Travels with Wyckerly

W-DeskLady1

Pat here!

The Wicked Wyckerly, the first of my Rebellious Sons series, will officially be released next week, but I’m brushing up for a blog tour and thought I’d start nattering here, no matter what the release date.

Which means free books! I have to do something with those boxes of books that have arrived on my doorstep.  I’ll give one away today and at each blog I attend next week.  So if you don’t win today, take a look at the sidebar and drop in to say hi wherever you can, please! It’s always nice to have friends around when I’m visiting.

I have an excerpt for the new book at my website at www.patriciarice.com if you want to test the Wyckerly waters. It’s not the first chapter because I’m always afraid readers will have my bad memory and think they’ve already read the book if they pick it up and the first page seems familiar.

I wish I did clever first lines so I could post one here, but it takes a paragraph or two before John Fitzhugh Wyckerly’s personality really kicks in—but personality he has, in spades. And hearts, clubs, and diamonds. Fitz is a mathematical genius who gambles for a living. You’ll have to pick up the book to read the opening since I don't have room to include it here.
Hobhouse

The thing about Fitz is that he acknowledges his faults and wishes he could have been a true gentleman who took the Grand Tour Anne talked about a few weeks ago.  He also wishes he had been able to attend university, but his father decided a wine cellar was more important. So with no money or family support or education, Fitz became a charming gambler, the extra male needed to complete a dinner table, an idler who conceived a child while still under the illusion that love would make him better. It didn’t.

Card-party2 So he’s one more in a line of Wicked Wyckerlys when his brother breaks his neck in a drunken stumble, and Fitz is suddenly earl of a bankrupt estate and must assume a burden of responsibility he’s had no training to handle. It’s no wonder he panics and chooses to go after the horse he’s won in a card game instead of hanging around, waiting for his family’s creditors to heave him in gaol. 

Although, in actuality, aristocrats were spared debtor’s prison. Their creditors just had bailiffs haul off the furnishings. Brummel had to flee to France to escape his debts because he was a commoner. The Marchioness of Worcester, on the other hand, watched bailiffs drag off everything she owned, except the gown she wore, when her husband ran up a hundred thousand pound debt he had no hope of paying. Gambling was an addiction that destroyed families high and low, but in aristocratic circles, gaming debts had to be paid immediately. It was a matter of honor. Which meant that all the tradesmen that supplied the household usually went unpaid.

So my gambling earl would be well aware of the stakes involved upon inheriting an estate so deeply in debt. If he didn’t pay the tradesmen, they were likely to starve unless they went to court to have everything on the estate taken away. How would you like to be handed that mess?

However, making his living at cards taught Fitz a great deal about human nature, and he knows how to take advantage of opportunity when it knocks. And naturally, our fearless heroine, Abigail Merriweather, encompasses all the excellent traits he could desire in a wife—except the extortionate wealth the estate requires. Given that she’s desperately attempting to reclaim her four half-siblings from a guardian who believes they should be raised by a man, she’s a money pit worse than his estate.

Wicked wyckerly final But Abby is the woman he wants, and for the first time in his life, Fitz is in a position to go after what he wants, no matter what he has to do to have her. He just has to convince his stubborn Abby that he’s not so wicked after all…

Why is it we’re so fascinated with Regency England when in reality, much of the ton spent their time fiddling while the Continent went up in flames? I’ll pick one commenter for a free book based solely on whim!

And for the e-book lovers out there, MAGIC MAN will be released as an e-book at www.bookviewcafe.com on Friday!

140 thoughts on “Travels with Wyckerly”

  1. Fitz sounds like my kind of hero. I LOVE intelligent men, and I tend toward science and mathematics. I’m not interested in Regency noble CEO’s.
    Why do I like the Regency? Because it’s the era when a person’s accomplishments started to become more important than his/her birth. I like people who earn what they get. And I can enjoy the tension between the two worlds in Regencies.

    Reply
  2. Fitz sounds like my kind of hero. I LOVE intelligent men, and I tend toward science and mathematics. I’m not interested in Regency noble CEO’s.
    Why do I like the Regency? Because it’s the era when a person’s accomplishments started to become more important than his/her birth. I like people who earn what they get. And I can enjoy the tension between the two worlds in Regencies.

    Reply
  3. Fitz sounds like my kind of hero. I LOVE intelligent men, and I tend toward science and mathematics. I’m not interested in Regency noble CEO’s.
    Why do I like the Regency? Because it’s the era when a person’s accomplishments started to become more important than his/her birth. I like people who earn what they get. And I can enjoy the tension between the two worlds in Regencies.

    Reply
  4. Fitz sounds like my kind of hero. I LOVE intelligent men, and I tend toward science and mathematics. I’m not interested in Regency noble CEO’s.
    Why do I like the Regency? Because it’s the era when a person’s accomplishments started to become more important than his/her birth. I like people who earn what they get. And I can enjoy the tension between the two worlds in Regencies.

    Reply
  5. Fitz sounds like my kind of hero. I LOVE intelligent men, and I tend toward science and mathematics. I’m not interested in Regency noble CEO’s.
    Why do I like the Regency? Because it’s the era when a person’s accomplishments started to become more important than his/her birth. I like people who earn what they get. And I can enjoy the tension between the two worlds in Regencies.

    Reply
  6. I think Austen has broad shoulders. “G” And I blame my editor for the alliteration. I’m into ambiguity–I wanted to call it Honest Scoundrel.
    Thank you, Linda, there should only be more of us like that!

    Reply
  7. I think Austen has broad shoulders. “G” And I blame my editor for the alliteration. I’m into ambiguity–I wanted to call it Honest Scoundrel.
    Thank you, Linda, there should only be more of us like that!

    Reply
  8. I think Austen has broad shoulders. “G” And I blame my editor for the alliteration. I’m into ambiguity–I wanted to call it Honest Scoundrel.
    Thank you, Linda, there should only be more of us like that!

    Reply
  9. I think Austen has broad shoulders. “G” And I blame my editor for the alliteration. I’m into ambiguity–I wanted to call it Honest Scoundrel.
    Thank you, Linda, there should only be more of us like that!

    Reply
  10. I think Austen has broad shoulders. “G” And I blame my editor for the alliteration. I’m into ambiguity–I wanted to call it Honest Scoundrel.
    Thank you, Linda, there should only be more of us like that!

    Reply
  11. Fitz sounds fascinating, I can hardly wait to read this book. As to why we are so interested in the Regency period, I’m not really sure, but Georgette Heyer’s books could have something to do with it.

    Reply
  12. Fitz sounds fascinating, I can hardly wait to read this book. As to why we are so interested in the Regency period, I’m not really sure, but Georgette Heyer’s books could have something to do with it.

    Reply
  13. Fitz sounds fascinating, I can hardly wait to read this book. As to why we are so interested in the Regency period, I’m not really sure, but Georgette Heyer’s books could have something to do with it.

