Travelling with Vikings

Christina here. Next week sees the publication of the second book in my Viking series – The Runes of Destiny. It is the story of Linnea, a twenty-first century woman who ends up travelling back in time to the Viking age. Here’s a short blurb:-

TROD Medium“When helping out at an archaeological dig, Linnea uncovers an exquisite brooch, but blacks out after reading the runic inscription. She wakes up surrounded by men in Viking costume, who seem to take re-enactment very seriously. Lost and confused, she finds herself in the power of Hrafn, a Viking warrior who claims her as his thrall and takes her on a journey across the seas to sell her for profit. Setting sail, she confronts the unthinkable: she has travelled back to the 9th century. Linnea is determined to find a way back to her own time, but there’s a connection forming with Hrafn. Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here …”

This story was inspire3d by the incredible Viking travels I’d read about. Despite their reputation as ferocious marauders, there was much to admire about the Vikings, and the one thing I am in total awe of is their fearless exploration of the world around them. It didn’t happen overnight, of course, and Scandinavian people had been travelling in all directions for decades (perhaps centuries) before the era we call the Viking age. However, the refinement of their sleek, clinker-built ships allowed them to go further and faster than ever before because of the invention of the keel. It gave the ships a stability they’d lacked and allowed them to take to the high seas. The fact that the vessels were shallow with a fairly flat bottom also made it easy for them to land on any beach and to travel far along most rivers without getting stuck.

It is now well-known that they were the first Europeans to set foot in America – or Vinland (“Wine Land”) as they called it, where they encountered the native population who they called ‘skraelings’. They didn’t stay for long and never, as far as we know, established trading links on that continent, but they settled in Greenland which is quite far enough from their homelands!

27

A hoard of silver dirhams

To me, however, their main achievement was the travel they did in the other direction – east and south. Trade with the east had probably been going on for centuries, with goods making its way in stages from places like Byzantium and Baghdad. On the island of Helgö, in a Viking age settlement just west of Stockholm, archaeologists have even found a little statue of a Buddha, and also trade goods from many other places.

Then someone, somewhere in Scandinavia (most likely Sweden) must have had the bright idea to try and go straight to the source in order to cut out the middlemen. To do that would be to gain enormous riches, as trade goods was incredibly valuable. Silk, glass, silver, rock crystal and gems like carnelian were some of the items to bring back. The only problem was how to get there. They could have sailed all the way down the European coast along what is now the Netherlands, France, Spain and into and around the Mediterranean, and some of them undoubtedly did. But there was a more direct route through modern day Russia along the rivers, and this is what they attempted.

I say attempted, because it was by no means certain they’d either make it there or back. It wasn’t just an arduous journey, but also very dangerous. 

Volkhov river Alexxx1979  CC BY-SA 4.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby-sa4.0  via Wikimedia Commons

Volkhov River Staraja Ladoga Alexxx1979 Wikimedia Commons

To reach the city of Byzantium (present day Istanbul), which the Vikings called Miklagarðr, in Grikkland (their word for the Byzantine empire), they had to head down one or other of the rivers that lead south from the Baltic coast. The most common route went via the Neva River (where St Petersburg is now situated), just south of Finland, passing briefly through Lake Ladoga and continuing up the Volkhov River. There was a trading settlement here called Aldeigjuborg (now Staraja Ladoga), which was established quite early on, and some people never went any further. The more intrepid travellers, however, continued upstream to Holmgarðr (Novgorod), across Lake Ilmen, and then via various tiny rivers and through enormous forests until they reached the river Dniepr.

512px-Dniepr_river_in_Kyiv Dmitry A. Mottl  CC BY-SA 3.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby-sa3.0  via Wikimedia Commons

Present day Kiev on the Dniepr – Dmitry A. Mottl Wikimedia Commons

I have no idea how they found their way in this wilderness. It is mind-boggling! It involved what is called portage – ie carrying their ships through the forests for quite long stretches. Although carrying isn’t quite the right word – what they would do is put down timber rollers and slide the ship along, bit by bit, until they got to another stretch of water of some kind. All the while, they had to be alert to the dangers around them, mainly the threat of attack from native tribes, who must have known they were vulnerable and carried a valuable cargo.

Once on the Dniepr, it wasn’t quite plain sailing either. This river is over 2,000 kilometers long and there are dangerous rapids and other parts that are tricky to navigate. The Vikings joined it roughly two thirds of the way up, but that was still a long way to go. They would have passed Koenugarðr (what would become the city of Kiev), then continued down towards the Black Sea and across to the Bosphorus, the narrow strait that joins it with the Mediterranean, and their goal – Miklagarðr. The entire journey was some 3,000 kilometers!

23It was undoubtedly worth it if you succeeded though. The trade goods the Vikings brought – things like furs, slaves, iron ore, amber, eiderdown and walrus tusks – made them good profits, and the things they took home with them made them even richer. The lure of this wealth must have been irresistible to many, even though they would have known the odds were against them. In Sweden, there are lots of rune stones that commemorate those who travelled to foreign lands, both those who made it and the ones who didn’t. And you can’t but admire their spirit of adventure and fearless optimism.

14For a twenty-first century person it seems unbelievably daunting, however, so I can’t blame my heroine for doubting she’ll survive!

If you had travelled back in time and were taken on a journey like this, how would you cope? And what would you miss the most from our century? For me, it would be chocolate!

IMG_7721The Runes of Destiny will be released on 10th December – it is available for pre-order here. To celebrate publication I will give away one signed copy of the book together with this little raven keyring (the hero’s name is Hrafn which means raven). Just leave a comment below, no later than midnight on Saturday and I will pick a winner at random.

200 thoughts on “Travelling with Vikings”

  1. Fascinating, Christina! I knew the Vikings were great and fearless explorers, but had no idea that they had found a water route through Russia and all the way down to Constantinople!
    I would cope very badly with the 9th century! I want my electricity and central heating and stacks of books! I’m sure your Linnea managed much better. *G*

    Reply
  2. Fascinating, Christina! I knew the Vikings were great and fearless explorers, but had no idea that they had found a water route through Russia and all the way down to Constantinople!
    I would cope very badly with the 9th century! I want my electricity and central heating and stacks of books! I’m sure your Linnea managed much better. *G*

    Reply
  3. Fascinating, Christina! I knew the Vikings were great and fearless explorers, but had no idea that they had found a water route through Russia and all the way down to Constantinople!
    I would cope very badly with the 9th century! I want my electricity and central heating and stacks of books! I’m sure your Linnea managed much better. *G*

    Reply
  4. Fascinating, Christina! I knew the Vikings were great and fearless explorers, but had no idea that they had found a water route through Russia and all the way down to Constantinople!
    I would cope very badly with the 9th century! I want my electricity and central heating and stacks of books! I’m sure your Linnea managed much better. *G*

    Reply
  5. Fascinating, Christina! I knew the Vikings were great and fearless explorers, but had no idea that they had found a water route through Russia and all the way down to Constantinople!
    I would cope very badly with the 9th century! I want my electricity and central heating and stacks of books! I’m sure your Linnea managed much better. *G*

    Reply
  6. How did the Vikings even come up with such ambitious adventures, much less put them into effect? Just feeding themselves along the way must have been arduous, and I doubt they always received a warm welcome when they showed up. I’ve been to the Viking Museum in (I think) York, which featured a peaceful Viking village, and also on a river trip through Russia, where rivers are now connected through multiple man-made canals rather than rolling the ship/boat through the ubiquitous forests. I never would have dreamed how truly adventurous and ambitious the Vikings were. I’m impressed! Thank you for an eye-opening post, Christina.

