To Tour or Not to Tour

Bagpiper   Scotland! I’ve been so fortunate to be able to visit there several times over several years … really, who would turn down a tax-deductible reason to go to Scotland?!

               

The place is wildly inspiring as well as tax deductible for a researching writer. I’ve been able to wander castles and ruins, sleep in ghost-inhabited manor houses, visit ancient cairns, medieval churches and old city quarters, all of which have appeared in one book or another; I’ve walked for hours in Edinburgh in rain, sun and fog; I’ve been through the Highlands in all sorts of weather, and some of the Hebridean islands too. I’ve stood on the shores of remote Highland lochs, jumped across fast burns and sunk to my ankles (and wheel covers) in muddy bogs; I’ve walked over narrow inlets and stood on windy cliffsides and sailed on boats through thick dawn mist. Yup, there are places in Scotland that really are as romantic, majestic, and/or atmospheric as reputation claims.

               

Highland_groom_reduced_jpg These are officially research trips, so I try to glean info for whatever I’m working on. Sometimes I’ve hit research gold, discovering information that doesn’t exist in books or online searches. A rusty old sign beside Loch Katrine telling about local whiskey smugglers gave me an idea for a novella (“White Fire” in APRIL MOON), and then my next Sarah Gabriel release, THE HIGHLAND GROOM.

Castle_2 And one day, standing in a quiet sunlit spot in a castle ruin, I suddenly imagined the strong-willed stonecarver heroine who became Alainna in THE STONE MAIDEN.

On a rainy afternoon in Dunfermline, I met an elderly historian who told me local historical anecdotes that have never been published (except by me!). Those nuggets added a deeper layer to the story I was writing at the time – LAIRD OF THE WIND. The hero, a close follower of William Wallace, feared that he had led betrayers to the patriot. The local traditions helped resolve the plot with a twist (and of course the hero found the love of his life!). Without that rainy afternoon, I might have written the story differently …

Dunfermline3_4 Now my visits to Dunfermline—one of my favorite peaceful places in Scotland—will come in handy again. My current novel-in-progress about Queen Margaret of Scotland is set partly in Dunfermline, where Margaret  and Malcolm Canmore spent much of their time. Until I can get back to Scotland, memories and digital picture files will do the trick.

               

And I’ve met people in Scotland who have become lifelong friends, who now visit me when they’re over here. Just last year I explained to a friend, Scottish musician Dougie MacLean (if you don’t know his music, you’re in for a treat!) about a plot problem in LADY MACBETH … how could Macbeth, fatally wounded in battle against Malcolm Canmore, travel the fifty rugged miles from the Highlands to Scone, as recent historical evidence indicates? Ladymacbeth_new Macbeth was severely wounded, and it seemed impossible. My friend pointed out that Macbeth would "just take a boat" -– heading for the coast instead of inland as historians assumed, he could have sailed down the firth to the River Tay. That made all the difference to the scene. I put my characters on a longship one more time….

               

Writing Scotland is a fantastic excuse to go to there, and I’ve often used what I’ve learned there … but more often I research my books at home. Traveling for research is huge fun, but it’s not essential to the writing process, especially for fiction. Many, many authors brilliantly evoke places they’ve never seen.

No matter how much in-depth, in situ research and trekking about we do, ultimately writing good fiction comes down to planting the self in the chair and getting the work done. Good writing relies on quality of imagination and the ability to weave what we’ve learned and imagined into a complete and convincing story fabric. Whether or not we’ve been to the places we write about isn’t the important thing … it’s writing about what we love and what fascinates us, and conveying that in the book. That’s what really counts.

Highland_coo Have you all been to Scotland, and if not, what’s your favorite place to travel (in reality or in daydreams)? Do you notice in a novel when an author seems know the place well, either through traveling or through detail work done from home?

I’m offering a special prize this week, since I mentioned Dougie MacLean, who’s currently on an east coast tour (check his concert schedule for tickets) … a winner chosen at random from comments to this blog will win an autographed Dougie MacLean CD!

Slainte!

Susan Sarah

95 thoughts on “To Tour or Not to Tour”

  1. I like a novel with a sense of place. I like descriptions of the location–the scenery, the people, different times of day. I especially like descriptions that paint pictures with words. You do this, Sarah, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find.
    As for traveling, I hate it, and only go as far as I have to. I’ll do mine in books. I just hope there are enough books left in these times of rush-rush-rush that give me the descriptions I want.

