Travel Tips and Pitfalls to Avoid

Suitcase-4410369_1280Pat here: As writers, the wenches travel. We travel for research. We travel for conferences. We travel for fun. So we thought we'd exchange a few of our favorite travel tips and see what happened–and apparently, it's all about the luggage! (Personally, I've always craved Terry Pratchett's suitcase with legs!)

Mary Jo:

 I could write a whole column about this myself!  But I'll stick to saying that it's best to never have more luggage than you can control with your own two hands.  I've seen inexperienced travelers juggling half a dozen different bags of different sizes, which is a recipe for disaster.

Ideally, you should have a wheeled suitcase, preferably a four wheeled spinner model because they're easier to move around. Then maybe a carry-on with a strap that can slide over the handle of your suitcase.  And easy, secure ways to handle your documents and money.  If you're carrying a handbag, cross body is the only way to go, and zippers are your friend.  For international flights, I use a passport carrier which hangs around my neck and can hold passport, a credit card, money, and boarding passes.  Very handy! MJsuitcase

 I have the carry on which can slide onto the handle of my suitcase, and it's large enough for me to tuck my cross body handbag inside. I love this one, a Volganik Rock cross body multi pocket travel bag

 It's nylon and super lightweight, with plenty of zippered pockets of just the sorts I need.  One for my wallet, one for my cell phone, small pockets for lipstick, keys, etc.  There are two full width large zippered pockets that can hold a book, an e-reader, a hat, a scarf, and a couple of small souvenirs, all at the same time if necessary.  Plus two spacious end elasticized end pockets to carry my sunglasses and one end and a water bottle at the other. The bag comes in two sizes and needless to say, I have the large one.  But—featherweight!

 If you're the kind of traveler who can go anywhere with just a carry on—you're a more efficient traveler than I am. <G>

Anne:

This year I tried using "packing cubes" on my recent trip to the USA for a conference and writing retreat. Packing cubes are small zippered bags of varying sizes, sometimes with a net "window", that fit inside your suitcase — you can see two of mine in the photo of my case. I watched a couple of videos about them and thought they were worth a try. Now I'm convinced. I used one cube for pants, one for underwear, another for "conference clothes" — the more formal, dressy clothes I needed for various events — dinners,  cocktail parties, signings, etc. The last was for casual tops and other bits and pieces.  The netting window meant I could see at a glance which cube contained what. I also used a small zippered waterproof one for my various connection and recharge cords.

1PackingCubeUsing the packing cubes made it easier to find what I wanted and kept the contents tidier. Whenever I moved location, the repacking was minimal and easy. And one time, when I was staying with a friend, they really came into their own. My friend's guest room was up three flights of stairs, but having the packing cubes meant I only needed to pull out one pre-packed cube containing all the clothes I needed, and my toiletries bag. I happily left the big heavy suitcase down the bottom of the stairs and trotted upstairs with my packing cube in hand.

Laundry can be another problem when traveling. I use a colored plastic bag for dirty laundry, and hand wash when I can. And though a washing machine is available in some places, they don't always have good washing powder. I once had clothes ruined because the "washing powder" I was given was pure bleach. I now carry a pack of DIZOLVE laundry detergent strips (see the packet in my photo.) They look like sheets of blotting paper (and weigh about the same) and you just rip off a section and toss it in with your wash. They completely dissolve, and they're eco-friendly, biodegradable, hypoallergenic etc. AND they work really well, giving you a good, clean wash. I keep a packet in my case at all times.

Nicola:

 For my trip to Canada and the US this summer I took only one small wheeled suitcase for three and a half weeks travel. I’d worked out in advance where I would be able to wash my clothes and made sure I had a supply of enough clean ones to see me through one week! I also packed some great travel washing gel which worked wonders. Oh, and I rolled up my clothes rather than packing them flat. Lots of people told me you can fit more in this way but I’m still not totally convinced! Beak hair clip

 I also took tiny versions of all the shampoos and hand cream etc that I would normally use, which made a huge difference to the weight of my bag. I wrapped them in separate little plastic bags rather than in one big toilet bag so I could squeeze them into small spaces.

My other advice would be that if you are flying, remember not to have any pointy items in your hair! I once had my favourite hair slide confiscated because the people on security thought it could be used as a weapon!

Andrea:

Let it be said that I am NOT a good packer for traveling. I dither, I fret—what if I need this, what if I need that . . . But as the days of oodles of steamer trunks (and the retinue of servants to carry them) are long gone, I’ve tried to figure out a system for taking what I need in a reasonable-sized suitcase. One thing that’s help is making sure Scarf different pieces of clothing go in various combinations—so color coordinating is good. I wear a lot of black, which helps. A pair of basic black pants and a black skirt (a slinky knit that won’t wrinkle is preferable) can be dressed up to fit most occasions that call for a polished appearance. A nice knit sweater or top finishes off the look. Comfortable clothes for walking/exploring is always a must, as I love to ramble in a new place. I always throw in a pair of jeans, but try to make sure I have presentable tops—dressy T-shirts for summer, turtle necks and synchilla vest for cooler weather. I also need to bring gym stuff for workouts, but thank goodness the new lightweight silk stuff packs really easily and can be stuffed in all the small nooks and crannies. Lastly, a selection of scarves and funky necklaces can really add a a dash of style and take up very little room. So that’s my method!

Joanna:

When I travel I’m accompanied everywhere by a retinue of electrical wires. The telephone charger, the ear buds, the kindle, and computer wires. In the dark of my suitcase the wires get up to all sorts of salacious activities. I know this because I arrive at my destination with everything all twisted up together whicheverway. Wench 1 handbag-2876260_640

So I carry them chastely, each in its own baggy. In use, if I can, I let only the two ends peek coyly out of the bag and never let the sneaky, snaky wire loose at all. In the midst of travel I am not in the mood to wrestle with complication.

Also, I carry aspirin in with my toiletries. And in my rucksack.

Did I mention the rucksack?

Doesn’t have to be a backpack necessarily. Can be a pretty carrying bag with pictures of cats on it. But the over-the-shoulder, carry-everywhere bag, pioneer-lady-in-C21 has to be big enough to hold my computer, that sweater you need because some indoor spaces are cold enough to welcome Nanook of the North, and a water bottle. And a peanut butter sandwich. And aspirin.

