To Be a Lady

From Pat Rice:

Just back from the RWA conference and my brain is utterly wiped.  And I really don’t think it was all the dancing in Pradas, either, although we probably would have melted from the heat if we’d tried to do more than breathe. 

The Literacy signing was utterly spectacular, so any of our readers out there who went—a huge thank you!  I have never seen so many people in one place, and craven that I am, I was thrilled my plane arrived too late to chance taking a table.  I don’t mind stopping in and doing my part for a few minutes, but three hours in that din and I would have been deaf.  So I think those who participated ought to be given some kind of charitable version of a Purple Heart.

The whole conference was quite upbeat, and the wenches are all happy to know that historicals are walking away with 40% of the romance market!  Yeah, team!  It looks as if publishers are really catching on to new trends in the historical market, so you ought to be seeing lots of great history and stories in the coming years.

I’m still playing catch-up after being gone nearly a week, so I’m running late and kicking myself for not bringing back pictures with which to fill the page.  (Did you know that it’s perfectly all right to end a sentence with a preposition? There is nothing wrong with “…pictures to fill the page with?” The preposition rule applies to Latin, not to English!)

So, now the big debate here is—do we want to brand ourselves as Barbies, teddy bears, or ancient ladies?  Right now, I’m leaning sadly toward ancient lady…  creak, rustle.Wdesklady1

30 thoughts on “To Be a Lady”

  1. Welcome back, Pat! And thanks for some great news on the state of historicals. They had a downswing for a while, but this business is nothing if not cyclical, so we learn to hang on and just wait it out. I think the current success of mainstream non-romance historicals is now trickling down to historical romance to renew reader interest, and also may expand the arena for historical writers. Yay!
    As for whether we go for Barbies, teddy bears, historical images or author images for our signature pictures and other art on the site — I like it all. The more variety the more fun. I might trot out a Barbie or two of my own. 😉
    ~Susan

    Reply
  2. Welcome back, Pat! And thanks for some great news on the state of historicals. They had a downswing for a while, but this business is nothing if not cyclical, so we learn to hang on and just wait it out. I think the current success of mainstream non-romance historicals is now trickling down to historical romance to renew reader interest, and also may expand the arena for historical writers. Yay!
    As for whether we go for Barbies, teddy bears, historical images or author images for our signature pictures and other art on the site — I like it all. The more variety the more fun. I might trot out a Barbie or two of my own. 😉
    ~Susan

    Reply
  3. Welcome back, Pat! And thanks for some great news on the state of historicals. They had a downswing for a while, but this business is nothing if not cyclical, so we learn to hang on and just wait it out. I think the current success of mainstream non-romance historicals is now trickling down to historical romance to renew reader interest, and also may expand the arena for historical writers. Yay!
    As for whether we go for Barbies, teddy bears, historical images or author images for our signature pictures and other art on the site — I like it all. The more variety the more fun. I might trot out a Barbie or two of my own. 😉
    ~Susan

    Reply
  4. I stumbled upon this site as I was in the process of doing some online research. I had not heard that the preposition rule only applied to Latin. How many of us have struggled to reword a perfectly good sentence because we thought we were breaking one of writing’s cardinal rules?

    Reply
  5. I stumbled upon this site as I was in the process of doing some online research. I had not heard that the preposition rule only applied to Latin. How many of us have struggled to reword a perfectly good sentence because we thought we were breaking one of writing’s cardinal rules?

    Reply
  6. I stumbled upon this site as I was in the process of doing some online research. I had not heard that the preposition rule only applied to Latin. How many of us have struggled to reword a perfectly good sentence because we thought we were breaking one of writing’s cardinal rules?

    Reply
  7. Aww heck, Pat. I’m not a Barbie. I don’t know quite what I am. Stilll searching, which I think is good. Must I be labeled? Fought against that all my life!

    Reply
  8. Aww heck, Pat. I’m not a Barbie. I don’t know quite what I am. Stilll searching, which I think is good. Must I be labeled? Fought against that all my life!

    Reply
  9. Aww heck, Pat. I’m not a Barbie. I don’t know quite what I am. Stilll searching, which I think is good. Must I be labeled? Fought against that all my life!

    Reply
  10. Hi, Cathy, glad to “see” you again! Maybe I just feel ancient today.
    The problem with the preposition rule is that so many people believe it, that it’s not worth the effort of challenging every editor and copyeditor who sincerely believes it. It’s kind of become a rule because it’s thought of as a rule.
    I can see being split personalities, teddy bears one day, Barbies another. Edith, you can be labeled by having no label!

    Reply
  11. Hi, Cathy, glad to “see” you again! Maybe I just feel ancient today.
    The problem with the preposition rule is that so many people believe it, that it’s not worth the effort of challenging every editor and copyeditor who sincerely believes it. It’s kind of become a rule because it’s thought of as a rule.
    I can see being split personalities, teddy bears one day, Barbies another. Edith, you can be labeled by having no label!

    Reply
  12. Hi, Cathy, glad to “see” you again! Maybe I just feel ancient today.
    The problem with the preposition rule is that so many people believe it, that it’s not worth the effort of challenging every editor and copyeditor who sincerely believes it. It’s kind of become a rule because it’s thought of as a rule.
    I can see being split personalities, teddy bears one day, Barbies another. Edith, you can be labeled by having no label!