    Reply
  2. I like a novel with a sense of place. I like descriptions of the location–the scenery, the people, different times of day. I especially like descriptions that paint pictures with words. You do this, Sarah, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find.
    As for traveling, I hate it, and only go as far as I have to. I’ll do mine in books. I just hope there are enough books left in these times of rush-rush-rush that give me the descriptions I want.

    Reply
  3. I like a novel with a sense of place. I like descriptions of the location–the scenery, the people, different times of day. I especially like descriptions that paint pictures with words. You do this, Sarah, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find.
    As for traveling, I hate it, and only go as far as I have to. I’ll do mine in books. I just hope there are enough books left in these times of rush-rush-rush that give me the descriptions I want.

    Reply
  4. I like a novel with a sense of place. I like descriptions of the location–the scenery, the people, different times of day. I especially like descriptions that paint pictures with words. You do this, Sarah, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find.
    As for traveling, I hate it, and only go as far as I have to. I’ll do mine in books. I just hope there are enough books left in these times of rush-rush-rush that give me the descriptions I want.

    Reply
  5. I like a novel with a sense of place. I like descriptions of the location–the scenery, the people, different times of day. I especially like descriptions that paint pictures with words. You do this, Sarah, but it’s becoming harder and harder to find.
    As for traveling, I hate it, and only go as far as I have to. I’ll do mine in books. I just hope there are enough books left in these times of rush-rush-rush that give me the descriptions I want.

    Reply
  6. My mother’s family came from Scotland, Forfar, a beautiful place. I grew up on stories of the country and the people, but have never been.
    I’m an only and my family (of course, not my husband, girls or his family, but my childhood family) is all gone now except for an aunt who still lives in Dundee. I call her several times a year but haven’t seen her since I was very young. I’d like to, once more. And I want to walk the ground my grandparents walked, visit the local cemetery and see my heritage and how far back my family goes.
    Funny, I’ve never been, but it became so alive for me through the stories and very old sepia toned pictures, the songs my grandmother sang to me, the music…Scotland calls to me, like a second home country.
    And some day, I’ll get there.
    Someday.
    So I love to read novels set in Scotland. The descriptions often remind me of those stories I heard as a child. Though of course, the novel must be well written and the area descriptions true.
    As a side note, my father’s parents were from Cornwall. Family dinners (few and very far between) with both sets of grandparents, were extremely interesting, to say the least.

    Reply
  7. My mother’s family came from Scotland, Forfar, a beautiful place. I grew up on stories of the country and the people, but have never been.
    I’m an only and my family (of course, not my husband, girls or his family, but my childhood family) is all gone now except for an aunt who still lives in Dundee. I call her several times a year but haven’t seen her since I was very young. I’d like to, once more. And I want to walk the ground my grandparents walked, visit the local cemetery and see my heritage and how far back my family goes.
    Funny, I’ve never been, but it became so alive for me through the stories and very old sepia toned pictures, the songs my grandmother sang to me, the music…Scotland calls to me, like a second home country.
    And some day, I’ll get there.
    Someday.
    So I love to read novels set in Scotland. The descriptions often remind me of those stories I heard as a child. Though of course, the novel must be well written and the area descriptions true.
    As a side note, my father’s parents were from Cornwall. Family dinners (few and very far between) with both sets of grandparents, were extremely interesting, to say the least.

    Reply
  8. My mother’s family came from Scotland, Forfar, a beautiful place. I grew up on stories of the country and the people, but have never been.
    I’m an only and my family (of course, not my husband, girls or his family, but my childhood family) is all gone now except for an aunt who still lives in Dundee. I call her several times a year but haven’t seen her since I was very young. I’d like to, once more. And I want to walk the ground my grandparents walked, visit the local cemetery and see my heritage and how far back my family goes.
    Funny, I’ve never been, but it became so alive for me through the stories and very old sepia toned pictures, the songs my grandmother sang to me, the music…Scotland calls to me, like a second home country.
    And some day, I’ll get there.
    Someday.
    So I love to read novels set in Scotland. The descriptions often remind me of those stories I heard as a child. Though of course, the novel must be well written and the area descriptions true.
    As a side note, my father’s parents were from Cornwall. Family dinners (few and very far between) with both sets of grandparents, were extremely interesting, to say the least.

