “right” to them. I have friends who are back in the 1950s and 1960s; they do full makeup first thing in the morning, they go to a beauty salon rather than Supercuts, they always have prominent jewelry on, and they change into “good” clothes before going out. I have other friends who froze into the 1970s; they favor that yellow/orange/lime green palette, they wear long dresses and flowy tops, and sandals unless it’s freezing.
    I froze in the 1980s, I think because that was when it became okay to wear jeans to the office I worked in. I like jeans with tees or sweaters, depending on season, and sneakers or boots. I feel like a Harlequin American cover of those years, when I still read them.
    Umbrellas? This is LA. We don’t need no stinkin’ umbrellas. At least not very often. I think I have one in the glove compartment, and an old semi-broken one in the closet.

    Reply
  94. I have this working theory that people pretty much pick a style decade and stick with it throughout their lives. It’s not necessarily related to their actual age; it’s what looks and feels “right” to them. I have friends who are back in the 1950s and 1960s; they do full makeup first thing in the morning, they go to a beauty salon rather than Supercuts, they always have prominent jewelry on, and they change into “good” clothes before going out. I have other friends who froze into the 1970s; they favor that yellow/orange/lime green palette, they wear long dresses and flowy tops, and sandals unless it’s freezing.
    I froze in the 1980s, I think because that was when it became okay to wear jeans to the office I worked in. I like jeans with tees or sweaters, depending on season, and sneakers or boots. I feel like a Harlequin American cover of those years, when I still read them.
    Umbrellas? This is LA. We don’t need no stinkin’ umbrellas. At least not very often. I think I have one in the glove compartment, and an old semi-broken one in the closet.

    Reply
  95. I have this working theory that people pretty much pick a style decade and stick with it throughout their lives. It’s not necessarily related to their actual age; it’s what looks and feels “right” to them. I have friends who are back in the 1950s and 1960s; they do full makeup first thing in the morning, they go to a beauty salon rather than Supercuts, they always have prominent jewelry on, and they change into “good” clothes before going out. I have other friends who froze into the 1970s; they favor that yellow/orange/lime green palette, they wear long dresses and flowy tops, and sandals unless it’s freezing.
    I froze in the 1980s, I think because that was when it became okay to wear jeans to the office I worked in. I like jeans with tees or sweaters, depending on season, and sneakers or boots. I feel like a Harlequin American cover of those years, when I still read them.
    Umbrellas? This is LA. We don’t need no stinkin’ umbrellas. At least not very often. I think I have one in the glove compartment, and an old semi-broken one in the closet.

    Reply
  96. L. Sprague de Camp once said that one of the little known pluses of writing as an occupation was that one could wear old clothes to work — in the next room 🙂

    Reply
  97. L. Sprague de Camp once said that one of the little known pluses of writing as an occupation was that one could wear old clothes to work — in the next room 🙂

    Reply
  98. L. Sprague de Camp once said that one of the little known pluses of writing as an occupation was that one could wear old clothes to work — in the next room 🙂

    Reply
  99. L. Sprague de Camp once said that one of the little known pluses of writing as an occupation was that one could wear old clothes to work — in the next room 🙂

    Reply
  100. L. Sprague de Camp once said that one of the little known pluses of writing as an occupation was that one could wear old clothes to work — in the next room 🙂

    Reply
  101. Men carried walking sticks; maybe carrying an umbrella as well was too much? I wonder why no inventive regency man came up with a combo umbrella/walking stick/concealed sword. Might have sold well.

    Reply
  102. Men carried walking sticks; maybe carrying an umbrella as well was too much? I wonder why no inventive regency man came up with a combo umbrella/walking stick/concealed sword. Might have sold well.

    Reply
  103. Men carried walking sticks; maybe carrying an umbrella as well was too much? I wonder why no inventive regency man came up with a combo umbrella/walking stick/concealed sword. Might have sold well.

    Reply
  104. Men carried walking sticks; maybe carrying an umbrella as well was too much? I wonder why no inventive regency man came up with a combo umbrella/walking stick/concealed sword. Might have sold well.

    Reply
  105. Men carried walking sticks; maybe carrying an umbrella as well was too much? I wonder why no inventive regency man came up with a combo umbrella/walking stick/concealed sword. Might have sold well.

    Reply
  106. Slop about in my ratty old clothes. Live where I like. Be evasive when somebody asks what I do, leaving them with the impression I run numbers or something. Work with the dog at my feet.
    I love writing.

    Reply
  107. Slop about in my ratty old clothes. Live where I like. Be evasive when somebody asks what I do, leaving them with the impression I run numbers or something. Work with the dog at my feet.
    I love writing.

    Reply
  108. Slop about in my ratty old clothes. Live where I like. Be evasive when somebody asks what I do, leaving them with the impression I run numbers or something. Work with the dog at my feet.
    I love writing.

    Reply
  109. Slop about in my ratty old clothes. Live where I like. Be evasive when somebody asks what I do, leaving them with the impression I run numbers or something. Work with the dog at my feet.
    I love writing.