Pat again:

ShoeUnlike Mary Jo, I can generally travel with a single carry-on roller-board and a large under-seat bag similar to the one she suggests—if I’m only to be gone a week, and the climate won’t change drastically. For quick travel like that, I choose a couple of colors—blue and black are usually compatible, plentiful, and I have tons of choices. For dressy, I have wrinkle-free travel slacks, jackets, and tops that I can simply roll up and stash between clothes stacks. Jeans and knit tops work for most casual uses, and if the colors are interchangeable, I can mix and match with colorful scarves. I have a knit travel jacket with tons of pockets for stuffing boarding passes and passports and even bottles of water—after I’m through TSA! Shoes are always an issue. Sandals are easy to pack. If I’ll need heavy shoes, I wear them. And I love Arcopedico shoes for walking. They’re super light, and they pack like a dream.

Because we travel frequently, we invested in a Global Entry pass. If we remember to enter the number when we buy our plane tickets, we get the TSA pre-check line and zip right through customs when we return—a huge bonus at the overcrowded LAX airport. Global Entry only costs slightly more than TSA pre-check, $100 vs $85, and is good for five years.

 

Do you have any travel tips? Pitfalls to avoid?

155 thoughts on “Travel Tips and Pitfalls to Avoid”

  1. 1. Bring a good book or six! Even though I travel with a Kindle, I still bring a paperback just in case my technology fails.
    2. Double check that you have your ticket, passport, other documentation, money/credit card, and contact information if you’re meeting someone at your destination.
    3. Pack glasses and any medications in your hand luggage.

    Reply
  2. 1. Bring a good book or six! Even though I travel with a Kindle, I still bring a paperback just in case my technology fails.
    2. Double check that you have your ticket, passport, other documentation, money/credit card, and contact information if you’re meeting someone at your destination.
    3. Pack glasses and any medications in your hand luggage.

    Reply
  3. 1. Bring a good book or six! Even though I travel with a Kindle, I still bring a paperback just in case my technology fails.
    2. Double check that you have your ticket, passport, other documentation, money/credit card, and contact information if you’re meeting someone at your destination.
    3. Pack glasses and any medications in your hand luggage.

    Reply
  4. 1. Bring a good book or six! Even though I travel with a Kindle, I still bring a paperback just in case my technology fails.
    2. Double check that you have your ticket, passport, other documentation, money/credit card, and contact information if you’re meeting someone at your destination.
    3. Pack glasses and any medications in your hand luggage.

    Reply
  5. 1. Bring a good book or six! Even though I travel with a Kindle, I still bring a paperback just in case my technology fails.
    2. Double check that you have your ticket, passport, other documentation, money/credit card, and contact information if you’re meeting someone at your destination.
    3. Pack glasses and any medications in your hand luggage.

    Reply
  6. Pat, I just had to pop in to say, I LOVE Terry Pratchett’s The Luggage — it’s one of my favorite characters. But I doubt it would be reliable — the things that go into it, often don’t come out again. But it will follow you home. LOL.
    I also love arcopedico shoes. I have a pair of red ankle boots, and some slip-ons from them, and, as you say, super light and so comfortable to walk in.

    Reply
  7. Pat, I just had to pop in to say, I LOVE Terry Pratchett’s The Luggage — it’s one of my favorite characters. But I doubt it would be reliable — the things that go into it, often don’t come out again. But it will follow you home. LOL.
    I also love arcopedico shoes. I have a pair of red ankle boots, and some slip-ons from them, and, as you say, super light and so comfortable to walk in.

    Reply
  8. Pat, I just had to pop in to say, I LOVE Terry Pratchett’s The Luggage — it’s one of my favorite characters. But I doubt it would be reliable — the things that go into it, often don’t come out again. But it will follow you home. LOL.
    I also love arcopedico shoes. I have a pair of red ankle boots, and some slip-ons from them, and, as you say, super light and so comfortable to walk in.

    Reply
  9. Pat, I just had to pop in to say, I LOVE Terry Pratchett’s The Luggage — it’s one of my favorite characters. But I doubt it would be reliable — the things that go into it, often don’t come out again. But it will follow you home. LOL.
    I also love arcopedico shoes. I have a pair of red ankle boots, and some slip-ons from them, and, as you say, super light and so comfortable to walk in.

    Reply
  10. Pat, I just had to pop in to say, I LOVE Terry Pratchett’s The Luggage — it’s one of my favorite characters. But I doubt it would be reliable — the things that go into it, often don’t come out again. But it will follow you home. LOL.
    I also love arcopedico shoes. I have a pair of red ankle boots, and some slip-ons from them, and, as you say, super light and so comfortable to walk in.

    Reply
  11. I have apparently broken typepad and cannot get in to reply, so Im using the email version and hoping this works. I think Id take anything the Luggage spits out and if it helps me home, Im good. 😉

    Reply
  12. I have apparently broken typepad and cannot get in to reply, so Im using the email version and hoping this works. I think Id take anything the Luggage spits out and if it helps me home, Im good. 😉

    Reply
  13. I have apparently broken typepad and cannot get in to reply, so Im using the email version and hoping this works. I think Id take anything the Luggage spits out and if it helps me home, Im good. 😉

    Reply
  14. I have apparently broken typepad and cannot get in to reply, so Im using the email version and hoping this works. I think Id take anything the Luggage spits out and if it helps me home, Im good. 😉

    Reply
  15. I have apparently broken typepad and cannot get in to reply, so Im using the email version and hoping this works. I think Id take anything the Luggage spits out and if it helps me home, Im good. 😉

    Reply
  16. How annoying that you can’t get in to type-pad, Pat, but I’m very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well — so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.

    Reply
  17. How annoying that you can’t get in to type-pad, Pat, but I’m very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well — so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.

    Reply
  18. How annoying that you can’t get in to type-pad, Pat, but I’m very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well — so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.

    Reply
  19. How annoying that you can’t get in to type-pad, Pat, but I’m very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well — so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.

    Reply
  20. How annoying that you can’t get in to type-pad, Pat, but I’m very interested to see that when you reply to the email notifications (instead of logging in to the site) you lose apostrophes, too. That happens to me as well — so many of my comments have no apostrophes. I used to go in and edit them to fix it, but it became too time consuming.