    Reply
  9. My mother’s family came from Scotland, Forfar, a beautiful place. I grew up on stories of the country and the people, but have never been.
    I’m an only and my family (of course, not my husband, girls or his family, but my childhood family) is all gone now except for an aunt who still lives in Dundee. I call her several times a year but haven’t seen her since I was very young. I’d like to, once more. And I want to walk the ground my grandparents walked, visit the local cemetery and see my heritage and how far back my family goes.
    Funny, I’ve never been, but it became so alive for me through the stories and very old sepia toned pictures, the songs my grandmother sang to me, the music…Scotland calls to me, like a second home country.
    And some day, I’ll get there.
    Someday.
    So I love to read novels set in Scotland. The descriptions often remind me of those stories I heard as a child. Though of course, the novel must be well written and the area descriptions true.
    As a side note, my father’s parents were from Cornwall. Family dinners (few and very far between) with both sets of grandparents, were extremely interesting, to say the least.

    Reply
  10. My mother’s family came from Scotland, Forfar, a beautiful place. I grew up on stories of the country and the people, but have never been.
    I’m an only and my family (of course, not my husband, girls or his family, but my childhood family) is all gone now except for an aunt who still lives in Dundee. I call her several times a year but haven’t seen her since I was very young. I’d like to, once more. And I want to walk the ground my grandparents walked, visit the local cemetery and see my heritage and how far back my family goes.
    Funny, I’ve never been, but it became so alive for me through the stories and very old sepia toned pictures, the songs my grandmother sang to me, the music…Scotland calls to me, like a second home country.
    And some day, I’ll get there.
    Someday.
    So I love to read novels set in Scotland. The descriptions often remind me of those stories I heard as a child. Though of course, the novel must be well written and the area descriptions true.
    As a side note, my father’s parents were from Cornwall. Family dinners (few and very far between) with both sets of grandparents, were extremely interesting, to say the least.

    Reply
  11. My ancestors on the maternal side were Scottish but it’s far enough back that I don’t know where they lived in the country. My Dad’s people were Irish. The family story is that some of them came over with Oglethorpe in the early 1700s. Since they were illiterate it’s very hard to document.
    I love stories set in Scotland and Ireland. Not just because of the genetic connection but because the stories of the people are so inspiring. Both groups have been ill treated and survived, even flourished. When I deal with hardheaded, stubborn relatives I am reminded that only the hardheaded, stubborn ones were able to survive or had the gumption to seek freedom in a new place. The pictures I’ve seen call to me and feel familiar, though I’ve never set foot on the soil.
    Many of you on this site are also Elizabeth Lowell fans and know this story. But for those who don’t, I’ll summarize. While EL was researching for her medieval series she was traveling in Scotland with her husband. They were wandering along a side road and ended up at an old parish church. The 2 of them were able to look at some of the records which dated back several hundred years. They found that their anscestors had lived near that spot and attended that very church. Further there were many instances of intermarriage between their 2 clans. EL said that she had previously wondered why he was “the one and only” and supposed that it was the genetic pattern of their distant past calling to them. She, of course, tells it much more eloquently.

    Reply
  12. My ancestors on the maternal side were Scottish but it’s far enough back that I don’t know where they lived in the country. My Dad’s people were Irish. The family story is that some of them came over with Oglethorpe in the early 1700s. Since they were illiterate it’s very hard to document.
    I love stories set in Scotland and Ireland. Not just because of the genetic connection but because the stories of the people are so inspiring. Both groups have been ill treated and survived, even flourished. When I deal with hardheaded, stubborn relatives I am reminded that only the hardheaded, stubborn ones were able to survive or had the gumption to seek freedom in a new place. The pictures I’ve seen call to me and feel familiar, though I’ve never set foot on the soil.
    Many of you on this site are also Elizabeth Lowell fans and know this story. But for those who don’t, I’ll summarize. While EL was researching for her medieval series she was traveling in Scotland with her husband. They were wandering along a side road and ended up at an old parish church. The 2 of them were able to look at some of the records which dated back several hundred years. They found that their anscestors had lived near that spot and attended that very church. Further there were many instances of intermarriage between their 2 clans. EL said that she had previously wondered why he was “the one and only” and supposed that it was the genetic pattern of their distant past calling to them. She, of course, tells it much more eloquently.

