Transported By Words

Tucson Festival of Books panel
Susanna here, just back from the sunny south and the wonderful Tucson Festival of Books, where I had the privilege of sitting on two panels—one called "Keeping History Fresh" (pictured above), with Susan Meissner and Kristina McMorris, moderated by Anne Spieth, and another called "Transported by Words", moderated by Victoria Marie Salajko, in which R.O. Kwon, Shobha Rao, and I talked about the use of setting in fiction.



MyBrotherMichaelBoth panels were great, and the questions we were asked could provide the jumping-off point for any number of posts here, but in the panel on setting we were asked, “What writers do you admire because of the way they create the places in their books?”

My choice was easy: Mary Stewart.

For me, no writer can so easily transport me with their words into a landscape I have never seen, and do it so convincingly that when I finally travel to that place, I feel I know it well.

On my writing reference bookshelf by my desk I have a well-thumbed copy of Writing Suspense and Mystery Fiction, edited by A.S. Burack and published in Boston by The Writer, Inc., in 1977. And on pages 190 to 196 of that book is an article titled “Setting and Background in the Novel”, written by Mary Stewart herself, in which—along with her advice on writing settings—she reveals the origin of her own process:

Delphi theatre1

Me standing in the setting for My Brother Michael

“Almost without realizing it, I have come to have the reputation of setting my suspense stories exotically—Avignon, Skye, Savoy, Corfu—and of using these settings not just as background color, but dynamically, almost as a ‘first character’ of the book. I do, in fact, start with the setting. I used to think it was chance that led me into this way of writing. When I wrote my first book, Madam, Will You Talk?, I had never written a story before, and it seemed natural, in that icy winter when the impulsion to write finally outweighed even my diffidence in starting, to choose the most exciting—and the hottest—place I had then been to. I found, in the writing of the book, that the tough, strange, romantic setting exactly suited the kind of thing I wanted to write; that it did, in fact, dictate its own kind of plot; and that to allow it to permeate every corner of the story could do nothing but enrich that story.

“This was obviously the kind of thing that suited me, so, book by book, from this kind of start I formed my own personal work map. A place which had had a powerful impact on my senses and imagination would suggest a story line and an atmosphere into which I could put my characters, and let their reactions to the setting, and to each other in that setting, work themselves out into a plot. The fact that I chose a different setting for each of my books made (I think) for variety in treatment and atmosphere, even though the basic ingredients of the ‘suspense novel’ must to some extent stay the same.”

Chinon, France

Chinon, France

I remember, after reading that the first time, trying to compare it to the way my own stories developed—because generally with me I find the people or the situation first, and that determines where the story must be set. Although at least once—with my book The Splendour Falls—the setting found me first and I went looking for a story I could set there.

What is it for you, if you’re a writer? Do the places find you first, or do the stories lead you to the places?

And for readers, what writers do you admire because of how they write their settings? Who transports you?

55 thoughts on “Transported By Words”

  1. Wonderful post, Susanna! Mary Stewart is indeed the queen of evoking place, and her stories always make me long to visit her magical kingdoms.
    My stories most often start with characters, but sometimes history, and even sometimes with place. For example, having visited Orkney and Shetland this past summer, some of my characters are going to have islands in their future!

    Reply
  2. Wonderful post, Susanna! Mary Stewart is indeed the queen of evoking place, and her stories always make me long to visit her magical kingdoms.
    My stories most often start with characters, but sometimes history, and even sometimes with place. For example, having visited Orkney and Shetland this past summer, some of my characters are going to have islands in their future!

    Reply
  3. Wonderful post, Susanna! Mary Stewart is indeed the queen of evoking place, and her stories always make me long to visit her magical kingdoms.
    My stories most often start with characters, but sometimes history, and even sometimes with place. For example, having visited Orkney and Shetland this past summer, some of my characters are going to have islands in their future!

    Reply
  4. Wonderful post, Susanna! Mary Stewart is indeed the queen of evoking place, and her stories always make me long to visit her magical kingdoms.
    My stories most often start with characters, but sometimes history, and even sometimes with place. For example, having visited Orkney and Shetland this past summer, some of my characters are going to have islands in their future!

    Reply
  5. Wonderful post, Susanna! Mary Stewart is indeed the queen of evoking place, and her stories always make me long to visit her magical kingdoms.
    My stories most often start with characters, but sometimes history, and even sometimes with place. For example, having visited Orkney and Shetland this past summer, some of my characters are going to have islands in their future!