    Reply
  7. How did the Vikings even come up with such ambitious adventures, much less put them into effect? Just feeding themselves along the way must have been arduous, and I doubt they always received a warm welcome when they showed up. I’ve been to the Viking Museum in (I think) York, which featured a peaceful Viking village, and also on a river trip through Russia, where rivers are now connected through multiple man-made canals rather than rolling the ship/boat through the ubiquitous forests. I never would have dreamed how truly adventurous and ambitious the Vikings were. I’m impressed! Thank you for an eye-opening post, Christina.

    Reply
  8. How did the Vikings even come up with such ambitious adventures, much less put them into effect? Just feeding themselves along the way must have been arduous, and I doubt they always received a warm welcome when they showed up. I’ve been to the Viking Museum in (I think) York, which featured a peaceful Viking village, and also on a river trip through Russia, where rivers are now connected through multiple man-made canals rather than rolling the ship/boat through the ubiquitous forests. I never would have dreamed how truly adventurous and ambitious the Vikings were. I’m impressed! Thank you for an eye-opening post, Christina.

    Reply
  9. How did the Vikings even come up with such ambitious adventures, much less put them into effect? Just feeding themselves along the way must have been arduous, and I doubt they always received a warm welcome when they showed up. I’ve been to the Viking Museum in (I think) York, which featured a peaceful Viking village, and also on a river trip through Russia, where rivers are now connected through multiple man-made canals rather than rolling the ship/boat through the ubiquitous forests. I never would have dreamed how truly adventurous and ambitious the Vikings were. I’m impressed! Thank you for an eye-opening post, Christina.

    Reply
  10. How did the Vikings even come up with such ambitious adventures, much less put them into effect? Just feeding themselves along the way must have been arduous, and I doubt they always received a warm welcome when they showed up. I’ve been to the Viking Museum in (I think) York, which featured a peaceful Viking village, and also on a river trip through Russia, where rivers are now connected through multiple man-made canals rather than rolling the ship/boat through the ubiquitous forests. I never would have dreamed how truly adventurous and ambitious the Vikings were. I’m impressed! Thank you for an eye-opening post, Christina.

    Reply
  11. The lure of the unknown and of treasure would be enough to encourage those who were landless Viking to go voyaging.A call to adventure and danger, which I am sure many would find irresistable.I love knowing that Vikings were more than just bloody thirsty raiders.What would I miss from the present day?
    Ease of communications, instant information,modern medicine and yes,chocolate.

    Reply
  12. The lure of the unknown and of treasure would be enough to encourage those who were landless Viking to go voyaging.A call to adventure and danger, which I am sure many would find irresistable.I love knowing that Vikings were more than just bloody thirsty raiders.What would I miss from the present day?
    Ease of communications, instant information,modern medicine and yes,chocolate.

    Reply
  13. The lure of the unknown and of treasure would be enough to encourage those who were landless Viking to go voyaging.A call to adventure and danger, which I am sure many would find irresistable.I love knowing that Vikings were more than just bloody thirsty raiders.What would I miss from the present day?
    Ease of communications, instant information,modern medicine and yes,chocolate.

    Reply
  14. The lure of the unknown and of treasure would be enough to encourage those who were landless Viking to go voyaging.A call to adventure and danger, which I am sure many would find irresistable.I love knowing that Vikings were more than just bloody thirsty raiders.What would I miss from the present day?
    Ease of communications, instant information,modern medicine and yes,chocolate.

    Reply
  15. The lure of the unknown and of treasure would be enough to encourage those who were landless Viking to go voyaging.A call to adventure and danger, which I am sure many would find irresistable.I love knowing that Vikings were more than just bloody thirsty raiders.What would I miss from the present day?
    Ease of communications, instant information,modern medicine and yes,chocolate.

    Reply
  16. Thank you, Mary Jo! Yes, it was an amazing feat, wasn’t it! I think it would be very difficult for us to cope without the central heating especially, and yes books! Hadn’t thought of that!

    Reply
  17. Thank you, Mary Jo! Yes, it was an amazing feat, wasn’t it! I think it would be very difficult for us to cope without the central heating especially, and yes books! Hadn’t thought of that!

    Reply
  18. Thank you, Mary Jo! Yes, it was an amazing feat, wasn’t it! I think it would be very difficult for us to cope without the central heating especially, and yes books! Hadn’t thought of that!

    Reply
  19. Thank you, Mary Jo! Yes, it was an amazing feat, wasn’t it! I think it would be very difficult for us to cope without the central heating especially, and yes books! Hadn’t thought of that!

    Reply
  20. Thank you, Mary Jo! Yes, it was an amazing feat, wasn’t it! I think it would be very difficult for us to cope without the central heating especially, and yes books! Hadn’t thought of that!

    Reply
  21. Thank you, Mary, so glad you enjoyed it! I’m sure you’re right and they must have had a very difficult time of it, but they were used to surviving on whatever they could find/fish/hunt I think. I love the Viking Museum in York – that village makes it all feel so real, doesn’t it? And you are very lucky to have been on a river trip through Russia!

    Reply
  22. Thank you, Mary, so glad you enjoyed it! I’m sure you’re right and they must have had a very difficult time of it, but they were used to surviving on whatever they could find/fish/hunt I think. I love the Viking Museum in York – that village makes it all feel so real, doesn’t it? And you are very lucky to have been on a river trip through Russia!

    Reply
  23. Thank you, Mary, so glad you enjoyed it! I’m sure you’re right and they must have had a very difficult time of it, but they were used to surviving on whatever they could find/fish/hunt I think. I love the Viking Museum in York – that village makes it all feel so real, doesn’t it? And you are very lucky to have been on a river trip through Russia!

