Tobacco

Cb Here are Charlie and Billy with my recent books, but I'm going to be writing about somethng connected to my MIP. (A wonderfully all-encompassing term. Manuscript, masterpiece, monster-in-progress.) It illustrates the little problems that can trip us up on the way, but I'm also hoping that by some wild chance, someone reading this can help.

I enjoy gardening, and what's more, I'll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won't move in until some work's been done, but the garden will need care, and it's only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

That's not relevant to the MIP except that when I'm writing, plants automatically fill in my vision of countryside and gardens, but they sometimes trip me up. Willow

For example, in An Unlikely Countess, Cate's brother collected exotic trees, a popular hobby in the 18th century. Among a few others, I tossed in a weeping willow, liking its connection to mourning. I think that's a weeping willow in the picture. It's gorgeous, anyway, and that's Buckingham Palace behind. (You can click on any picture to enlarge it.)

I thought I'd check how new the willow was at the time…. Whoops! It had only just begun to be imported, and specimens were regularly failing in the south of England, never mind the north!

I made lemonade out of lemons, however, and made it a dying weeping willow. How very metaphorical or something.

In the MIP, A Scandalous Countess, I wanted a plant that gives out a perfume in the evening, and the obvious choice was nicotiana, or flowering tobacco. If you've never grown it, give it a try, and if you have the space, go for the tall, leggy sort.  It's not pretty, but my goodness, the perfume in the evening is gorgeous.

Nicotiana That's what I had in mind, and from there I got a nice little word play between Georgia and Tom about tobacco, pleasures denied ladies, and other matters. But I asked myself, was flowering tobacco known at the time? And I can't find out. I found a gardener's dictionary from 1754 in Googlebooks that describes a number of nicotianas, some of them sounding like the one I mean, but no mention of perfume.

I was intrigued, even bemused, by this bit. "The two smaller Sorts of Tobacco are preserved in Botanic Gardens for Variety ; but are seldom propagated for Use. The first Sort is found growing upon Dunghills in divers Parts of England. These are both very hardy, and may be propagated by sowing their Seeds in March, upon a Bed of light Earth, where they will come up, and may be transplanted into any Part of the Garden.

The first of these Sorts is the most common in England, and is generally raised by the Gardeners near London, who supply the Markets with Pots of Plants to adorn Balconies and Shop windows in the City. This Sort, when raised early in the Spring, and planted in a rich Soil, will grow to the Height of ten or twelve Feet, provided the Plants are duly watered in dry Weather."

Ten or twelve feet! On balconies and in shop windows? I'm having trouble forming the picture, but I'd like one of those plants as a show-off specimen!

S1 cute Chiffchaff in orange tree, from Nerja flat Talking of showing off, here's another lovely bird photograph by my husband.

There are many articles about tobacco, but I've found nothing about the introduction of the ornamental sort, in my books or on line. My gut feel is that the leggy, perfumed kind did arrive early, but it'd be great to know. If anyone can come up with something definite, I'll acknowledge it in the book. Out next February.

Adding this, supplied by a reader on my yahoo chat list. "A native of Brazil, Flowering Tobacco was introduced into garden cultivation in England in 1829."

There's no source, so as it's not what I want to hear, I'm still looking. After all, a plant collector could have had some earlier, couldn't they?

If you haven't bought your copy of An Unlikely Countess yet, hurry, hurry, hurry! I'm delighted by the reviews. Readers seem to really be enjoying Cate and Prudence, and many have also picked up on the way it touches on the roles of women at all levels of society in the 18th century. I didn't plan that, but I thiAncountsmrnk it is interesting.

If you're having any trouble finding it, in print or e-form, I've put together a page of suggestions. What a complicated world we live in! 

All best wishes from sunny Devon,

Jo

 

 

 

85 thoughts on “Tobacco”

  1. Jo, I expect you have thought of this, but have you checked the various Botanical Gardens for information? Two in the U. S. come to my mind. 1) The one in Brooklyn (NYC), which I believe is called “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens,” and 2) The one I grew up with, “Missouri Botanical Gardens” in St. Louis, MO (commonly called “Shaw’s Garden.” I know that the latter keeps a library and does research. I think Brooklyn does also. Henry Shaw was younger than your period, but I believe he started the research by looking into the efforts of earlier gardeners.

    Reply
  2. Jo, I expect you have thought of this, but have you checked the various Botanical Gardens for information? Two in the U. S. come to my mind. 1) The one in Brooklyn (NYC), which I believe is called “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens,” and 2) The one I grew up with, “Missouri Botanical Gardens” in St. Louis, MO (commonly called “Shaw’s Garden.” I know that the latter keeps a library and does research. I think Brooklyn does also. Henry Shaw was younger than your period, but I believe he started the research by looking into the efforts of earlier gardeners.