    Reply
  13. My ancestors on the maternal side were Scottish but it’s far enough back that I don’t know where they lived in the country. My Dad’s people were Irish. The family story is that some of them came over with Oglethorpe in the early 1700s. Since they were illiterate it’s very hard to document.
    I love stories set in Scotland and Ireland. Not just because of the genetic connection but because the stories of the people are so inspiring. Both groups have been ill treated and survived, even flourished. When I deal with hardheaded, stubborn relatives I am reminded that only the hardheaded, stubborn ones were able to survive or had the gumption to seek freedom in a new place. The pictures I’ve seen call to me and feel familiar, though I’ve never set foot on the soil.
    Many of you on this site are also Elizabeth Lowell fans and know this story. But for those who don’t, I’ll summarize. While EL was researching for her medieval series she was traveling in Scotland with her husband. They were wandering along a side road and ended up at an old parish church. The 2 of them were able to look at some of the records which dated back several hundred years. They found that their anscestors had lived near that spot and attended that very church. Further there were many instances of intermarriage between their 2 clans. EL said that she had previously wondered why he was “the one and only” and supposed that it was the genetic pattern of their distant past calling to them. She, of course, tells it much more eloquently.

    Reply
  14. My ancestors on the maternal side were Scottish but it’s far enough back that I don’t know where they lived in the country. My Dad’s people were Irish. The family story is that some of them came over with Oglethorpe in the early 1700s. Since they were illiterate it’s very hard to document.
    I love stories set in Scotland and Ireland. Not just because of the genetic connection but because the stories of the people are so inspiring. Both groups have been ill treated and survived, even flourished. When I deal with hardheaded, stubborn relatives I am reminded that only the hardheaded, stubborn ones were able to survive or had the gumption to seek freedom in a new place. The pictures I’ve seen call to me and feel familiar, though I’ve never set foot on the soil.
    Many of you on this site are also Elizabeth Lowell fans and know this story. But for those who don’t, I’ll summarize. While EL was researching for her medieval series she was traveling in Scotland with her husband. They were wandering along a side road and ended up at an old parish church. The 2 of them were able to look at some of the records which dated back several hundred years. They found that their anscestors had lived near that spot and attended that very church. Further there were many instances of intermarriage between their 2 clans. EL said that she had previously wondered why he was “the one and only” and supposed that it was the genetic pattern of their distant past calling to them. She, of course, tells it much more eloquently.

    Reply
  15. My ancestors on the maternal side were Scottish but it’s far enough back that I don’t know where they lived in the country. My Dad’s people were Irish. The family story is that some of them came over with Oglethorpe in the early 1700s. Since they were illiterate it’s very hard to document.
    I love stories set in Scotland and Ireland. Not just because of the genetic connection but because the stories of the people are so inspiring. Both groups have been ill treated and survived, even flourished. When I deal with hardheaded, stubborn relatives I am reminded that only the hardheaded, stubborn ones were able to survive or had the gumption to seek freedom in a new place. The pictures I’ve seen call to me and feel familiar, though I’ve never set foot on the soil.
    Many of you on this site are also Elizabeth Lowell fans and know this story. But for those who don’t, I’ll summarize. While EL was researching for her medieval series she was traveling in Scotland with her husband. They were wandering along a side road and ended up at an old parish church. The 2 of them were able to look at some of the records which dated back several hundred years. They found that their anscestors had lived near that spot and attended that very church. Further there were many instances of intermarriage between their 2 clans. EL said that she had previously wondered why he was “the one and only” and supposed that it was the genetic pattern of their distant past calling to them. She, of course, tells it much more eloquently.

    Reply
  16. I studied at Edinburgh Univ. and have returned to that city several times since then, but my heart–and my relatives–are in the Western Highlands. Through my mother I’ve got relatives in Kintyre still, whom my parents visit annually.
    The last time my husband and I were there, it was ceilidh night. We had a blast! We also stopped in at the clan chieftan’s castle.
    Long ago I chose not to write any books set in Scotland–though I love reading them, and of course I know how popular they are.
    I wanted to save one place in this world to which I could escape and shut off my writer’s brain. For me, it’s a place for just “being” and not thinking or researching–unless I’m chasing an elusive ancestral line, and mostly I leave that to my mother.
    I don’t know if that makes any sense, but it’s an important distinction.