    Reply
  21. I made myself an oversized tunic to wear traveling to my nieces wedding in Col. Sailed thru Nashua NH airport. got pulled out of precheck line in Denver. Went thru the scan twice, and then got wanded. The shirt had metalic threads in it and my scan showed absolutely opaque over my entire trunk. Have to make sure I don’t weaar anything like that again

    Reply
  22. I made myself an oversized tunic to wear traveling to my nieces wedding in Col. Sailed thru Nashua NH airport. got pulled out of precheck line in Denver. Went thru the scan twice, and then got wanded. The shirt had metalic threads in it and my scan showed absolutely opaque over my entire trunk. Have to make sure I don’t weaar anything like that again

    Reply
  23. I made myself an oversized tunic to wear traveling to my nieces wedding in Col. Sailed thru Nashua NH airport. got pulled out of precheck line in Denver. Went thru the scan twice, and then got wanded. The shirt had metalic threads in it and my scan showed absolutely opaque over my entire trunk. Have to make sure I don’t weaar anything like that again

    Reply
  24. I made myself an oversized tunic to wear traveling to my nieces wedding in Col. Sailed thru Nashua NH airport. got pulled out of precheck line in Denver. Went thru the scan twice, and then got wanded. The shirt had metalic threads in it and my scan showed absolutely opaque over my entire trunk. Have to make sure I don’t weaar anything like that again

    Reply
  25. I made myself an oversized tunic to wear traveling to my nieces wedding in Col. Sailed thru Nashua NH airport. got pulled out of precheck line in Denver. Went thru the scan twice, and then got wanded. The shirt had metalic threads in it and my scan showed absolutely opaque over my entire trunk. Have to make sure I don’t weaar anything like that again

    Reply
  26. !!!!!! Metallic thread sets it off? Oh my… I wore a tshirt with a few brass studs on it that set it off too. I mean, cmon guys! They could see the studs. They could see the pattern in the xray. What did they think I had stashed on my skinny frame beneath a tight tshirt? But metallic threads…that really beats the cake.

    Reply
  27. !!!!!! Metallic thread sets it off? Oh my… I wore a tshirt with a few brass studs on it that set it off too. I mean, cmon guys! They could see the studs. They could see the pattern in the xray. What did they think I had stashed on my skinny frame beneath a tight tshirt? But metallic threads…that really beats the cake.

    Reply
  28. !!!!!! Metallic thread sets it off? Oh my… I wore a tshirt with a few brass studs on it that set it off too. I mean, cmon guys! They could see the studs. They could see the pattern in the xray. What did they think I had stashed on my skinny frame beneath a tight tshirt? But metallic threads…that really beats the cake.

    Reply
  29. !!!!!! Metallic thread sets it off? Oh my… I wore a tshirt with a few brass studs on it that set it off too. I mean, cmon guys! They could see the studs. They could see the pattern in the xray. What did they think I had stashed on my skinny frame beneath a tight tshirt? But metallic threads…that really beats the cake.

    Reply
  30. !!!!!! Metallic thread sets it off? Oh my… I wore a tshirt with a few brass studs on it that set it off too. I mean, cmon guys! They could see the studs. They could see the pattern in the xray. What did they think I had stashed on my skinny frame beneath a tight tshirt? But metallic threads…that really beats the cake.

    Reply
  31. I always pack my carry-on bag with the expectation my luggage will be lost. I always have a change of clothes (two for long-haul travel – e.g. Australia to Europe), and enough of everything to get by for a day or two at the other end.
    I’ve had luggage lost all over the world. London, Paris, Queensland, a bunch of other places. On separate occasions both my brother and my mother have arrived somewhere to discover their bags were still in Finland. It’s better to prepare for the worst!

    Reply
  32. I always pack my carry-on bag with the expectation my luggage will be lost. I always have a change of clothes (two for long-haul travel – e.g. Australia to Europe), and enough of everything to get by for a day or two at the other end.
    I’ve had luggage lost all over the world. London, Paris, Queensland, a bunch of other places. On separate occasions both my brother and my mother have arrived somewhere to discover their bags were still in Finland. It’s better to prepare for the worst!

    Reply
  33. I always pack my carry-on bag with the expectation my luggage will be lost. I always have a change of clothes (two for long-haul travel – e.g. Australia to Europe), and enough of everything to get by for a day or two at the other end.
    I’ve had luggage lost all over the world. London, Paris, Queensland, a bunch of other places. On separate occasions both my brother and my mother have arrived somewhere to discover their bags were still in Finland. It’s better to prepare for the worst!

    Reply
  34. I always pack my carry-on bag with the expectation my luggage will be lost. I always have a change of clothes (two for long-haul travel – e.g. Australia to Europe), and enough of everything to get by for a day or two at the other end.
    I’ve had luggage lost all over the world. London, Paris, Queensland, a bunch of other places. On separate occasions both my brother and my mother have arrived somewhere to discover their bags were still in Finland. It’s better to prepare for the worst!

    Reply
  35. I always pack my carry-on bag with the expectation my luggage will be lost. I always have a change of clothes (two for long-haul travel – e.g. Australia to Europe), and enough of everything to get by for a day or two at the other end.
    I’ve had luggage lost all over the world. London, Paris, Queensland, a bunch of other places. On separate occasions both my brother and my mother have arrived somewhere to discover their bags were still in Finland. It’s better to prepare for the worst!

    Reply
  36. Hi Ladies
    Some great advice here, I am off on another cruise in December and always like to get advice on packing, because I am a terrible packer I always end up with way more than we need, this holiday I am determined to cut down what we take.
    One thing I always have with me is my kindle 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  37. Hi Ladies
    Some great advice here, I am off on another cruise in December and always like to get advice on packing, because I am a terrible packer I always end up with way more than we need, this holiday I am determined to cut down what we take.
    One thing I always have with me is my kindle 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  38. Hi Ladies
    Some great advice here, I am off on another cruise in December and always like to get advice on packing, because I am a terrible packer I always end up with way more than we need, this holiday I am determined to cut down what we take.
    One thing I always have with me is my kindle 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  39. Hi Ladies
    Some great advice here, I am off on another cruise in December and always like to get advice on packing, because I am a terrible packer I always end up with way more than we need, this holiday I am determined to cut down what we take.
    One thing I always have with me is my kindle 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  40. Hi Ladies
    Some great advice here, I am off on another cruise in December and always like to get advice on packing, because I am a terrible packer I always end up with way more than we need, this holiday I am determined to cut down what we take.
    One thing I always have with me is my kindle 🙂
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  41. Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.