    Reply
  110. Slop about in my ratty old clothes. Live where I like. Be evasive when somebody asks what I do, leaving them with the impression I run numbers or something. Work with the dog at my feet.
    I love writing.

    Reply
  111. We never have enough umbrellas and we never have one when we need it.
    Now, of late years I don’t use one at all. I have a folding umbrella that sits in a basket in the back of the car — I store stuff in baskets in the car — but I never take it out.
    I just cram a hat on my head and run into wherever I have to go.
    That’s the difference between me and actual umbrella users. I don’t go for walks in the rain and I very seldom have to look neat and well pressed.

    Reply
  112. We never have enough umbrellas and we never have one when we need it.
    Now, of late years I don’t use one at all. I have a folding umbrella that sits in a basket in the back of the car — I store stuff in baskets in the car — but I never take it out.
    I just cram a hat on my head and run into wherever I have to go.
    That’s the difference between me and actual umbrella users. I don’t go for walks in the rain and I very seldom have to look neat and well pressed.

    Reply
  113. We never have enough umbrellas and we never have one when we need it.
    Now, of late years I don’t use one at all. I have a folding umbrella that sits in a basket in the back of the car — I store stuff in baskets in the car — but I never take it out.
    I just cram a hat on my head and run into wherever I have to go.
    That’s the difference between me and actual umbrella users. I don’t go for walks in the rain and I very seldom have to look neat and well pressed.

    Reply
  114. We never have enough umbrellas and we never have one when we need it.
    Now, of late years I don’t use one at all. I have a folding umbrella that sits in a basket in the back of the car — I store stuff in baskets in the car — but I never take it out.
    I just cram a hat on my head and run into wherever I have to go.
    That’s the difference between me and actual umbrella users. I don’t go for walks in the rain and I very seldom have to look neat and well pressed.

    Reply
  115. We never have enough umbrellas and we never have one when we need it.
    Now, of late years I don’t use one at all. I have a folding umbrella that sits in a basket in the back of the car — I store stuff in baskets in the car — but I never take it out.
    I just cram a hat on my head and run into wherever I have to go.
    That’s the difference between me and actual umbrella users. I don’t go for walks in the rain and I very seldom have to look neat and well pressed.

    Reply
  116. That is a fine clever thought for when we have to, or choose to, use computers out in the sun.
    I will keep this in mind. Thank you.
    And thank you for the good work FEMA does. You guys are on the side of the angels.

    Reply
  117. That is a fine clever thought for when we have to, or choose to, use computers out in the sun.
    I will keep this in mind. Thank you.
    And thank you for the good work FEMA does. You guys are on the side of the angels.

    Reply
  118. That is a fine clever thought for when we have to, or choose to, use computers out in the sun.
    I will keep this in mind. Thank you.
    And thank you for the good work FEMA does. You guys are on the side of the angels.

    Reply
  119. That is a fine clever thought for when we have to, or choose to, use computers out in the sun.
    I will keep this in mind. Thank you.
    And thank you for the good work FEMA does. You guys are on the side of the angels.

    Reply
  120. That is a fine clever thought for when we have to, or choose to, use computers out in the sun.
    I will keep this in mind. Thank you.
    And thank you for the good work FEMA does. You guys are on the side of the angels.

    Reply
  121. Sometimes the DD will swipe something I’ve used and valued. I am so happy to pass it along.
    We get an emotional attachment to objects. Natural, I think. Velveteen-Rabbit-like bringing the inanimate to life. (I can’t read that book w/o crying.)
    Pass along a treasured item and it has two lives. So cool.

    Reply
  122. Sometimes the DD will swipe something I’ve used and valued. I am so happy to pass it along.
    We get an emotional attachment to objects. Natural, I think. Velveteen-Rabbit-like bringing the inanimate to life. (I can’t read that book w/o crying.)
    Pass along a treasured item and it has two lives. So cool.

    Reply
  123. Sometimes the DD will swipe something I’ve used and valued. I am so happy to pass it along.
    We get an emotional attachment to objects. Natural, I think. Velveteen-Rabbit-like bringing the inanimate to life. (I can’t read that book w/o crying.)
    Pass along a treasured item and it has two lives. So cool.

    Reply
  124. Sometimes the DD will swipe something I’ve used and valued. I am so happy to pass it along.
    We get an emotional attachment to objects. Natural, I think. Velveteen-Rabbit-like bringing the inanimate to life. (I can’t read that book w/o crying.)
    Pass along a treasured item and it has two lives. So cool.

    Reply
  125. Sometimes the DD will swipe something I’ve used and valued. I am so happy to pass it along.
    We get an emotional attachment to objects. Natural, I think. Velveteen-Rabbit-like bringing the inanimate to life. (I can’t read that book w/o crying.)
    Pass along a treasured item and it has two lives. So cool.

    Reply
  126. Being retired is a very ‘freeing’ thing.
    A lot of folks say, “Now I can go to Nome Alaska.” Or, “Now I can tie all the flies I want.”
    I said, “Now I can sleep late.”
    Then I got a dog that wakes up at the crack of dawn.
    I do, however, get to dress pretty much as I choose.