    Reply
  3. Jo, I expect you have thought of this, but have you checked the various Botanical Gardens for information? Two in the U. S. come to my mind. 1) The one in Brooklyn (NYC), which I believe is called “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens,” and 2) The one I grew up with, “Missouri Botanical Gardens” in St. Louis, MO (commonly called “Shaw’s Garden.” I know that the latter keeps a library and does research. I think Brooklyn does also. Henry Shaw was younger than your period, but I believe he started the research by looking into the efforts of earlier gardeners.

    Reply
  4. Jo, I expect you have thought of this, but have you checked the various Botanical Gardens for information? Two in the U. S. come to my mind. 1) The one in Brooklyn (NYC), which I believe is called “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens,” and 2) The one I grew up with, “Missouri Botanical Gardens” in St. Louis, MO (commonly called “Shaw’s Garden.” I know that the latter keeps a library and does research. I think Brooklyn does also. Henry Shaw was younger than your period, but I believe he started the research by looking into the efforts of earlier gardeners.

    Reply
  5. Jo, I expect you have thought of this, but have you checked the various Botanical Gardens for information? Two in the U. S. come to my mind. 1) The one in Brooklyn (NYC), which I believe is called “Brooklyn Botanical Gardens,” and 2) The one I grew up with, “Missouri Botanical Gardens” in St. Louis, MO (commonly called “Shaw’s Garden.” I know that the latter keeps a library and does research. I think Brooklyn does also. Henry Shaw was younger than your period, but I believe he started the research by looking into the efforts of earlier gardeners.

    Reply
  6. All best wishes from rainy Maine. :)At least it’s not snow.
    Though my daughter is a professional gardener, I know nothing to help you. But I did want to tell you I finished reading An Unlikely Countess last night & enjoyed it very much!

    Reply
  7. All best wishes from rainy Maine. :)At least it’s not snow.
    Though my daughter is a professional gardener, I know nothing to help you. But I did want to tell you I finished reading An Unlikely Countess last night & enjoyed it very much!

    Reply
  8. All best wishes from rainy Maine. :)At least it’s not snow.
    Though my daughter is a professional gardener, I know nothing to help you. But I did want to tell you I finished reading An Unlikely Countess last night & enjoyed it very much!

    Reply
  9. All best wishes from rainy Maine. :)At least it’s not snow.
    Though my daughter is a professional gardener, I know nothing to help you. But I did want to tell you I finished reading An Unlikely Countess last night & enjoyed it very much!

    Reply
  10. All best wishes from rainy Maine. :)At least it’s not snow.
    Though my daughter is a professional gardener, I know nothing to help you. But I did want to tell you I finished reading An Unlikely Countess last night & enjoyed it very much!

    Reply
  11. Several books set in the south have mentioned camillias, and their heavy fragrance. Umm. They don’t have any. Must be thinking of gardenias. I have worked in camellia greenhouses, and it is most unsettling- all that color and not a whim of perfume. So don’t beat yourself up too much- most people wont know the difference.

    Reply
  12. Several books set in the south have mentioned camillias, and their heavy fragrance. Umm. They don’t have any. Must be thinking of gardenias. I have worked in camellia greenhouses, and it is most unsettling- all that color and not a whim of perfume. So don’t beat yourself up too much- most people wont know the difference.

    Reply
  13. Several books set in the south have mentioned camillias, and their heavy fragrance. Umm. They don’t have any. Must be thinking of gardenias. I have worked in camellia greenhouses, and it is most unsettling- all that color and not a whim of perfume. So don’t beat yourself up too much- most people wont know the difference.

    Reply
  14. Several books set in the south have mentioned camillias, and their heavy fragrance. Umm. They don’t have any. Must be thinking of gardenias. I have worked in camellia greenhouses, and it is most unsettling- all that color and not a whim of perfume. So don’t beat yourself up too much- most people wont know the difference.

    Reply
  15. Several books set in the south have mentioned camillias, and their heavy fragrance. Umm. They don’t have any. Must be thinking of gardenias. I have worked in camellia greenhouses, and it is most unsettling- all that color and not a whim of perfume. So don’t beat yourself up too much- most people wont know the difference.

    Reply
  16. Loved “An Unlikely Countess”. Excellent read. Finished it at 2:30 AM yesterday.
    Have an “Indian Tobacco” plant here in Southern California. Grows wild and seeds every where. It reaches 10 or 12 feet. Has small tubular yellow flowers. No aroma though.