    Reply
  42. Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.

    Reply
  43. Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.

    Reply
  44. Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.

    Reply
  45. Sonya, I, too travel with a change of clothes and some basic necessities in my carry-on, as well as my computer, writing notebook., kindle etc. Being stuck for 24 hours in Hong Kong on the way to Europe some years ago taught me that.

    Reply
  46. Some great tips here. I’ve used most of them over the years. Here are a few more ideas:
    I’ve done all of my travel with a carry-on and “extra item,” plus a roomy fanny pack (that fits in the extra item when they’re counting items at the gate). My extra item is an Ikea food bag, white-and-green canvas with a zipper and some side pockets. I’ve done over six weeks with this combo.
    The fanny pack belt hugs my body so closely that no one’s going to cut it off, and I like having everything I need (including my passport) right in front of me, with my hand resting on it. The belt also provides a hanger for my water bottle and a handy place to hang plastic bags with purchases, leaving my hands free. Do I look like a tourist? Yes. But not a gullible one.
    Spinner bag is the best, but get a sturdy one with good-sized wheels. I recently started using the two techniques of packing cubes (YES!) and rolling my clothes, which lets me pack probably 30% more stuff, in an organized way. But it makes my bag so heavy the spinner wheels balk, and also got a complaint from the flight attendant who had to lift it for me to stow it. Probably wouldn’t have passed weight limit, if gate staff had been checking, but they don’t anymore.
    My standard travel shoes are boat shoes, designed not to slip on wet surfaces, from Ahnu. They don’t make my model anymore, but there’s probably another style with the same features. Mine are like tennis shoes, but with solid toes, mesh inserts up top and soft strap heels. I have never had a blister with these, no matter how much walking I do. Safety with style–I still get compliments on them after 10 years!
    Finally, I recommend watching some Youtube videos on packing. There’s no end of ideas to make your life easier on the move. Happy traveling, all!

    Reply
  47. Some great tips here. I’ve used most of them over the years. Here are a few more ideas:
    I’ve done all of my travel with a carry-on and “extra item,” plus a roomy fanny pack (that fits in the extra item when they’re counting items at the gate). My extra item is an Ikea food bag, white-and-green canvas with a zipper and some side pockets. I’ve done over six weeks with this combo.
    The fanny pack belt hugs my body so closely that no one’s going to cut it off, and I like having everything I need (including my passport) right in front of me, with my hand resting on it. The belt also provides a hanger for my water bottle and a handy place to hang plastic bags with purchases, leaving my hands free. Do I look like a tourist? Yes. But not a gullible one.
    Spinner bag is the best, but get a sturdy one with good-sized wheels. I recently started using the two techniques of packing cubes (YES!) and rolling my clothes, which lets me pack probably 30% more stuff, in an organized way. But it makes my bag so heavy the spinner wheels balk, and also got a complaint from the flight attendant who had to lift it for me to stow it. Probably wouldn’t have passed weight limit, if gate staff had been checking, but they don’t anymore.
    My standard travel shoes are boat shoes, designed not to slip on wet surfaces, from Ahnu. They don’t make my model anymore, but there’s probably another style with the same features. Mine are like tennis shoes, but with solid toes, mesh inserts up top and soft strap heels. I have never had a blister with these, no matter how much walking I do. Safety with style–I still get compliments on them after 10 years!
    Finally, I recommend watching some Youtube videos on packing. There’s no end of ideas to make your life easier on the move. Happy traveling, all!

    Reply
  48. Some great tips here. I’ve used most of them over the years. Here are a few more ideas:
    I’ve done all of my travel with a carry-on and “extra item,” plus a roomy fanny pack (that fits in the extra item when they’re counting items at the gate). My extra item is an Ikea food bag, white-and-green canvas with a zipper and some side pockets. I’ve done over six weeks with this combo.
    The fanny pack belt hugs my body so closely that no one’s going to cut it off, and I like having everything I need (including my passport) right in front of me, with my hand resting on it. The belt also provides a hanger for my water bottle and a handy place to hang plastic bags with purchases, leaving my hands free. Do I look like a tourist? Yes. But not a gullible one.
    Spinner bag is the best, but get a sturdy one with good-sized wheels. I recently started using the two techniques of packing cubes (YES!) and rolling my clothes, which lets me pack probably 30% more stuff, in an organized way. But it makes my bag so heavy the spinner wheels balk, and also got a complaint from the flight attendant who had to lift it for me to stow it. Probably wouldn’t have passed weight limit, if gate staff had been checking, but they don’t anymore.
    My standard travel shoes are boat shoes, designed not to slip on wet surfaces, from Ahnu. They don’t make my model anymore, but there’s probably another style with the same features. Mine are like tennis shoes, but with solid toes, mesh inserts up top and soft strap heels. I have never had a blister with these, no matter how much walking I do. Safety with style–I still get compliments on them after 10 years!
    Finally, I recommend watching some Youtube videos on packing. There’s no end of ideas to make your life easier on the move. Happy traveling, all!

    Reply
  49. Some great tips here. I’ve used most of them over the years. Here are a few more ideas:
    I’ve done all of my travel with a carry-on and “extra item,” plus a roomy fanny pack (that fits in the extra item when they’re counting items at the gate). My extra item is an Ikea food bag, white-and-green canvas with a zipper and some side pockets. I’ve done over six weeks with this combo.
    The fanny pack belt hugs my body so closely that no one’s going to cut it off, and I like having everything I need (including my passport) right in front of me, with my hand resting on it. The belt also provides a hanger for my water bottle and a handy place to hang plastic bags with purchases, leaving my hands free. Do I look like a tourist? Yes. But not a gullible one.
    Spinner bag is the best, but get a sturdy one with good-sized wheels. I recently started using the two techniques of packing cubes (YES!) and rolling my clothes, which lets me pack probably 30% more stuff, in an organized way. But it makes my bag so heavy the spinner wheels balk, and also got a complaint from the flight attendant who had to lift it for me to stow it. Probably wouldn’t have passed weight limit, if gate staff had been checking, but they don’t anymore.
    My standard travel shoes are boat shoes, designed not to slip on wet surfaces, from Ahnu. They don’t make my model anymore, but there’s probably another style with the same features. Mine are like tennis shoes, but with solid toes, mesh inserts up top and soft strap heels. I have never had a blister with these, no matter how much walking I do. Safety with style–I still get compliments on them after 10 years!
    Finally, I recommend watching some Youtube videos on packing. There’s no end of ideas to make your life easier on the move. Happy traveling, all!

