Turning Over a New Leaf . . .

Sept mumAndrea here. As summer begins to unfurl here where I live in New England, the profusion of colors and textures—both wild and cultivated—coming to life have me thinking about gardens. Now, in the spirit of full disclosure, I am NOT a gardener. Other than the annual rite of planting impatiens in the big urns on my entrance steps and herbs on my deck, I don’t have the patience to dig and weed, and work toward a vision that may take years to come to fruition. But I truly appreciate the artistry, and am grateful to those who have a passion for cultivating the earth.

The Brother GardenersMy recent walks reminded me of a fascinating story in botanical history. One of the many books (too many—I really need more bookshelves1) stacked on the overflow table of my TBR and Keeper piles is The Brother Gardeners, by Andrea Wulf. It’s wonderful history revolving around a small group of men who started the movement of trading seeds and specimen plantings between America and Britain, which changed the face of the English landscape.

At the heart of the story is Peter Collinson, who was born into a prosperous English mercantile Quaker family. His father was a cloth merchant, dealing in high quality fabric both in Britain and its American colonies. Collinson, who couldn’t attend university in England because of his religion, took over the family business. But his real passion was botany.


Peter_CollinsonjpgSelf-taught in the subject through the vast collection of book he collected on the natural world. He soon gained a reputation as an able amateur naturalist and was elected to membership in the Royal Society in 1728 after being sponsored by Sir Hans Sloane.

Rubbing shoulders with the learned gentlemen of the Royal Society inspired an even greater interest in botany. Through his Quaker connections, he came to know Thomas Penn, son of Pennsylvania’s founder, William Penn, and for a number of years sent him English plant specimens as well as book on English estate design. Collinson also began to use his connections in business to begin collecting seeds and specimens from America.

PineDigging deeper into the subject, Collinson also created his own specimen garden, and though his Philadelphia friends, he came into contact with the American farmer/naturalist, John Bartram. The two formed a longtime friendship and trading arrangement that ended up changing the face of English landscape design. (Though like most friendships, there were rough patches where each thought the other didn’t appreciate all the hard work he was doing.) Collinson began to pay Bartram to send regular boxes of American seeds and specimens.

220px-Miller-Garden-Titelsäit--wHe also became friends with Philip Miller, the chief gardener at the Chelsea Physic Garden, who also collected specimens from outside of Britain and was the author of The Gardeners Dictionary, which helped spark an interest in botany with the British public. Through Miller, Collinson began to supply American plants and tree seeds to some of the grand English estates. Baron Petrie was his first noble client—others included the Duke of Bedford and the Duke of Richmond. Soon an impressive array of North American trees—hickory, white and black walnut trees, sassafras, dogwood, red cedar, magnolia, hemlock, chestnut oak, white oak and tulip trees, to name just a few—were changing the British landscape.

396754The self-taught Collinson also began to hobnob with famous scholars like Sir Joseph Banks, who sailed with Captain Cook and collected exotic specimens from around the world, and Carl Linnaeus, who was trying to get the British to accept his new nomenclature for plants. Peter Miller was opposed to the system but Collinson helped convince the British scientific world that it made sense. (Perhaps as a thank you, Linnaeus named a plant after Collinson—Collinsonia canadensis—which pleased him greatly.

Collinson was a catalyst for making Britain the center of botanical research and specimen sharing. His ideas helped spur the creation of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, which helped to disseminate medicinal plants, agricultural species and useful trees around the globe. (The Royal Botanic Gardens play an important cameo role in my upcoming Wrexford & Sloane mystery, which releases in September!)

So what about you? Are you an avid gardener? Do you have a favorite famous garden. If Collinson could gift you any tree or flowering plant, what would you choose?

 

100 thoughts on “Turning Over a New Leaf . . .”

  1. That sounds like a fascinating book!
    As a gardener, I was always more ambitious than adept. I have planted innumerable imaginary gardens as I moon over plant and seed catalogs, but when it comes to practice, I confine myself to killing houseplants. (I keep forgetting that they need to be watered.)
    But I think I’ll read that book.

