Translations, Organization, Home Office

From Pat Rice:

Image002ma119096210002 Still running behind and just had a chance to read fellow wench blogs, so instead of daily comments as I usually do, I’ll try to remember everything covered and reply on here.  (So, I’m cheating—want to make an issue of it?) File001ma110991100003

Mary Jo wrote about foreign translations.  I have, upon occasion, made the mistake of giving copies of mine to people who spoke the language—Chinese and German come immediately to mind.  The echoing silence from the recipients said more than I need to know. I am trying very hard not to wonder if I’ve badly insulted them by giving them pornographic trash.  And then I wonder if I really ought to donate all those old copies to libraries per their requests.  Could they really want something that badly translated?  Maybe I should be more optimistic and hope that the translations are really quite good and people just don’t know how to adequately describe their reaction!

Loretta’s organizational crisis is something we can all relate to.  I used to pride myself on how organized I was.  I had a place for everything because I’d never be able to find anything unless I did.  And then, as I worked less and less with accounting and more and more with writing, I started slipping over to the dark side.  Snapshots are no longer placed in neat little albums and labeled. Heck, they’re all on my hard drive somewhere in some disorganized tangle of names that look like AZ24926244224.  I see them flashing across my screensaver and wonder where in heck the computer found them because I surely can’t.  I have a photo printer, but why add to the chaos by printing them? 

When we moved last year, the movers stacked all my paper files in boxes. The file cabinets are still sitting empty in the basement, and all the files are still in boxes.  Maybe I should give them a “pull” date, like bad cheese, after which I have to throw them out.  Att1ma130252520001

I can’t reply to Edith’s post because she’d probably fly out here and personally kill me if I tell her I don’t get colds.  But I will say that I continued working in my accounting office long past the time I needed to just so I could have someone to talk to every day.  Working at home can be danged lonely, and I have to make appointments with friends just to get out of the house.  I can’t say that I miss the daily commute because I used to walk to work.  <G>  And I’m a Leo.  I rather enjoyed the excuse of work to buy new clothes.  Now, I only buy them for conferences.  Maybe I ought to go to more meetings and conferences. (Right, after just admitting I’m so far behind I don’t even have time to write a blog!)

Which, naturally, takes us back to Susan/Miranda’s subject of deadlines. I don’t do the traditional deadline hell that Loretta and Susan/Miranda talk about. I stress very badly if there is any danger whatsoever that a book won’t be turned in on time, so when I sign contracts, I make certain that I stretch the deadline date to the full limit I can get away with.  And even then, I’ve usually written half the book or more before the contract is signed.  There are a lot of disadvantages to this system that I won’t try to explain, but it saves me from the one neurosis about this business guaranteed to push me over the brink and freeze my creativity faster than dry ice. 

So when I’m rushed for time, it’s because of deadlines beyond my control—copyedits and galleys that arrive just as I’m leaving town, revisions that never end, family crises, proposals I have to send before Mercury goes retrograde (really, I can’t control retrograde, can I?!), and Tuesdays that insist on arriving before I’m ready. 

File008ma119096210018 And because I seem to have all of the above on my desk right now, I’m going to hurry and post this and hope for the best. Before I go, I want to leave the floor open to questions from our readers.  We really do run into these time crunches, and questions you’ve asked go into a file for those days (providing we’re organized enough to find the file when the day arrives!).  So if there’s anything you’ve ever wished to ask a wench, please do!  You’d be surprised at how happy we are to have questions to answer.

24 thoughts on “Translations, Organization, Home Office”

  1. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  5. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  6. LOL about how leaving your accounting job let you slip over to the dark side in terms of life organization. I’ve found the same: since becoming a full time writer, I’ve gotten fuzzier and fuzzier. In my designer days, when I was juggling a bunch of projects at once, I was soooo much more efficient.
    Worse, I’m pretty sure there’s no going back….
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. Oh, Edith, you are still sick. I am so sorry. I’m fighting my fall migraine, right now. I think I’d rather have a 10 day cold. Trade ya. *g*
    Questions: I always have lots.
    Here’s one. England seems to be divided into ‘counties’ like York and Somerset. Historically, were each of those ‘counties’ (apologies if I’m using the wrong word) ruled by a Duke? If so, what was the next lower rank? Could there be only one Duke in a county?
    Here’s another. Ranking: Other than by birth, how did one get to be a viscount Earl, Marquess or a Duke? And if one found himself so titled, what did that entitle him to?
    One more: The Duke of Wellington (a fascinating man, btw) didn’t start out as a Duke. He was dubbed Author Wellesley on the day he was born. At 40 years of age he became a viscount and 5 years later was the Duke of Wellington. Why? (other than his obvious talent for winning wars) Was such titling similar to moving from Director, to Managing-Director to VP in Corporate America?
    Nina