    Reply
  50. Some great tips here. I’ve used most of them over the years. Here are a few more ideas:
    I’ve done all of my travel with a carry-on and “extra item,” plus a roomy fanny pack (that fits in the extra item when they’re counting items at the gate). My extra item is an Ikea food bag, white-and-green canvas with a zipper and some side pockets. I’ve done over six weeks with this combo.
    The fanny pack belt hugs my body so closely that no one’s going to cut it off, and I like having everything I need (including my passport) right in front of me, with my hand resting on it. The belt also provides a hanger for my water bottle and a handy place to hang plastic bags with purchases, leaving my hands free. Do I look like a tourist? Yes. But not a gullible one.
    Spinner bag is the best, but get a sturdy one with good-sized wheels. I recently started using the two techniques of packing cubes (YES!) and rolling my clothes, which lets me pack probably 30% more stuff, in an organized way. But it makes my bag so heavy the spinner wheels balk, and also got a complaint from the flight attendant who had to lift it for me to stow it. Probably wouldn’t have passed weight limit, if gate staff had been checking, but they don’t anymore.
    My standard travel shoes are boat shoes, designed not to slip on wet surfaces, from Ahnu. They don’t make my model anymore, but there’s probably another style with the same features. Mine are like tennis shoes, but with solid toes, mesh inserts up top and soft strap heels. I have never had a blister with these, no matter how much walking I do. Safety with style–I still get compliments on them after 10 years!
    Finally, I recommend watching some Youtube videos on packing. There’s no end of ideas to make your life easier on the move. Happy traveling, all!

    Reply
  51. The tips for packing are helpful. I have a Cochlear Implant inside my ear and a magnet behind the ear under the skin. Whenever I go through a detector, I informed the security in case the magnet triggers the alarms.

    Reply
  52. The tips for packing are helpful. I have a Cochlear Implant inside my ear and a magnet behind the ear under the skin. Whenever I go through a detector, I informed the security in case the magnet triggers the alarms.

    Reply
  53. The tips for packing are helpful. I have a Cochlear Implant inside my ear and a magnet behind the ear under the skin. Whenever I go through a detector, I informed the security in case the magnet triggers the alarms.

    Reply
  54. The tips for packing are helpful. I have a Cochlear Implant inside my ear and a magnet behind the ear under the skin. Whenever I go through a detector, I informed the security in case the magnet triggers the alarms.

    Reply
  55. The tips for packing are helpful. I have a Cochlear Implant inside my ear and a magnet behind the ear under the skin. Whenever I go through a detector, I informed the security in case the magnet triggers the alarms.

    Reply
  56. I recommend the rolled clothes. I don’t know about it using less space (but it probaby does); what I have noticed is that rolling the items cuts down on wrinkles. I don’t roll our underwear. That goes in the mesh pocket at the top of the suitcase. Underwear doesn’t wrinkle (at least what we buy doesn’t).

    Reply
  57. I recommend the rolled clothes. I don’t know about it using less space (but it probaby does); what I have noticed is that rolling the items cuts down on wrinkles. I don’t roll our underwear. That goes in the mesh pocket at the top of the suitcase. Underwear doesn’t wrinkle (at least what we buy doesn’t).

    Reply
  58. I recommend the rolled clothes. I don’t know about it using less space (but it probaby does); what I have noticed is that rolling the items cuts down on wrinkles. I don’t roll our underwear. That goes in the mesh pocket at the top of the suitcase. Underwear doesn’t wrinkle (at least what we buy doesn’t).

    Reply
  59. I recommend the rolled clothes. I don’t know about it using less space (but it probaby does); what I have noticed is that rolling the items cuts down on wrinkles. I don’t roll our underwear. That goes in the mesh pocket at the top of the suitcase. Underwear doesn’t wrinkle (at least what we buy doesn’t).

    Reply
  60. I recommend the rolled clothes. I don’t know about it using less space (but it probaby does); what I have noticed is that rolling the items cuts down on wrinkles. I don’t roll our underwear. That goes in the mesh pocket at the top of the suitcase. Underwear doesn’t wrinkle (at least what we buy doesn’t).

    Reply
  61. I highly agree on the Global Entry – it makes everything easier. The only problem is you sometimes have to travel to an out of town airport for your final interview & approval. I haven’t gone through the renewal process yet so I don’t know if that will be a hassle or not!

    Reply
  62. I highly agree on the Global Entry – it makes everything easier. The only problem is you sometimes have to travel to an out of town airport for your final interview & approval. I haven’t gone through the renewal process yet so I don’t know if that will be a hassle or not!

    Reply
  63. I highly agree on the Global Entry – it makes everything easier. The only problem is you sometimes have to travel to an out of town airport for your final interview & approval. I haven’t gone through the renewal process yet so I don’t know if that will be a hassle or not!

    Reply
  64. I highly agree on the Global Entry – it makes everything easier. The only problem is you sometimes have to travel to an out of town airport for your final interview & approval. I haven’t gone through the renewal process yet so I don’t know if that will be a hassle or not!

    Reply
  65. I highly agree on the Global Entry – it makes everything easier. The only problem is you sometimes have to travel to an out of town airport for your final interview & approval. I haven’t gone through the renewal process yet so I don’t know if that will be a hassle or not!

    Reply
  66. I’m a firm believer in packing cubes. I’ve been using them for several years now. I always pack a change of clothes in my carry on as well as my electronics, medications, and snacks. (I have a gluten intolerance and food I can eat isn’t always readily available.) Basically, everything I’ll need immediately if my checked luggage gets lost. I take travel size bottles of toiletries that I can toss when empty. It frees up space in my luggage to bring home those fun souvenirs.
    A couple years ago, I discovered that most airlines have gluten-free meal options available if you request them in advance of the flight. On my last international flights, the GF meals were delicious. The people seated near me who got the regular meals were quite envious. 😉
    Mary Jo, thanks for the crossbody recommendation. I’m going to check that out!