    Reply
  17. I studied at Edinburgh Univ. and have returned to that city several times since then, but my heart–and my relatives–are in the Western Highlands. Through my mother I’ve got relatives in Kintyre still, whom my parents visit annually.
    The last time my husband and I were there, it was ceilidh night. We had a blast! We also stopped in at the clan chieftan’s castle.
    Long ago I chose not to write any books set in Scotland–though I love reading them, and of course I know how popular they are.
    I wanted to save one place in this world to which I could escape and shut off my writer’s brain. For me, it’s a place for just “being” and not thinking or researching–unless I’m chasing an elusive ancestral line, and mostly I leave that to my mother.
    I don’t know if that makes any sense, but it’s an important distinction.

    Reply
  18. I studied at Edinburgh Univ. and have returned to that city several times since then, but my heart–and my relatives–are in the Western Highlands. Through my mother I’ve got relatives in Kintyre still, whom my parents visit annually.
    The last time my husband and I were there, it was ceilidh night. We had a blast! We also stopped in at the clan chieftan’s castle.
    Long ago I chose not to write any books set in Scotland–though I love reading them, and of course I know how popular they are.
    I wanted to save one place in this world to which I could escape and shut off my writer’s brain. For me, it’s a place for just “being” and not thinking or researching–unless I’m chasing an elusive ancestral line, and mostly I leave that to my mother.
    I don’t know if that makes any sense, but it’s an important distinction.

    Reply
  19. I studied at Edinburgh Univ. and have returned to that city several times since then, but my heart–and my relatives–are in the Western Highlands. Through my mother I’ve got relatives in Kintyre still, whom my parents visit annually.
    The last time my husband and I were there, it was ceilidh night. We had a blast! We also stopped in at the clan chieftan’s castle.
    Long ago I chose not to write any books set in Scotland–though I love reading them, and of course I know how popular they are.
    I wanted to save one place in this world to which I could escape and shut off my writer’s brain. For me, it’s a place for just “being” and not thinking or researching–unless I’m chasing an elusive ancestral line, and mostly I leave that to my mother.
    I don’t know if that makes any sense, but it’s an important distinction.

    Reply
  20. I studied at Edinburgh Univ. and have returned to that city several times since then, but my heart–and my relatives–are in the Western Highlands. Through my mother I’ve got relatives in Kintyre still, whom my parents visit annually.
    The last time my husband and I were there, it was ceilidh night. We had a blast! We also stopped in at the clan chieftan’s castle.
    Long ago I chose not to write any books set in Scotland–though I love reading them, and of course I know how popular they are.
    I wanted to save one place in this world to which I could escape and shut off my writer’s brain. For me, it’s a place for just “being” and not thinking or researching–unless I’m chasing an elusive ancestral line, and mostly I leave that to my mother.
    I don’t know if that makes any sense, but it’s an important distinction.

    Reply
  21. That is one of the reasons I enjoy reading so much, traveling to another place and time while sitting on the couch. I don’t think I have ever felt that an author didn’t know the setting he/she was describing so I don’t think it makes any differece if you research it or travel there personally. The important thing is that he/she helps me see it. Some authors seem to concentrate on the setting, making it a big part of the story while others don’t get as in-depth. I don’t know if that’s dictated by the author’s preference or by the story.

    Reply
  22. That is one of the reasons I enjoy reading so much, traveling to another place and time while sitting on the couch. I don’t think I have ever felt that an author didn’t know the setting he/she was describing so I don’t think it makes any differece if you research it or travel there personally. The important thing is that he/she helps me see it. Some authors seem to concentrate on the setting, making it a big part of the story while others don’t get as in-depth. I don’t know if that’s dictated by the author’s preference or by the story.

    Reply
  23. That is one of the reasons I enjoy reading so much, traveling to another place and time while sitting on the couch. I don’t think I have ever felt that an author didn’t know the setting he/she was describing so I don’t think it makes any differece if you research it or travel there personally. The important thing is that he/she helps me see it. Some authors seem to concentrate on the setting, making it a big part of the story while others don’t get as in-depth. I don’t know if that’s dictated by the author’s preference or by the story.