    Reply
  17. Loved “An Unlikely Countess”. Excellent read. Finished it at 2:30 AM yesterday.
    Have an “Indian Tobacco” plant here in Southern California. Grows wild and seeds every where. It reaches 10 or 12 feet. Has small tubular yellow flowers. No aroma though.

    Reply
  18. Loved “An Unlikely Countess”. Excellent read. Finished it at 2:30 AM yesterday.
    Have an “Indian Tobacco” plant here in Southern California. Grows wild and seeds every where. It reaches 10 or 12 feet. Has small tubular yellow flowers. No aroma though.

    Reply
  19. Loved “An Unlikely Countess”. Excellent read. Finished it at 2:30 AM yesterday.
    Have an “Indian Tobacco” plant here in Southern California. Grows wild and seeds every where. It reaches 10 or 12 feet. Has small tubular yellow flowers. No aroma though.

    Reply
  20. Loved “An Unlikely Countess”. Excellent read. Finished it at 2:30 AM yesterday.
    Have an “Indian Tobacco” plant here in Southern California. Grows wild and seeds every where. It reaches 10 or 12 feet. Has small tubular yellow flowers. No aroma though.

    Reply
  21. How interesting, Jo. As a child we used to drive through whole valleys of tobacco farms and I never realized there was a perfumed variety. I love perfumed plants in the garden. I’ll look this one out.

    Reply
  22. How interesting, Jo. As a child we used to drive through whole valleys of tobacco farms and I never realized there was a perfumed variety. I love perfumed plants in the garden. I’ll look this one out.

    Reply
  23. How interesting, Jo. As a child we used to drive through whole valleys of tobacco farms and I never realized there was a perfumed variety. I love perfumed plants in the garden. I’ll look this one out.

    Reply
  24. How interesting, Jo. As a child we used to drive through whole valleys of tobacco farms and I never realized there was a perfumed variety. I love perfumed plants in the garden. I’ll look this one out.

    Reply
  25. How interesting, Jo. As a child we used to drive through whole valleys of tobacco farms and I never realized there was a perfumed variety. I love perfumed plants in the garden. I’ll look this one out.

    Reply
  26. Stephen Garroway was a Seedsman and Net-maker established at the Rose, near the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street. Printed circa 1770 his “Catalogue of Garden, Grass, Tree & Flower Seeds, Flower Roots, Plants & Nets” does list Tobacco under “Flower Seeds” along with such other fragrant offerings as stock, wallflowers, carnations, and so on.
    I don’t know if this date of appearance is early enough for your purposes. I haven’t yet found an earlier reference.

    Reply
  27. Stephen Garroway was a Seedsman and Net-maker established at the Rose, near the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street. Printed circa 1770 his “Catalogue of Garden, Grass, Tree & Flower Seeds, Flower Roots, Plants & Nets” does list Tobacco under “Flower Seeds” along with such other fragrant offerings as stock, wallflowers, carnations, and so on.
    I don’t know if this date of appearance is early enough for your purposes. I haven’t yet found an earlier reference.

    Reply
  28. Stephen Garroway was a Seedsman and Net-maker established at the Rose, near the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street. Printed circa 1770 his “Catalogue of Garden, Grass, Tree & Flower Seeds, Flower Roots, Plants & Nets” does list Tobacco under “Flower Seeds” along with such other fragrant offerings as stock, wallflowers, carnations, and so on.
    I don’t know if this date of appearance is early enough for your purposes. I haven’t yet found an earlier reference.

    Reply
  29. Stephen Garroway was a Seedsman and Net-maker established at the Rose, near the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street. Printed circa 1770 his “Catalogue of Garden, Grass, Tree & Flower Seeds, Flower Roots, Plants & Nets” does list Tobacco under “Flower Seeds” along with such other fragrant offerings as stock, wallflowers, carnations, and so on.
    I don’t know if this date of appearance is early enough for your purposes. I haven’t yet found an earlier reference.

    Reply
  30. Stephen Garroway was a Seedsman and Net-maker established at the Rose, near the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street. Printed circa 1770 his “Catalogue of Garden, Grass, Tree & Flower Seeds, Flower Roots, Plants & Nets” does list Tobacco under “Flower Seeds” along with such other fragrant offerings as stock, wallflowers, carnations, and so on.
    I don’t know if this date of appearance is early enough for your purposes. I haven’t yet found an earlier reference.

