Training A Service Dog

Angus 1Hello! This is Angus MacLeod Cornick. Today I’m an honorary Word Wench as Nicola has turned her blog spot over to me to tell you about how I train service dogs for the UK Guide Dogs Association. It’s a demanding job but I like to feel I do my bit to help and my fee of one special dog treat per day is, I think, very reasonable. Earlier this year I qualified as an official Guide Dogs supporter dog, a role usually reserved for retired or failed guide dogs – Nicola was very proud of me! The exam was arduous – I had to remain calm and steady in all sorts of situations, from small children approaching me to other dogs barking at me. This was okay as my natural state is to sleep a large part of the time.

My life as a service dog mentor began a couple of years ago when my blissful experience of being a spoiled only dog came to an abrupt halt. I should have spotted the warning signs but I was young and naïve. I thought that when a “luxury indoor kennel” appeared full of cuddly toys my humans were trying to curry favour with me. Little did I realise it was for someone else.

Then this arrived. It was small, it was fluffy, it wasn’t house trained and it followed me around all the time and tried to sleep on Ethel and Angustop of me or underneath me or just generally next to me. I thought it would go away but it stayed. And stayed. Its name was Ethel and it was a girl.

The humans explained that it was something called a “service dog” and was going to grow up to be a guide dog that would be trained to help blind or partially-sighted people, leading them across roads, taking them to the shops and on buses and trains. Frankly I couldn’t see what was special about these puppies. I can lead people across the road (although I do get distracted if I catch the scent of something interesting) and I’m sure I’d be great at finding food in the supermarket only they won’t let me try.

Angus and LucyAnyway, Nicola told me that alongside her guide dog training, Ethel also needed to learn dog etiquette and that was where I came in.  There were several strands to her education. First there was how to behave around other dogs:  Don’t try to steal their food, don’t pester them if they don’t want to play and Top Dog (me) always gets toys and treats first. Ethel was quite a slow learner at this but eventually I trained her not to rush up to every other dog she met and jump all over them, to wait politely whilst I inspected her toys and to show respect for a senior dog. The humans did have a part in this training too, of course, but I took the lead. When she headed off to Advanced Training School I thought I had done a pretty good job and prepared to relax back into my life as an only dog extracting every possible privilege from my humans to make up for a year of hard work.

Ethel arrivesAlas! My peaceful life was not to last. A terrible thing happened; out came the luxury indoor kennel again, and this time I knew what it meant. Lucy arrived, and it all started all over again! You can see from the picture how pleased I was to see her!

Lucy didn't bark as much as Ethel did, which was great, but on the other hand she wasn't good at sleeping, which is a top requirement for a dog. I tried to explain to her that sleep is what dogs do for a large part of the time but she still hasn't really got it. She's far too active. Apparently she's very good when she's working though – it's the "settling" she just can't do.

My favourite aspect of the puppy training is teaching them how to retrieve. Nicola explained that they don’t Ethel 2need to be able to do this to be guide dogs but it’s part of their general obedience training. However, they are hopeless at it. Apparently it’s because they are bred especially to be guide dogs whereas I was bred specially to retrieve stuff and I frequently find all sorts of lost things, from watches and phones to money and crockery. It’s my super power! However Ethel never got the hang of it and Lucy, my current trainee, has finally learned to find things but hasn’t got the second part, which is to bring them back. Like I say: Hopeless.

Angus beachOccasionally I have been accused of leading the puppies astray. An incident of food theft was cited but that was just a misunderstanding. However, I have taught Lucy to swim on the basis that she doesn’t lead her owner into water unless they have specifically asked her to. Okay, I’ll admit it; there are times when I like to play and it’s fun to have a dog companion to go for walks with and show the ropes. When Lucy is doing obedience training I join in because it means extra biscuit rewards. I was the one who taught her how to sit and lie down because she copies everything I do. So there are compensations. However, when she goes off to guide dog school I’ll be hiding that luxury indoor kennel before it can get another occupant!

Finally I also give the puppies some special advice that was imparted to me by my predecessor pet dog, now known as the Sainted Monty.  This is advice on how to manage your human, which is the other essential part of training for any dog.