    Reply
  24. Thank you, Mary, so glad you enjoyed it! I’m sure you’re right and they must have had a very difficult time of it, but they were used to surviving on whatever they could find/fish/hunt I think. I love the Viking Museum in York – that village makes it all feel so real, doesn’t it? And you are very lucky to have been on a river trip through Russia!

    Reply
  25. Thank you, Mary, so glad you enjoyed it! I’m sure you’re right and they must have had a very difficult time of it, but they were used to surviving on whatever they could find/fish/hunt I think. I love the Viking Museum in York – that village makes it all feel so real, doesn’t it? And you are very lucky to have been on a river trip through Russia!

    Reply
  26. Yes, if they’d seen others return with piles of silver and other treasure, it must have been irresistible to an adventurous young man. And Vikings didn’t fear anything other than dying dishonourably apparently! Medicine – yes, I’d definitely miss that too. There are so many things we take for granted now.

    Reply
  27. Yes, if they’d seen others return with piles of silver and other treasure, it must have been irresistible to an adventurous young man. And Vikings didn’t fear anything other than dying dishonourably apparently! Medicine – yes, I’d definitely miss that too. There are so many things we take for granted now.

    Reply
  28. Yes, if they’d seen others return with piles of silver and other treasure, it must have been irresistible to an adventurous young man. And Vikings didn’t fear anything other than dying dishonourably apparently! Medicine – yes, I’d definitely miss that too. There are so many things we take for granted now.

    Reply
  29. Yes, if they’d seen others return with piles of silver and other treasure, it must have been irresistible to an adventurous young man. And Vikings didn’t fear anything other than dying dishonourably apparently! Medicine – yes, I’d definitely miss that too. There are so many things we take for granted now.

    Reply
  30. Yes, if they’d seen others return with piles of silver and other treasure, it must have been irresistible to an adventurous young man. And Vikings didn’t fear anything other than dying dishonourably apparently! Medicine – yes, I’d definitely miss that too. There are so many things we take for granted now.

    Reply
  31. I prefer to travel back in time the easy way — through books! My first Viking journey was found in the pages of “Barrow Sinister” by Elsie Lee. Elsie Lee doesn’t openly show the same basis of research that many of my later favorite authors have shown, but her book opened up those doors to me, making other early reading more enjoyable and understandable. And yes, I got some slight idea of the travels Christina has describe here from that early favorite of mine.

    Reply
  32. I prefer to travel back in time the easy way — through books! My first Viking journey was found in the pages of “Barrow Sinister” by Elsie Lee. Elsie Lee doesn’t openly show the same basis of research that many of my later favorite authors have shown, but her book opened up those doors to me, making other early reading more enjoyable and understandable. And yes, I got some slight idea of the travels Christina has describe here from that early favorite of mine.

    Reply
  33. I prefer to travel back in time the easy way — through books! My first Viking journey was found in the pages of “Barrow Sinister” by Elsie Lee. Elsie Lee doesn’t openly show the same basis of research that many of my later favorite authors have shown, but her book opened up those doors to me, making other early reading more enjoyable and understandable. And yes, I got some slight idea of the travels Christina has describe here from that early favorite of mine.

    Reply
  34. I prefer to travel back in time the easy way — through books! My first Viking journey was found in the pages of “Barrow Sinister” by Elsie Lee. Elsie Lee doesn’t openly show the same basis of research that many of my later favorite authors have shown, but her book opened up those doors to me, making other early reading more enjoyable and understandable. And yes, I got some slight idea of the travels Christina has describe here from that early favorite of mine.

    Reply
  35. I prefer to travel back in time the easy way — through books! My first Viking journey was found in the pages of “Barrow Sinister” by Elsie Lee. Elsie Lee doesn’t openly show the same basis of research that many of my later favorite authors have shown, but her book opened up those doors to me, making other early reading more enjoyable and understandable. And yes, I got some slight idea of the travels Christina has describe here from that early favorite of mine.

    Reply
  36. Thank you, Sue, I must look that up! I always enjoy books featuring Vikings and the first one I ever read was “The Longships”(aka “Red Orm”) by Frans G Bengtsson. It’s a bit outdated now but I read it as a child and found it very exciting!

    Reply
  37. Thank you, Sue, I must look that up! I always enjoy books featuring Vikings and the first one I ever read was “The Longships”(aka “Red Orm”) by Frans G Bengtsson. It’s a bit outdated now but I read it as a child and found it very exciting!

    Reply
  38. Thank you, Sue, I must look that up! I always enjoy books featuring Vikings and the first one I ever read was “The Longships”(aka “Red Orm”) by Frans G Bengtsson. It’s a bit outdated now but I read it as a child and found it very exciting!

    Reply
  39. Thank you, Sue, I must look that up! I always enjoy books featuring Vikings and the first one I ever read was “The Longships”(aka “Red Orm”) by Frans G Bengtsson. It’s a bit outdated now but I read it as a child and found it very exciting!

    Reply
  40. Thank you, Sue, I must look that up! I always enjoy books featuring Vikings and the first one I ever read was “The Longships”(aka “Red Orm”) by Frans G Bengtsson. It’s a bit outdated now but I read it as a child and found it very exciting!

    Reply
  41. Wow, I also had no idea the Vikings travelled so far East and South! It’s quite amazing. I’ve never been to the Black Sea, but I understand it is quite rough and difficult to navigate. I also wonder how much the Vikings mingled with the local people in Byzantium, if there was any intermarriage.

    Reply
  42. Wow, I also had no idea the Vikings travelled so far East and South! It’s quite amazing. I’ve never been to the Black Sea, but I understand it is quite rough and difficult to navigate. I also wonder how much the Vikings mingled with the local people in Byzantium, if there was any intermarriage.

    Reply
  43. Wow, I also had no idea the Vikings travelled so far East and South! It’s quite amazing. I’ve never been to the Black Sea, but I understand it is quite rough and difficult to navigate. I also wonder how much the Vikings mingled with the local people in Byzantium, if there was any intermarriage.

    Reply
  44. Wow, I also had no idea the Vikings travelled so far East and South! It’s quite amazing. I’ve never been to the Black Sea, but I understand it is quite rough and difficult to navigate. I also wonder how much the Vikings mingled with the local people in Byzantium, if there was any intermarriage.

    Reply
  45. Wow, I also had no idea the Vikings travelled so far East and South! It’s quite amazing. I’ve never been to the Black Sea, but I understand it is quite rough and difficult to navigate. I also wonder how much the Vikings mingled with the local people in Byzantium, if there was any intermarriage.

    Reply
  46. I think it would depend on where I would go, how far back in time, how long I would have to be there and if I would have guide there.