    Reply
  2. That sounds like a fascinating book!
    As a gardener, I was always more ambitious than adept. I have planted innumerable imaginary gardens as I moon over plant and seed catalogs, but when it comes to practice, I confine myself to killing houseplants. (I keep forgetting that they need to be watered.)
    But I think I’ll read that book.

    Reply
  3. That sounds like a fascinating book!
    As a gardener, I was always more ambitious than adept. I have planted innumerable imaginary gardens as I moon over plant and seed catalogs, but when it comes to practice, I confine myself to killing houseplants. (I keep forgetting that they need to be watered.)
    But I think I’ll read that book.

    Reply
  4. That sounds like a fascinating book!
    As a gardener, I was always more ambitious than adept. I have planted innumerable imaginary gardens as I moon over plant and seed catalogs, but when it comes to practice, I confine myself to killing houseplants. (I keep forgetting that they need to be watered.)
    But I think I’ll read that book.

    Reply
  5. That sounds like a fascinating book!
    As a gardener, I was always more ambitious than adept. I have planted innumerable imaginary gardens as I moon over plant and seed catalogs, but when it comes to practice, I confine myself to killing houseplants. (I keep forgetting that they need to be watered.)
    But I think I’ll read that book.

    Reply
  6. Like you, I appreciate the efforts of gardeners, but I loathe the chore of gardening. I do like the result when the work is done, but a week later it has to be done again. The gardens I inherited have become mainly easy to maintain hostas, irises, and day lilies. Fortunately, I have a niece and nephew that enjoy the work.
    When I travel, I enjoy going to a large garden such as Middleton Place in Charleston, SC. The main house is gone, but the gardens and wildlife they attract are worth the visit.
    But on the other hand, I volunteer in one of the Metro Parks where I live and wind up pulling weeds. It is interesting that some of the very seeds that English gardeners brought to North America, for example: garlic mustard and bush honeysuckle, are some of the worst invasive plants that threaten native wildlife. I’m sure some North American plants are the cause for gardeners’ curses in England, also.

    Reply
  7. Like you, I appreciate the efforts of gardeners, but I loathe the chore of gardening. I do like the result when the work is done, but a week later it has to be done again. The gardens I inherited have become mainly easy to maintain hostas, irises, and day lilies. Fortunately, I have a niece and nephew that enjoy the work.
    When I travel, I enjoy going to a large garden such as Middleton Place in Charleston, SC. The main house is gone, but the gardens and wildlife they attract are worth the visit.
    But on the other hand, I volunteer in one of the Metro Parks where I live and wind up pulling weeds. It is interesting that some of the very seeds that English gardeners brought to North America, for example: garlic mustard and bush honeysuckle, are some of the worst invasive plants that threaten native wildlife. I’m sure some North American plants are the cause for gardeners’ curses in England, also.

    Reply
  8. Like you, I appreciate the efforts of gardeners, but I loathe the chore of gardening. I do like the result when the work is done, but a week later it has to be done again. The gardens I inherited have become mainly easy to maintain hostas, irises, and day lilies. Fortunately, I have a niece and nephew that enjoy the work.
    When I travel, I enjoy going to a large garden such as Middleton Place in Charleston, SC. The main house is gone, but the gardens and wildlife they attract are worth the visit.
    But on the other hand, I volunteer in one of the Metro Parks where I live and wind up pulling weeds. It is interesting that some of the very seeds that English gardeners brought to North America, for example: garlic mustard and bush honeysuckle, are some of the worst invasive plants that threaten native wildlife. I’m sure some North American plants are the cause for gardeners’ curses in England, also.

