To Fluff or Not to Fluff

      From Loretta:
      
      This comes from the Truth is Stranger than Fiction Department.
      
      A couple of weeks ago, Massachusetts State Senator Jarrett Barrios announced that he would file legislation to outlaw Marshmallow Fluff in school lunch programs, because he was outraged that his son, in third grade, was served a Fluffernutter at school.
      
     Jar_of_fluff  For the uninitiated, Fluff is a marshmallow spread and a Fluffernutter is a sandwich of Fluff and peanut butter.
      
      A man named Archibald Query started making Fluff sometime before World War I in Somerville, MA, and sold it door to door.  After the war H. Allen Durkee and Fred L. Mower bought the recipe.  Durkees are still running the company.
      
      For more sexy pictures of jars of Fluff, history, and recipes, here’s the company’s site:
      http://www.marshmallowfluff.com/
      
      The day after Barrios’ announcement, State Representative Kathi-Anne Reinstein, outraged at her colleague’s dissing a beloved, locally made product, announced that she was going to file legislation to make the Fluffernutter Massachusetts’ State Sandwich.
      
      Fluff_oozes A major debate ensued between the anti- and pro-Fluff factions.  The pros, along with simply loving it the way many of us love chocolate (and in fact, a spoonful of Fluff is a splendid topping for a cup of hot chocolate), point out that this is a home-grown article, made in Lynn, Massachusetts, that it is superior to all other marshmallow cream spreads in the known universe, and that to cast any sort of aspersions upon it is un-Massachusettsian, perhaps un-American. 
      
      Yes, I know at first glance this debate looks ridiculous, and Rep. Reinstein said so.  Yes, there are far more important issues for our state legislators to tackle.  And yet…
      
       I have a lot of respect for any locally-owned, family-owned company that’s managed to survive and thrive in the era of megalithic conglomerates.  And let us remember that a Fluffernutter, while not tops on the food pyramid (which by the way, represents a compromise between nutritionists and business) is not actively lethal, unless you are allergic to peanuts–but that’s not what the hullabaloo is about.
      
     Fluff_at_breakfast_1  Now, a good deal of the food in my house is organic, and in the summer I buy as much as I can from the farmer’s market (all locally grown produce).  I don’t eat fast food and almost no junk food–ice cream and chocolate don’t count.  In spite of all this nutritional awareness,
      
      I do love my Fluffernutters.
      
     Fluffernutter_sandwich  These days I might make them on organic whole wheat bread, but they’re still an occasional part of my diet.  They make a splendid breakfast, lunch, or dinner in a hurry.  A Fluffernutter is not empty of nutrients.  After all, there’s egg white in the Fluff, and peanut butter has lots of protein.
      
      So, as much as I am all for healthy eating, and would like to see a massive reduction in junk food served to kids, whether it’s in school or at fast-food restaurants, I was a little troubled by the prospect of a children’s world bereft of Fluffernutters.  I found myself remembering the school lunches of my youth.  From what I see under the School Lunch listings, many of the same meals are still served.  The soggy pizza.  The gristly hamburgers.  Wasn’t ketchup designated a vegetable at one point?  Has it been taken off the vegetable list?  And let’s not forget that gourmet delight, American Chop Suey.
      
      How much worse than those inedible school lunchroom meals is an eminently edible Fluffernutter?Fluffernutter_art_1
      
      Furthermore, the banning of the Fluffernutter raises another sticky issue.  If it goes, some of us have wondered, wouldn’t peanut butter & jelly have to go, too?
      
      Well, it turns out we’ll not be having that disturbing discussion anytime soon.  This past Wednesday, State Senator Barrios dropped his opposition to Fluff.  I ate a Fluffernutter to celebrate.
      
      So what about you?  Have you ever experienced the delights of a Fluffernutter?  Have you a similarly quick, easy, and delicious meal item that might not bear the scrutiny of the Nutrition Police?
      