    Reply
  14. Fitz sounds fascinating, I can hardly wait to read this book. As to why we are so interested in the Regency period, I’m not really sure, but Georgette Heyer’s books could have something to do with it.

    Reply
  15. Fitz sounds fascinating, I can hardly wait to read this book. As to why we are so interested in the Regency period, I’m not really sure, but Georgette Heyer’s books could have something to do with it.

    Reply
  16. I blame Heyer & Austen & Cartland all the same – at this point it’s familiarity. James & Gurhke are writing great books on either end of that period, but the mental association between Regency and Romance has been locked into people’s minds.
    The initial attraction was probably the wealth of events going on – you’ve got the crackdown of a new morality (not as contemporary as Victorian times to Heyer & Courtland, but not too distant as to be unfamiliar) a father and son in struggle, high stakes war raging (but not too close) and wealthy people throwing parties. Coming out of the post war period (first then second) it’s a good fantasy canvas to tell your current stories on.
    Move forward to the 70’s, where a generation of writers who found these authors emerge with stories to tell about woman’s study against the patriarchy and established social class, and it’s an even better fantasy canvas to use with the late 70’s / early 80’s regencies being pretty likely to include anti war statements.
    Now it’s an established genre, with established ‘rules’ and it’s where you tell the story. It’s still got all the elements it had before, but now the time period has the extra level of being the proper way, Once Upon A Time transposed to In The Regency (although the Victorian times hold more parables to our own time of sweeping industrial changes)
    Or, I could be completely off. That’s just my initial feeling.

    Reply
  17. I blame Heyer & Austen & Cartland all the same – at this point it’s familiarity. James & Gurhke are writing great books on either end of that period, but the mental association between Regency and Romance has been locked into people’s minds.
    The initial attraction was probably the wealth of events going on – you’ve got the crackdown of a new morality (not as contemporary as Victorian times to Heyer & Courtland, but not too distant as to be unfamiliar) a father and son in struggle, high stakes war raging (but not too close) and wealthy people throwing parties. Coming out of the post war period (first then second) it’s a good fantasy canvas to tell your current stories on.
    Move forward to the 70’s, where a generation of writers who found these authors emerge with stories to tell about woman’s study against the patriarchy and established social class, and it’s an even better fantasy canvas to use with the late 70’s / early 80’s regencies being pretty likely to include anti war statements.
    Now it’s an established genre, with established ‘rules’ and it’s where you tell the story. It’s still got all the elements it had before, but now the time period has the extra level of being the proper way, Once Upon A Time transposed to In The Regency (although the Victorian times hold more parables to our own time of sweeping industrial changes)
    Or, I could be completely off. That’s just my initial feeling.

    Reply
  18. I blame Heyer & Austen & Cartland all the same – at this point it’s familiarity. James & Gurhke are writing great books on either end of that period, but the mental association between Regency and Romance has been locked into people’s minds.
    The initial attraction was probably the wealth of events going on – you’ve got the crackdown of a new morality (not as contemporary as Victorian times to Heyer & Courtland, but not too distant as to be unfamiliar) a father and son in struggle, high stakes war raging (but not too close) and wealthy people throwing parties. Coming out of the post war period (first then second) it’s a good fantasy canvas to tell your current stories on.
    Move forward to the 70’s, where a generation of writers who found these authors emerge with stories to tell about woman’s study against the patriarchy and established social class, and it’s an even better fantasy canvas to use with the late 70’s / early 80’s regencies being pretty likely to include anti war statements.
    Now it’s an established genre, with established ‘rules’ and it’s where you tell the story. It’s still got all the elements it had before, but now the time period has the extra level of being the proper way, Once Upon A Time transposed to In The Regency (although the Victorian times hold more parables to our own time of sweeping industrial changes)
    Or, I could be completely off. That’s just my initial feeling.

    Reply
  19. I blame Heyer & Austen & Cartland all the same – at this point it’s familiarity. James & Gurhke are writing great books on either end of that period, but the mental association between Regency and Romance has been locked into people’s minds.
    The initial attraction was probably the wealth of events going on – you’ve got the crackdown of a new morality (not as contemporary as Victorian times to Heyer & Courtland, but not too distant as to be unfamiliar) a father and son in struggle, high stakes war raging (but not too close) and wealthy people throwing parties. Coming out of the post war period (first then second) it’s a good fantasy canvas to tell your current stories on.
    Move forward to the 70’s, where a generation of writers who found these authors emerge with stories to tell about woman’s study against the patriarchy and established social class, and it’s an even better fantasy canvas to use with the late 70’s / early 80’s regencies being pretty likely to include anti war statements.
    Now it’s an established genre, with established ‘rules’ and it’s where you tell the story. It’s still got all the elements it had before, but now the time period has the extra level of being the proper way, Once Upon A Time transposed to In The Regency (although the Victorian times hold more parables to our own time of sweeping industrial changes)
    Or, I could be completely off. That’s just my initial feeling.

    Reply
  20. I blame Heyer & Austen & Cartland all the same – at this point it’s familiarity. James & Gurhke are writing great books on either end of that period, but the mental association between Regency and Romance has been locked into people’s minds.
    The initial attraction was probably the wealth of events going on – you’ve got the crackdown of a new morality (not as contemporary as Victorian times to Heyer & Courtland, but not too distant as to be unfamiliar) a father and son in struggle, high stakes war raging (but not too close) and wealthy people throwing parties. Coming out of the post war period (first then second) it’s a good fantasy canvas to tell your current stories on.
    Move forward to the 70’s, where a generation of writers who found these authors emerge with stories to tell about woman’s study against the patriarchy and established social class, and it’s an even better fantasy canvas to use with the late 70’s / early 80’s regencies being pretty likely to include anti war statements.
    Now it’s an established genre, with established ‘rules’ and it’s where you tell the story. It’s still got all the elements it had before, but now the time period has the extra level of being the proper way, Once Upon A Time transposed to In The Regency (although the Victorian times hold more parables to our own time of sweeping industrial changes)
    Or, I could be completely off. That’s just my initial feeling.

    Reply
  21. Intriguing theory. Readers do have certain expectations when they pick up an historical. Back in the 80s, they simply expected sex and romance and maybe some adventure. The background didn’t matter. But as more and more readers found Regencies and those books became more popular through the nineties, reader expectations changed. Food for thought, thank you!

    Reply
  22. Intriguing theory. Readers do have certain expectations when they pick up an historical. Back in the 80s, they simply expected sex and romance and maybe some adventure. The background didn’t matter. But as more and more readers found Regencies and those books became more popular through the nineties, reader expectations changed. Food for thought, thank you!

    Reply
  23. Intriguing theory. Readers do have certain expectations when they pick up an historical. Back in the 80s, they simply expected sex and romance and maybe some adventure. The background didn’t matter. But as more and more readers found Regencies and those books became more popular through the nineties, reader expectations changed. Food for thought, thank you!