    Reply
  9. Like you, I appreciate the efforts of gardeners, but I loathe the chore of gardening. I do like the result when the work is done, but a week later it has to be done again. The gardens I inherited have become mainly easy to maintain hostas, irises, and day lilies. Fortunately, I have a niece and nephew that enjoy the work.
    When I travel, I enjoy going to a large garden such as Middleton Place in Charleston, SC. The main house is gone, but the gardens and wildlife they attract are worth the visit.
    But on the other hand, I volunteer in one of the Metro Parks where I live and wind up pulling weeds. It is interesting that some of the very seeds that English gardeners brought to North America, for example: garlic mustard and bush honeysuckle, are some of the worst invasive plants that threaten native wildlife. I’m sure some North American plants are the cause for gardeners’ curses in England, also.

    Reply
  10. Like you, I appreciate the efforts of gardeners, but I loathe the chore of gardening. I do like the result when the work is done, but a week later it has to be done again. The gardens I inherited have become mainly easy to maintain hostas, irises, and day lilies. Fortunately, I have a niece and nephew that enjoy the work.
    When I travel, I enjoy going to a large garden such as Middleton Place in Charleston, SC. The main house is gone, but the gardens and wildlife they attract are worth the visit.
    But on the other hand, I volunteer in one of the Metro Parks where I live and wind up pulling weeds. It is interesting that some of the very seeds that English gardeners brought to North America, for example: garlic mustard and bush honeysuckle, are some of the worst invasive plants that threaten native wildlife. I’m sure some North American plants are the cause for gardeners’ curses in England, also.

    Reply
  11. I had a similar thought, @Pamela, about the possibility of non-native plants causing issues.
    The people and the book sound fascinating, Andrea; thanks for bringing them to my attention. As for me, I am not a gardener though I enjoy admiring (and eating) the fruits of others’ labor.

    Reply
  12. I had a similar thought, @Pamela, about the possibility of non-native plants causing issues.
    The people and the book sound fascinating, Andrea; thanks for bringing them to my attention. As for me, I am not a gardener though I enjoy admiring (and eating) the fruits of others’ labor.

    Reply
  13. I had a similar thought, @Pamela, about the possibility of non-native plants causing issues.
    The people and the book sound fascinating, Andrea; thanks for bringing them to my attention. As for me, I am not a gardener though I enjoy admiring (and eating) the fruits of others’ labor.

    Reply
  14. I had a similar thought, @Pamela, about the possibility of non-native plants causing issues.
    The people and the book sound fascinating, Andrea; thanks for bringing them to my attention. As for me, I am not a gardener though I enjoy admiring (and eating) the fruits of others’ labor.

    Reply
  15. I had a similar thought, @Pamela, about the possibility of non-native plants causing issues.
    The people and the book sound fascinating, Andrea; thanks for bringing them to my attention. As for me, I am not a gardener though I enjoy admiring (and eating) the fruits of others’ labor.

    Reply
  16. Gardening is another activity that has been side-tracked by age. I put in a garden in every house I lived in (including this one, we’ve been hereover 30 years). I alwats planted some daffodils that had reverted to basic stock. The original bulbs came from the house I grew up in. I had some here, but a yard remake lost them.
    Now my gardening a virtual.

    Reply
  17. Gardening is another activity that has been side-tracked by age. I put in a garden in every house I lived in (including this one, we’ve been hereover 30 years). I alwats planted some daffodils that had reverted to basic stock. The original bulbs came from the house I grew up in. I had some here, but a yard remake lost them.
    Now my gardening a virtual.

    Reply
  18. Gardening is another activity that has been side-tracked by age. I put in a garden in every house I lived in (including this one, we’ve been hereover 30 years). I alwats planted some daffodils that had reverted to basic stock. The original bulbs came from the house I grew up in. I had some here, but a yard remake lost them.
    Now my gardening a virtual.

    Reply
  19. Gardening is another activity that has been side-tracked by age. I put in a garden in every house I lived in (including this one, we’ve been hereover 30 years). I alwats planted some daffodils that had reverted to basic stock. The original bulbs came from the house I grew up in. I had some here, but a yard remake lost them.
    Now my gardening a virtual.