    Reply
  8. Oh, Edith, you are still sick. I am so sorry. I’m fighting my fall migraine, right now. I think I’d rather have a 10 day cold. Trade ya. *g*
    Questions: I always have lots.
    Here’s one. England seems to be divided into ‘counties’ like York and Somerset. Historically, were each of those ‘counties’ (apologies if I’m using the wrong word) ruled by a Duke? If so, what was the next lower rank? Could there be only one Duke in a county?
    Here’s another. Ranking: Other than by birth, how did one get to be a viscount Earl, Marquess or a Duke? And if one found himself so titled, what did that entitle him to?
    One more: The Duke of Wellington (a fascinating man, btw) didn’t start out as a Duke. He was dubbed Author Wellesley on the day he was born. At 40 years of age he became a viscount and 5 years later was the Duke of Wellington. Why? (other than his obvious talent for winning wars) Was such titling similar to moving from Director, to Managing-Director to VP in Corporate America?
    Nina

    Reply
  9. Oh, Edith, you are still sick. I am so sorry. I’m fighting my fall migraine, right now. I think I’d rather have a 10 day cold. Trade ya. *g*
    Questions: I always have lots.
    Here’s one. England seems to be divided into ‘counties’ like York and Somerset. Historically, were each of those ‘counties’ (apologies if I’m using the wrong word) ruled by a Duke? If so, what was the next lower rank? Could there be only one Duke in a county?
    Here’s another. Ranking: Other than by birth, how did one get to be a viscount Earl, Marquess or a Duke? And if one found himself so titled, what did that entitle him to?
    One more: The Duke of Wellington (a fascinating man, btw) didn’t start out as a Duke. He was dubbed Author Wellesley on the day he was born. At 40 years of age he became a viscount and 5 years later was the Duke of Wellington. Why? (other than his obvious talent for winning wars) Was such titling similar to moving from Director, to Managing-Director to VP in Corporate America?
    Nina

    Reply
  10. Edith, if I could tell you how to prevent colds, I would, but I think it’s just genetics. Or my big nose that doesn’t hold germs.
    Nina, thank you kindly! I’m hoping one of the other wenches can answer because it will take research to remind me of much of this. But I do know that today’s counties have very little relevance to the often medieval duchies, beyond their names, if that’s of any use to you right now!

    Reply
  11. Edith, if I could tell you how to prevent colds, I would, but I think it’s just genetics. Or my big nose that doesn’t hold germs.
    Nina, thank you kindly! I’m hoping one of the other wenches can answer because it will take research to remind me of much of this. But I do know that today’s counties have very little relevance to the often medieval duchies, beyond their names, if that’s of any use to you right now!

    Reply
  12. Edith, if I could tell you how to prevent colds, I would, but I think it’s just genetics. Or my big nose that doesn’t hold germs.
    Nina, thank you kindly! I’m hoping one of the other wenches can answer because it will take research to remind me of much of this. But I do know that today’s counties have very little relevance to the often medieval duchies, beyond their names, if that’s of any use to you right now!

    Reply
  13. Nina, for explanations of noble titles and inheritance, a good quick reference is the A-Z section of Burke’s Peerage:
    http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/common/sitepages/reindex.asp
    Look up ‘Duke’, ‘Viscount’ and so on, and you will find a definition and explanation. One usually acquires titles by inheriting them, and they don’t entitle one to very much at all. Knighthoods are conferred by the sovereign in recognition of some achievement: they cannot be inherited.
    No, counties were not ‘ruled’ by Dukes!
    🙂
    I am sure some of the authors here know more about these matters than I do, because they need to get them right in their books.

    Reply
  14. Nina, for explanations of noble titles and inheritance, a good quick reference is the A-Z section of Burke’s Peerage:
    http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/common/sitepages/reindex.asp
    Look up ‘Duke’, ‘Viscount’ and so on, and you will find a definition and explanation. One usually acquires titles by inheriting them, and they don’t entitle one to very much at all. Knighthoods are conferred by the sovereign in recognition of some achievement: they cannot be inherited.
    No, counties were not ‘ruled’ by Dukes!
    🙂
    I am sure some of the authors here know more about these matters than I do, because they need to get them right in their books.