“You are a service dog but you are also a Labrador Retriever. This is crucially important with regard to issues such as food. Humans Free run believe you should eat a “nourishing complete dog food”. It is important to disabuse them of this belief as soon as possible. I would suggest refusing to eat it, looking sad and my particular favourite:- eating bits of dried food off the floor. This is particularly effective if the human has guests. They will feel embarrassed that their friends think that they are mistreating you.

Training is vital. Begin a structured training program with your owner as soon as possible. It works like this. Every interaction with your owner is an opportunity to be given a treat.  Refuse to do anything you are asked until the human “obeys” you and gives you a treat. Don’t fall for being given dried food (see earlier note); we are talking about steak, sausages and chicken. Me and my big friendRemember we are dogs and we have no shame.   Hope this helps, good luck.”

I've found Monty's advice invaluable and taken together with my own brand of teaching it means that our puppies go out into the world fully trained in how to manage humans and relate to other dogs alongside their formal guide dog training. Lucy will be with a while longer (sigh!) so there's plenty of time for me to teach her how to be a proper dog as well as an assistance dog!

I hope you've enjoyed Angus's description of how he trains the guide dog puppies. He's very happy to take any questions and wonders if you have any tips for him on how to improve his training? 

145 thoughts on “Training A Service Dog”

  1. Aww, looks like you and Ethel learned to nap quite nicely. So nice of you to share your training skills and Monty’s tips.

    Reply
  2. Aww, looks like you and Ethel learned to nap quite nicely. So nice of you to share your training skills and Monty’s tips.

    Reply
  3. Aww, looks like you and Ethel learned to nap quite nicely. So nice of you to share your training skills and Monty’s tips.

    Reply
  4. Aww, looks like you and Ethel learned to nap quite nicely. So nice of you to share your training skills and Monty’s tips.

    Reply
  5. Aww, looks like you and Ethel learned to nap quite nicely. So nice of you to share your training skills and Monty’s tips.

    Reply
  6. Dear Angus, one of my favorite books is A LOYAL COMPANION by Barbara Metzger. Fitz, the dog is the star and does much of the narration. You should see if you can get your Nicola to write a story that you could star in. I know, with your help, it would be a success.
    I love you. I wish you were my dog.

    Reply
  7. Dear Angus, one of my favorite books is A LOYAL COMPANION by Barbara Metzger. Fitz, the dog is the star and does much of the narration. You should see if you can get your Nicola to write a story that you could star in. I know, with your help, it would be a success.
    I love you. I wish you were my dog.

    Reply
  8. Dear Angus, one of my favorite books is A LOYAL COMPANION by Barbara Metzger. Fitz, the dog is the star and does much of the narration. You should see if you can get your Nicola to write a story that you could star in. I know, with your help, it would be a success.
    I love you. I wish you were my dog.

    Reply
  9. Dear Angus, one of my favorite books is A LOYAL COMPANION by Barbara Metzger. Fitz, the dog is the star and does much of the narration. You should see if you can get your Nicola to write a story that you could star in. I know, with your help, it would be a success.
    I love you. I wish you were my dog.

    Reply
  10. Dear Angus, one of my favorite books is A LOYAL COMPANION by Barbara Metzger. Fitz, the dog is the star and does much of the narration. You should see if you can get your Nicola to write a story that you could star in. I know, with your help, it would be a success.
    I love you. I wish you were my dog.

    Reply
  11. It’s lovely to meet you, Mary. I will ask Nicola to look out for that book. It sounds great! She has written a few dogs in her stories but not an Angus… Yet. It would need to be a very special dog!

    Reply
  12. It’s lovely to meet you, Mary. I will ask Nicola to look out for that book. It sounds great! She has written a few dogs in her stories but not an Angus… Yet. It would need to be a very special dog!

    Reply
  13. It’s lovely to meet you, Mary. I will ask Nicola to look out for that book. It sounds great! She has written a few dogs in her stories but not an Angus… Yet. It would need to be a very special dog!

    Reply
  14. It’s lovely to meet you, Mary. I will ask Nicola to look out for that book. It sounds great! She has written a few dogs in her stories but not an Angus… Yet. It would need to be a very special dog!

    Reply
  15. It’s lovely to meet you, Mary. I will ask Nicola to look out for that book. It sounds great! She has written a few dogs in her stories but not an Angus… Yet. It would need to be a very special dog!