51 thoughts on “To Fluff or Not to Fluff”

  1. LOL! I’ve never had a Fluffnutter, Loretta, not being very partial to marshmallows in any form, but I’m like you in celebrating the survival of local products. The peanut butter definitely raises the nutritional content, though I prefer mine on banana or apple. (Actually, I don’t keep peanut butter in the house because I Behave Very Badly when it’s within reach.)
    But I’m very glad to hear that the Fluffnutter has survived the depredations of politicians in Massachussetts. A triumph for common sense!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. LOL! I’ve never had a Fluffnutter, Loretta, not being very partial to marshmallows in any form, but I’m like you in celebrating the survival of local products. The peanut butter definitely raises the nutritional content, though I prefer mine on banana or apple. (Actually, I don’t keep peanut butter in the house because I Behave Very Badly when it’s within reach.)
    But I’m very glad to hear that the Fluffnutter has survived the depredations of politicians in Massachussetts. A triumph for common sense!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. LOL! I’ve never had a Fluffnutter, Loretta, not being very partial to marshmallows in any form, but I’m like you in celebrating the survival of local products. The peanut butter definitely raises the nutritional content, though I prefer mine on banana or apple. (Actually, I don’t keep peanut butter in the house because I Behave Very Badly when it’s within reach.)
    But I’m very glad to hear that the Fluffnutter has survived the depredations of politicians in Massachussetts. A triumph for common sense!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. The fluffernutter definitely didn’t make it into English cuisine, and I’m not sure it’s in Canada, either. Anyone know?
    Peanut butter itself is uncommon in England, but we did sometimes have it in the house when I was a child. My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter. But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.
    I suppose up there with local foods that are delicious but bad for you is the bacon butty. A butty is a sandwich made with buttered bread. The bacon is what you put in the sandwich. A staple treat in the North of England when I was growing up. What am I saying? It was considered a complete meal!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  5. The fluffernutter definitely didn’t make it into English cuisine, and I’m not sure it’s in Canada, either. Anyone know?
    Peanut butter itself is uncommon in England, but we did sometimes have it in the house when I was a child. My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter. But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.
    I suppose up there with local foods that are delicious but bad for you is the bacon butty. A butty is a sandwich made with buttered bread. The bacon is what you put in the sandwich. A staple treat in the North of England when I was growing up. What am I saying? It was considered a complete meal!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  6. The fluffernutter definitely didn’t make it into English cuisine, and I’m not sure it’s in Canada, either. Anyone know?
    Peanut butter itself is uncommon in England, but we did sometimes have it in the house when I was a child. My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter. But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.
    I suppose up there with local foods that are delicious but bad for you is the bacon butty. A butty is a sandwich made with buttered bread. The bacon is what you put in the sandwich. A staple treat in the North of England when I was growing up. What am I saying? It was considered a complete meal!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  7. Here’s a variation for you. I told my Mom about the whole fluff controversy, and she said (we’re in NJ as a preface) she used to have fluff and peanut butter on crackers. Forget the exact type of crackers she said, so you can take your pick if you’re so inclinded to try it. 🙂 Me, I like my marshmellow in my ice cream. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  8. Here’s a variation for you. I told my Mom about the whole fluff controversy, and she said (we’re in NJ as a preface) she used to have fluff and peanut butter on crackers. Forget the exact type of crackers she said, so you can take your pick if you’re so inclinded to try it. 🙂 Me, I like my marshmellow in my ice cream. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  9. Here’s a variation for you. I told my Mom about the whole fluff controversy, and she said (we’re in NJ as a preface) she used to have fluff and peanut butter on crackers. Forget the exact type of crackers she said, so you can take your pick if you’re so inclinded to try it. 🙂 Me, I like my marshmellow in my ice cream. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  10. I have a kid that eats paeanut butter and honey sandwich almost every day. He’d probably like the fluff but we’ve never tried it.
    One of our favorite easies is a cheese quesadia (sp?) or “quesadida” as my 4-yr-old says it. Sprinkle some mexican mix shredded chees on a flour tortilla an pop it in the microwave for about 30 seconds. We had that today with apple & peanut butter slivers (p.b. spread between two thins slices of apple).