    Reply
  47. I think it would depend on where I would go, how far back in time, how long I would have to be there and if I would have guide there.

    Reply
  48. I think it would depend on where I would go, how far back in time, how long I would have to be there and if I would have guide there.

    Reply
  49. I think it would depend on where I would go, how far back in time, how long I would have to be there and if I would have guide there.

    Reply
  50. I think it would depend on where I would go, how far back in time, how long I would have to be there and if I would have guide there.

    Reply
  51. After reading this post, I realize I am a coward. I would have been curious to see the unknown, but I also would have been terrified about the unknown. Also, I can’t swim, so being on long journeys in a boat are not something I would love.
    As to what I would miss, I guess it would be books. Maybe I could get one of the explorers to write a book that told me all about their journeys. But, I know I would miss being able to read a book.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  52. After reading this post, I realize I am a coward. I would have been curious to see the unknown, but I also would have been terrified about the unknown. Also, I can’t swim, so being on long journeys in a boat are not something I would love.
    As to what I would miss, I guess it would be books. Maybe I could get one of the explorers to write a book that told me all about their journeys. But, I know I would miss being able to read a book.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  53. After reading this post, I realize I am a coward. I would have been curious to see the unknown, but I also would have been terrified about the unknown. Also, I can’t swim, so being on long journeys in a boat are not something I would love.
    As to what I would miss, I guess it would be books. Maybe I could get one of the explorers to write a book that told me all about their journeys. But, I know I would miss being able to read a book.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  54. After reading this post, I realize I am a coward. I would have been curious to see the unknown, but I also would have been terrified about the unknown. Also, I can’t swim, so being on long journeys in a boat are not something I would love.
    As to what I would miss, I guess it would be books. Maybe I could get one of the explorers to write a book that told me all about their journeys. But, I know I would miss being able to read a book.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  55. After reading this post, I realize I am a coward. I would have been curious to see the unknown, but I also would have been terrified about the unknown. Also, I can’t swim, so being on long journeys in a boat are not something I would love.
    As to what I would miss, I guess it would be books. Maybe I could get one of the explorers to write a book that told me all about their journeys. But, I know I would miss being able to read a book.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  56. I think in the beginning there were strict rules governing trade so probably not a lot of mingling with the locals. But later the Byzantine emperor recruited Vikings as his own personal guard – the Varangian guard – because they were such fierce (and tall) fighters. They might have met and married local women then?

    Reply
  57. I think in the beginning there were strict rules governing trade so probably not a lot of mingling with the locals. But later the Byzantine emperor recruited Vikings as his own personal guard – the Varangian guard – because they were such fierce (and tall) fighters. They might have met and married local women then?

    Reply
  58. I think in the beginning there were strict rules governing trade so probably not a lot of mingling with the locals. But later the Byzantine emperor recruited Vikings as his own personal guard – the Varangian guard – because they were such fierce (and tall) fighters. They might have met and married local women then?

    Reply
  59. I think in the beginning there were strict rules governing trade so probably not a lot of mingling with the locals. But later the Byzantine emperor recruited Vikings as his own personal guard – the Varangian guard – because they were such fierce (and tall) fighters. They might have met and married local women then?

    Reply
  60. I think in the beginning there were strict rules governing trade so probably not a lot of mingling with the locals. But later the Byzantine emperor recruited Vikings as his own personal guard – the Varangian guard – because they were such fierce (and tall) fighters. They might have met and married local women then?

    Reply
  61. That’s a good point, Minna – and some time periods would be better for a time traveller than others. I like the Viking age and the Roman era as they seem to have been better from a female point of view. The Middle Ages not so much!

    Reply
  62. That’s a good point, Minna – and some time periods would be better for a time traveller than others. I like the Viking age and the Roman era as they seem to have been better from a female point of view. The Middle Ages not so much!

    Reply
  63. That’s a good point, Minna – and some time periods would be better for a time traveller than others. I like the Viking age and the Roman era as they seem to have been better from a female point of view. The Middle Ages not so much!

    Reply
  64. That’s a good point, Minna – and some time periods would be better for a time traveller than others. I like the Viking age and the Roman era as they seem to have been better from a female point of view. The Middle Ages not so much!

    Reply
  65. That’s a good point, Minna – and some time periods would be better for a time traveller than others. I like the Viking age and the Roman era as they seem to have been better from a female point of view. The Middle Ages not so much!

    Reply
  66. Thank you, Annette! Yes, it does sound rather terrifying, doesn’t it? If you wanted books in the Viking age you’d have to go and raid a monastery I think 🙂 The Vikings could write with runes but didn’t have paper (or vellum) and pens/quills so didn’t use them to write stories. A shame as it would have been interesting to get their point of view on all that happened!

    Reply
  67. Thank you, Annette! Yes, it does sound rather terrifying, doesn’t it? If you wanted books in the Viking age you’d have to go and raid a monastery I think 🙂 The Vikings could write with runes but didn’t have paper (or vellum) and pens/quills so didn’t use them to write stories. A shame as it would have been interesting to get their point of view on all that happened!

    Reply
  68. Thank you, Annette! Yes, it does sound rather terrifying, doesn’t it? If you wanted books in the Viking age you’d have to go and raid a monastery I think 🙂 The Vikings could write with runes but didn’t have paper (or vellum) and pens/quills so didn’t use them to write stories. A shame as it would have been interesting to get their point of view on all that happened!

    Reply
  69. Thank you, Annette! Yes, it does sound rather terrifying, doesn’t it? If you wanted books in the Viking age you’d have to go and raid a monastery I think 🙂 The Vikings could write with runes but didn’t have paper (or vellum) and pens/quills so didn’t use them to write stories. A shame as it would have been interesting to get their point of view on all that happened!

    Reply
  70. Thank you, Annette! Yes, it does sound rather terrifying, doesn’t it? If you wanted books in the Viking age you’d have to go and raid a monastery I think 🙂 The Vikings could write with runes but didn’t have paper (or vellum) and pens/quills so didn’t use them to write stories. A shame as it would have been interesting to get their point of view on all that happened!

    Reply
  71. Aww, the raven is adorable. I was fascinated by my visit to the Skansen outdoor museum years ago – the rune stone image in this post reminds me of that, and makes me hope I can go back someday.

    Reply
  72. Aww, the raven is adorable. I was fascinated by my visit to the Skansen outdoor museum years ago – the rune stone image in this post reminds me of that, and makes me hope I can go back someday.

    Reply
  73. Aww, the raven is adorable. I was fascinated by my visit to the Skansen outdoor museum years ago – the rune stone image in this post reminds me of that, and makes me hope I can go back someday.