    Reply
  16. Angus, you might be interested in a UPI article yesterday on research as to empathy and calmness being, perhaps, important qualities in service dogs. No doubt you are particularly suited to instilling these qualities in those puppies your humans rely on you to train.

    Reply
  17. Angus, you might be interested in a UPI article yesterday on research as to empathy and calmness being, perhaps, important qualities in service dogs. No doubt you are particularly suited to instilling these qualities in those puppies your humans rely on you to train.

    Reply
  18. Angus, you might be interested in a UPI article yesterday on research as to empathy and calmness being, perhaps, important qualities in service dogs. No doubt you are particularly suited to instilling these qualities in those puppies your humans rely on you to train.

    Reply
  19. Angus, you might be interested in a UPI article yesterday on research as to empathy and calmness being, perhaps, important qualities in service dogs. No doubt you are particularly suited to instilling these qualities in those puppies your humans rely on you to train.

    Reply
  20. Angus, you might be interested in a UPI article yesterday on research as to empathy and calmness being, perhaps, important qualities in service dogs. No doubt you are particularly suited to instilling these qualities in those puppies your humans rely on you to train.

    Reply
  21. That’s me! I’m very empathetic! When Nicola tripped up the other day when she was taking me for a walk I went over and nudged her to get up because I knew she wouldn’t want to cause a delay!

    Reply
  22. That’s me! I’m very empathetic! When Nicola tripped up the other day when she was taking me for a walk I went over and nudged her to get up because I knew she wouldn’t want to cause a delay!

    Reply
  23. That’s me! I’m very empathetic! When Nicola tripped up the other day when she was taking me for a walk I went over and nudged her to get up because I knew she wouldn’t want to cause a delay!

    Reply
  24. That’s me! I’m very empathetic! When Nicola tripped up the other day when she was taking me for a walk I went over and nudged her to get up because I knew she wouldn’t want to cause a delay!

    Reply
  25. That’s me! I’m very empathetic! When Nicola tripped up the other day when she was taking me for a walk I went over and nudged her to get up because I knew she wouldn’t want to cause a delay!

    Reply
  26. Awwwwww. Love Angus’s voice!! Oh! I see Joanne agrees with me.
    And may I borrow Angus between his next stints? Please tell me he’s willing to train a rowdy, headstrong, stubborn, rascally, adorable three-year-old handful…

    Reply
  27. Awwwwww. Love Angus’s voice!! Oh! I see Joanne agrees with me.
    And may I borrow Angus between his next stints? Please tell me he’s willing to train a rowdy, headstrong, stubborn, rascally, adorable three-year-old handful…

    Reply
  28. Awwwwww. Love Angus’s voice!! Oh! I see Joanne agrees with me.
    And may I borrow Angus between his next stints? Please tell me he’s willing to train a rowdy, headstrong, stubborn, rascally, adorable three-year-old handful…

    Reply
  29. Awwwwww. Love Angus’s voice!! Oh! I see Joanne agrees with me.
    And may I borrow Angus between his next stints? Please tell me he’s willing to train a rowdy, headstrong, stubborn, rascally, adorable three-year-old handful…

    Reply
  30. Awwwwww. Love Angus’s voice!! Oh! I see Joanne agrees with me.
    And may I borrow Angus between his next stints? Please tell me he’s willing to train a rowdy, headstrong, stubborn, rascally, adorable three-year-old handful…

    Reply
  31. Wonderful post. Since I’m mildly allergic to dogs, I haven’t gotten to know many. I needed Angus’s insights. I wish I’d known this when I babysat our grandchildren’s dog.

    Reply
  32. Wonderful post. Since I’m mildly allergic to dogs, I haven’t gotten to know many. I needed Angus’s insights. I wish I’d known this when I babysat our grandchildren’s dog.

    Reply
  33. Wonderful post. Since I’m mildly allergic to dogs, I haven’t gotten to know many. I needed Angus’s insights. I wish I’d known this when I babysat our grandchildren’s dog.

    Reply
  34. Wonderful post. Since I’m mildly allergic to dogs, I haven’t gotten to know many. I needed Angus’s insights. I wish I’d known this when I babysat our grandchildren’s dog.

    Reply
  35. Wonderful post. Since I’m mildly allergic to dogs, I haven’t gotten to know many. I needed Angus’s insights. I wish I’d known this when I babysat our grandchildren’s dog.