    Reply
  11. I have a kid that eats paeanut butter and honey sandwich almost every day. He’d probably like the fluff but we’ve never tried it.
    One of our favorite easies is a cheese quesadia (sp?) or “quesadida” as my 4-yr-old says it. Sprinkle some mexican mix shredded chees on a flour tortilla an pop it in the microwave for about 30 seconds. We had that today with apple & peanut butter slivers (p.b. spread between two thins slices of apple).

    Reply
  12. I have a kid that eats paeanut butter and honey sandwich almost every day. He’d probably like the fluff but we’ve never tried it.
    One of our favorite easies is a cheese quesadia (sp?) or “quesadida” as my 4-yr-old says it. Sprinkle some mexican mix shredded chees on a flour tortilla an pop it in the microwave for about 30 seconds. We had that today with apple & peanut butter slivers (p.b. spread between two thins slices of apple).

    Reply
  13. Marshmallows never floated my boat, but I grew up eating nothing but grape jelly and butter sandwiches for lunch, so I’ve no right to disparage the taste of others.
    Can’t get past the smell of peanut butter though.
    I think sometimes politicians come up with these stupidities so they don’t have to deal with reality. Does that make their legislation romance?

    Reply
  14. Marshmallows never floated my boat, but I grew up eating nothing but grape jelly and butter sandwiches for lunch, so I’ve no right to disparage the taste of others.
    Can’t get past the smell of peanut butter though.
    I think sometimes politicians come up with these stupidities so they don’t have to deal with reality. Does that make their legislation romance?

    Reply
  15. Marshmallows never floated my boat, but I grew up eating nothing but grape jelly and butter sandwiches for lunch, so I’ve no right to disparage the taste of others.
    Can’t get past the smell of peanut butter though.
    I think sometimes politicians come up with these stupidities so they don’t have to deal with reality. Does that make their legislation romance?

    Reply
  16. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter, but I love Ben & Jerry’s Phish Food frozen yogurt largely for the sake of the rich veins of marshmallow fluff.
    As for favorite bad-for-me foods, I love ballpark food–hot dogs, brats, polish sausage, garlic fries, etc. Anything kinda smoky and salty. And when I go back to Alabama, where I grew up, I practically live on barbecue, specifically pulled pork with a tangy (never sweet) red sauce. What passes for barbecue outside of my native corner of the Deep South doesn’t taste right to me.

    Reply
  17. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter, but I love Ben & Jerry’s Phish Food frozen yogurt largely for the sake of the rich veins of marshmallow fluff.
    As for favorite bad-for-me foods, I love ballpark food–hot dogs, brats, polish sausage, garlic fries, etc. Anything kinda smoky and salty. And when I go back to Alabama, where I grew up, I practically live on barbecue, specifically pulled pork with a tangy (never sweet) red sauce. What passes for barbecue outside of my native corner of the Deep South doesn’t taste right to me.

    Reply
  18. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter, but I love Ben & Jerry’s Phish Food frozen yogurt largely for the sake of the rich veins of marshmallow fluff.
    As for favorite bad-for-me foods, I love ballpark food–hot dogs, brats, polish sausage, garlic fries, etc. Anything kinda smoky and salty. And when I go back to Alabama, where I grew up, I practically live on barbecue, specifically pulled pork with a tangy (never sweet) red sauce. What passes for barbecue outside of my native corner of the Deep South doesn’t taste right to me.