    Reply
  24. Intriguing theory. Readers do have certain expectations when they pick up an historical. Back in the 80s, they simply expected sex and romance and maybe some adventure. The background didn’t matter. But as more and more readers found Regencies and those books became more popular through the nineties, reader expectations changed. Food for thought, thank you!

    Reply
  25. Intriguing theory. Readers do have certain expectations when they pick up an historical. Back in the 80s, they simply expected sex and romance and maybe some adventure. The background didn’t matter. But as more and more readers found Regencies and those books became more popular through the nineties, reader expectations changed. Food for thought, thank you!

    Reply
  26. Lol.. I do that. Read an excerpt and then by the time I get the book, I am like “woah, did I read this already?”…but I read your excerpt and LOVED it. The characters sound like such fun. I love historicals with a decent humorous quality.
    Why I love regency era: because now a days I can turn to nickelodeon and see a chubby (nothing wrong with that) little 4 year old girl wearing a midriff and short shorts or turn on the radio and hear all sorts of derogatory phrases. I read regencies because they leave something to the imagination. Their forbidden quality just hook me every time. <3 , plus, even though most try to be rakes and rogues, in the end, one the heroine matters (sigh)

    Reply
  27. Lol.. I do that. Read an excerpt and then by the time I get the book, I am like “woah, did I read this already?”…but I read your excerpt and LOVED it. The characters sound like such fun. I love historicals with a decent humorous quality.
    Why I love regency era: because now a days I can turn to nickelodeon and see a chubby (nothing wrong with that) little 4 year old girl wearing a midriff and short shorts or turn on the radio and hear all sorts of derogatory phrases. I read regencies because they leave something to the imagination. Their forbidden quality just hook me every time. <3 , plus, even though most try to be rakes and rogues, in the end, one the heroine matters (sigh)

    Reply
  28. Lol.. I do that. Read an excerpt and then by the time I get the book, I am like “woah, did I read this already?”…but I read your excerpt and LOVED it. The characters sound like such fun. I love historicals with a decent humorous quality.
    Why I love regency era: because now a days I can turn to nickelodeon and see a chubby (nothing wrong with that) little 4 year old girl wearing a midriff and short shorts or turn on the radio and hear all sorts of derogatory phrases. I read regencies because they leave something to the imagination. Their forbidden quality just hook me every time. <3 , plus, even though most try to be rakes and rogues, in the end, one the heroine matters (sigh)

    Reply
  29. Lol.. I do that. Read an excerpt and then by the time I get the book, I am like “woah, did I read this already?”…but I read your excerpt and LOVED it. The characters sound like such fun. I love historicals with a decent humorous quality.
    Why I love regency era: because now a days I can turn to nickelodeon and see a chubby (nothing wrong with that) little 4 year old girl wearing a midriff and short shorts or turn on the radio and hear all sorts of derogatory phrases. I read regencies because they leave something to the imagination. Their forbidden quality just hook me every time. <3 , plus, even though most try to be rakes and rogues, in the end, one the heroine matters (sigh)

    Reply
  30. Lol.. I do that. Read an excerpt and then by the time I get the book, I am like “woah, did I read this already?”…but I read your excerpt and LOVED it. The characters sound like such fun. I love historicals with a decent humorous quality.
    Why I love regency era: because now a days I can turn to nickelodeon and see a chubby (nothing wrong with that) little 4 year old girl wearing a midriff and short shorts or turn on the radio and hear all sorts of derogatory phrases. I read regencies because they leave something to the imagination. Their forbidden quality just hook me every time. <3 , plus, even though most try to be rakes and rogues, in the end, one the heroine matters (sigh)

    Reply
  31. Oh, I do so want to read The Wicked Wyckerly. Sounds like you have a fabulous hero, a fearless heroine and a wonderful story.

    Reply
  32. Oh, I do so want to read The Wicked Wyckerly. Sounds like you have a fabulous hero, a fearless heroine and a wonderful story.

    Reply
  33. Oh, I do so want to read The Wicked Wyckerly. Sounds like you have a fabulous hero, a fearless heroine and a wonderful story.

    Reply
  34. Oh, I do so want to read The Wicked Wyckerly. Sounds like you have a fabulous hero, a fearless heroine and a wonderful story.

    Reply
  35. Oh, I do so want to read The Wicked Wyckerly. Sounds like you have a fabulous hero, a fearless heroine and a wonderful story.

    Reply
  36. Pat, I am so excited to have TWW on my TBB list! It sounds so good and Fitz sounds like a great hero.
    I think Regency romances appeal to me because I enjoy reading about a high society of that time and a society that was on the brink of change in industries, technologies, and class systems. I love reading about the extravagant balls, musicales, the beautiful dresses, and the ton.

    Reply
  37. Pat, I am so excited to have TWW on my TBB list! It sounds so good and Fitz sounds like a great hero.
    I think Regency romances appeal to me because I enjoy reading about a high society of that time and a society that was on the brink of change in industries, technologies, and class systems. I love reading about the extravagant balls, musicales, the beautiful dresses, and the ton.

    Reply
  38. Pat, I am so excited to have TWW on my TBB list! It sounds so good and Fitz sounds like a great hero.
    I think Regency romances appeal to me because I enjoy reading about a high society of that time and a society that was on the brink of change in industries, technologies, and class systems. I love reading about the extravagant balls, musicales, the beautiful dresses, and the ton.

    Reply
  39. Pat, I am so excited to have TWW on my TBB list! It sounds so good and Fitz sounds like a great hero.
    I think Regency romances appeal to me because I enjoy reading about a high society of that time and a society that was on the brink of change in industries, technologies, and class systems. I love reading about the extravagant balls, musicales, the beautiful dresses, and the ton.

    Reply
  40. Pat, I am so excited to have TWW on my TBB list! It sounds so good and Fitz sounds like a great hero.
    I think Regency romances appeal to me because I enjoy reading about a high society of that time and a society that was on the brink of change in industries, technologies, and class systems. I love reading about the extravagant balls, musicales, the beautiful dresses, and the ton.

    Reply
  41. Abby and Fitz sound enchanting, and I look forward to meeting them. Heyer’s Regencies were the first romance novels I read, and it’s still my favorite period as a reader. I the timeless qualities of the era come from a combination of the characters in England at the time: dashing soldiers, aged dowagers clinging to 18th century fashion, dandies, belles and wallflowers.

    Reply
  42. Abby and Fitz sound enchanting, and I look forward to meeting them. Heyer’s Regencies were the first romance novels I read, and it’s still my favorite period as a reader. I the timeless qualities of the era come from a combination of the characters in England at the time: dashing soldiers, aged dowagers clinging to 18th century fashion, dandies, belles and wallflowers.

    Reply
  43. Abby and Fitz sound enchanting, and I look forward to meeting them. Heyer’s Regencies were the first romance novels I read, and it’s still my favorite period as a reader. I the timeless qualities of the era come from a combination of the characters in England at the time: dashing soldiers, aged dowagers clinging to 18th century fashion, dandies, belles and wallflowers.