    Reply
  13. From Sherrie:
    Pat, you have done a PSA–a public service announcement! It most certainly *is* all right to end a sentence with a preposition! Yet, as you say, so many people are under the misapprehension that it is a big no-no. One of my favorite quotes regarding this comes from Winston Churchill when he was corrected by a lady for ending a sentence with a preposition. He replied that she was right, and that it was “a practice up with which I will not put.”

    Reply
  14. From Sherrie:
    Pat, you have done a PSA–a public service announcement! It most certainly *is* all right to end a sentence with a preposition! Yet, as you say, so many people are under the misapprehension that it is a big no-no. One of my favorite quotes regarding this comes from Winston Churchill when he was corrected by a lady for ending a sentence with a preposition. He replied that she was right, and that it was “a practice up with which I will not put.”

    Reply
  15. From Sherrie:
    Pat, you have done a PSA–a public service announcement! It most certainly *is* all right to end a sentence with a preposition! Yet, as you say, so many people are under the misapprehension that it is a big no-no. One of my favorite quotes regarding this comes from Winston Churchill when he was corrected by a lady for ending a sentence with a preposition. He replied that she was right, and that it was “a practice up with which I will not put.”

    Reply
  16. Hi Pat:
    It was wonderful to meet you in the bookstore at the conference. I loved having the chance to chat with you and Mary Jo…not sure I mentioned it to you (I was a little starstruck!) but I’m a big fan. Though I know I could never pull off writing one, I definitely love reading historicals. I was thrilled to learn that so many of my fave historical authors are right here in one place!
    Best of luck and welcome to the blogging world, Wenches!
    Leslie Kelly
    http://www.plotmonkeys.com

    Reply
  17. Hi Pat:
    It was wonderful to meet you in the bookstore at the conference. I loved having the chance to chat with you and Mary Jo…not sure I mentioned it to you (I was a little starstruck!) but I’m a big fan. Though I know I could never pull off writing one, I definitely love reading historicals. I was thrilled to learn that so many of my fave historical authors are right here in one place!
    Best of luck and welcome to the blogging world, Wenches!
    Leslie Kelly
    http://www.plotmonkeys.com

    Reply
  18. Hi Pat:
    It was wonderful to meet you in the bookstore at the conference. I loved having the chance to chat with you and Mary Jo…not sure I mentioned it to you (I was a little starstruck!) but I’m a big fan. Though I know I could never pull off writing one, I definitely love reading historicals. I was thrilled to learn that so many of my fave historical authors are right here in one place!
    Best of luck and welcome to the blogging world, Wenches!
    Leslie Kelly
    http://www.plotmonkeys.com

    Reply
  19. Sherrie, this is just one version of a much-disputed attribution. This is the version cited by the Churchill Centre:
    After receiving a Minute issued by a priggish civil servant, objecting to the ending of a sentence with a preposition and the use of a dangling participle in official documents, Churchill red pencilled in the margin: “This is the sort of pedantry up with which I will not put.”
    And this, alas! seems to be the real skinny:
    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001715.html

    Reply
  20. Sherrie, this is just one version of a much-disputed attribution. This is the version cited by the Churchill Centre:
    After receiving a Minute issued by a priggish civil servant, objecting to the ending of a sentence with a preposition and the use of a dangling participle in official documents, Churchill red pencilled in the margin: “This is the sort of pedantry up with which I will not put.”
    And this, alas! seems to be the real skinny:
    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001715.html

    Reply
  21. Sherrie, this is just one version of a much-disputed attribution. This is the version cited by the Churchill Centre:
    After receiving a Minute issued by a priggish civil servant, objecting to the ending of a sentence with a preposition and the use of a dangling participle in official documents, Churchill red pencilled in the margin: “This is the sort of pedantry up with which I will not put.”
    And this, alas! seems to be the real skinny:
    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001715.html

    Reply
  22. Pat, can you expand a bit on this “historicals as 40% of the market” report that you got at RWA? Perhaps in your next blog? Thanks,
    ml

    Reply
  23. Pat, can you expand a bit on this “historicals as 40% of the market” report that you got at RWA? Perhaps in your next blog? Thanks,
    ml

    Reply
  24. Pat, can you expand a bit on this “historicals as 40% of the market” report that you got at RWA? Perhaps in your next blog? Thanks,
    ml

    Reply
  25. Starstruck? of moi? You mean I didn’t have jelly down my front for a change? Or spinach between my teeth? Must have been early in the conference. Your group gave us some great ideas to chew on. Hope you’ll be at the Ninc conference so we can talk some more.
    Mary Lynne, I’m not certain how much I can expand upon the 40% but I’ll see what I can come up with. We’re talking about doing a writing business column occasionally, so let’s see what comes of it.

    Reply
  26. Starstruck? of moi? You mean I didn’t have jelly down my front for a change? Or spinach between my teeth? Must have been early in the conference. Your group gave us some great ideas to chew on. Hope you’ll be at the Ninc conference so we can talk some more.
    Mary Lynne, I’m not certain how much I can expand upon the 40% but I’ll see what I can come up with. We’re talking about doing a writing business column occasionally, so let’s see what comes of it.

    Reply
  27. Starstruck? of moi? You mean I didn’t have jelly down my front for a change? Or spinach between my teeth? Must have been early in the conference. Your group gave us some great ideas to chew on. Hope you’ll be at the Ninc conference so we can talk some more.
    Mary Lynne, I’m not certain how much I can expand upon the 40% but I’ll see what I can come up with. We’re talking about doing a writing business column occasionally, so let’s see what comes of it.

    Reply

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