    Reply
  20. Gardening is another activity that has been side-tracked by age. I put in a garden in every house I lived in (including this one, we’ve been hereover 30 years). I alwats planted some daffodils that had reverted to basic stock. The original bulbs came from the house I grew up in. I had some here, but a yard remake lost them.
    Now my gardening a virtual.

    Reply
  21. My favorite garden is Hidcote Manor in the English Cotswolds. It was created by the American Lawrence Johnston and is now owned by the National Trust. Part is designed as a series of rooms so for example, you can go through an arch from the white garden to the fuchsia garden and beyond. As a bonus Kiftsgate garden is only a half mile away so the two together make for a day in gardening heaven!
    Reading some of the comments on weeding and hard work I think perhaps a study of mulching and ground cover plants might be helpful for some! I put a thick mulch between my plants in early spring to stop the light activating weed seeds and make extensive use of hardy geraniums between my specimen plants. There are some beautiful varieties e.g. the blue rozanne which doesn’t set seed and flowers throughout the summer right through until the Autumn frosts. The geraniums cover the soil, suppress weeds and are very beautiful.

    Reply
  22. My favorite garden is Hidcote Manor in the English Cotswolds. It was created by the American Lawrence Johnston and is now owned by the National Trust. Part is designed as a series of rooms so for example, you can go through an arch from the white garden to the fuchsia garden and beyond. As a bonus Kiftsgate garden is only a half mile away so the two together make for a day in gardening heaven!
    Reading some of the comments on weeding and hard work I think perhaps a study of mulching and ground cover plants might be helpful for some! I put a thick mulch between my plants in early spring to stop the light activating weed seeds and make extensive use of hardy geraniums between my specimen plants. There are some beautiful varieties e.g. the blue rozanne which doesn’t set seed and flowers throughout the summer right through until the Autumn frosts. The geraniums cover the soil, suppress weeds and are very beautiful.

    Reply
  23. My favorite garden is Hidcote Manor in the English Cotswolds. It was created by the American Lawrence Johnston and is now owned by the National Trust. Part is designed as a series of rooms so for example, you can go through an arch from the white garden to the fuchsia garden and beyond. As a bonus Kiftsgate garden is only a half mile away so the two together make for a day in gardening heaven!
    Reading some of the comments on weeding and hard work I think perhaps a study of mulching and ground cover plants might be helpful for some! I put a thick mulch between my plants in early spring to stop the light activating weed seeds and make extensive use of hardy geraniums between my specimen plants. There are some beautiful varieties e.g. the blue rozanne which doesn’t set seed and flowers throughout the summer right through until the Autumn frosts. The geraniums cover the soil, suppress weeds and are very beautiful.

    Reply
  24. My favorite garden is Hidcote Manor in the English Cotswolds. It was created by the American Lawrence Johnston and is now owned by the National Trust. Part is designed as a series of rooms so for example, you can go through an arch from the white garden to the fuchsia garden and beyond. As a bonus Kiftsgate garden is only a half mile away so the two together make for a day in gardening heaven!
    Reading some of the comments on weeding and hard work I think perhaps a study of mulching and ground cover plants might be helpful for some! I put a thick mulch between my plants in early spring to stop the light activating weed seeds and make extensive use of hardy geraniums between my specimen plants. There are some beautiful varieties e.g. the blue rozanne which doesn’t set seed and flowers throughout the summer right through until the Autumn frosts. The geraniums cover the soil, suppress weeds and are very beautiful.

    Reply
  25. My favorite garden is Hidcote Manor in the English Cotswolds. It was created by the American Lawrence Johnston and is now owned by the National Trust. Part is designed as a series of rooms so for example, you can go through an arch from the white garden to the fuchsia garden and beyond. As a bonus Kiftsgate garden is only a half mile away so the two together make for a day in gardening heaven!
    Reading some of the comments on weeding and hard work I think perhaps a study of mulching and ground cover plants might be helpful for some! I put a thick mulch between my plants in early spring to stop the light activating weed seeds and make extensive use of hardy geraniums between my specimen plants. There are some beautiful varieties e.g. the blue rozanne which doesn’t set seed and flowers throughout the summer right through until the Autumn frosts. The geraniums cover the soil, suppress weeds and are very beautiful.