    Reply
  44. Abby and Fitz sound enchanting, and I look forward to meeting them. Heyer’s Regencies were the first romance novels I read, and it’s still my favorite period as a reader. I the timeless qualities of the era come from a combination of the characters in England at the time: dashing soldiers, aged dowagers clinging to 18th century fashion, dandies, belles and wallflowers.

    Reply
  45. Abby and Fitz sound enchanting, and I look forward to meeting them. Heyer’s Regencies were the first romance novels I read, and it’s still my favorite period as a reader. I the timeless qualities of the era come from a combination of the characters in England at the time: dashing soldiers, aged dowagers clinging to 18th century fashion, dandies, belles and wallflowers.

    Reply
  46. I’m so glad the excerpt is hooking people! (Hmmm, now I’m wondering about the origin of the word hooking–sounds bad doesn’t it?)
    It’s true, the elegance of the fashion and the manners have an appeal of an earlier time in today’s jaded world. But Victorians were far more elegant and theoretically more mannered (read–repressed), but Regencies still sell better. Maybe that’s changing?

    Reply
  47. I’m so glad the excerpt is hooking people! (Hmmm, now I’m wondering about the origin of the word hooking–sounds bad doesn’t it?)
    It’s true, the elegance of the fashion and the manners have an appeal of an earlier time in today’s jaded world. But Victorians were far more elegant and theoretically more mannered (read–repressed), but Regencies still sell better. Maybe that’s changing?

    Reply
  48. I’m so glad the excerpt is hooking people! (Hmmm, now I’m wondering about the origin of the word hooking–sounds bad doesn’t it?)
    It’s true, the elegance of the fashion and the manners have an appeal of an earlier time in today’s jaded world. But Victorians were far more elegant and theoretically more mannered (read–repressed), but Regencies still sell better. Maybe that’s changing?

    Reply
  49. I’m so glad the excerpt is hooking people! (Hmmm, now I’m wondering about the origin of the word hooking–sounds bad doesn’t it?)
    It’s true, the elegance of the fashion and the manners have an appeal of an earlier time in today’s jaded world. But Victorians were far more elegant and theoretically more mannered (read–repressed), but Regencies still sell better. Maybe that’s changing?

    Reply
  50. I’m so glad the excerpt is hooking people! (Hmmm, now I’m wondering about the origin of the word hooking–sounds bad doesn’t it?)
    It’s true, the elegance of the fashion and the manners have an appeal of an earlier time in today’s jaded world. But Victorians were far more elegant and theoretically more mannered (read–repressed), but Regencies still sell better. Maybe that’s changing?

    Reply
  51. Ah well, it was kind of silly to think I would be the first to mention it, but yep, the blame must go to Jane. 🙂 Then the way it sounds, a bit to Georgette too. . . (me, I’m quite a JA amateur expert, but not so much GH, though I am trying to change that, but boy, did she write quite a few books! LOL).
    In addition to all the reasons already mentioned, the one that I can add to be different, is something I like, but really don’t know if it’s something that other people go for, and hopefully I can explain it properly. . . I like the Regency period because while it’s not that far back in time, it’s still close to now, but as a whole, we can kind of look at it as a different time, a different one where things were simpler. When we think of Victorian, we start seeing things that are familiar to us, because the industral revolution is moving, well, full steam ahead, pun intended. . . which is why when I read Victorian, it tends to be the earlier years where they might have the more uncomfortable looking clothing, but no trains just yet. Hope that doesn’t sound too stupid or something. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  52. Ah well, it was kind of silly to think I would be the first to mention it, but yep, the blame must go to Jane. 🙂 Then the way it sounds, a bit to Georgette too. . . (me, I’m quite a JA amateur expert, but not so much GH, though I am trying to change that, but boy, did she write quite a few books! LOL).
    In addition to all the reasons already mentioned, the one that I can add to be different, is something I like, but really don’t know if it’s something that other people go for, and hopefully I can explain it properly. . . I like the Regency period because while it’s not that far back in time, it’s still close to now, but as a whole, we can kind of look at it as a different time, a different one where things were simpler. When we think of Victorian, we start seeing things that are familiar to us, because the industral revolution is moving, well, full steam ahead, pun intended. . . which is why when I read Victorian, it tends to be the earlier years where they might have the more uncomfortable looking clothing, but no trains just yet. Hope that doesn’t sound too stupid or something. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  53. Ah well, it was kind of silly to think I would be the first to mention it, but yep, the blame must go to Jane. 🙂 Then the way it sounds, a bit to Georgette too. . . (me, I’m quite a JA amateur expert, but not so much GH, though I am trying to change that, but boy, did she write quite a few books! LOL).
    In addition to all the reasons already mentioned, the one that I can add to be different, is something I like, but really don’t know if it’s something that other people go for, and hopefully I can explain it properly. . . I like the Regency period because while it’s not that far back in time, it’s still close to now, but as a whole, we can kind of look at it as a different time, a different one where things were simpler. When we think of Victorian, we start seeing things that are familiar to us, because the industral revolution is moving, well, full steam ahead, pun intended. . . which is why when I read Victorian, it tends to be the earlier years where they might have the more uncomfortable looking clothing, but no trains just yet. Hope that doesn’t sound too stupid or something. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  54. Ah well, it was kind of silly to think I would be the first to mention it, but yep, the blame must go to Jane. 🙂 Then the way it sounds, a bit to Georgette too. . . (me, I’m quite a JA amateur expert, but not so much GH, though I am trying to change that, but boy, did she write quite a few books! LOL).
    In addition to all the reasons already mentioned, the one that I can add to be different, is something I like, but really don’t know if it’s something that other people go for, and hopefully I can explain it properly. . . I like the Regency period because while it’s not that far back in time, it’s still close to now, but as a whole, we can kind of look at it as a different time, a different one where things were simpler. When we think of Victorian, we start seeing things that are familiar to us, because the industral revolution is moving, well, full steam ahead, pun intended. . . which is why when I read Victorian, it tends to be the earlier years where they might have the more uncomfortable looking clothing, but no trains just yet. Hope that doesn’t sound too stupid or something. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  55. Ah well, it was kind of silly to think I would be the first to mention it, but yep, the blame must go to Jane. 🙂 Then the way it sounds, a bit to Georgette too. . . (me, I’m quite a JA amateur expert, but not so much GH, though I am trying to change that, but boy, did she write quite a few books! LOL).
    In addition to all the reasons already mentioned, the one that I can add to be different, is something I like, but really don’t know if it’s something that other people go for, and hopefully I can explain it properly. . . I like the Regency period because while it’s not that far back in time, it’s still close to now, but as a whole, we can kind of look at it as a different time, a different one where things were simpler. When we think of Victorian, we start seeing things that are familiar to us, because the industral revolution is moving, well, full steam ahead, pun intended. . . which is why when I read Victorian, it tends to be the earlier years where they might have the more uncomfortable looking clothing, but no trains just yet. Hope that doesn’t sound too stupid or something. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  56. That’s fascinating that aristocrats did not go to debtors prison. I had always assumed they did.
    Sounds good – I’ll have to look for this one.