    Reply
  36. Thanks so much, Angus, for an educational post.
    Like Mary T, I was also reminded of books in which a dog’s narration plays a role. For children, there is a fun series of mysteries by John R. Erickson featuring Hank the Cowdog. Then there is the romance series by T. Hammond which begins with Blind Seduction (that title is currently free to Kindle readers); this series does have adult content.

    Reply
  37. Thanks so much, Angus, for an educational post.
    Like Mary T, I was also reminded of books in which a dog’s narration plays a role. For children, there is a fun series of mysteries by John R. Erickson featuring Hank the Cowdog. Then there is the romance series by T. Hammond which begins with Blind Seduction (that title is currently free to Kindle readers); this series does have adult content.

    Reply
  38. Thanks so much, Angus, for an educational post.
    Like Mary T, I was also reminded of books in which a dog’s narration plays a role. For children, there is a fun series of mysteries by John R. Erickson featuring Hank the Cowdog. Then there is the romance series by T. Hammond which begins with Blind Seduction (that title is currently free to Kindle readers); this series does have adult content.

    Reply
  39. Thanks so much, Angus, for an educational post.
    Like Mary T, I was also reminded of books in which a dog’s narration plays a role. For children, there is a fun series of mysteries by John R. Erickson featuring Hank the Cowdog. Then there is the romance series by T. Hammond which begins with Blind Seduction (that title is currently free to Kindle readers); this series does have adult content.

    Reply
  40. Thanks so much, Angus, for an educational post.
    Like Mary T, I was also reminded of books in which a dog’s narration plays a role. For children, there is a fun series of mysteries by John R. Erickson featuring Hank the Cowdog. Then there is the romance series by T. Hammond which begins with Blind Seduction (that title is currently free to Kindle readers); this series does have adult content.

    Reply
  41. Angus, I want to thank you for your very informative and fun post. I really enjoyed it. I certainly understand your dislike of the super luxurious kennel. But thank you for helping the young ones to learn their manners.
    Nicola, Thank YOU for this super fabulous post. Totally loved it.

    Reply
  42. Angus, I want to thank you for your very informative and fun post. I really enjoyed it. I certainly understand your dislike of the super luxurious kennel. But thank you for helping the young ones to learn their manners.
    Nicola, Thank YOU for this super fabulous post. Totally loved it.

    Reply
  43. Angus, I want to thank you for your very informative and fun post. I really enjoyed it. I certainly understand your dislike of the super luxurious kennel. But thank you for helping the young ones to learn their manners.
    Nicola, Thank YOU for this super fabulous post. Totally loved it.

    Reply
  44. Angus, I want to thank you for your very informative and fun post. I really enjoyed it. I certainly understand your dislike of the super luxurious kennel. But thank you for helping the young ones to learn their manners.
    Nicola, Thank YOU for this super fabulous post. Totally loved it.

    Reply
  45. Angus, I want to thank you for your very informative and fun post. I really enjoyed it. I certainly understand your dislike of the super luxurious kennel. But thank you for helping the young ones to learn their manners.
    Nicola, Thank YOU for this super fabulous post. Totally loved it.

    Reply
  46. Well Angus you seem to have everything in hand. I’ve picked up some great tips from you here. I do hope you’ll have more updates soon. (By the way I’m getting my human to type this to my dictation).
    From Merlin, a small(fat) Labrador Cross!!
    Hey I never said type fat:-( That’s the worst of paws instead of fingers!!

    Reply
  47. Well Angus you seem to have everything in hand. I’ve picked up some great tips from you here. I do hope you’ll have more updates soon. (By the way I’m getting my human to type this to my dictation).
    From Merlin, a small(fat) Labrador Cross!!
    Hey I never said type fat:-( That’s the worst of paws instead of fingers!!

    Reply
  48. Well Angus you seem to have everything in hand. I’ve picked up some great tips from you here. I do hope you’ll have more updates soon. (By the way I’m getting my human to type this to my dictation).
    From Merlin, a small(fat) Labrador Cross!!
    Hey I never said type fat:-( That’s the worst of paws instead of fingers!!

    Reply
  49. Well Angus you seem to have everything in hand. I’ve picked up some great tips from you here. I do hope you’ll have more updates soon. (By the way I’m getting my human to type this to my dictation).
    From Merlin, a small(fat) Labrador Cross!!
    Hey I never said type fat:-( That’s the worst of paws instead of fingers!!