    Reply
  26. Thank you so much for this, Andrea – I now know the perfect Father’s Day gift for 2 men in my family! They are avid gardeners, while I am always willing to plan what they should plant, nurture, and weed assiduously! 😎 My husband cannot understand why I do not wish to see orange dahlias in the midst of our white, pink and blue perennial garden — but he indulges my dreams of recreating the fabulous borders we have seen in UK gardens. We, too, live in New England, and nothing is more glorious than early summer here, but my favorite gardens are Stourhead, which is actually many gardens, and the walled garden at Culzean in Scotland. I’ve only ever seen Stourhead in its June and July colors, but would love to be there for the rhododendrons. And the two times we’ve been at Culzean, it’s been dark and dreary, but the flowers seemed to glow in the grayness – including the most beautiful delphiniums ever. It seems I must thank you, too, for a trip down garden memory lane!

    Reply
  27. Thank you so much for this, Andrea – I now know the perfect Father’s Day gift for 2 men in my family! They are avid gardeners, while I am always willing to plan what they should plant, nurture, and weed assiduously! 😎 My husband cannot understand why I do not wish to see orange dahlias in the midst of our white, pink and blue perennial garden — but he indulges my dreams of recreating the fabulous borders we have seen in UK gardens. We, too, live in New England, and nothing is more glorious than early summer here, but my favorite gardens are Stourhead, which is actually many gardens, and the walled garden at Culzean in Scotland. I’ve only ever seen Stourhead in its June and July colors, but would love to be there for the rhododendrons. And the two times we’ve been at Culzean, it’s been dark and dreary, but the flowers seemed to glow in the grayness – including the most beautiful delphiniums ever. It seems I must thank you, too, for a trip down garden memory lane!

    Reply
  28. Thank you so much for this, Andrea – I now know the perfect Father’s Day gift for 2 men in my family! They are avid gardeners, while I am always willing to plan what they should plant, nurture, and weed assiduously! 😎 My husband cannot understand why I do not wish to see orange dahlias in the midst of our white, pink and blue perennial garden — but he indulges my dreams of recreating the fabulous borders we have seen in UK gardens. We, too, live in New England, and nothing is more glorious than early summer here, but my favorite gardens are Stourhead, which is actually many gardens, and the walled garden at Culzean in Scotland. I’ve only ever seen Stourhead in its June and July colors, but would love to be there for the rhododendrons. And the two times we’ve been at Culzean, it’s been dark and dreary, but the flowers seemed to glow in the grayness – including the most beautiful delphiniums ever. It seems I must thank you, too, for a trip down garden memory lane!

    Reply
  29. Thank you so much for this, Andrea – I now know the perfect Father’s Day gift for 2 men in my family! They are avid gardeners, while I am always willing to plan what they should plant, nurture, and weed assiduously! 😎 My husband cannot understand why I do not wish to see orange dahlias in the midst of our white, pink and blue perennial garden — but he indulges my dreams of recreating the fabulous borders we have seen in UK gardens. We, too, live in New England, and nothing is more glorious than early summer here, but my favorite gardens are Stourhead, which is actually many gardens, and the walled garden at Culzean in Scotland. I’ve only ever seen Stourhead in its June and July colors, but would love to be there for the rhododendrons. And the two times we’ve been at Culzean, it’s been dark and dreary, but the flowers seemed to glow in the grayness – including the most beautiful delphiniums ever. It seems I must thank you, too, for a trip down garden memory lane!