    Reply
  74. Aww, the raven is adorable. I was fascinated by my visit to the Skansen outdoor museum years ago – the rune stone image in this post reminds me of that, and makes me hope I can go back someday.

    Reply
  75. Aww, the raven is adorable. I was fascinated by my visit to the Skansen outdoor museum years ago – the rune stone image in this post reminds me of that, and makes me hope I can go back someday.

    Reply
  76. Congratulations, Christina, on the publication of your new book and thank you for a fascinating post!
    Hmm, what would I miss were I to travel back in time? Probably access to toilets and warm showers. I suspect that time travel might best be suited to the young and adventurous, two camps to which I do not belong!

    Reply
  77. Congratulations, Christina, on the publication of your new book and thank you for a fascinating post!
    Hmm, what would I miss were I to travel back in time? Probably access to toilets and warm showers. I suspect that time travel might best be suited to the young and adventurous, two camps to which I do not belong!

    Reply
  78. Congratulations, Christina, on the publication of your new book and thank you for a fascinating post!
    Hmm, what would I miss were I to travel back in time? Probably access to toilets and warm showers. I suspect that time travel might best be suited to the young and adventurous, two camps to which I do not belong!

    Reply
  79. Congratulations, Christina, on the publication of your new book and thank you for a fascinating post!
    Hmm, what would I miss were I to travel back in time? Probably access to toilets and warm showers. I suspect that time travel might best be suited to the young and adventurous, two camps to which I do not belong!

    Reply
  80. Congratulations, Christina, on the publication of your new book and thank you for a fascinating post!
    Hmm, what would I miss were I to travel back in time? Probably access to toilets and warm showers. I suspect that time travel might best be suited to the young and adventurous, two camps to which I do not belong!

    Reply
  81. I do admire those Viking explorers. This is really petty but if I were sent back in time I would miss bathroom facilities. So much for the spirit of adventure!

    Reply
  82. I do admire those Viking explorers. This is really petty but if I were sent back in time I would miss bathroom facilities. So much for the spirit of adventure!

    Reply
  83. I do admire those Viking explorers. This is really petty but if I were sent back in time I would miss bathroom facilities. So much for the spirit of adventure!

    Reply
  84. I do admire those Viking explorers. This is really petty but if I were sent back in time I would miss bathroom facilities. So much for the spirit of adventure!

    Reply
  85. I do admire those Viking explorers. This is really petty but if I were sent back in time I would miss bathroom facilities. So much for the spirit of adventure!

    Reply
  86. Thank you, Amy, I love ravens! We have some in our garden and they are fascinating but shy. I’m so glad you enjoyed visiting Skansen – I was there last year with a friend and it is a great place, isn’t it! I hope you can visit again soon.

    Reply
  87. Thank you, Amy, I love ravens! We have some in our garden and they are fascinating but shy. I’m so glad you enjoyed visiting Skansen – I was there last year with a friend and it is a great place, isn’t it! I hope you can visit again soon.

    Reply
  88. Thank you, Amy, I love ravens! We have some in our garden and they are fascinating but shy. I’m so glad you enjoyed visiting Skansen – I was there last year with a friend and it is a great place, isn’t it! I hope you can visit again soon.

    Reply
  89. Thank you, Amy, I love ravens! We have some in our garden and they are fascinating but shy. I’m so glad you enjoyed visiting Skansen – I was there last year with a friend and it is a great place, isn’t it! I hope you can visit again soon.

    Reply
  90. Thank you, Amy, I love ravens! We have some in our garden and they are fascinating but shy. I’m so glad you enjoyed visiting Skansen – I was there last year with a friend and it is a great place, isn’t it! I hope you can visit again soon.

    Reply
  91. Thank you, Kareni, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes we would probably miss those things at first but we could adapt I’m sure. Although it would definitely be easier in summer (with access to a lake or river) than winter!

    Reply
  92. Thank you, Kareni, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes we would probably miss those things at first but we could adapt I’m sure. Although it would definitely be easier in summer (with access to a lake or river) than winter!

    Reply
  93. Thank you, Kareni, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes we would probably miss those things at first but we could adapt I’m sure. Although it would definitely be easier in summer (with access to a lake or river) than winter!

    Reply
  94. Thank you, Kareni, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes we would probably miss those things at first but we could adapt I’m sure. Although it would definitely be easier in summer (with access to a lake or river) than winter!

    Reply
  95. Thank you, Kareni, so glad you enjoyed it! Yes we would probably miss those things at first but we could adapt I’m sure. Although it would definitely be easier in summer (with access to a lake or river) than winter!

    Reply
  96. I don’t think that I would enjoy this type of trip into the past though it is fascinating to read about.
    However if I had a time travel capsule with a controlled environment I would love to travel into the remote past to try,for example, to resolve the age old mystery of the origin of life. I would need a fully equipped lab with various probes, rather like the unmanned landers sent to explore the solar system. Of course the controlled environment would allow me to take home comforts including books, hot showers and chocolate … its the only way to time travel!

    Reply
  97. I don’t think that I would enjoy this type of trip into the past though it is fascinating to read about.
    However if I had a time travel capsule with a controlled environment I would love to travel into the remote past to try,for example, to resolve the age old mystery of the origin of life. I would need a fully equipped lab with various probes, rather like the unmanned landers sent to explore the solar system. Of course the controlled environment would allow me to take home comforts including books, hot showers and chocolate … its the only way to time travel!

    Reply
  98. I don’t think that I would enjoy this type of trip into the past though it is fascinating to read about.
    However if I had a time travel capsule with a controlled environment I would love to travel into the remote past to try,for example, to resolve the age old mystery of the origin of life. I would need a fully equipped lab with various probes, rather like the unmanned landers sent to explore the solar system. Of course the controlled environment would allow me to take home comforts including books, hot showers and chocolate … its the only way to time travel!

    Reply
  99. I don’t think that I would enjoy this type of trip into the past though it is fascinating to read about.
    However if I had a time travel capsule with a controlled environment I would love to travel into the remote past to try,for example, to resolve the age old mystery of the origin of life. I would need a fully equipped lab with various probes, rather like the unmanned landers sent to explore the solar system. Of course the controlled environment would allow me to take home comforts including books, hot showers and chocolate … its the only way to time travel!

    Reply
  100. I don’t think that I would enjoy this type of trip into the past though it is fascinating to read about.
    However if I had a time travel capsule with a controlled environment I would love to travel into the remote past to try,for example, to resolve the age old mystery of the origin of life. I would need a fully equipped lab with various probes, rather like the unmanned landers sent to explore the solar system. Of course the controlled environment would allow me to take home comforts including books, hot showers and chocolate … its the only way to time travel!