    Reply
  50. Well Angus you seem to have everything in hand. I’ve picked up some great tips from you here. I do hope you’ll have more updates soon. (By the way I’m getting my human to type this to my dictation).
    From Merlin, a small(fat) Labrador Cross!!
    Hey I never said type fat:-( That’s the worst of paws instead of fingers!!

    Reply
  51. It is easy to see why Labs are the most popular dog in the US. It must be their intelligence and ability to reason out the best way to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is their charm and ability to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is because like Angus, all of them are absolutely beautiful so they deserve extra treats.

    Reply
  52. It is easy to see why Labs are the most popular dog in the US. It must be their intelligence and ability to reason out the best way to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is their charm and ability to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is because like Angus, all of them are absolutely beautiful so they deserve extra treats.

    Reply
  53. It is easy to see why Labs are the most popular dog in the US. It must be their intelligence and ability to reason out the best way to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is their charm and ability to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is because like Angus, all of them are absolutely beautiful so they deserve extra treats.

    Reply
  54. It is easy to see why Labs are the most popular dog in the US. It must be their intelligence and ability to reason out the best way to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is their charm and ability to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is because like Angus, all of them are absolutely beautiful so they deserve extra treats.

    Reply
  55. It is easy to see why Labs are the most popular dog in the US. It must be their intelligence and ability to reason out the best way to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is their charm and ability to get extra treats.
    Or maybe it is because like Angus, all of them are absolutely beautiful so they deserve extra treats.

    Reply
  56. Hi Annette! Yes, this is all true. I am clever and have a large vocabulary of food-related words (also words related to walks, swimming and naps!) plus I am very handsome and charming. Who wouldn’t want to give me a treat??

    Reply
  57. Hi Annette! Yes, this is all true. I am clever and have a large vocabulary of food-related words (also words related to walks, swimming and naps!) plus I am very handsome and charming. Who wouldn’t want to give me a treat??

    Reply
  58. Hi Annette! Yes, this is all true. I am clever and have a large vocabulary of food-related words (also words related to walks, swimming and naps!) plus I am very handsome and charming. Who wouldn’t want to give me a treat??

    Reply
  59. Hi Annette! Yes, this is all true. I am clever and have a large vocabulary of food-related words (also words related to walks, swimming and naps!) plus I am very handsome and charming. Who wouldn’t want to give me a treat??

    Reply
  60. Hi Annette! Yes, this is all true. I am clever and have a large vocabulary of food-related words (also words related to walks, swimming and naps!) plus I am very handsome and charming. Who wouldn’t want to give me a treat??

    Reply
  61. I’m chiming in late, Angus, but having just met you, I can say without reservation that you are a VERY smart dog, and have definitely trained your humans well. My sympathies on having to be so patient with the puppy interlopers. But as you point out, the opportunities to cadge extra treats outweighs the interruptions of your peace and quiet. . (As I said, you are VERY smart!)

    Reply
  62. I’m chiming in late, Angus, but having just met you, I can say without reservation that you are a VERY smart dog, and have definitely trained your humans well. My sympathies on having to be so patient with the puppy interlopers. But as you point out, the opportunities to cadge extra treats outweighs the interruptions of your peace and quiet. . (As I said, you are VERY smart!)

    Reply
  63. I’m chiming in late, Angus, but having just met you, I can say without reservation that you are a VERY smart dog, and have definitely trained your humans well. My sympathies on having to be so patient with the puppy interlopers. But as you point out, the opportunities to cadge extra treats outweighs the interruptions of your peace and quiet. . (As I said, you are VERY smart!)

    Reply
  64. I’m chiming in late, Angus, but having just met you, I can say without reservation that you are a VERY smart dog, and have definitely trained your humans well. My sympathies on having to be so patient with the puppy interlopers. But as you point out, the opportunities to cadge extra treats outweighs the interruptions of your peace and quiet. . (As I said, you are VERY smart!)

    Reply
  65. I’m chiming in late, Angus, but having just met you, I can say without reservation that you are a VERY smart dog, and have definitely trained your humans well. My sympathies on having to be so patient with the puppy interlopers. But as you point out, the opportunities to cadge extra treats outweighs the interruptions of your peace and quiet. . (As I said, you are VERY smart!)