    Reply
  30. Thank you so much for this, Andrea – I now know the perfect Father’s Day gift for 2 men in my family! They are avid gardeners, while I am always willing to plan what they should plant, nurture, and weed assiduously! 😎 My husband cannot understand why I do not wish to see orange dahlias in the midst of our white, pink and blue perennial garden — but he indulges my dreams of recreating the fabulous borders we have seen in UK gardens. We, too, live in New England, and nothing is more glorious than early summer here, but my favorite gardens are Stourhead, which is actually many gardens, and the walled garden at Culzean in Scotland. I’ve only ever seen Stourhead in its June and July colors, but would love to be there for the rhododendrons. And the two times we’ve been at Culzean, it’s been dark and dreary, but the flowers seemed to glow in the grayness – including the most beautiful delphiniums ever. It seems I must thank you, too, for a trip down garden memory lane!

    Reply
  31. I once loved to garden. Now, I plant things in pots on my patio. I have grown trees and given them away…we need trees in the world. There are some things which do wonderfully for me, and other things that take one look at me and die immediately if not sooner.
    Hope everyone is well and safe.

    Reply
  32. I once loved to garden. Now, I plant things in pots on my patio. I have grown trees and given them away…we need trees in the world. There are some things which do wonderfully for me, and other things that take one look at me and die immediately if not sooner.
    Hope everyone is well and safe.

    Reply
  33. I once loved to garden. Now, I plant things in pots on my patio. I have grown trees and given them away…we need trees in the world. There are some things which do wonderfully for me, and other things that take one look at me and die immediately if not sooner.
    Hope everyone is well and safe.

    Reply
  34. I once loved to garden. Now, I plant things in pots on my patio. I have grown trees and given them away…we need trees in the world. There are some things which do wonderfully for me, and other things that take one look at me and die immediately if not sooner.
    Hope everyone is well and safe.

    Reply
  35. I once loved to garden. Now, I plant things in pots on my patio. I have grown trees and given them away…we need trees in the world. There are some things which do wonderfully for me, and other things that take one look at me and die immediately if not sooner.
    Hope everyone is well and safe.

    Reply
  36. Yes, I am an avid gardener. My borders are not manicured, I prefer the informal English cottage garden look. Although I have many old hand-me-down plants, like peonies, daylilies, and lilac, I have recently become aware of the importance of native plants. I have incorporated milkweed into my garden, and it was surprising how quickly the monarch butterfly caterpillars showed up!
    It’s hard to pick one botanical garden, I’ve been to so many. I guess my favorites are combination sculpture/botanical gardens like Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and the Donald Kendall Sculpture Garden in New York.

    Reply
  37. Yes, I am an avid gardener. My borders are not manicured, I prefer the informal English cottage garden look. Although I have many old hand-me-down plants, like peonies, daylilies, and lilac, I have recently become aware of the importance of native plants. I have incorporated milkweed into my garden, and it was surprising how quickly the monarch butterfly caterpillars showed up!
    It’s hard to pick one botanical garden, I’ve been to so many. I guess my favorites are combination sculpture/botanical gardens like Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and the Donald Kendall Sculpture Garden in New York.

    Reply
  38. Yes, I am an avid gardener. My borders are not manicured, I prefer the informal English cottage garden look. Although I have many old hand-me-down plants, like peonies, daylilies, and lilac, I have recently become aware of the importance of native plants. I have incorporated milkweed into my garden, and it was surprising how quickly the monarch butterfly caterpillars showed up!
    It’s hard to pick one botanical garden, I’ve been to so many. I guess my favorites are combination sculpture/botanical gardens like Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and the Donald Kendall Sculpture Garden in New York.

    Reply
  39. Yes, I am an avid gardener. My borders are not manicured, I prefer the informal English cottage garden look. Although I have many old hand-me-down plants, like peonies, daylilies, and lilac, I have recently become aware of the importance of native plants. I have incorporated milkweed into my garden, and it was surprising how quickly the monarch butterfly caterpillars showed up!
    It’s hard to pick one botanical garden, I’ve been to so many. I guess my favorites are combination sculpture/botanical gardens like Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and the Donald Kendall Sculpture Garden in New York.