    Reply
  101. Having read the first book in the series and having been introduced to some of the characters, it has whet my appetite to learn more about the Vikings and their way of life. Also I like the main character, Mia, and the story that has evolved so far. I would enjoy following her adventures into the 2nd book in the series.
    I don’t think I would do well as a particpant in a time slip story. I like my creature comforts and also being able to explore the time period as a spectator. Somehow I don’t think that would be possible while living it. I would probably get into trouble or be accused of being a witch. I would be very interested in the healing arts and those persons were easily misunderstood.

    Reply
  102. Having read the first book in the series and having been introduced to some of the characters, it has whet my appetite to learn more about the Vikings and their way of life. Also I like the main character, Mia, and the story that has evolved so far. I would enjoy following her adventures into the 2nd book in the series.
    I don’t think I would do well as a particpant in a time slip story. I like my creature comforts and also being able to explore the time period as a spectator. Somehow I don’t think that would be possible while living it. I would probably get into trouble or be accused of being a witch. I would be very interested in the healing arts and those persons were easily misunderstood.

    Reply
  103. Having read the first book in the series and having been introduced to some of the characters, it has whet my appetite to learn more about the Vikings and their way of life. Also I like the main character, Mia, and the story that has evolved so far. I would enjoy following her adventures into the 2nd book in the series.
    I don’t think I would do well as a particpant in a time slip story. I like my creature comforts and also being able to explore the time period as a spectator. Somehow I don’t think that would be possible while living it. I would probably get into trouble or be accused of being a witch. I would be very interested in the healing arts and those persons were easily misunderstood.

    Reply
  104. Having read the first book in the series and having been introduced to some of the characters, it has whet my appetite to learn more about the Vikings and their way of life. Also I like the main character, Mia, and the story that has evolved so far. I would enjoy following her adventures into the 2nd book in the series.
    I don’t think I would do well as a particpant in a time slip story. I like my creature comforts and also being able to explore the time period as a spectator. Somehow I don’t think that would be possible while living it. I would probably get into trouble or be accused of being a witch. I would be very interested in the healing arts and those persons were easily misunderstood.

    Reply
  105. Having read the first book in the series and having been introduced to some of the characters, it has whet my appetite to learn more about the Vikings and their way of life. Also I like the main character, Mia, and the story that has evolved so far. I would enjoy following her adventures into the 2nd book in the series.
    I don’t think I would do well as a particpant in a time slip story. I like my creature comforts and also being able to explore the time period as a spectator. Somehow I don’t think that would be possible while living it. I would probably get into trouble or be accused of being a witch. I would be very interested in the healing arts and those persons were easily misunderstood.

    Reply
  106. Oooh, this sounds fascinating! Like you I think I would miss chocolate. But I would also miss the almost instantaneous access we have to information, entertainment, etc. Back then, even for the wealthy, life must have been hard.

    Reply
  107. Oooh, this sounds fascinating! Like you I think I would miss chocolate. But I would also miss the almost instantaneous access we have to information, entertainment, etc. Back then, even for the wealthy, life must have been hard.

    Reply
  108. Oooh, this sounds fascinating! Like you I think I would miss chocolate. But I would also miss the almost instantaneous access we have to information, entertainment, etc. Back then, even for the wealthy, life must have been hard.

    Reply
  109. Oooh, this sounds fascinating! Like you I think I would miss chocolate. But I would also miss the almost instantaneous access we have to information, entertainment, etc. Back then, even for the wealthy, life must have been hard.

    Reply
  110. Oooh, this sounds fascinating! Like you I think I would miss chocolate. But I would also miss the almost instantaneous access we have to information, entertainment, etc. Back then, even for the wealthy, life must have been hard.

    Reply
  111. A time travel capsule sounds like an excellent idea, Quantum! Especially if it contains chocolate. I honestly don’t know if I could survive without any sweet things at all (and I hate honey so that’s no good to me!). It would be extremely interesting to go back to that first moment, the origin of life – definitely an unusual destination!

    Reply
  112. A time travel capsule sounds like an excellent idea, Quantum! Especially if it contains chocolate. I honestly don’t know if I could survive without any sweet things at all (and I hate honey so that’s no good to me!). It would be extremely interesting to go back to that first moment, the origin of life – definitely an unusual destination!

    Reply
  113. A time travel capsule sounds like an excellent idea, Quantum! Especially if it contains chocolate. I honestly don’t know if I could survive without any sweet things at all (and I hate honey so that’s no good to me!). It would be extremely interesting to go back to that first moment, the origin of life – definitely an unusual destination!

    Reply
  114. A time travel capsule sounds like an excellent idea, Quantum! Especially if it contains chocolate. I honestly don’t know if I could survive without any sweet things at all (and I hate honey so that’s no good to me!). It would be extremely interesting to go back to that first moment, the origin of life – definitely an unusual destination!

    Reply
  115. A time travel capsule sounds like an excellent idea, Quantum! Especially if it contains chocolate. I honestly don’t know if I could survive without any sweet things at all (and I hate honey so that’s no good to me!). It would be extremely interesting to go back to that first moment, the origin of life – definitely an unusual destination!

    Reply
  116. Thank you, MaryJane, I’m so pleased you enjoyed the first book! And you’re right – it would be really difficult not to try and use our knowledge of medicine and thereby be accused of being a witch. It would be a very tricky situation indeed!

    Reply
  117. Thank you, MaryJane, I’m so pleased you enjoyed the first book! And you’re right – it would be really difficult not to try and use our knowledge of medicine and thereby be accused of being a witch. It would be a very tricky situation indeed!

    Reply
  118. Thank you, MaryJane, I’m so pleased you enjoyed the first book! And you’re right – it would be really difficult not to try and use our knowledge of medicine and thereby be accused of being a witch. It would be a very tricky situation indeed!

    Reply
  119. Thank you, MaryJane, I’m so pleased you enjoyed the first book! And you’re right – it would be really difficult not to try and use our knowledge of medicine and thereby be accused of being a witch. It would be a very tricky situation indeed!

    Reply
  120. Thank you, MaryJane, I’m so pleased you enjoyed the first book! And you’re right – it would be really difficult not to try and use our knowledge of medicine and thereby be accused of being a witch. It would be a very tricky situation indeed!

    Reply
  121. Thank you, Jane! Yes I’m sure life was incredibly hard, even if you were wealthy and had enough food all year round. Keeping anything fresh for long periods of time was a definite challenge. As for entertainment, perhaps one could learn to enjoy things like board games, storytelling and so on? I should think it would be tough for a 21st century person though.

    Reply
  122. Thank you, Jane! Yes I’m sure life was incredibly hard, even if you were wealthy and had enough food all year round. Keeping anything fresh for long periods of time was a definite challenge. As for entertainment, perhaps one could learn to enjoy things like board games, storytelling and so on? I should think it would be tough for a 21st century person though.