    Reply
  6. AS a reader, I don’t believe I care how the author starts (or even realize that how the idea starts may have a strong impact on the outcome). What I look for is an interesting and believable entirety. Mary Stewart has been a life-long love of mine; the passage you quoted will make me appreciate her settings more, but I love her writings because of the way she pulls everything together.
    As for Susanna Kearsley, I don’t what started you writing “Shadowy Horses” but I have a strong sense of that area as well as a strong sense of the people each time I reread the booK
    (As an aside — and since it’s another of my favorite genre — i Science Fiction the “gizmo” may be the starting point: as in, “What is a machine does all the cooking, starting from molecular structure?” Some very good SF has sprung from such an idea.)
    And these three looks at specific “what I enjoy reading” still come back to my original statement. The book MUST be a complete mix of all elements to make it into a regular re-read for me.

    Reply
  7. AS a reader, I don’t believe I care how the author starts (or even realize that how the idea starts may have a strong impact on the outcome). What I look for is an interesting and believable entirety. Mary Stewart has been a life-long love of mine; the passage you quoted will make me appreciate her settings more, but I love her writings because of the way she pulls everything together.
    As for Susanna Kearsley, I don’t what started you writing “Shadowy Horses” but I have a strong sense of that area as well as a strong sense of the people each time I reread the booK
    (As an aside — and since it’s another of my favorite genre — i Science Fiction the “gizmo” may be the starting point: as in, “What is a machine does all the cooking, starting from molecular structure?” Some very good SF has sprung from such an idea.)
    And these three looks at specific “what I enjoy reading” still come back to my original statement. The book MUST be a complete mix of all elements to make it into a regular re-read for me.

    Reply
  8. AS a reader, I don’t believe I care how the author starts (or even realize that how the idea starts may have a strong impact on the outcome). What I look for is an interesting and believable entirety. Mary Stewart has been a life-long love of mine; the passage you quoted will make me appreciate her settings more, but I love her writings because of the way she pulls everything together.
    As for Susanna Kearsley, I don’t what started you writing “Shadowy Horses” but I have a strong sense of that area as well as a strong sense of the people each time I reread the booK
    (As an aside — and since it’s another of my favorite genre — i Science Fiction the “gizmo” may be the starting point: as in, “What is a machine does all the cooking, starting from molecular structure?” Some very good SF has sprung from such an idea.)
    And these three looks at specific “what I enjoy reading” still come back to my original statement. The book MUST be a complete mix of all elements to make it into a regular re-read for me.

    Reply
  9. AS a reader, I don’t believe I care how the author starts (or even realize that how the idea starts may have a strong impact on the outcome). What I look for is an interesting and believable entirety. Mary Stewart has been a life-long love of mine; the passage you quoted will make me appreciate her settings more, but I love her writings because of the way she pulls everything together.
    As for Susanna Kearsley, I don’t what started you writing “Shadowy Horses” but I have a strong sense of that area as well as a strong sense of the people each time I reread the booK
    (As an aside — and since it’s another of my favorite genre — i Science Fiction the “gizmo” may be the starting point: as in, “What is a machine does all the cooking, starting from molecular structure?” Some very good SF has sprung from such an idea.)
    And these three looks at specific “what I enjoy reading” still come back to my original statement. The book MUST be a complete mix of all elements to make it into a regular re-read for me.

    Reply
  10. AS a reader, I don’t believe I care how the author starts (or even realize that how the idea starts may have a strong impact on the outcome). What I look for is an interesting and believable entirety. Mary Stewart has been a life-long love of mine; the passage you quoted will make me appreciate her settings more, but I love her writings because of the way she pulls everything together.
    As for Susanna Kearsley, I don’t what started you writing “Shadowy Horses” but I have a strong sense of that area as well as a strong sense of the people each time I reread the booK
    (As an aside — and since it’s another of my favorite genre — i Science Fiction the “gizmo” may be the starting point: as in, “What is a machine does all the cooking, starting from molecular structure?” Some very good SF has sprung from such an idea.)
    And these three looks at specific “what I enjoy reading” still come back to my original statement. The book MUST be a complete mix of all elements to make it into a regular re-read for me.

    Reply
  11. For me, location is always the first thing to strike my creative spark. The Wild West Country between Florence and Siena in Tuscany grabbed me by the neck and would not let me go until I finished my first published novel and had the sequels well in mind. And more recently, I’ve sought out new venues for the mysteries I’m developing now. It’s a darn good thing I love to travel! Like you, Susanna, Chinon holds a special place in my heart. One of the new mysteries is set in the Loire Valley, with my MC staying in a vineyard on the outskirts of Chinon proper.