    Reply
  127. Being retired is a very ‘freeing’ thing.
    A lot of folks say, “Now I can go to Nome Alaska.” Or, “Now I can tie all the flies I want.”
    I said, “Now I can sleep late.”
    Then I got a dog that wakes up at the crack of dawn.
    I do, however, get to dress pretty much as I choose.

    Reply
  128. Being retired is a very ‘freeing’ thing.
    A lot of folks say, “Now I can go to Nome Alaska.” Or, “Now I can tie all the flies I want.”
    I said, “Now I can sleep late.”
    Then I got a dog that wakes up at the crack of dawn.
    I do, however, get to dress pretty much as I choose.

    Reply
  129. Being retired is a very ‘freeing’ thing.
    A lot of folks say, “Now I can go to Nome Alaska.” Or, “Now I can tie all the flies I want.”
    I said, “Now I can sleep late.”
    Then I got a dog that wakes up at the crack of dawn.
    I do, however, get to dress pretty much as I choose.

    Reply
  130. Being retired is a very ‘freeing’ thing.
    A lot of folks say, “Now I can go to Nome Alaska.” Or, “Now I can tie all the flies I want.”
    I said, “Now I can sleep late.”
    Then I got a dog that wakes up at the crack of dawn.
    I do, however, get to dress pretty much as I choose.

    Reply
  131. I, too, like to pull the hood up or grab a hat instead of using an umbrella.
    Two kinds of people there.
    I wonder if it has to do with the kind of hair. Mine frizzes us from the humidity of the rain. Not much point in trying to keep it dry. The damage is already done.

    Reply
  132. I, too, like to pull the hood up or grab a hat instead of using an umbrella.
    Two kinds of people there.
    I wonder if it has to do with the kind of hair. Mine frizzes us from the humidity of the rain. Not much point in trying to keep it dry. The damage is already done.

    Reply
  133. I, too, like to pull the hood up or grab a hat instead of using an umbrella.
    Two kinds of people there.
    I wonder if it has to do with the kind of hair. Mine frizzes us from the humidity of the rain. Not much point in trying to keep it dry. The damage is already done.

    Reply
  134. I, too, like to pull the hood up or grab a hat instead of using an umbrella.
    Two kinds of people there.
    I wonder if it has to do with the kind of hair. Mine frizzes us from the humidity of the rain. Not much point in trying to keep it dry. The damage is already done.

    Reply
  135. I, too, like to pull the hood up or grab a hat instead of using an umbrella.
    Two kinds of people there.
    I wonder if it has to do with the kind of hair. Mine frizzes us from the humidity of the rain. Not much point in trying to keep it dry. The damage is already done.

    Reply
  136. LA must be pretty much an umbrella-free zone. If I remember correctly from my time in Venice, the falling down thing to fear was giant palm fronds.
    I am unredeemed hippie in style, I’m afraid. Birkenstocks. I still wear Birkenstocks.

    Reply
  137. LA must be pretty much an umbrella-free zone. If I remember correctly from my time in Venice, the falling down thing to fear was giant palm fronds.
    I am unredeemed hippie in style, I’m afraid. Birkenstocks. I still wear Birkenstocks.

    Reply
  138. LA must be pretty much an umbrella-free zone. If I remember correctly from my time in Venice, the falling down thing to fear was giant palm fronds.
    I am unredeemed hippie in style, I’m afraid. Birkenstocks. I still wear Birkenstocks.

    Reply
  139. LA must be pretty much an umbrella-free zone. If I remember correctly from my time in Venice, the falling down thing to fear was giant palm fronds.
    I am unredeemed hippie in style, I’m afraid. Birkenstocks. I still wear Birkenstocks.

    Reply
  140. LA must be pretty much an umbrella-free zone. If I remember correctly from my time in Venice, the falling down thing to fear was giant palm fronds.
    I am unredeemed hippie in style, I’m afraid. Birkenstocks. I still wear Birkenstocks.

    Reply
  141. There are high winds during Santa Ana episodes and palm branches do go flying form on high. A daily risk, however, is being bombed with stripped pinecones by angry squirrels but well fed squirrels.

    Reply
  142. There are high winds during Santa Ana episodes and palm branches do go flying form on high. A daily risk, however, is being bombed with stripped pinecones by angry squirrels but well fed squirrels.

    Reply
  143. There are high winds during Santa Ana episodes and palm branches do go flying form on high. A daily risk, however, is being bombed with stripped pinecones by angry squirrels but well fed squirrels.

    Reply
  144. There are high winds during Santa Ana episodes and palm branches do go flying form on high. A daily risk, however, is being bombed with stripped pinecones by angry squirrels but well fed squirrels.

    Reply
  145. There are high winds during Santa Ana episodes and palm branches do go flying form on high. A daily risk, however, is being bombed with stripped pinecones by angry squirrels but well fed squirrels.

    Reply
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