    Reply
  24. That is one of the reasons I enjoy reading so much, traveling to another place and time while sitting on the couch. I don’t think I have ever felt that an author didn’t know the setting he/she was describing so I don’t think it makes any differece if you research it or travel there personally. The important thing is that he/she helps me see it. Some authors seem to concentrate on the setting, making it a big part of the story while others don’t get as in-depth. I don’t know if that’s dictated by the author’s preference or by the story.

    Reply
  25. That is one of the reasons I enjoy reading so much, traveling to another place and time while sitting on the couch. I don’t think I have ever felt that an author didn’t know the setting he/she was describing so I don’t think it makes any differece if you research it or travel there personally. The important thing is that he/she helps me see it. Some authors seem to concentrate on the setting, making it a big part of the story while others don’t get as in-depth. I don’t know if that’s dictated by the author’s preference or by the story.

    Reply
  26. I have never been to Scotland, but I desperately want to go. There’s Scots blood on both sides of the family. Besides, the colorful history and beauty of the land, I really want to know if there are THAT many redheads to warrant the one question I get asked when I first meet someone – Are you Irish or Scottish? just because I have red hair. The answer is, of course, yes, but I’m more Scottish than I’m Irish.

    Reply
  27. I have never been to Scotland, but I desperately want to go. There’s Scots blood on both sides of the family. Besides, the colorful history and beauty of the land, I really want to know if there are THAT many redheads to warrant the one question I get asked when I first meet someone – Are you Irish or Scottish? just because I have red hair. The answer is, of course, yes, but I’m more Scottish than I’m Irish.

    Reply
  28. I have never been to Scotland, but I desperately want to go. There’s Scots blood on both sides of the family. Besides, the colorful history and beauty of the land, I really want to know if there are THAT many redheads to warrant the one question I get asked when I first meet someone – Are you Irish or Scottish? just because I have red hair. The answer is, of course, yes, but I’m more Scottish than I’m Irish.

    Reply
  29. I have never been to Scotland, but I desperately want to go. There’s Scots blood on both sides of the family. Besides, the colorful history and beauty of the land, I really want to know if there are THAT many redheads to warrant the one question I get asked when I first meet someone – Are you Irish or Scottish? just because I have red hair. The answer is, of course, yes, but I’m more Scottish than I’m Irish.

    Reply
  30. I have never been to Scotland, but I desperately want to go. There’s Scots blood on both sides of the family. Besides, the colorful history and beauty of the land, I really want to know if there are THAT many redheads to warrant the one question I get asked when I first meet someone – Are you Irish or Scottish? just because I have red hair. The answer is, of course, yes, but I’m more Scottish than I’m Irish.

    Reply
  31. Yes I ‘ve been to Scotland. Loved the place. Remember the “Tattoo” show at Edinburgh Castle. The lone piper atop the castle at the end is very stirring.
    Remember reading the EL storey…gave me “goosebumps”

    Reply
  32. Yes I ‘ve been to Scotland. Loved the place. Remember the “Tattoo” show at Edinburgh Castle. The lone piper atop the castle at the end is very stirring.
    Remember reading the EL storey…gave me “goosebumps”

    Reply
  33. Yes I ‘ve been to Scotland. Loved the place. Remember the “Tattoo” show at Edinburgh Castle. The lone piper atop the castle at the end is very stirring.
    Remember reading the EL storey…gave me “goosebumps”

    Reply
  34. Yes I ‘ve been to Scotland. Loved the place. Remember the “Tattoo” show at Edinburgh Castle. The lone piper atop the castle at the end is very stirring.
    Remember reading the EL storey…gave me “goosebumps”

    Reply
  35. Yes I ‘ve been to Scotland. Loved the place. Remember the “Tattoo” show at Edinburgh Castle. The lone piper atop the castle at the end is very stirring.
    Remember reading the EL storey…gave me “goosebumps”

    Reply
  36. I just decided this week that I’m going to Scotland for vacation 10/11 – 10/20. Any recommendations?
    I’m actually flying into London, meeting my parents there, renting a car, driving north, hitting some stuff on the Yorkshire coast last year, and heading into Scotland. Not sure if we’ll be able to make it all the way to the highlands, but I’m sure the “lowlands” have interesting stuff.