    Reply
  67. I’m a firm believer in packing cubes. I’ve been using them for several years now. I always pack a change of clothes in my carry on as well as my electronics, medications, and snacks. (I have a gluten intolerance and food I can eat isn’t always readily available.) Basically, everything I’ll need immediately if my checked luggage gets lost. I take travel size bottles of toiletries that I can toss when empty. It frees up space in my luggage to bring home those fun souvenirs.
    A couple years ago, I discovered that most airlines have gluten-free meal options available if you request them in advance of the flight. On my last international flights, the GF meals were delicious. The people seated near me who got the regular meals were quite envious. 😉
    Mary Jo, thanks for the crossbody recommendation. I’m going to check that out!

    Reply
  68. I’m a firm believer in packing cubes. I’ve been using them for several years now. I always pack a change of clothes in my carry on as well as my electronics, medications, and snacks. (I have a gluten intolerance and food I can eat isn’t always readily available.) Basically, everything I’ll need immediately if my checked luggage gets lost. I take travel size bottles of toiletries that I can toss when empty. It frees up space in my luggage to bring home those fun souvenirs.
    A couple years ago, I discovered that most airlines have gluten-free meal options available if you request them in advance of the flight. On my last international flights, the GF meals were delicious. The people seated near me who got the regular meals were quite envious. 😉
    Mary Jo, thanks for the crossbody recommendation. I’m going to check that out!

    Reply
  69. I’m a firm believer in packing cubes. I’ve been using them for several years now. I always pack a change of clothes in my carry on as well as my electronics, medications, and snacks. (I have a gluten intolerance and food I can eat isn’t always readily available.) Basically, everything I’ll need immediately if my checked luggage gets lost. I take travel size bottles of toiletries that I can toss when empty. It frees up space in my luggage to bring home those fun souvenirs.
    A couple years ago, I discovered that most airlines have gluten-free meal options available if you request them in advance of the flight. On my last international flights, the GF meals were delicious. The people seated near me who got the regular meals were quite envious. 😉
    Mary Jo, thanks for the crossbody recommendation. I’m going to check that out!

    Reply
  70. I’m a firm believer in packing cubes. I’ve been using them for several years now. I always pack a change of clothes in my carry on as well as my electronics, medications, and snacks. (I have a gluten intolerance and food I can eat isn’t always readily available.) Basically, everything I’ll need immediately if my checked luggage gets lost. I take travel size bottles of toiletries that I can toss when empty. It frees up space in my luggage to bring home those fun souvenirs.
    A couple years ago, I discovered that most airlines have gluten-free meal options available if you request them in advance of the flight. On my last international flights, the GF meals were delicious. The people seated near me who got the regular meals were quite envious. 😉
    Mary Jo, thanks for the crossbody recommendation. I’m going to check that out!

    Reply
  71. I’m always fighting the battle of the bulge…ie suitcase. I always try to pack light but unfortunately I’m of the but I might need this, that or the other mentality.
    To make matters worse I’m always cold so I have to pack bulkier clothing so I’ll be warm. I haven’t yet solved the cold feet and body at night problem. I need something to wrap my feet in snugly and then something to drape over my upper body.
    My carry on is a backpack with my extra item a big purse. With of course a regular suitcase!
    Mary Jo, thanks for the link to the travel bag. I’m eyeing it because of all the great pockets. It would make a great car travel bag as well for long trips.
    Packing cubes are the best thing ever. They also work well in our camper. I can use bins instead of shoeboxes and the cubes are easy to sort through without ending up with a tossed mess like the shoe boxes used to be.

    Reply
  72. I’m always fighting the battle of the bulge…ie suitcase. I always try to pack light but unfortunately I’m of the but I might need this, that or the other mentality.
    To make matters worse I’m always cold so I have to pack bulkier clothing so I’ll be warm. I haven’t yet solved the cold feet and body at night problem. I need something to wrap my feet in snugly and then something to drape over my upper body.
    My carry on is a backpack with my extra item a big purse. With of course a regular suitcase!
    Mary Jo, thanks for the link to the travel bag. I’m eyeing it because of all the great pockets. It would make a great car travel bag as well for long trips.
    Packing cubes are the best thing ever. They also work well in our camper. I can use bins instead of shoeboxes and the cubes are easy to sort through without ending up with a tossed mess like the shoe boxes used to be.

    Reply
  73. I’m always fighting the battle of the bulge…ie suitcase. I always try to pack light but unfortunately I’m of the but I might need this, that or the other mentality.
    To make matters worse I’m always cold so I have to pack bulkier clothing so I’ll be warm. I haven’t yet solved the cold feet and body at night problem. I need something to wrap my feet in snugly and then something to drape over my upper body.
    My carry on is a backpack with my extra item a big purse. With of course a regular suitcase!
    Mary Jo, thanks for the link to the travel bag. I’m eyeing it because of all the great pockets. It would make a great car travel bag as well for long trips.
    Packing cubes are the best thing ever. They also work well in our camper. I can use bins instead of shoeboxes and the cubes are easy to sort through without ending up with a tossed mess like the shoe boxes used to be.

    Reply
  74. I’m always fighting the battle of the bulge…ie suitcase. I always try to pack light but unfortunately I’m of the but I might need this, that or the other mentality.
    To make matters worse I’m always cold so I have to pack bulkier clothing so I’ll be warm. I haven’t yet solved the cold feet and body at night problem. I need something to wrap my feet in snugly and then something to drape over my upper body.
    My carry on is a backpack with my extra item a big purse. With of course a regular suitcase!
    Mary Jo, thanks for the link to the travel bag. I’m eyeing it because of all the great pockets. It would make a great car travel bag as well for long trips.
    Packing cubes are the best thing ever. They also work well in our camper. I can use bins instead of shoeboxes and the cubes are easy to sort through without ending up with a tossed mess like the shoe boxes used to be.