    Reply
  57. That’s fascinating that aristocrats did not go to debtors prison. I had always assumed they did.
    Sounds good – I’ll have to look for this one.

    Reply
  58. That’s fascinating that aristocrats did not go to debtors prison. I had always assumed they did.
    Sounds good – I’ll have to look for this one.

    Reply
  59. That’s fascinating that aristocrats did not go to debtors prison. I had always assumed they did.
    Sounds good – I’ll have to look for this one.

    Reply
  60. That’s fascinating that aristocrats did not go to debtors prison. I had always assumed they did.
    Sounds good – I’ll have to look for this one.

    Reply
  61. I have to admit that the day I got The Wicked Wyckerly, I tossed aside the book I’d been reading and thought I’d sample a few paragraphs of Wyckerly. Standing up in the kitchen, of course, because I had housework to do and if I sat, I’d never get it done. Well . . . several chapters later I was still standing in the kitchen–with sore feet. I finally had to set the book down to finish the housework. So much for willpower. I can’t wait to get back to it!
    Pat, your sense of humor lends itself very well to Regency romances. I’m glad to see you return. (and how funny is it that you gave an irascible butler the last name of Butler?!! I love the wordplay)
    I love the Regency for the elegance and manners and fascinating, bigger than life real people–Brummel, Prinny, Wellington–just to name a few. It was a time of science and discovery and invention. I loved the rigid manners and code of honor. And I love the aristocracy, with all their privileges and nobility.

    Reply
  62. I have to admit that the day I got The Wicked Wyckerly, I tossed aside the book I’d been reading and thought I’d sample a few paragraphs of Wyckerly. Standing up in the kitchen, of course, because I had housework to do and if I sat, I’d never get it done. Well . . . several chapters later I was still standing in the kitchen–with sore feet. I finally had to set the book down to finish the housework. So much for willpower. I can’t wait to get back to it!
    Pat, your sense of humor lends itself very well to Regency romances. I’m glad to see you return. (and how funny is it that you gave an irascible butler the last name of Butler?!! I love the wordplay)
    I love the Regency for the elegance and manners and fascinating, bigger than life real people–Brummel, Prinny, Wellington–just to name a few. It was a time of science and discovery and invention. I loved the rigid manners and code of honor. And I love the aristocracy, with all their privileges and nobility.

    Reply
  63. I have to admit that the day I got The Wicked Wyckerly, I tossed aside the book I’d been reading and thought I’d sample a few paragraphs of Wyckerly. Standing up in the kitchen, of course, because I had housework to do and if I sat, I’d never get it done. Well . . . several chapters later I was still standing in the kitchen–with sore feet. I finally had to set the book down to finish the housework. So much for willpower. I can’t wait to get back to it!
    Pat, your sense of humor lends itself very well to Regency romances. I’m glad to see you return. (and how funny is it that you gave an irascible butler the last name of Butler?!! I love the wordplay)
    I love the Regency for the elegance and manners and fascinating, bigger than life real people–Brummel, Prinny, Wellington–just to name a few. It was a time of science and discovery and invention. I loved the rigid manners and code of honor. And I love the aristocracy, with all their privileges and nobility.

    Reply
  64. I have to admit that the day I got The Wicked Wyckerly, I tossed aside the book I’d been reading and thought I’d sample a few paragraphs of Wyckerly. Standing up in the kitchen, of course, because I had housework to do and if I sat, I’d never get it done. Well . . . several chapters later I was still standing in the kitchen–with sore feet. I finally had to set the book down to finish the housework. So much for willpower. I can’t wait to get back to it!
    Pat, your sense of humor lends itself very well to Regency romances. I’m glad to see you return. (and how funny is it that you gave an irascible butler the last name of Butler?!! I love the wordplay)
    I love the Regency for the elegance and manners and fascinating, bigger than life real people–Brummel, Prinny, Wellington–just to name a few. It was a time of science and discovery and invention. I loved the rigid manners and code of honor. And I love the aristocracy, with all their privileges and nobility.

    Reply
  65. I have to admit that the day I got The Wicked Wyckerly, I tossed aside the book I’d been reading and thought I’d sample a few paragraphs of Wyckerly. Standing up in the kitchen, of course, because I had housework to do and if I sat, I’d never get it done. Well . . . several chapters later I was still standing in the kitchen–with sore feet. I finally had to set the book down to finish the housework. So much for willpower. I can’t wait to get back to it!
    Pat, your sense of humor lends itself very well to Regency romances. I’m glad to see you return. (and how funny is it that you gave an irascible butler the last name of Butler?!! I love the wordplay)
    I love the Regency for the elegance and manners and fascinating, bigger than life real people–Brummel, Prinny, Wellington–just to name a few. It was a time of science and discovery and invention. I loved the rigid manners and code of honor. And I love the aristocracy, with all their privileges and nobility.

    Reply
  66. I think the Victorian times are so exciting – because when you begin, most people don’t even own a cup or a fork – just having a coffee cup is a luxury – and when you end, factories and trains and mass produced goods. What must it have been like to suddenly have department stores? In your childhood most of the people you know can put all of their possessions in a box, and in your retirement years you can clutter the parlor with all manner of tchockes! Is it any wonder they went a little decor mad? My ggg-grandfather writes about discovering his belt that was stolen and how the fellow that has it needs it more, he can’t get another, and his daughter grows up to have a magnificent parlor with a pianoforte I have today (converted into a desk) in a world where a belt wouldn’t be worth mention. So amazing!

    Reply
  67. I think the Victorian times are so exciting – because when you begin, most people don’t even own a cup or a fork – just having a coffee cup is a luxury – and when you end, factories and trains and mass produced goods. What must it have been like to suddenly have department stores? In your childhood most of the people you know can put all of their possessions in a box, and in your retirement years you can clutter the parlor with all manner of tchockes! Is it any wonder they went a little decor mad? My ggg-grandfather writes about discovering his belt that was stolen and how the fellow that has it needs it more, he can’t get another, and his daughter grows up to have a magnificent parlor with a pianoforte I have today (converted into a desk) in a world where a belt wouldn’t be worth mention. So amazing!

    Reply
  68. I think the Victorian times are so exciting – because when you begin, most people don’t even own a cup or a fork – just having a coffee cup is a luxury – and when you end, factories and trains and mass produced goods. What must it have been like to suddenly have department stores? In your childhood most of the people you know can put all of their possessions in a box, and in your retirement years you can clutter the parlor with all manner of tchockes! Is it any wonder they went a little decor mad? My ggg-grandfather writes about discovering his belt that was stolen and how the fellow that has it needs it more, he can’t get another, and his daughter grows up to have a magnificent parlor with a pianoforte I have today (converted into a desk) in a world where a belt wouldn’t be worth mention. So amazing!