    Reply
  66. Angus – Lovely post! Unlike some of my best friends, who are also some of my favorite authors who own cats (you know who you are!), I’m a dog person. Who no longer has dogs. Instead, I have a lovely cat named Mitzer. But I still love dogs. And like Kareni and Mary T., I also love books where the dog has a POV. Most recently recently, I read Susan Wilson’s The Dog Who Saved Me. She writes beautifully about dogs. And in that book, the dog definitely has its share of ink. And if anyone would like a light-hearted, dog-centric romance, try Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service. In closing, Angus, I hope Nicola gives you a big hug and several special treats. You deserve them – writing a blog column is hard work!

    Reply
  67. Angus – Lovely post! Unlike some of my best friends, who are also some of my favorite authors who own cats (you know who you are!), I’m a dog person. Who no longer has dogs. Instead, I have a lovely cat named Mitzer. But I still love dogs. And like Kareni and Mary T., I also love books where the dog has a POV. Most recently recently, I read Susan Wilson’s The Dog Who Saved Me. She writes beautifully about dogs. And in that book, the dog definitely has its share of ink. And if anyone would like a light-hearted, dog-centric romance, try Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service. In closing, Angus, I hope Nicola gives you a big hug and several special treats. You deserve them – writing a blog column is hard work!

    Reply
  68. Angus – Lovely post! Unlike some of my best friends, who are also some of my favorite authors who own cats (you know who you are!), I’m a dog person. Who no longer has dogs. Instead, I have a lovely cat named Mitzer. But I still love dogs. And like Kareni and Mary T., I also love books where the dog has a POV. Most recently recently, I read Susan Wilson’s The Dog Who Saved Me. She writes beautifully about dogs. And in that book, the dog definitely has its share of ink. And if anyone would like a light-hearted, dog-centric romance, try Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service. In closing, Angus, I hope Nicola gives you a big hug and several special treats. You deserve them – writing a blog column is hard work!

    Reply
  69. Angus – Lovely post! Unlike some of my best friends, who are also some of my favorite authors who own cats (you know who you are!), I’m a dog person. Who no longer has dogs. Instead, I have a lovely cat named Mitzer. But I still love dogs. And like Kareni and Mary T., I also love books where the dog has a POV. Most recently recently, I read Susan Wilson’s The Dog Who Saved Me. She writes beautifully about dogs. And in that book, the dog definitely has its share of ink. And if anyone would like a light-hearted, dog-centric romance, try Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service. In closing, Angus, I hope Nicola gives you a big hug and several special treats. You deserve them – writing a blog column is hard work!

    Reply
  70. Angus – Lovely post! Unlike some of my best friends, who are also some of my favorite authors who own cats (you know who you are!), I’m a dog person. Who no longer has dogs. Instead, I have a lovely cat named Mitzer. But I still love dogs. And like Kareni and Mary T., I also love books where the dog has a POV. Most recently recently, I read Susan Wilson’s The Dog Who Saved Me. She writes beautifully about dogs. And in that book, the dog definitely has its share of ink. And if anyone would like a light-hearted, dog-centric romance, try Beth Kendrick’s The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service. In closing, Angus, I hope Nicola gives you a big hug and several special treats. You deserve them – writing a blog column is hard work!

    Reply
  71. Thank you, Binnie Syril, I’m pleased to meet you. Having written a blog column I’m now considering a story from a dog’s pov as it sounds rather fun. A lot of hard work, though… Many treats required!

    Reply
  72. Thank you, Binnie Syril, I’m pleased to meet you. Having written a blog column I’m now considering a story from a dog’s pov as it sounds rather fun. A lot of hard work, though… Many treats required!

    Reply
  73. Thank you, Binnie Syril, I’m pleased to meet you. Having written a blog column I’m now considering a story from a dog’s pov as it sounds rather fun. A lot of hard work, though… Many treats required!

    Reply
  74. Thank you, Binnie Syril, I’m pleased to meet you. Having written a blog column I’m now considering a story from a dog’s pov as it sounds rather fun. A lot of hard work, though… Many treats required!

    Reply
  75. Thank you, Binnie Syril, I’m pleased to meet you. Having written a blog column I’m now considering a story from a dog’s pov as it sounds rather fun. A lot of hard work, though… Many treats required!

    Reply

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