    Reply
  31. Some of the most sweet-scented nicotianas don’t seem to have been introduced into Britain, at least as ornamentals, until the 19th century.
    According to The Ladies’ Flower-Garden of Ornamental Annuals by Jane Loudon (1840), Nicotiana alata was introduced to Britain from Brazil in 1829 (p.247), and the “very fragrant” Nicotiana noctiflora (“night-flowering tobacco”) from the Andes in 1826 (p.245). She does not mention Nicotiana sylvestris, which is famous for its evening scent.
    The website for the National Garden Bureau (US) has a fact sheet about ornamental nicotiana with the following information: “The first of the ornamental nicotianas to gain garden popularity was Nicotiana alata. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800’s it was prized for its white, highly scented flowers that opened at night. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.” (The earliest British references to Nicotiana sylvestris that I came across on Google Books seem mostly to date to the latter half of the nineteenth century.)
    Sorry not to have found something helpful, but at least I can report that I have An Unlikely Countess on order, and look forward to reading it!

    Reply
  32. Some of the most sweet-scented nicotianas don’t seem to have been introduced into Britain, at least as ornamentals, until the 19th century.
    According to The Ladies’ Flower-Garden of Ornamental Annuals by Jane Loudon (1840), Nicotiana alata was introduced to Britain from Brazil in 1829 (p.247), and the “very fragrant” Nicotiana noctiflora (“night-flowering tobacco”) from the Andes in 1826 (p.245). She does not mention Nicotiana sylvestris, which is famous for its evening scent.
    The website for the National Garden Bureau (US) has a fact sheet about ornamental nicotiana with the following information: “The first of the ornamental nicotianas to gain garden popularity was Nicotiana alata. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800’s it was prized for its white, highly scented flowers that opened at night. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.” (The earliest British references to Nicotiana sylvestris that I came across on Google Books seem mostly to date to the latter half of the nineteenth century.)
    Sorry not to have found something helpful, but at least I can report that I have An Unlikely Countess on order, and look forward to reading it!

    Reply
  33. Some of the most sweet-scented nicotianas don’t seem to have been introduced into Britain, at least as ornamentals, until the 19th century.
    According to The Ladies’ Flower-Garden of Ornamental Annuals by Jane Loudon (1840), Nicotiana alata was introduced to Britain from Brazil in 1829 (p.247), and the “very fragrant” Nicotiana noctiflora (“night-flowering tobacco”) from the Andes in 1826 (p.245). She does not mention Nicotiana sylvestris, which is famous for its evening scent.
    The website for the National Garden Bureau (US) has a fact sheet about ornamental nicotiana with the following information: “The first of the ornamental nicotianas to gain garden popularity was Nicotiana alata. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800’s it was prized for its white, highly scented flowers that opened at night. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.” (The earliest British references to Nicotiana sylvestris that I came across on Google Books seem mostly to date to the latter half of the nineteenth century.)
    Sorry not to have found something helpful, but at least I can report that I have An Unlikely Countess on order, and look forward to reading it!

    Reply
  34. Some of the most sweet-scented nicotianas don’t seem to have been introduced into Britain, at least as ornamentals, until the 19th century.
    According to The Ladies’ Flower-Garden of Ornamental Annuals by Jane Loudon (1840), Nicotiana alata was introduced to Britain from Brazil in 1829 (p.247), and the “very fragrant” Nicotiana noctiflora (“night-flowering tobacco”) from the Andes in 1826 (p.245). She does not mention Nicotiana sylvestris, which is famous for its evening scent.
    The website for the National Garden Bureau (US) has a fact sheet about ornamental nicotiana with the following information: “The first of the ornamental nicotianas to gain garden popularity was Nicotiana alata. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800’s it was prized for its white, highly scented flowers that opened at night. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.” (The earliest British references to Nicotiana sylvestris that I came across on Google Books seem mostly to date to the latter half of the nineteenth century.)
    Sorry not to have found something helpful, but at least I can report that I have An Unlikely Countess on order, and look forward to reading it!

    Reply
  35. Some of the most sweet-scented nicotianas don’t seem to have been introduced into Britain, at least as ornamentals, until the 19th century.
    According to The Ladies’ Flower-Garden of Ornamental Annuals by Jane Loudon (1840), Nicotiana alata was introduced to Britain from Brazil in 1829 (p.247), and the “very fragrant” Nicotiana noctiflora (“night-flowering tobacco”) from the Andes in 1826 (p.245). She does not mention Nicotiana sylvestris, which is famous for its evening scent.
    The website for the National Garden Bureau (US) has a fact sheet about ornamental nicotiana with the following information: “The first of the ornamental nicotianas to gain garden popularity was Nicotiana alata. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800’s it was prized for its white, highly scented flowers that opened at night. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.” (The earliest British references to Nicotiana sylvestris that I came across on Google Books seem mostly to date to the latter half of the nineteenth century.)
    Sorry not to have found something helpful, but at least I can report that I have An Unlikely Countess on order, and look forward to reading it!