    Reply
  69. I think the Victorian times are so exciting – because when you begin, most people don’t even own a cup or a fork – just having a coffee cup is a luxury – and when you end, factories and trains and mass produced goods. What must it have been like to suddenly have department stores? In your childhood most of the people you know can put all of their possessions in a box, and in your retirement years you can clutter the parlor with all manner of tchockes! Is it any wonder they went a little decor mad? My ggg-grandfather writes about discovering his belt that was stolen and how the fellow that has it needs it more, he can’t get another, and his daughter grows up to have a magnificent parlor with a pianoforte I have today (converted into a desk) in a world where a belt wouldn’t be worth mention. So amazing!

    Reply
  70. I think the Victorian times are so exciting – because when you begin, most people don’t even own a cup or a fork – just having a coffee cup is a luxury – and when you end, factories and trains and mass produced goods. What must it have been like to suddenly have department stores? In your childhood most of the people you know can put all of their possessions in a box, and in your retirement years you can clutter the parlor with all manner of tchockes! Is it any wonder they went a little decor mad? My ggg-grandfather writes about discovering his belt that was stolen and how the fellow that has it needs it more, he can’t get another, and his daughter grows up to have a magnificent parlor with a pianoforte I have today (converted into a desk) in a world where a belt wouldn’t be worth mention. So amazing!

    Reply
  71. Pat, I am really looking forward to the Wicked Wyckerly. I am going to have to order it from my book seller, because waiting for it to arrive on the shelves will take months if not years here.
    Why do we like the Regency? I think it is because it is just on the verge of modern times. The industrial revolution in England is just ramping up and much of what we take for granted today is the result of that period. The steam engine for one thing which led to the factories, trains, later motor cars.
    As well, Jane Austens writings are so easy to identify with which has also made the era popular. Also, reading and writing was just starting to be available to everyone, and the feminist movement was just starting, thanks to Mary Wollstonecraft. And if anyone is lucky enough to travel to England, the towns and buildings are still there for us to see. It was a wonderful period of history.

    Reply
  72. Pat, I am really looking forward to the Wicked Wyckerly. I am going to have to order it from my book seller, because waiting for it to arrive on the shelves will take months if not years here.
    Why do we like the Regency? I think it is because it is just on the verge of modern times. The industrial revolution in England is just ramping up and much of what we take for granted today is the result of that period. The steam engine for one thing which led to the factories, trains, later motor cars.
    As well, Jane Austens writings are so easy to identify with which has also made the era popular. Also, reading and writing was just starting to be available to everyone, and the feminist movement was just starting, thanks to Mary Wollstonecraft. And if anyone is lucky enough to travel to England, the towns and buildings are still there for us to see. It was a wonderful period of history.

    Reply
  73. Pat, I am really looking forward to the Wicked Wyckerly. I am going to have to order it from my book seller, because waiting for it to arrive on the shelves will take months if not years here.
    Why do we like the Regency? I think it is because it is just on the verge of modern times. The industrial revolution in England is just ramping up and much of what we take for granted today is the result of that period. The steam engine for one thing which led to the factories, trains, later motor cars.
    As well, Jane Austens writings are so easy to identify with which has also made the era popular. Also, reading and writing was just starting to be available to everyone, and the feminist movement was just starting, thanks to Mary Wollstonecraft. And if anyone is lucky enough to travel to England, the towns and buildings are still there for us to see. It was a wonderful period of history.

    Reply
  74. Pat, I am really looking forward to the Wicked Wyckerly. I am going to have to order it from my book seller, because waiting for it to arrive on the shelves will take months if not years here.
    Why do we like the Regency? I think it is because it is just on the verge of modern times. The industrial revolution in England is just ramping up and much of what we take for granted today is the result of that period. The steam engine for one thing which led to the factories, trains, later motor cars.
    As well, Jane Austens writings are so easy to identify with which has also made the era popular. Also, reading and writing was just starting to be available to everyone, and the feminist movement was just starting, thanks to Mary Wollstonecraft. And if anyone is lucky enough to travel to England, the towns and buildings are still there for us to see. It was a wonderful period of history.

    Reply
  75. Pat, I am really looking forward to the Wicked Wyckerly. I am going to have to order it from my book seller, because waiting for it to arrive on the shelves will take months if not years here.
    Why do we like the Regency? I think it is because it is just on the verge of modern times. The industrial revolution in England is just ramping up and much of what we take for granted today is the result of that period. The steam engine for one thing which led to the factories, trains, later motor cars.
    As well, Jane Austens writings are so easy to identify with which has also made the era popular. Also, reading and writing was just starting to be available to everyone, and the feminist movement was just starting, thanks to Mary Wollstonecraft. And if anyone is lucky enough to travel to England, the towns and buildings are still there for us to see. It was a wonderful period of history.

    Reply
  76. Thank you for the kind words, Sherrie! Your check is in the mail. “G” Everyone keep in mind I acknowledged Sherrie’s wicked humor in this one.
    I’m quite enjoying these thought provoking posts. I’m not sure I understand the reluctance to acknowledge industry (ie: trains)but Meosops post about the Victorian era actually reminds me of how many of us started out, comparing what we had in the 60s to what we have now. Now my mind really is churning!

    Reply
  77. Thank you for the kind words, Sherrie! Your check is in the mail. “G” Everyone keep in mind I acknowledged Sherrie’s wicked humor in this one.
    I’m quite enjoying these thought provoking posts. I’m not sure I understand the reluctance to acknowledge industry (ie: trains)but Meosops post about the Victorian era actually reminds me of how many of us started out, comparing what we had in the 60s to what we have now. Now my mind really is churning!

    Reply
  78. Thank you for the kind words, Sherrie! Your check is in the mail. “G” Everyone keep in mind I acknowledged Sherrie’s wicked humor in this one.
    I’m quite enjoying these thought provoking posts. I’m not sure I understand the reluctance to acknowledge industry (ie: trains)but Meosops post about the Victorian era actually reminds me of how many of us started out, comparing what we had in the 60s to what we have now. Now my mind really is churning!

    Reply
  79. Thank you for the kind words, Sherrie! Your check is in the mail. “G” Everyone keep in mind I acknowledged Sherrie’s wicked humor in this one.
    I’m quite enjoying these thought provoking posts. I’m not sure I understand the reluctance to acknowledge industry (ie: trains)but Meosops post about the Victorian era actually reminds me of how many of us started out, comparing what we had in the 60s to what we have now. Now my mind really is churning!

    Reply
  80. Thank you for the kind words, Sherrie! Your check is in the mail. “G” Everyone keep in mind I acknowledged Sherrie’s wicked humor in this one.
    I’m quite enjoying these thought provoking posts. I’m not sure I understand the reluctance to acknowledge industry (ie: trains)but Meosops post about the Victorian era actually reminds me of how many of us started out, comparing what we had in the 60s to what we have now. Now my mind really is churning!