    Reply
  12. For me, location is always the first thing to strike my creative spark. The Wild West Country between Florence and Siena in Tuscany grabbed me by the neck and would not let me go until I finished my first published novel and had the sequels well in mind. And more recently, I’ve sought out new venues for the mysteries I’m developing now. It’s a darn good thing I love to travel! Like you, Susanna, Chinon holds a special place in my heart. One of the new mysteries is set in the Loire Valley, with my MC staying in a vineyard on the outskirts of Chinon proper.

    Reply
  13. For me, location is always the first thing to strike my creative spark. The Wild West Country between Florence and Siena in Tuscany grabbed me by the neck and would not let me go until I finished my first published novel and had the sequels well in mind. And more recently, I’ve sought out new venues for the mysteries I’m developing now. It’s a darn good thing I love to travel! Like you, Susanna, Chinon holds a special place in my heart. One of the new mysteries is set in the Loire Valley, with my MC staying in a vineyard on the outskirts of Chinon proper.

    Reply
  14. For me, location is always the first thing to strike my creative spark. The Wild West Country between Florence and Siena in Tuscany grabbed me by the neck and would not let me go until I finished my first published novel and had the sequels well in mind. And more recently, I’ve sought out new venues for the mysteries I’m developing now. It’s a darn good thing I love to travel! Like you, Susanna, Chinon holds a special place in my heart. One of the new mysteries is set in the Loire Valley, with my MC staying in a vineyard on the outskirts of Chinon proper.

    Reply
  15. For me, location is always the first thing to strike my creative spark. The Wild West Country between Florence and Siena in Tuscany grabbed me by the neck and would not let me go until I finished my first published novel and had the sequels well in mind. And more recently, I’ve sought out new venues for the mysteries I’m developing now. It’s a darn good thing I love to travel! Like you, Susanna, Chinon holds a special place in my heart. One of the new mysteries is set in the Loire Valley, with my MC staying in a vineyard on the outskirts of Chinon proper.

    Reply
  16. Setting, first, always for me. If I can believe the characters are where the author puts them, then I can start believing in them. Mary Stewart’s places were so important to me that I traveled to some of them just to be in that space. Look no farther than Diana Gabaldon’s impact on Scottish tourism to believe in the importance of a good setting. Your settings are evocative, Susanna, too. In my soul I believe in where your characters live, sure in the knowledge that I could find them, if I looked. Thanks for the reminder of the wonder that are Stewart books and also, yours. I need to pull some off the shelves and indulge my self —- good escape from a long snowy winter!

    Reply
  17. Setting, first, always for me. If I can believe the characters are where the author puts them, then I can start believing in them. Mary Stewart’s places were so important to me that I traveled to some of them just to be in that space. Look no farther than Diana Gabaldon’s impact on Scottish tourism to believe in the importance of a good setting. Your settings are evocative, Susanna, too. In my soul I believe in where your characters live, sure in the knowledge that I could find them, if I looked. Thanks for the reminder of the wonder that are Stewart books and also, yours. I need to pull some off the shelves and indulge my self —- good escape from a long snowy winter!

    Reply
  18. Setting, first, always for me. If I can believe the characters are where the author puts them, then I can start believing in them. Mary Stewart’s places were so important to me that I traveled to some of them just to be in that space. Look no farther than Diana Gabaldon’s impact on Scottish tourism to believe in the importance of a good setting. Your settings are evocative, Susanna, too. In my soul I believe in where your characters live, sure in the knowledge that I could find them, if I looked. Thanks for the reminder of the wonder that are Stewart books and also, yours. I need to pull some off the shelves and indulge my self —- good escape from a long snowy winter!

    Reply
  19. Setting, first, always for me. If I can believe the characters are where the author puts them, then I can start believing in them. Mary Stewart’s places were so important to me that I traveled to some of them just to be in that space. Look no farther than Diana Gabaldon’s impact on Scottish tourism to believe in the importance of a good setting. Your settings are evocative, Susanna, too. In my soul I believe in where your characters live, sure in the knowledge that I could find them, if I looked. Thanks for the reminder of the wonder that are Stewart books and also, yours. I need to pull some off the shelves and indulge my self —- good escape from a long snowy winter!