    Reply
  19. Loretta–a slight correction. He didn’t want to ban the Fluffernutter entirely; he just thought it should only be available once a week instead of every day.
    Never tried it, but I don’t think of marshmallow fluff as something one eats on its own, but as something one mixes into fillings or icings. I think I’d prefer the peanut butter-and-banana sandwich made famous by that well-known nutritional maven, Elvis Presley.
    Incidentally, your title took me considerably aback, as my wicked little mind (corrupted by insectivore porn, no doubt) immediately went to the “fluffer” in porn films….
    — Mole, going back to watch the XXX-rated version of THE TAMING OF THE SHREW with real shrews

    Reply
  20. Loretta–a slight correction. He didn’t want to ban the Fluffernutter entirely; he just thought it should only be available once a week instead of every day.
    Never tried it, but I don’t think of marshmallow fluff as something one eats on its own, but as something one mixes into fillings or icings. I think I’d prefer the peanut butter-and-banana sandwich made famous by that well-known nutritional maven, Elvis Presley.
    Incidentally, your title took me considerably aback, as my wicked little mind (corrupted by insectivore porn, no doubt) immediately went to the “fluffer” in porn films….
    — Mole, going back to watch the XXX-rated version of THE TAMING OF THE SHREW with real shrews

    Reply
  21. Loretta–a slight correction. He didn’t want to ban the Fluffernutter entirely; he just thought it should only be available once a week instead of every day.
    Never tried it, but I don’t think of marshmallow fluff as something one eats on its own, but as something one mixes into fillings or icings. I think I’d prefer the peanut butter-and-banana sandwich made famous by that well-known nutritional maven, Elvis Presley.
    Incidentally, your title took me considerably aback, as my wicked little mind (corrupted by insectivore porn, no doubt) immediately went to the “fluffer” in porn films….
    — Mole, going back to watch the XXX-rated version of THE TAMING OF THE SHREW with real shrews

    Reply
  22. Loretta, I’m glad you’ve brought the defense of the noble Fluffernutter to our attention. Though I can’t see how Massachusetts, the state that gave the rest of America drive-thru Dunkin Donuts, can possibly find sense in limiting the intake of Fluff.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  23. Loretta, I’m glad you’ve brought the defense of the noble Fluffernutter to our attention. Though I can’t see how Massachusetts, the state that gave the rest of America drive-thru Dunkin Donuts, can possibly find sense in limiting the intake of Fluff.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  24. Loretta, I’m glad you’ve brought the defense of the noble Fluffernutter to our attention. Though I can’t see how Massachusetts, the state that gave the rest of America drive-thru Dunkin Donuts, can possibly find sense in limiting the intake of Fluff.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  25. OK, peanut butter goes beautifully with so many things. Bananas and apples, yes, Mary Jo. But enquiring minds want to know how you Behave Badly. Do you eat it with a spoon right out of the jar? Denise, peanut butter and honey is also delicious. One of my special breakfast treats is an English muffin topped with peanut butter, a bit of crispy bacon, and a drizzle of honey. Sometimes I add a thin slice of apple. It’s like eating a mountain but it’s mmmmm good. Jo, where you use butter, I slather on mayo, so I had no trouble appreciating the yummy goodness. Lois, Fluff & peanut butter on crackers is also a delicious treat. When I’ve been ill–often after a bout with migraine–the first clue that I’m recovering is a desperate need for Fluff, with or without PB on a Ritz cracker (or actually, a Hain’s Rich Cracker, which tastes even better, IMO). Susan W., I do love a pulled pork sandwich, and I will certainly agree that it’s not the same up North as down South. However, there are some pockets of BBQ even up here that my husband (born in VA, grew up mostly in GA) doesn’t completely disdain. But the owners tend to be transplanted Southerners. Talpiana, all Fluff lovers knew that cutting back to one day a week was the narrow wedge. Susan/Miranda: not only does Dunkin Donuts continue to proliferate but you will be excited to learn that behind the counters of most of the local DDs these days are Albanians. My sister and I love to go in and impress them with the three Albanian words we know.