    Reply
  36. An Unlikely Countess is sitting on my TBR stack as we speak. If I can ever get past these revisions / rewrite or whatever it is I’m doing I will treat myself and read it!! Fascinating information about the night blooming tobacco. Can’t find it in any of my books and I was going to suggest talking to Kew (I think someone already did.) I think they have all sorts of cultivation records in their archives. A lovely sweet smelling flowering shrub I have on my property is the tea olive. The flowers are tiny and white, but the scent is heavenly. Can’t wait to read your book !

    Reply
  37. An Unlikely Countess is sitting on my TBR stack as we speak. If I can ever get past these revisions / rewrite or whatever it is I’m doing I will treat myself and read it!! Fascinating information about the night blooming tobacco. Can’t find it in any of my books and I was going to suggest talking to Kew (I think someone already did.) I think they have all sorts of cultivation records in their archives. A lovely sweet smelling flowering shrub I have on my property is the tea olive. The flowers are tiny and white, but the scent is heavenly. Can’t wait to read your book !

    Reply
  38. An Unlikely Countess is sitting on my TBR stack as we speak. If I can ever get past these revisions / rewrite or whatever it is I’m doing I will treat myself and read it!! Fascinating information about the night blooming tobacco. Can’t find it in any of my books and I was going to suggest talking to Kew (I think someone already did.) I think they have all sorts of cultivation records in their archives. A lovely sweet smelling flowering shrub I have on my property is the tea olive. The flowers are tiny and white, but the scent is heavenly. Can’t wait to read your book !

    Reply
  39. An Unlikely Countess is sitting on my TBR stack as we speak. If I can ever get past these revisions / rewrite or whatever it is I’m doing I will treat myself and read it!! Fascinating information about the night blooming tobacco. Can’t find it in any of my books and I was going to suggest talking to Kew (I think someone already did.) I think they have all sorts of cultivation records in their archives. A lovely sweet smelling flowering shrub I have on my property is the tea olive. The flowers are tiny and white, but the scent is heavenly. Can’t wait to read your book !

    Reply
  40. An Unlikely Countess is sitting on my TBR stack as we speak. If I can ever get past these revisions / rewrite or whatever it is I’m doing I will treat myself and read it!! Fascinating information about the night blooming tobacco. Can’t find it in any of my books and I was going to suggest talking to Kew (I think someone already did.) I think they have all sorts of cultivation records in their archives. A lovely sweet smelling flowering shrub I have on my property is the tea olive. The flowers are tiny and white, but the scent is heavenly. Can’t wait to read your book !

    Reply
  41. Thanks for a most informative post. I have seen the plant at the nurseries, but never realized they were so fragrant.

    Reply
  42. Thanks for a most informative post. I have seen the plant at the nurseries, but never realized they were so fragrant.

    Reply
  43. Thanks for a most informative post. I have seen the plant at the nurseries, but never realized they were so fragrant.

    Reply
  44. Thanks for a most informative post. I have seen the plant at the nurseries, but never realized they were so fragrant.

    Reply
  45. Thanks for a most informative post. I have seen the plant at the nurseries, but never realized they were so fragrant.

    Reply
  46. Other inventions – the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas — greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

    Reply
  47. Other inventions – the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas — greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

    Reply
  48. Other inventions – the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas — greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

    Reply
  49. Other inventions – the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas — greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

    Reply
  50. Other inventions – the vacuum tube to amplify sound, and coaxial cables to link long distances on land and under the seas — greatly expanded phone service. Transistors replaced the old vacuum tubes, and by the 1960s communications satellites eliminated the necessity of landlines. Today, bundles of glass fibers carry calls on laser beams of light.

    Reply
  51. I enjoy gardening, and what’s more, I’ll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won’t move in until some work’s been done, but the garden will need care, and it’s only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

    Reply
  52. I enjoy gardening, and what’s more, I’ll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won’t move in until some work’s been done, but the garden will need care, and it’s only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

    Reply
  53. I enjoy gardening, and what’s more, I’ll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won’t move in until some work’s been done, but the garden will need care, and it’s only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

    Reply
  54. I enjoy gardening, and what’s more, I’ll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won’t move in until some work’s been done, but the garden will need care, and it’s only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

    Reply
  55. I enjoy gardening, and what’s more, I’ll soon have a garden to play with. We take possession of our ne house tomorrow. Yay! We won’t move in until some work’s been done, but the garden will need care, and it’s only a 15 min. walk from our rental.

    Reply

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