    Reply
  20. Setting, first, always for me. If I can believe the characters are where the author puts them, then I can start believing in them. Mary Stewart’s places were so important to me that I traveled to some of them just to be in that space. Look no farther than Diana Gabaldon’s impact on Scottish tourism to believe in the importance of a good setting. Your settings are evocative, Susanna, too. In my soul I believe in where your characters live, sure in the knowledge that I could find them, if I looked. Thanks for the reminder of the wonder that are Stewart books and also, yours. I need to pull some off the shelves and indulge my self —- good escape from a long snowy winter!

    Reply
  21. Sometimes places are so vivid in my memory that I have to stop and think before I know if I have actually been there or just read about it. I want to bundle up just thinking about the Wyoming and Colorado winters in Jo Goodman’s western stories. And the London of Sherlock Holmes is more vivid to me than the modern version that I have visited.

    Reply
  22. Sometimes places are so vivid in my memory that I have to stop and think before I know if I have actually been there or just read about it. I want to bundle up just thinking about the Wyoming and Colorado winters in Jo Goodman’s western stories. And the London of Sherlock Holmes is more vivid to me than the modern version that I have visited.

    Reply
  23. Sometimes places are so vivid in my memory that I have to stop and think before I know if I have actually been there or just read about it. I want to bundle up just thinking about the Wyoming and Colorado winters in Jo Goodman’s western stories. And the London of Sherlock Holmes is more vivid to me than the modern version that I have visited.

    Reply
  24. Sometimes places are so vivid in my memory that I have to stop and think before I know if I have actually been there or just read about it. I want to bundle up just thinking about the Wyoming and Colorado winters in Jo Goodman’s western stories. And the London of Sherlock Holmes is more vivid to me than the modern version that I have visited.

    Reply
  25. Sometimes places are so vivid in my memory that I have to stop and think before I know if I have actually been there or just read about it. I want to bundle up just thinking about the Wyoming and Colorado winters in Jo Goodman’s western stories. And the London of Sherlock Holmes is more vivid to me than the modern version that I have visited.

    Reply
  26. I’ve always liked books where the author paints pictures with words. Unfortunately, that’s out of style now. Too much dialog now, not enough description. People think the description slows the book down.

    Reply
  27. I’ve always liked books where the author paints pictures with words. Unfortunately, that’s out of style now. Too much dialog now, not enough description. People think the description slows the book down.

    Reply
  28. I’ve always liked books where the author paints pictures with words. Unfortunately, that’s out of style now. Too much dialog now, not enough description. People think the description slows the book down.

    Reply
  29. I’ve always liked books where the author paints pictures with words. Unfortunately, that’s out of style now. Too much dialog now, not enough description. People think the description slows the book down.

    Reply
  30. I’ve always liked books where the author paints pictures with words. Unfortunately, that’s out of style now. Too much dialog now, not enough description. People think the description slows the book down.

    Reply
  31. I enjoyed your post very much. I think James Lee Burke evokes Louisiana and New Orleans perfectly and Sharyn McCrumb does the same with Appalachia. I agree about Mary Stewart too.

    Reply
  32. I enjoyed your post very much. I think James Lee Burke evokes Louisiana and New Orleans perfectly and Sharyn McCrumb does the same with Appalachia. I agree about Mary Stewart too.

    Reply
  33. I enjoyed your post very much. I think James Lee Burke evokes Louisiana and New Orleans perfectly and Sharyn McCrumb does the same with Appalachia. I agree about Mary Stewart too.

    Reply
  34. I enjoyed your post very much. I think James Lee Burke evokes Louisiana and New Orleans perfectly and Sharyn McCrumb does the same with Appalachia. I agree about Mary Stewart too.

    Reply
  35. I enjoyed your post very much. I think James Lee Burke evokes Louisiana and New Orleans perfectly and Sharyn McCrumb does the same with Appalachia. I agree about Mary Stewart too.

    Reply
  36. Definitely agree about Mary Stewart and Diana Gabaldon! Margaret Maron brings me immediately home to North Carolina in her Deborah Knott mystery series, but in her case, it is both evocation of place and use of language, cadence. Together, they transport me within the first few pages.

    Reply
  37. Definitely agree about Mary Stewart and Diana Gabaldon! Margaret Maron brings me immediately home to North Carolina in her Deborah Knott mystery series, but in her case, it is both evocation of place and use of language, cadence. Together, they transport me within the first few pages.