    Reply
  26. OK, peanut butter goes beautifully with so many things. Bananas and apples, yes, Mary Jo. But enquiring minds want to know how you Behave Badly. Do you eat it with a spoon right out of the jar? Denise, peanut butter and honey is also delicious. One of my special breakfast treats is an English muffin topped with peanut butter, a bit of crispy bacon, and a drizzle of honey. Sometimes I add a thin slice of apple. It’s like eating a mountain but it’s mmmmm good. Jo, where you use butter, I slather on mayo, so I had no trouble appreciating the yummy goodness. Lois, Fluff & peanut butter on crackers is also a delicious treat. When I’ve been ill–often after a bout with migraine–the first clue that I’m recovering is a desperate need for Fluff, with or without PB on a Ritz cracker (or actually, a Hain’s Rich Cracker, which tastes even better, IMO). Susan W., I do love a pulled pork sandwich, and I will certainly agree that it’s not the same up North as down South. However, there are some pockets of BBQ even up here that my husband (born in VA, grew up mostly in GA) doesn’t completely disdain. But the owners tend to be transplanted Southerners. Talpiana, all Fluff lovers knew that cutting back to one day a week was the narrow wedge. Susan/Miranda: not only does Dunkin Donuts continue to proliferate but you will be excited to learn that behind the counters of most of the local DDs these days are Albanians. My sister and I love to go in and impress them with the three Albanian words we know.

    Reply
  27. OK, peanut butter goes beautifully with so many things. Bananas and apples, yes, Mary Jo. But enquiring minds want to know how you Behave Badly. Do you eat it with a spoon right out of the jar? Denise, peanut butter and honey is also delicious. One of my special breakfast treats is an English muffin topped with peanut butter, a bit of crispy bacon, and a drizzle of honey. Sometimes I add a thin slice of apple. It’s like eating a mountain but it’s mmmmm good. Jo, where you use butter, I slather on mayo, so I had no trouble appreciating the yummy goodness. Lois, Fluff & peanut butter on crackers is also a delicious treat. When I’ve been ill–often after a bout with migraine–the first clue that I’m recovering is a desperate need for Fluff, with or without PB on a Ritz cracker (or actually, a Hain’s Rich Cracker, which tastes even better, IMO). Susan W., I do love a pulled pork sandwich, and I will certainly agree that it’s not the same up North as down South. However, there are some pockets of BBQ even up here that my husband (born in VA, grew up mostly in GA) doesn’t completely disdain. But the owners tend to be transplanted Southerners. Talpiana, all Fluff lovers knew that cutting back to one day a week was the narrow wedge. Susan/Miranda: not only does Dunkin Donuts continue to proliferate but you will be excited to learn that behind the counters of most of the local DDs these days are Albanians. My sister and I love to go in and impress them with the three Albanian words we know.

    Reply
  28. Wow. Haven’t had one in years but I am now craving a fluffernuter bigtime. I never thought about having an adult on-wheat-type fluffernutter. Brilliant! If there was a market open within 30 miles of here I’d be sending my husband out for some fluff now — figuring a pregnant woman is allowed, nay obligated, to demand something outrageous and nutritionally suspect late at night at least once.

    Reply
  29. Wow. Haven’t had one in years but I am now craving a fluffernuter bigtime. I never thought about having an adult on-wheat-type fluffernutter. Brilliant! If there was a market open within 30 miles of here I’d be sending my husband out for some fluff now — figuring a pregnant woman is allowed, nay obligated, to demand something outrageous and nutritionally suspect late at night at least once.

    Reply
  30. Wow. Haven’t had one in years but I am now craving a fluffernuter bigtime. I never thought about having an adult on-wheat-type fluffernutter. Brilliant! If there was a market open within 30 miles of here I’d be sending my husband out for some fluff now — figuring a pregnant woman is allowed, nay obligated, to demand something outrageous and nutritionally suspect late at night at least once.

    Reply
  31. Coming from Australia I have never heard of fluffernutters, and have often found the idea of peanut butter and jam sandwiches make me feek slightly icky. However you cannot get past the old chip (french fries) butty with lashings of butter foloowed closely by a brown sugar sandwich (again with lashings of butter. I am sure there must be some kind of nutritional value in there somewhere?