    Reply
  123. Thank you, Jane! Yes I’m sure life was incredibly hard, even if you were wealthy and had enough food all year round. Keeping anything fresh for long periods of time was a definite challenge. As for entertainment, perhaps one could learn to enjoy things like board games, storytelling and so on? I should think it would be tough for a 21st century person though.

    Reply
  124. Thank you, Jane! Yes I’m sure life was incredibly hard, even if you were wealthy and had enough food all year round. Keeping anything fresh for long periods of time was a definite challenge. As for entertainment, perhaps one could learn to enjoy things like board games, storytelling and so on? I should think it would be tough for a 21st century person though.

    Reply
  125. Thank you, Jane! Yes I’m sure life was incredibly hard, even if you were wealthy and had enough food all year round. Keeping anything fresh for long periods of time was a definite challenge. As for entertainment, perhaps one could learn to enjoy things like board games, storytelling and so on? I should think it would be tough for a 21st century person though.

    Reply
  126. Time slip stories with a Viking destination is even more exciting. They were not afraid of exploring and creating as much wealth and power as possible.
    I would miss the ease and convenience of 21st-century living as well as comfort food like the chocolate you mentioned.

    Reply
  127. Time slip stories with a Viking destination is even more exciting. They were not afraid of exploring and creating as much wealth and power as possible.
    I would miss the ease and convenience of 21st-century living as well as comfort food like the chocolate you mentioned.

    Reply
  128. Time slip stories with a Viking destination is even more exciting. They were not afraid of exploring and creating as much wealth and power as possible.
    I would miss the ease and convenience of 21st-century living as well as comfort food like the chocolate you mentioned.

    Reply
  129. Time slip stories with a Viking destination is even more exciting. They were not afraid of exploring and creating as much wealth and power as possible.
    I would miss the ease and convenience of 21st-century living as well as comfort food like the chocolate you mentioned.

    Reply
  130. Time slip stories with a Viking destination is even more exciting. They were not afraid of exploring and creating as much wealth and power as possible.
    I would miss the ease and convenience of 21st-century living as well as comfort food like the chocolate you mentioned.

    Reply
  131. I love them too, Patricia! Apart from chocolate, I’d definitely miss comfort food too and things like fast food and takeaways. Cooking from scratch always takes so long!

    Reply
  132. I love them too, Patricia! Apart from chocolate, I’d definitely miss comfort food too and things like fast food and takeaways. Cooking from scratch always takes so long!

    Reply
  133. I love them too, Patricia! Apart from chocolate, I’d definitely miss comfort food too and things like fast food and takeaways. Cooking from scratch always takes so long!

    Reply
  134. I love them too, Patricia! Apart from chocolate, I’d definitely miss comfort food too and things like fast food and takeaways. Cooking from scratch always takes so long!

    Reply
  135. I love them too, Patricia! Apart from chocolate, I’d definitely miss comfort food too and things like fast food and takeaways. Cooking from scratch always takes so long!

    Reply
  136. LOL Linnea – you’ll need to go to Sweden as I think most of them live there. According to Google there are over 73,000 at the moment. As you probably know, you’re named after a very pretty and delicate flower which happens to grow in the part of Sweden I grew up in, Småland. I love them! They are very elusive though – I’ve only seen them in the wild once in my life! Here are some photos: https://www.dreamstime.com/photos-images/linnea-borealis.html

    Reply
  137. LOL Linnea – you’ll need to go to Sweden as I think most of them live there. According to Google there are over 73,000 at the moment. As you probably know, you’re named after a very pretty and delicate flower which happens to grow in the part of Sweden I grew up in, Småland. I love them! They are very elusive though – I’ve only seen them in the wild once in my life! Here are some photos: https://www.dreamstime.com/photos-images/linnea-borealis.html

    Reply
  138. LOL Linnea – you’ll need to go to Sweden as I think most of them live there. According to Google there are over 73,000 at the moment. As you probably know, you’re named after a very pretty and delicate flower which happens to grow in the part of Sweden I grew up in, Småland. I love them! They are very elusive though – I’ve only seen them in the wild once in my life! Here are some photos: https://www.dreamstime.com/photos-images/linnea-borealis.html

    Reply
  139. LOL Linnea – you’ll need to go to Sweden as I think most of them live there. According to Google there are over 73,000 at the moment. As you probably know, you’re named after a very pretty and delicate flower which happens to grow in the part of Sweden I grew up in, Småland. I love them! They are very elusive though – I’ve only seen them in the wild once in my life! Here are some photos: https://www.dreamstime.com/photos-images/linnea-borealis.html

    Reply
  140. LOL Linnea – you’ll need to go to Sweden as I think most of them live there. According to Google there are over 73,000 at the moment. As you probably know, you’re named after a very pretty and delicate flower which happens to grow in the part of Sweden I grew up in, Småland. I love them! They are very elusive though – I’ve only seen them in the wild once in my life! Here are some photos: https://www.dreamstime.com/photos-images/linnea-borealis.html

    Reply
  141. I love the last line in the blurb. “Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here”. It definitely hooks me and makes me know what happens.

    Reply
  142. I love the last line in the blurb. “Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here”. It definitely hooks me and makes me know what happens.

    Reply
  143. I love the last line in the blurb. “Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here”. It definitely hooks me and makes me know what happens.

    Reply
  144. I love the last line in the blurb. “Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here”. It definitely hooks me and makes me know what happens.

    Reply
  145. I love the last line in the blurb. “Can she resist the call of the runes and accept her destiny lies here”. It definitely hooks me and makes me know what happens.

    Reply
  146. No books, true, but I believe they were great storytellers, and many of their poems and songs still survive. At the university I attended, a section of the English Dept was devoted to Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse literature, in fact they were taught as languages so students could read the poems and sagas in the original. And at “sherry parties” there would be dancing and singing of songs in those languages.
    I remember the old Prof, who was a total darling, and a big part of this, telling a story about how he once met a vulcanologist in a bar in Reykjavik, and he also spoke Ancient Icelandic and they spent an evening drinking and making up dirty ditties in Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse. That story always tickled me. I can imagine them falling about laughing and nobody else in the place having a clue what they were saying.

    Reply
  147. No books, true, but I believe they were great storytellers, and many of their poems and songs still survive. At the university I attended, a section of the English Dept was devoted to Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse literature, in fact they were taught as languages so students could read the poems and sagas in the original. And at “sherry parties” there would be dancing and singing of songs in those languages.
    I remember the old Prof, who was a total darling, and a big part of this, telling a story about how he once met a vulcanologist in a bar in Reykjavik, and he also spoke Ancient Icelandic and they spent an evening drinking and making up dirty ditties in Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse. That story always tickled me. I can imagine them falling about laughing and nobody else in the place having a clue what they were saying.