    Reply
  15. Nina, for explanations of noble titles and inheritance, a good quick reference is the A-Z section of Burke’s Peerage:
    http://www.burkes-peerage.net/sites/common/sitepages/reindex.asp
    Look up ‘Duke’, ‘Viscount’ and so on, and you will find a definition and explanation. One usually acquires titles by inheriting them, and they don’t entitle one to very much at all. Knighthoods are conferred by the sovereign in recognition of some achievement: they cannot be inherited.
    No, counties were not ‘ruled’ by Dukes!
    🙂
    I am sure some of the authors here know more about these matters than I do, because they need to get them right in their books.

    Reply
  16. Hi Edith,
    I don’t think there’s any surefire way to avoid getting a cold–but you can lessen your chances.
    In my hospice work and in all medical settings the mantra is “wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands”! We are told that this is the surest way to stop germs spreading and to keep from getting a cold or any virus/bacteria for that matter. I know it seems elementary but it is easy to let slip (and sometimes medical professionals are the worst–did you see your doctor wash his hands the last time you visited him?) We teach our hospice volunteers that they should lather and wash for one full minute–just try it–it’s a long time!
    There are also those great waterless alcohol gels and foams that you can carry around with you in your purse and just wash up anytime–like after you shake a lot of hands at an appearance– (do any of you wenches routinely do this? I do it before and after I shake hands after church because so many vulnerable older people are in the congregation), –after you visit your kid’s preschool (green nose goo factories), or visit a bathroom where soap and water are mysteriously missing.
    Other tips: remember not to put your hands in your eyes or nose (entry points for the germs); pay attention to desks, keyboards, phones, door handles, and other items we use all the time but don’t think about being slathered with germs (when was the last time your cleaned them?); and if you have a cold but no tissues handy, sneeze or cough into your elbow to prevent spraying your neighbors.
    I know it’s not scientific and medical professionals will sneer at me, but historically I have gotten fewer colds in the winters where I have had a flu shot.
    Edith, I hope you are doing better soon!

    Reply
  17. Hi Edith,
    I don’t think there’s any surefire way to avoid getting a cold–but you can lessen your chances.
    In my hospice work and in all medical settings the mantra is “wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands”! We are told that this is the surest way to stop germs spreading and to keep from getting a cold or any virus/bacteria for that matter. I know it seems elementary but it is easy to let slip (and sometimes medical professionals are the worst–did you see your doctor wash his hands the last time you visited him?) We teach our hospice volunteers that they should lather and wash for one full minute–just try it–it’s a long time!
    There are also those great waterless alcohol gels and foams that you can carry around with you in your purse and just wash up anytime–like after you shake a lot of hands at an appearance– (do any of you wenches routinely do this? I do it before and after I shake hands after church because so many vulnerable older people are in the congregation), –after you visit your kid’s preschool (green nose goo factories), or visit a bathroom where soap and water are mysteriously missing.
    Other tips: remember not to put your hands in your eyes or nose (entry points for the germs); pay attention to desks, keyboards, phones, door handles, and other items we use all the time but don’t think about being slathered with germs (when was the last time your cleaned them?); and if you have a cold but no tissues handy, sneeze or cough into your elbow to prevent spraying your neighbors.
    I know it’s not scientific and medical professionals will sneer at me, but historically I have gotten fewer colds in the winters where I have had a flu shot.
    Edith, I hope you are doing better soon!

    Reply
  18. Hi Edith,
    I don’t think there’s any surefire way to avoid getting a cold–but you can lessen your chances.
    In my hospice work and in all medical settings the mantra is “wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands”! We are told that this is the surest way to stop germs spreading and to keep from getting a cold or any virus/bacteria for that matter. I know it seems elementary but it is easy to let slip (and sometimes medical professionals are the worst–did you see your doctor wash his hands the last time you visited him?) We teach our hospice volunteers that they should lather and wash for one full minute–just try it–it’s a long time!
    There are also those great waterless alcohol gels and foams that you can carry around with you in your purse and just wash up anytime–like after you shake a lot of hands at an appearance– (do any of you wenches routinely do this? I do it before and after I shake hands after church because so many vulnerable older people are in the congregation), –after you visit your kid’s preschool (green nose goo factories), or visit a bathroom where soap and water are mysteriously missing.
    Other tips: remember not to put your hands in your eyes or nose (entry points for the germs); pay attention to desks, keyboards, phones, door handles, and other items we use all the time but don’t think about being slathered with germs (when was the last time your cleaned them?); and if you have a cold but no tissues handy, sneeze or cough into your elbow to prevent spraying your neighbors.
    I know it’s not scientific and medical professionals will sneer at me, but historically I have gotten fewer colds in the winters where I have had a flu shot.
    Edith, I hope you are doing better soon!

    Reply

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