    Reply
  32. Coming from Australia I have never heard of fluffernutters, and have often found the idea of peanut butter and jam sandwiches make me feek slightly icky. However you cannot get past the old chip (french fries) butty with lashings of butter foloowed closely by a brown sugar sandwich (again with lashings of butter. I am sure there must be some kind of nutritional value in there somewhere?

    Reply
  33. Coming from Australia I have never heard of fluffernutters, and have often found the idea of peanut butter and jam sandwiches make me feek slightly icky. However you cannot get past the old chip (french fries) butty with lashings of butter foloowed closely by a brown sugar sandwich (again with lashings of butter. I am sure there must be some kind of nutritional value in there somewhere?

    Reply
  34. From Sherrie:
    Jo B said: “My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter.”
    That’s a crime? Jo, I always butter my bread first, no matter what kind of sandwich I make. It just wouldn’t taste like a sandwich without it.
    Jo B. also said: “But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.”
    OK, I’m an American just across the border from you, Jo, but as I said above, I always butter my bread when making sandwiches, and that includes cheese sandwiches. But for cheese sandwiches, I also use mayonnaise.
    I grew up with peanut butter and strawberry jelly sandwiches, and I love them to this day, especially on buttered toast.
    But the one sandwich I’ve never made is a fluffernutter. Never heard of it before. In fact, I’ve never heard of Marshmallow Fluff, and even if I had, it would never have occurred to me to mix it with peanut butter. It does sound good thought.
    Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.
    I like peanut butter on apples and celery sticks. I also like to add peanut butter and honey together and mix it well before spreading on buttered toast. Then I burp peanut butter the rest of the day. (g)
    Sherrie Holmes

    Reply
  35. From Sherrie:
    Jo B said: “My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter.”
    That’s a crime? Jo, I always butter my bread first, no matter what kind of sandwich I make. It just wouldn’t taste like a sandwich without it.
    Jo B. also said: “But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.”
    OK, I’m an American just across the border from you, Jo, but as I said above, I always butter my bread when making sandwiches, and that includes cheese sandwiches. But for cheese sandwiches, I also use mayonnaise.
    I grew up with peanut butter and strawberry jelly sandwiches, and I love them to this day, especially on buttered toast.
    But the one sandwich I’ve never made is a fluffernutter. Never heard of it before. In fact, I’ve never heard of Marshmallow Fluff, and even if I had, it would never have occurred to me to mix it with peanut butter. It does sound good thought.
    Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.
    I like peanut butter on apples and celery sticks. I also like to add peanut butter and honey together and mix it well before spreading on buttered toast. Then I burp peanut butter the rest of the day. (g)
    Sherrie Holmes

    Reply
  36. From Sherrie:
    Jo B said: “My crime, in North American eyes, is that I like a peanut butter sandwich with butter.”
    That’s a crime? Jo, I always butter my bread first, no matter what kind of sandwich I make. It just wouldn’t taste like a sandwich without it.
    Jo B. also said: “But then, I freaked some American friends because I use buttered bread to make a cheese sandwich.”
    OK, I’m an American just across the border from you, Jo, but as I said above, I always butter my bread when making sandwiches, and that includes cheese sandwiches. But for cheese sandwiches, I also use mayonnaise.
    I grew up with peanut butter and strawberry jelly sandwiches, and I love them to this day, especially on buttered toast.
    But the one sandwich I’ve never made is a fluffernutter. Never heard of it before. In fact, I’ve never heard of Marshmallow Fluff, and even if I had, it would never have occurred to me to mix it with peanut butter. It does sound good thought.
    Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.
    I like peanut butter on apples and celery sticks. I also like to add peanut butter and honey together and mix it well before spreading on buttered toast. Then I burp peanut butter the rest of the day. (g)
    Sherrie Holmes

    Reply
  37. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter or even had Marshmallow Fluff. My family has always used Kraft marshmallow creme, especially to make homemade fudge. But I wouldn’t mind trying it.
    My mom grew up on peanut butter and honey mixed together with a little bit of butter, to make it creamy, spread on bread, but my brother’s and I didn’t care for that combination. So my mom made a mixture of peanut butter, maple syrup and butter. That was one of our favorite treats.
    Now my dad got me hooked on saltine crackers crumbled up in milk and it was always in a glass not a bowl, lol. I’ve never heard of that one from anyone else.