    Reply
  81. There’s the glitter and glamour of the wealthy (or those just keeping up appearances or the with the ‘Joneses’), days spent not working but in lazy idol — shopping, teas, parties, gossip, gambling, etc. more so than other periods. There were clear distinctions between men & women, the classes; set rules of behavior with which each interacted. It was also the time when all this was starting to come to an end as politics, economics & industrialization began to mold the world as we’re familiar with it now.

    Reply
  82. There’s the glitter and glamour of the wealthy (or those just keeping up appearances or the with the ‘Joneses’), days spent not working but in lazy idol — shopping, teas, parties, gossip, gambling, etc. more so than other periods. There were clear distinctions between men & women, the classes; set rules of behavior with which each interacted. It was also the time when all this was starting to come to an end as politics, economics & industrialization began to mold the world as we’re familiar with it now.

    Reply
  83. There’s the glitter and glamour of the wealthy (or those just keeping up appearances or the with the ‘Joneses’), days spent not working but in lazy idol — shopping, teas, parties, gossip, gambling, etc. more so than other periods. There were clear distinctions between men & women, the classes; set rules of behavior with which each interacted. It was also the time when all this was starting to come to an end as politics, economics & industrialization began to mold the world as we’re familiar with it now.

    Reply
  84. There’s the glitter and glamour of the wealthy (or those just keeping up appearances or the with the ‘Joneses’), days spent not working but in lazy idol — shopping, teas, parties, gossip, gambling, etc. more so than other periods. There were clear distinctions between men & women, the classes; set rules of behavior with which each interacted. It was also the time when all this was starting to come to an end as politics, economics & industrialization began to mold the world as we’re familiar with it now.

    Reply
  85. There’s the glitter and glamour of the wealthy (or those just keeping up appearances or the with the ‘Joneses’), days spent not working but in lazy idol — shopping, teas, parties, gossip, gambling, etc. more so than other periods. There were clear distinctions between men & women, the classes; set rules of behavior with which each interacted. It was also the time when all this was starting to come to an end as politics, economics & industrialization began to mold the world as we’re familiar with it now.

    Reply
  86. Economically it’s most like our times – where you might have had the only tv on your street and now you have an ipad in your tote.
    I’ll be interested if Mad Men brings any interest in ‘near contemporary’ storytelling. The vintage romance market and the potential for ebook reprinting might open reader receptivity to modern thinking heroines in something newer than Regency garb.
    (Can you tell this is a topic I like? It’s interesting to me as a fan of many defunct romance crazes to think about what will come a the end of this Vampire Period)

    Reply
  87. Economically it’s most like our times – where you might have had the only tv on your street and now you have an ipad in your tote.
    I’ll be interested if Mad Men brings any interest in ‘near contemporary’ storytelling. The vintage romance market and the potential for ebook reprinting might open reader receptivity to modern thinking heroines in something newer than Regency garb.
    (Can you tell this is a topic I like? It’s interesting to me as a fan of many defunct romance crazes to think about what will come a the end of this Vampire Period)

    Reply
  88. Economically it’s most like our times – where you might have had the only tv on your street and now you have an ipad in your tote.
    I’ll be interested if Mad Men brings any interest in ‘near contemporary’ storytelling. The vintage romance market and the potential for ebook reprinting might open reader receptivity to modern thinking heroines in something newer than Regency garb.
    (Can you tell this is a topic I like? It’s interesting to me as a fan of many defunct romance crazes to think about what will come a the end of this Vampire Period)

    Reply
  89. Economically it’s most like our times – where you might have had the only tv on your street and now you have an ipad in your tote.
    I’ll be interested if Mad Men brings any interest in ‘near contemporary’ storytelling. The vintage romance market and the potential for ebook reprinting might open reader receptivity to modern thinking heroines in something newer than Regency garb.
    (Can you tell this is a topic I like? It’s interesting to me as a fan of many defunct romance crazes to think about what will come a the end of this Vampire Period)

    Reply
  90. Economically it’s most like our times – where you might have had the only tv on your street and now you have an ipad in your tote.
    I’ll be interested if Mad Men brings any interest in ‘near contemporary’ storytelling. The vintage romance market and the potential for ebook reprinting might open reader receptivity to modern thinking heroines in something newer than Regency garb.
    (Can you tell this is a topic I like? It’s interesting to me as a fan of many defunct romance crazes to think about what will come a the end of this Vampire Period)

    Reply
  91. Donna Ann, does this mean you like the rules and restrictions? Does that make the Regency more comfortable–because everything has a proper place?
    And yes, Meoskop, I’m there with you. I told my editor when Buffy and some of those witch programs were on that paranormal was the next big deal, which is how I got away with the Magic series way back when. And everyone is desperately looking for the next big thing after vampires!

    Reply
  92. Donna Ann, does this mean you like the rules and restrictions? Does that make the Regency more comfortable–because everything has a proper place?
    And yes, Meoskop, I’m there with you. I told my editor when Buffy and some of those witch programs were on that paranormal was the next big deal, which is how I got away with the Magic series way back when. And everyone is desperately looking for the next big thing after vampires!

    Reply
  93. Donna Ann, does this mean you like the rules and restrictions? Does that make the Regency more comfortable–because everything has a proper place?
    And yes, Meoskop, I’m there with you. I told my editor when Buffy and some of those witch programs were on that paranormal was the next big deal, which is how I got away with the Magic series way back when. And everyone is desperately looking for the next big thing after vampires!

    Reply
  94. Donna Ann, does this mean you like the rules and restrictions? Does that make the Regency more comfortable–because everything has a proper place?
    And yes, Meoskop, I’m there with you. I told my editor when Buffy and some of those witch programs were on that paranormal was the next big deal, which is how I got away with the Magic series way back when. And everyone is desperately looking for the next big thing after vampires!

    Reply
  95. Donna Ann, does this mean you like the rules and restrictions? Does that make the Regency more comfortable–because everything has a proper place?
    And yes, Meoskop, I’m there with you. I told my editor when Buffy and some of those witch programs were on that paranormal was the next big deal, which is how I got away with the Magic series way back when. And everyone is desperately looking for the next big thing after vampires!

    Reply
  96. Why do I like the Regency? I like to read about Regency and about the whole 19th century, really because things were beginning to change and new inventions were made.

    Reply
  97. Why do I like the Regency? I like to read about Regency and about the whole 19th century, really because things were beginning to change and new inventions were made.

    Reply
  98. Why do I like the Regency? I like to read about Regency and about the whole 19th century, really because things were beginning to change and new inventions were made.

    Reply
  99. Why do I like the Regency? I like to read about Regency and about the whole 19th century, really because things were beginning to change and new inventions were made.

    Reply
  100. Why do I like the Regency? I like to read about Regency and about the whole 19th century, really because things were beginning to change and new inventions were made.