    Reply
  38. Definitely agree about Mary Stewart and Diana Gabaldon! Margaret Maron brings me immediately home to North Carolina in her Deborah Knott mystery series, but in her case, it is both evocation of place and use of language, cadence. Together, they transport me within the first few pages.

    Reply
  39. Definitely agree about Mary Stewart and Diana Gabaldon! Margaret Maron brings me immediately home to North Carolina in her Deborah Knott mystery series, but in her case, it is both evocation of place and use of language, cadence. Together, they transport me within the first few pages.

    Reply
  40. Definitely agree about Mary Stewart and Diana Gabaldon! Margaret Maron brings me immediately home to North Carolina in her Deborah Knott mystery series, but in her case, it is both evocation of place and use of language, cadence. Together, they transport me within the first few pages.

    Reply
  41. For the first time, I have started with setting. Usually, it’s an event or an issue that takes up space in my mind until characters eventually crop up and run with it. Setting falls into place after they become “real”. It’s slow going this time. I wonder if it is because starting with setting isn’t a good approach for me. Hmmm.

    Reply
  42. For the first time, I have started with setting. Usually, it’s an event or an issue that takes up space in my mind until characters eventually crop up and run with it. Setting falls into place after they become “real”. It’s slow going this time. I wonder if it is because starting with setting isn’t a good approach for me. Hmmm.

    Reply
  43. For the first time, I have started with setting. Usually, it’s an event or an issue that takes up space in my mind until characters eventually crop up and run with it. Setting falls into place after they become “real”. It’s slow going this time. I wonder if it is because starting with setting isn’t a good approach for me. Hmmm.

    Reply
  44. For the first time, I have started with setting. Usually, it’s an event or an issue that takes up space in my mind until characters eventually crop up and run with it. Setting falls into place after they become “real”. It’s slow going this time. I wonder if it is because starting with setting isn’t a good approach for me. Hmmm.

    Reply
  45. For the first time, I have started with setting. Usually, it’s an event or an issue that takes up space in my mind until characters eventually crop up and run with it. Setting falls into place after they become “real”. It’s slow going this time. I wonder if it is because starting with setting isn’t a good approach for me. Hmmm.

    Reply
  46. Great post, Susanna! I read Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting first, then I discovered Madam, Will You Talk? It changed both my real life and my writing life. I’ve never found a book with a better sense of place. When friends of mine were planning their trip to France last year, I took them on a verbal tour of Avignon, the bridge, Pont du Gard, the amphitheatre, etc.I don’t think setting is always important. I just finished reading a delightful book yesterday, where setting definitely was less than memorable. I don’t even remember what state the story takes place in. OTOH, think of the many niche contemporary romances that have been created in recent years, by authors such as Robyn Carr, RaeAnne Thayne, Virginia Kantra, Mariah Stewart, and of course, Nora Roberts. I can absolutely sense Maryland’s St. Michaels throughout her Chesapeake Bay series. Sometimes the sense of place is so strong I can smell the trees or hear the crash of the waves. And not to slight historical genres – but how many of us have read regencies and historicals and visited London – seeking out Gunter’s, White’s Club, etc. BTW – I re-read Madam, Will You Talk so often that I wore out my first paperback copy. I now have 1 additional paperback and 2 hardcovers – just in case.

    Reply
  47. Great post, Susanna! I read Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting first, then I discovered Madam, Will You Talk? It changed both my real life and my writing life. I’ve never found a book with a better sense of place. When friends of mine were planning their trip to France last year, I took them on a verbal tour of Avignon, the bridge, Pont du Gard, the amphitheatre, etc.I don’t think setting is always important. I just finished reading a delightful book yesterday, where setting definitely was less than memorable. I don’t even remember what state the story takes place in. OTOH, think of the many niche contemporary romances that have been created in recent years, by authors such as Robyn Carr, RaeAnne Thayne, Virginia Kantra, Mariah Stewart, and of course, Nora Roberts. I can absolutely sense Maryland’s St. Michaels throughout her Chesapeake Bay series. Sometimes the sense of place is so strong I can smell the trees or hear the crash of the waves. And not to slight historical genres – but how many of us have read regencies and historicals and visited London – seeking out Gunter’s, White’s Club, etc. BTW – I re-read Madam, Will You Talk so often that I wore out my first paperback copy. I now have 1 additional paperback and 2 hardcovers – just in case.