    Reply
  148. No books, true, but I believe they were great storytellers, and many of their poems and songs still survive. At the university I attended, a section of the English Dept was devoted to Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse literature, in fact they were taught as languages so students could read the poems and sagas in the original. And at “sherry parties” there would be dancing and singing of songs in those languages.
    I remember the old Prof, who was a total darling, and a big part of this, telling a story about how he once met a vulcanologist in a bar in Reykjavik, and he also spoke Ancient Icelandic and they spent an evening drinking and making up dirty ditties in Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse. That story always tickled me. I can imagine them falling about laughing and nobody else in the place having a clue what they were saying.

    Reply
  149. No books, true, but I believe they were great storytellers, and many of their poems and songs still survive. At the university I attended, a section of the English Dept was devoted to Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse literature, in fact they were taught as languages so students could read the poems and sagas in the original. And at “sherry parties” there would be dancing and singing of songs in those languages.
    I remember the old Prof, who was a total darling, and a big part of this, telling a story about how he once met a vulcanologist in a bar in Reykjavik, and he also spoke Ancient Icelandic and they spent an evening drinking and making up dirty ditties in Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse. That story always tickled me. I can imagine them falling about laughing and nobody else in the place having a clue what they were saying.

    Reply
  150. No books, true, but I believe they were great storytellers, and many of their poems and songs still survive. At the university I attended, a section of the English Dept was devoted to Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse literature, in fact they were taught as languages so students could read the poems and sagas in the original. And at “sherry parties” there would be dancing and singing of songs in those languages.
    I remember the old Prof, who was a total darling, and a big part of this, telling a story about how he once met a vulcanologist in a bar in Reykjavik, and he also spoke Ancient Icelandic and they spent an evening drinking and making up dirty ditties in Ancient Icelandic and Old Norse. That story always tickled me. I can imagine them falling about laughing and nobody else in the place having a clue what they were saying.

    Reply
  151. I live in Co. Waterford in Ireland. We are a Viking city as you, Christina, will probably know from the name. We have a famous tower in the city called Reginald’s Tower. A marriage took place here, many moons ago, of Strongbow and Aoife. She was the daughter of the ruler of the time and Strongbow was one of the Vikings who invaded. I should know more of the story and I do love history but was never into this phase of it. Since I read Echoes of the Runes it has piqued my interest.
    So looking forward to The Runes of Destiny.

    Reply
  152. I live in Co. Waterford in Ireland. We are a Viking city as you, Christina, will probably know from the name. We have a famous tower in the city called Reginald’s Tower. A marriage took place here, many moons ago, of Strongbow and Aoife. She was the daughter of the ruler of the time and Strongbow was one of the Vikings who invaded. I should know more of the story and I do love history but was never into this phase of it. Since I read Echoes of the Runes it has piqued my interest.
    So looking forward to The Runes of Destiny.

    Reply
  153. I live in Co. Waterford in Ireland. We are a Viking city as you, Christina, will probably know from the name. We have a famous tower in the city called Reginald’s Tower. A marriage took place here, many moons ago, of Strongbow and Aoife. She was the daughter of the ruler of the time and Strongbow was one of the Vikings who invaded. I should know more of the story and I do love history but was never into this phase of it. Since I read Echoes of the Runes it has piqued my interest.
    So looking forward to The Runes of Destiny.

    Reply
  154. I live in Co. Waterford in Ireland. We are a Viking city as you, Christina, will probably know from the name. We have a famous tower in the city called Reginald’s Tower. A marriage took place here, many moons ago, of Strongbow and Aoife. She was the daughter of the ruler of the time and Strongbow was one of the Vikings who invaded. I should know more of the story and I do love history but was never into this phase of it. Since I read Echoes of the Runes it has piqued my interest.
    So looking forward to The Runes of Destiny.

    Reply
  155. I live in Co. Waterford in Ireland. We are a Viking city as you, Christina, will probably know from the name. We have a famous tower in the city called Reginald’s Tower. A marriage took place here, many moons ago, of Strongbow and Aoife. She was the daughter of the ruler of the time and Strongbow was one of the Vikings who invaded. I should know more of the story and I do love history but was never into this phase of it. Since I read Echoes of the Runes it has piqued my interest.
    So looking forward to The Runes of Destiny.

    Reply
  156. That sounds wonderful Anne! Oh to have understood what they said – would be intriguing! You’re right that the Vikings were great storytellers and of course their sagas were written down a couple hundred years later. I guess we’ll never know how much they changed in the meantime though as stories passed on orally have a tendency to be embellished. They are still great!

    Reply
  157. That sounds wonderful Anne! Oh to have understood what they said – would be intriguing! You’re right that the Vikings were great storytellers and of course their sagas were written down a couple hundred years later. I guess we’ll never know how much they changed in the meantime though as stories passed on orally have a tendency to be embellished. They are still great!

    Reply
  158. That sounds wonderful Anne! Oh to have understood what they said – would be intriguing! You’re right that the Vikings were great storytellers and of course their sagas were written down a couple hundred years later. I guess we’ll never know how much they changed in the meantime though as stories passed on orally have a tendency to be embellished. They are still great!

    Reply
  159. That sounds wonderful Anne! Oh to have understood what they said – would be intriguing! You’re right that the Vikings were great storytellers and of course their sagas were written down a couple hundred years later. I guess we’ll never know how much they changed in the meantime though as stories passed on orally have a tendency to be embellished. They are still great!

    Reply
  160. That sounds wonderful Anne! Oh to have understood what they said – would be intriguing! You’re right that the Vikings were great storytellers and of course their sagas were written down a couple hundred years later. I guess we’ll never know how much they changed in the meantime though as stories passed on orally have a tendency to be embellished. They are still great!

    Reply
  161. Many thanks Teresa! That sounds like an intriguing story – I’ll have to research it. And I’d love to visit your country too – hopefully one day!

    Reply
  162. Many thanks Teresa! That sounds like an intriguing story – I’ll have to research it. And I’d love to visit your country too – hopefully one day!

    Reply
  163. Many thanks Teresa! That sounds like an intriguing story – I’ll have to research it. And I’d love to visit your country too – hopefully one day!

    Reply
  164. Many thanks Teresa! That sounds like an intriguing story – I’ll have to research it. And I’d love to visit your country too – hopefully one day!

    Reply
  165. Many thanks Teresa! That sounds like an intriguing story – I’ll have to research it. And I’d love to visit your country too – hopefully one day!

    Reply

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