    Reply
  40. Yes, I am an avid gardener. My borders are not manicured, I prefer the informal English cottage garden look. Although I have many old hand-me-down plants, like peonies, daylilies, and lilac, I have recently become aware of the importance of native plants. I have incorporated milkweed into my garden, and it was surprising how quickly the monarch butterfly caterpillars showed up!
    It’s hard to pick one botanical garden, I’ve been to so many. I guess my favorites are combination sculpture/botanical gardens like Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and the Donald Kendall Sculpture Garden in New York.

    Reply
  41. LOL – I love to see the fruits of someone else’s labors. I love the colorful beauty of plants & flowers but do not enjoy any kind of work associated with them. I have a beautiful yard with big redwood trees (God’s gift) & gorgeous flowers in mostly yellow & purple (my gardener’s labor). I have managed to grow & keep alive a few succulent plants but that’s about all!

    Reply
  42. LOL – I love to see the fruits of someone else’s labors. I love the colorful beauty of plants & flowers but do not enjoy any kind of work associated with them. I have a beautiful yard with big redwood trees (God’s gift) & gorgeous flowers in mostly yellow & purple (my gardener’s labor). I have managed to grow & keep alive a few succulent plants but that’s about all!

    Reply
  43. LOL – I love to see the fruits of someone else’s labors. I love the colorful beauty of plants & flowers but do not enjoy any kind of work associated with them. I have a beautiful yard with big redwood trees (God’s gift) & gorgeous flowers in mostly yellow & purple (my gardener’s labor). I have managed to grow & keep alive a few succulent plants but that’s about all!

    Reply
  44. LOL – I love to see the fruits of someone else’s labors. I love the colorful beauty of plants & flowers but do not enjoy any kind of work associated with them. I have a beautiful yard with big redwood trees (God’s gift) & gorgeous flowers in mostly yellow & purple (my gardener’s labor). I have managed to grow & keep alive a few succulent plants but that’s about all!

    Reply
  45. LOL – I love to see the fruits of someone else’s labors. I love the colorful beauty of plants & flowers but do not enjoy any kind of work associated with them. I have a beautiful yard with big redwood trees (God’s gift) & gorgeous flowers in mostly yellow & purple (my gardener’s labor). I have managed to grow & keep alive a few succulent plants but that’s about all!

    Reply
  46. So glad you enjoyed the blog, Constance. I think any gardener will love the book.
    I haven’t been to either Stourhead or Culzean, but they sould beautiful. I’ve seen many pictures of Stourhead, and it has a wonderful history.Having seen other gardens in Scotland and Ireland in gloomy weather, I know just what you mean about the flowers seeming to glow with their own light.

    Reply
  47. So glad you enjoyed the blog, Constance. I think any gardener will love the book.
    I haven’t been to either Stourhead or Culzean, but they sould beautiful. I’ve seen many pictures of Stourhead, and it has a wonderful history.Having seen other gardens in Scotland and Ireland in gloomy weather, I know just what you mean about the flowers seeming to glow with their own light.

    Reply
  48. So glad you enjoyed the blog, Constance. I think any gardener will love the book.
    I haven’t been to either Stourhead or Culzean, but they sould beautiful. I’ve seen many pictures of Stourhead, and it has a wonderful history.Having seen other gardens in Scotland and Ireland in gloomy weather, I know just what you mean about the flowers seeming to glow with their own light.

    Reply
  49. So glad you enjoyed the blog, Constance. I think any gardener will love the book.
    I haven’t been to either Stourhead or Culzean, but they sould beautiful. I’ve seen many pictures of Stourhead, and it has a wonderful history.Having seen other gardens in Scotland and Ireland in gloomy weather, I know just what you mean about the flowers seeming to glow with their own light.

    Reply
  50. So glad you enjoyed the blog, Constance. I think any gardener will love the book.
    I haven’t been to either Stourhead or Culzean, but they sould beautiful. I’ve seen many pictures of Stourhead, and it has a wonderful history.Having seen other gardens in Scotland and Ireland in gloomy weather, I know just what you mean about the flowers seeming to glow with their own light.

    Reply

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