    Reply
  38. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter or even had Marshmallow Fluff. My family has always used Kraft marshmallow creme, especially to make homemade fudge. But I wouldn’t mind trying it.
    My mom grew up on peanut butter and honey mixed together with a little bit of butter, to make it creamy, spread on bread, but my brother’s and I didn’t care for that combination. So my mom made a mixture of peanut butter, maple syrup and butter. That was one of our favorite treats.
    Now my dad got me hooked on saltine crackers crumbled up in milk and it was always in a glass not a bowl, lol. I’ve never heard of that one from anyone else.

    Reply
  39. I’ve never eaten a fluffernutter or even had Marshmallow Fluff. My family has always used Kraft marshmallow creme, especially to make homemade fudge. But I wouldn’t mind trying it.
    My mom grew up on peanut butter and honey mixed together with a little bit of butter, to make it creamy, spread on bread, but my brother’s and I didn’t care for that combination. So my mom made a mixture of peanut butter, maple syrup and butter. That was one of our favorite treats.
    Now my dad got me hooked on saltine crackers crumbled up in milk and it was always in a glass not a bowl, lol. I’ve never heard of that one from anyone else.

    Reply
  40. Sherrie wrote:
    “Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.”
    I’ll bet that’s heresy, Sherrie. You’d better duck.
    Lefsley, wishing we had Fluff here in Washington State so I could be part of the in-crowd.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie wrote:
    “Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.”
    I’ll bet that’s heresy, Sherrie. You’d better duck.
    Lefsley, wishing we had Fluff here in Washington State so I could be part of the in-crowd.

    Reply
  42. Sherrie wrote:
    “Up here, we have Kraft Marshmallow Cream, which is probably the same thing as Fluff.”
    I’ll bet that’s heresy, Sherrie. You’d better duck.
    Lefsley, wishing we had Fluff here in Washington State so I could be part of the in-crowd.

    Reply
  43. I think fluffernutters are a New England thing – or at least northeastern. They were my absolute favorite sandwich growing up in CT, but most people outside of New England have no clue what I’m talking about when I mention them. Of course, they don’t know what a grinder is either. They’re just deprived.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  44. I think fluffernutters are a New England thing – or at least northeastern. They were my absolute favorite sandwich growing up in CT, but most people outside of New England have no clue what I’m talking about when I mention them. Of course, they don’t know what a grinder is either. They’re just deprived.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  45. I think fluffernutters are a New England thing – or at least northeastern. They were my absolute favorite sandwich growing up in CT, but most people outside of New England have no clue what I’m talking about when I mention them. Of course, they don’t know what a grinder is either. They’re just deprived.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  46. Susie, can you get Fluff where you are, or are you sending your husband to MA?
    Cat, my father did the same thing.
    Lefsley, Sherrie did commit heresy. I’m just going to have to send her a jar and enlighten her.
    Michelle, you are absolutely right. They’re deprived.

    Reply
  47. Susie, can you get Fluff where you are, or are you sending your husband to MA?
    Cat, my father did the same thing.
    Lefsley, Sherrie did commit heresy. I’m just going to have to send her a jar and enlighten her.
    Michelle, you are absolutely right. They’re deprived.

    Reply
  48. Susie, can you get Fluff where you are, or are you sending your husband to MA?
    Cat, my father did the same thing.
    Lefsley, Sherrie did commit heresy. I’m just going to have to send her a jar and enlighten her.
    Michelle, you are absolutely right. They’re deprived.

    Reply

Leave a Comment