    Reply
  75. I’m always fighting the battle of the bulge…ie suitcase. I always try to pack light but unfortunately I’m of the but I might need this, that or the other mentality.
    To make matters worse I’m always cold so I have to pack bulkier clothing so I’ll be warm. I haven’t yet solved the cold feet and body at night problem. I need something to wrap my feet in snugly and then something to drape over my upper body.
    My carry on is a backpack with my extra item a big purse. With of course a regular suitcase!
    Mary Jo, thanks for the link to the travel bag. I’m eyeing it because of all the great pockets. It would make a great car travel bag as well for long trips.
    Packing cubes are the best thing ever. They also work well in our camper. I can use bins instead of shoeboxes and the cubes are easy to sort through without ending up with a tossed mess like the shoe boxes used to be.

    Reply
  76. I recently applied and received my conditional approval, pending the final interview. I found out that I can do that next time I go through customs at my local airport. Luckily, I’m planning an international trip later this year. Otherwise, I’d have to drive several hours to the nearest airport who handles interview appointments. They don’t make it easy. 😉

    Reply
  77. I recently applied and received my conditional approval, pending the final interview. I found out that I can do that next time I go through customs at my local airport. Luckily, I’m planning an international trip later this year. Otherwise, I’d have to drive several hours to the nearest airport who handles interview appointments. They don’t make it easy. 😉

    Reply
  78. I recently applied and received my conditional approval, pending the final interview. I found out that I can do that next time I go through customs at my local airport. Luckily, I’m planning an international trip later this year. Otherwise, I’d have to drive several hours to the nearest airport who handles interview appointments. They don’t make it easy. 😉

    Reply
  79. I recently applied and received my conditional approval, pending the final interview. I found out that I can do that next time I go through customs at my local airport. Luckily, I’m planning an international trip later this year. Otherwise, I’d have to drive several hours to the nearest airport who handles interview appointments. They don’t make it easy. 😉

    Reply
  80. I recently applied and received my conditional approval, pending the final interview. I found out that I can do that next time I go through customs at my local airport. Luckily, I’m planning an international trip later this year. Otherwise, I’d have to drive several hours to the nearest airport who handles interview appointments. They don’t make it easy. 😉

    Reply
  81. I love all these tips – and need to bookmark a few for future reference and/or shopping. 🙂
    I’m trying to get better about not over-packing to the point that I can’t lift my small wheeled case.

    Reply
  82. I love all these tips – and need to bookmark a few for future reference and/or shopping. 🙂
    I’m trying to get better about not over-packing to the point that I can’t lift my small wheeled case.

    Reply
  83. I love all these tips – and need to bookmark a few for future reference and/or shopping. 🙂
    I’m trying to get better about not over-packing to the point that I can’t lift my small wheeled case.

    Reply
  84. I love all these tips – and need to bookmark a few for future reference and/or shopping. 🙂
    I’m trying to get better about not over-packing to the point that I can’t lift my small wheeled case.

    Reply
  85. I love all these tips – and need to bookmark a few for future reference and/or shopping. 🙂
    I’m trying to get better about not over-packing to the point that I can’t lift my small wheeled case.

    Reply
  86. I hadn’t thought about making the spinner bag too heavy to move! I haven’t given up on my old Travelpro yet but I do love my small spinner. I think maybe the spinners are a little heavier than other kinds to start with? Great thoughts, thank you!

    Reply
  87. I hadn’t thought about making the spinner bag too heavy to move! I haven’t given up on my old Travelpro yet but I do love my small spinner. I think maybe the spinners are a little heavier than other kinds to start with? Great thoughts, thank you!

    Reply
  88. I hadn’t thought about making the spinner bag too heavy to move! I haven’t given up on my old Travelpro yet but I do love my small spinner. I think maybe the spinners are a little heavier than other kinds to start with? Great thoughts, thank you!

    Reply
  89. I hadn’t thought about making the spinner bag too heavy to move! I haven’t given up on my old Travelpro yet but I do love my small spinner. I think maybe the spinners are a little heavier than other kinds to start with? Great thoughts, thank you!

    Reply
  90. I hadn’t thought about making the spinner bag too heavy to move! I haven’t given up on my old Travelpro yet but I do love my small spinner. I think maybe the spinners are a little heavier than other kinds to start with? Great thoughts, thank you!

    Reply
  91. huh on the apostrophe.Different mail servers maybe?
    Before I started packing non-wrinkly clothes, I used to lay out all my shirts on top of each other and fold them over. That seemed to work reasonably well too.

    Reply
  92. huh on the apostrophe.Different mail servers maybe?
    Before I started packing non-wrinkly clothes, I used to lay out all my shirts on top of each other and fold them over. That seemed to work reasonably well too.

    Reply
  93. huh on the apostrophe.Different mail servers maybe?
    Before I started packing non-wrinkly clothes, I used to lay out all my shirts on top of each other and fold them over. That seemed to work reasonably well too.

    Reply
  94. huh on the apostrophe.Different mail servers maybe?
    Before I started packing non-wrinkly clothes, I used to lay out all my shirts on top of each other and fold them over. That seemed to work reasonably well too.

    Reply
  95. huh on the apostrophe.Different mail servers maybe?
    Before I started packing non-wrinkly clothes, I used to lay out all my shirts on top of each other and fold them over. That seemed to work reasonably well too.

    Reply
  96. Even with a medical card/xray my mom gets wanded because of her hip replacement. They also go over her walker and test it for explosives and drugs. I guess they can’t assume anyone isn’t a possible terrorist, but really!

    Reply
  97. Even with a medical card/xray my mom gets wanded because of her hip replacement. They also go over her walker and test it for explosives and drugs. I guess they can’t assume anyone isn’t a possible terrorist, but really!

    Reply
  98. Even with a medical card/xray my mom gets wanded because of her hip replacement. They also go over her walker and test it for explosives and drugs. I guess they can’t assume anyone isn’t a possible terrorist, but really!

    Reply
  99. Even with a medical card/xray my mom gets wanded because of her hip replacement. They also go over her walker and test it for explosives and drugs. I guess they can’t assume anyone isn’t a possible terrorist, but really!

    Reply
  100. Even with a medical card/xray my mom gets wanded because of her hip replacement. They also go over her walker and test it for explosives and drugs. I guess they can’t assume anyone isn’t a possible terrorist, but really!