    Reply
  101. It looks like dashing gamblers are in the wind, Pat! I’m writing one now, but of course, me being me and you being you, the characters and stories are completely different. *g*
    The REgency had it all: war, romance, revolution–it was a time of major transition, and the clothes were relative comfortable. *g*

    Reply
  102. It looks like dashing gamblers are in the wind, Pat! I’m writing one now, but of course, me being me and you being you, the characters and stories are completely different. *g*
    The REgency had it all: war, romance, revolution–it was a time of major transition, and the clothes were relative comfortable. *g*

    Reply
  103. It looks like dashing gamblers are in the wind, Pat! I’m writing one now, but of course, me being me and you being you, the characters and stories are completely different. *g*
    The REgency had it all: war, romance, revolution–it was a time of major transition, and the clothes were relative comfortable. *g*

    Reply
  104. It looks like dashing gamblers are in the wind, Pat! I’m writing one now, but of course, me being me and you being you, the characters and stories are completely different. *g*
    The REgency had it all: war, romance, revolution–it was a time of major transition, and the clothes were relative comfortable. *g*

    Reply
  105. It looks like dashing gamblers are in the wind, Pat! I’m writing one now, but of course, me being me and you being you, the characters and stories are completely different. *g*
    The REgency had it all: war, romance, revolution–it was a time of major transition, and the clothes were relative comfortable. *g*

    Reply
  106. (This conversation also makes me sad, because I wish Edith were part of it. Twice during it I have thought of something she’s said on this topic and wished she could chime in, and twice I haven’t said so. Apologies if I’ve made anyone else sad now!)
    @ Donna Ann, I think you’ve nailed a big part of it – that was rather the last generation where it was ‘ok’ not to have a job, or work. A big part of the fairy tale of the Regency is being able to ascend to a class where you are expected to enjoy yourself and pursue only that which you wish to pursue – while books with investment / spy / inventor leads have definitely risen dramatically, the arc still leads toward an ‘early retirement’ for the characters.

    Reply
  107. (This conversation also makes me sad, because I wish Edith were part of it. Twice during it I have thought of something she’s said on this topic and wished she could chime in, and twice I haven’t said so. Apologies if I’ve made anyone else sad now!)
    @ Donna Ann, I think you’ve nailed a big part of it – that was rather the last generation where it was ‘ok’ not to have a job, or work. A big part of the fairy tale of the Regency is being able to ascend to a class where you are expected to enjoy yourself and pursue only that which you wish to pursue – while books with investment / spy / inventor leads have definitely risen dramatically, the arc still leads toward an ‘early retirement’ for the characters.

    Reply
  108. (This conversation also makes me sad, because I wish Edith were part of it. Twice during it I have thought of something she’s said on this topic and wished she could chime in, and twice I haven’t said so. Apologies if I’ve made anyone else sad now!)
    @ Donna Ann, I think you’ve nailed a big part of it – that was rather the last generation where it was ‘ok’ not to have a job, or work. A big part of the fairy tale of the Regency is being able to ascend to a class where you are expected to enjoy yourself and pursue only that which you wish to pursue – while books with investment / spy / inventor leads have definitely risen dramatically, the arc still leads toward an ‘early retirement’ for the characters.

    Reply
  109. (This conversation also makes me sad, because I wish Edith were part of it. Twice during it I have thought of something she’s said on this topic and wished she could chime in, and twice I haven’t said so. Apologies if I’ve made anyone else sad now!)
    @ Donna Ann, I think you’ve nailed a big part of it – that was rather the last generation where it was ‘ok’ not to have a job, or work. A big part of the fairy tale of the Regency is being able to ascend to a class where you are expected to enjoy yourself and pursue only that which you wish to pursue – while books with investment / spy / inventor leads have definitely risen dramatically, the arc still leads toward an ‘early retirement’ for the characters.

    Reply
  110. (This conversation also makes me sad, because I wish Edith were part of it. Twice during it I have thought of something she’s said on this topic and wished she could chime in, and twice I haven’t said so. Apologies if I’ve made anyone else sad now!)
    @ Donna Ann, I think you’ve nailed a big part of it – that was rather the last generation where it was ‘ok’ not to have a job, or work. A big part of the fairy tale of the Regency is being able to ascend to a class where you are expected to enjoy yourself and pursue only that which you wish to pursue – while books with investment / spy / inventor leads have definitely risen dramatically, the arc still leads toward an ‘early retirement’ for the characters.

    Reply
  111. We miss Edith constantly, but if she’s in our hearts, she’s still with us. Wyckerly is dedicated to her because I was writing it when she left.
    Regency is retirement! I think I like that. “G”

    Reply
  112. We miss Edith constantly, but if she’s in our hearts, she’s still with us. Wyckerly is dedicated to her because I was writing it when she left.
    Regency is retirement! I think I like that. “G”

    Reply
  113. We miss Edith constantly, but if she’s in our hearts, she’s still with us. Wyckerly is dedicated to her because I was writing it when she left.
    Regency is retirement! I think I like that. “G”

    Reply
  114. We miss Edith constantly, but if she’s in our hearts, she’s still with us. Wyckerly is dedicated to her because I was writing it when she left.
    Regency is retirement! I think I like that. “G”

    Reply
  115. We miss Edith constantly, but if she’s in our hearts, she’s still with us. Wyckerly is dedicated to her because I was writing it when she left.
    Regency is retirement! I think I like that. “G”

    Reply
  116. ms heyer started me on regencys when i was 8 or so with fantasy writers like mccaffrey, lackey, weis, it’s no wonder i like your books please keep up the good stuff:-)

    Reply
  117. ms heyer started me on regencys when i was 8 or so with fantasy writers like mccaffrey, lackey, weis, it’s no wonder i like your books please keep up the good stuff:-)

    Reply
  118. ms heyer started me on regencys when i was 8 or so with fantasy writers like mccaffrey, lackey, weis, it’s no wonder i like your books please keep up the good stuff:-)

    Reply
  119. ms heyer started me on regencys when i was 8 or so with fantasy writers like mccaffrey, lackey, weis, it’s no wonder i like your books please keep up the good stuff:-)

    Reply
  120. ms heyer started me on regencys when i was 8 or so with fantasy writers like mccaffrey, lackey, weis, it’s no wonder i like your books please keep up the good stuff:-)

    Reply
  121. I like Regency stories because they are an escape from everyday life. Gorgeous dresses, servants, and totally different rules. It’s fun to imagine myself in the story.

    Reply
  122. I like Regency stories because they are an escape from everyday life. Gorgeous dresses, servants, and totally different rules. It’s fun to imagine myself in the story.

    Reply
  123. I like Regency stories because they are an escape from everyday life. Gorgeous dresses, servants, and totally different rules. It’s fun to imagine myself in the story.

    Reply
  124. I like Regency stories because they are an escape from everyday life. Gorgeous dresses, servants, and totally different rules. It’s fun to imagine myself in the story.

    Reply
  125. I like Regency stories because they are an escape from everyday life. Gorgeous dresses, servants, and totally different rules. It’s fun to imagine myself in the story.

    Reply

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