    Reply
  48. Great post, Susanna! I read Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting first, then I discovered Madam, Will You Talk? It changed both my real life and my writing life. I’ve never found a book with a better sense of place. When friends of mine were planning their trip to France last year, I took them on a verbal tour of Avignon, the bridge, Pont du Gard, the amphitheatre, etc.I don’t think setting is always important. I just finished reading a delightful book yesterday, where setting definitely was less than memorable. I don’t even remember what state the story takes place in. OTOH, think of the many niche contemporary romances that have been created in recent years, by authors such as Robyn Carr, RaeAnne Thayne, Virginia Kantra, Mariah Stewart, and of course, Nora Roberts. I can absolutely sense Maryland’s St. Michaels throughout her Chesapeake Bay series. Sometimes the sense of place is so strong I can smell the trees or hear the crash of the waves. And not to slight historical genres – but how many of us have read regencies and historicals and visited London – seeking out Gunter’s, White’s Club, etc. BTW – I re-read Madam, Will You Talk so often that I wore out my first paperback copy. I now have 1 additional paperback and 2 hardcovers – just in case.

    Reply
  49. Great post, Susanna! I read Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting first, then I discovered Madam, Will You Talk? It changed both my real life and my writing life. I’ve never found a book with a better sense of place. When friends of mine were planning their trip to France last year, I took them on a verbal tour of Avignon, the bridge, Pont du Gard, the amphitheatre, etc.I don’t think setting is always important. I just finished reading a delightful book yesterday, where setting definitely was less than memorable. I don’t even remember what state the story takes place in. OTOH, think of the many niche contemporary romances that have been created in recent years, by authors such as Robyn Carr, RaeAnne Thayne, Virginia Kantra, Mariah Stewart, and of course, Nora Roberts. I can absolutely sense Maryland’s St. Michaels throughout her Chesapeake Bay series. Sometimes the sense of place is so strong I can smell the trees or hear the crash of the waves. And not to slight historical genres – but how many of us have read regencies and historicals and visited London – seeking out Gunter’s, White’s Club, etc. BTW – I re-read Madam, Will You Talk so often that I wore out my first paperback copy. I now have 1 additional paperback and 2 hardcovers – just in case.

    Reply
  50. Great post, Susanna! I read Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting first, then I discovered Madam, Will You Talk? It changed both my real life and my writing life. I’ve never found a book with a better sense of place. When friends of mine were planning their trip to France last year, I took them on a verbal tour of Avignon, the bridge, Pont du Gard, the amphitheatre, etc.I don’t think setting is always important. I just finished reading a delightful book yesterday, where setting definitely was less than memorable. I don’t even remember what state the story takes place in. OTOH, think of the many niche contemporary romances that have been created in recent years, by authors such as Robyn Carr, RaeAnne Thayne, Virginia Kantra, Mariah Stewart, and of course, Nora Roberts. I can absolutely sense Maryland’s St. Michaels throughout her Chesapeake Bay series. Sometimes the sense of place is so strong I can smell the trees or hear the crash of the waves. And not to slight historical genres – but how many of us have read regencies and historicals and visited London – seeking out Gunter’s, White’s Club, etc. BTW – I re-read Madam, Will You Talk so often that I wore out my first paperback copy. I now have 1 additional paperback and 2 hardcovers – just in case.

    Reply
  51. First of all – Love Mary Stewart. It seems she’s been involved in lots of posts recently. I’m not sure place grabs me first but I definitely buy books set in New Orleans or Ireland. I guess those places are somehow in my heart or I lived there in past lives!

    Reply
  52. First of all – Love Mary Stewart. It seems she’s been involved in lots of posts recently. I’m not sure place grabs me first but I definitely buy books set in New Orleans or Ireland. I guess those places are somehow in my heart or I lived there in past lives!

    Reply
  53. First of all – Love Mary Stewart. It seems she’s been involved in lots of posts recently. I’m not sure place grabs me first but I definitely buy books set in New Orleans or Ireland. I guess those places are somehow in my heart or I lived there in past lives!

    Reply
  54. First of all – Love Mary Stewart. It seems she’s been involved in lots of posts recently. I’m not sure place grabs me first but I definitely buy books set in New Orleans or Ireland. I guess those places are somehow in my heart or I lived there in past lives!

    Reply
  55. First of all – Love Mary Stewart. It seems she’s been involved in lots of posts recently. I’m not sure place grabs me first but I definitely buy books set in New Orleans or Ireland. I guess those places are somehow in my heart or I lived there in past lives!

    Reply

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