    Reply
  101. When I was visiting family in Colombia, I almost didn’t get through customs because I didn’t have the street address of my destination. It was stored in my computer at home, and I didn’t really need it because I was getting picked up at the airport, but as a tourist, they wanted to know where I was going to be staying. Luckily, the officer finally took pity and let me in!
    I’ve got a couple of pairs of shoe socks that were handed down to me, but I assume they can still be bought somewhere. They’re stretchy knit tubes with a drawstring top that are big enough to fit over your shoes. That way you can pack extra shoes without getting dirt on anything else in the suitcase.
    I try to remember to take my tiny clip-on LED reading light. It’s not only great for the plane, but I can use it to read in bed in the hotel room without disturbing my husband’s sleep. I like to take back issues of The New Yorker magazine that I haven’t caught up with on vacation. Once I read them, I can get rid of them, which lightens the load for the return trip.
    I love pashminas because they’re so multi-purpose. It can be a blanket, a shawl, a head scarf, a picnic blanket, a beach sarong, even an ad hoc sling for carrying things.

    Reply
  102. When I was visiting family in Colombia, I almost didn’t get through customs because I didn’t have the street address of my destination. It was stored in my computer at home, and I didn’t really need it because I was getting picked up at the airport, but as a tourist, they wanted to know where I was going to be staying. Luckily, the officer finally took pity and let me in!
    I’ve got a couple of pairs of shoe socks that were handed down to me, but I assume they can still be bought somewhere. They’re stretchy knit tubes with a drawstring top that are big enough to fit over your shoes. That way you can pack extra shoes without getting dirt on anything else in the suitcase.
    I try to remember to take my tiny clip-on LED reading light. It’s not only great for the plane, but I can use it to read in bed in the hotel room without disturbing my husband’s sleep. I like to take back issues of The New Yorker magazine that I haven’t caught up with on vacation. Once I read them, I can get rid of them, which lightens the load for the return trip.
    I love pashminas because they’re so multi-purpose. It can be a blanket, a shawl, a head scarf, a picnic blanket, a beach sarong, even an ad hoc sling for carrying things.

    Reply
  103. When I was visiting family in Colombia, I almost didn’t get through customs because I didn’t have the street address of my destination. It was stored in my computer at home, and I didn’t really need it because I was getting picked up at the airport, but as a tourist, they wanted to know where I was going to be staying. Luckily, the officer finally took pity and let me in!
    I’ve got a couple of pairs of shoe socks that were handed down to me, but I assume they can still be bought somewhere. They’re stretchy knit tubes with a drawstring top that are big enough to fit over your shoes. That way you can pack extra shoes without getting dirt on anything else in the suitcase.
    I try to remember to take my tiny clip-on LED reading light. It’s not only great for the plane, but I can use it to read in bed in the hotel room without disturbing my husband’s sleep. I like to take back issues of The New Yorker magazine that I haven’t caught up with on vacation. Once I read them, I can get rid of them, which lightens the load for the return trip.
    I love pashminas because they’re so multi-purpose. It can be a blanket, a shawl, a head scarf, a picnic blanket, a beach sarong, even an ad hoc sling for carrying things.

    Reply
  104. When I was visiting family in Colombia, I almost didn’t get through customs because I didn’t have the street address of my destination. It was stored in my computer at home, and I didn’t really need it because I was getting picked up at the airport, but as a tourist, they wanted to know where I was going to be staying. Luckily, the officer finally took pity and let me in!
    I’ve got a couple of pairs of shoe socks that were handed down to me, but I assume they can still be bought somewhere. They’re stretchy knit tubes with a drawstring top that are big enough to fit over your shoes. That way you can pack extra shoes without getting dirt on anything else in the suitcase.
    I try to remember to take my tiny clip-on LED reading light. It’s not only great for the plane, but I can use it to read in bed in the hotel room without disturbing my husband’s sleep. I like to take back issues of The New Yorker magazine that I haven’t caught up with on vacation. Once I read them, I can get rid of them, which lightens the load for the return trip.
    I love pashminas because they’re so multi-purpose. It can be a blanket, a shawl, a head scarf, a picnic blanket, a beach sarong, even an ad hoc sling for carrying things.

    Reply
  105. When I was visiting family in Colombia, I almost didn’t get through customs because I didn’t have the street address of my destination. It was stored in my computer at home, and I didn’t really need it because I was getting picked up at the airport, but as a tourist, they wanted to know where I was going to be staying. Luckily, the officer finally took pity and let me in!
    I’ve got a couple of pairs of shoe socks that were handed down to me, but I assume they can still be bought somewhere. They’re stretchy knit tubes with a drawstring top that are big enough to fit over your shoes. That way you can pack extra shoes without getting dirt on anything else in the suitcase.
    I try to remember to take my tiny clip-on LED reading light. It’s not only great for the plane, but I can use it to read in bed in the hotel room without disturbing my husband’s sleep. I like to take back issues of The New Yorker magazine that I haven’t caught up with on vacation. Once I read them, I can get rid of them, which lightens the load for the return trip.
    I love pashminas because they’re so multi-purpose. It can be a blanket, a shawl, a head scarf, a picnic blanket, a beach sarong, even an ad hoc sling for carrying things.

    Reply
  106. Oh I hadnt thought about knowing a street address if not going to a hotel! I usually list the hotel and theyre good with that. Although we did an apartment once, but we had to have that paper handy for the taxi. Ouch, the things we have to think of! And arent pashminas perfect?

    Reply
  107. Oh I hadnt thought about knowing a street address if not going to a hotel! I usually list the hotel and theyre good with that. Although we did an apartment once, but we had to have that paper handy for the taxi. Ouch, the things we have to think of! And arent pashminas perfect?

    Reply
  108. Oh I hadnt thought about knowing a street address if not going to a hotel! I usually list the hotel and theyre good with that. Although we did an apartment once, but we had to have that paper handy for the taxi. Ouch, the things we have to think of! And arent pashminas perfect?

    Reply
  109. Oh I hadnt thought about knowing a street address if not going to a hotel! I usually list the hotel and theyre good with that. Although we did an apartment once, but we had to have that paper handy for the taxi. Ouch, the things we have to think of! And arent pashminas perfect?

    Reply
  110. Oh I hadnt thought about knowing a street address if not going to a hotel! I usually list the hotel and theyre good with that. Although we did an apartment once, but we had to have that paper handy for the taxi. Ouch, the things we have to think of! And arent pashminas perfect?

    Reply

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