    Reply
  37. I just decided this week that I’m going to Scotland for vacation 10/11 – 10/20. Any recommendations?
    I’m actually flying into London, meeting my parents there, renting a car, driving north, hitting some stuff on the Yorkshire coast last year, and heading into Scotland. Not sure if we’ll be able to make it all the way to the highlands, but I’m sure the “lowlands” have interesting stuff.

    Reply
  38. I just decided this week that I’m going to Scotland for vacation 10/11 – 10/20. Any recommendations?
    I’m actually flying into London, meeting my parents there, renting a car, driving north, hitting some stuff on the Yorkshire coast last year, and heading into Scotland. Not sure if we’ll be able to make it all the way to the highlands, but I’m sure the “lowlands” have interesting stuff.

    Reply
  39. I just decided this week that I’m going to Scotland for vacation 10/11 – 10/20. Any recommendations?
    I’m actually flying into London, meeting my parents there, renting a car, driving north, hitting some stuff on the Yorkshire coast last year, and heading into Scotland. Not sure if we’ll be able to make it all the way to the highlands, but I’m sure the “lowlands” have interesting stuff.

    Reply
  40. I just decided this week that I’m going to Scotland for vacation 10/11 – 10/20. Any recommendations?
    I’m actually flying into London, meeting my parents there, renting a car, driving north, hitting some stuff on the Yorkshire coast last year, and heading into Scotland. Not sure if we’ll be able to make it all the way to the highlands, but I’m sure the “lowlands” have interesting stuff.

    Reply
  41. I never been to scotland but
    that is the place i would love to travel to.I love the history of
    scotland.I do notice the setting in a book.And how will the author
    tells about it in a book.
    I think thats why i love highlander books so much.the castles ,kilts and there accents.
    all sound wonderful.

    Reply
  42. I never been to scotland but
    that is the place i would love to travel to.I love the history of
    scotland.I do notice the setting in a book.And how will the author
    tells about it in a book.
    I think thats why i love highlander books so much.the castles ,kilts and there accents.
    all sound wonderful.

    Reply
  43. I never been to scotland but
    that is the place i would love to travel to.I love the history of
    scotland.I do notice the setting in a book.And how will the author
    tells about it in a book.
    I think thats why i love highlander books so much.the castles ,kilts and there accents.
    all sound wonderful.

    Reply
  44. I never been to scotland but
    that is the place i would love to travel to.I love the history of
    scotland.I do notice the setting in a book.And how will the author
    tells about it in a book.
    I think thats why i love highlander books so much.the castles ,kilts and there accents.
    all sound wonderful.

    Reply
  45. I never been to scotland but
    that is the place i would love to travel to.I love the history of
    scotland.I do notice the setting in a book.And how will the author
    tells about it in a book.
    I think thats why i love highlander books so much.the castles ,kilts and there accents.
    all sound wonderful.

    Reply
  46. I’ve been to Scotland three times and it’s not enough. I think it’s truly the most beautiful place on earth. The fact that everyone I meet there is named Margaret is pretty fun too! My husband’s family is from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia, so I get to be Scottish by association. Their name was originally Robertson, so when my daughters were little, they had Robertson plaid kilts. So cute.

    Reply
  47. I’ve been to Scotland three times and it’s not enough. I think it’s truly the most beautiful place on earth. The fact that everyone I meet there is named Margaret is pretty fun too! My husband’s family is from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia, so I get to be Scottish by association. Their name was originally Robertson, so when my daughters were little, they had Robertson plaid kilts. So cute.

    Reply
  48. I’ve been to Scotland three times and it’s not enough. I think it’s truly the most beautiful place on earth. The fact that everyone I meet there is named Margaret is pretty fun too! My husband’s family is from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia, so I get to be Scottish by association. Their name was originally Robertson, so when my daughters were little, they had Robertson plaid kilts. So cute.

    Reply
  49. I’ve been to Scotland three times and it’s not enough. I think it’s truly the most beautiful place on earth. The fact that everyone I meet there is named Margaret is pretty fun too! My husband’s family is from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia, so I get to be Scottish by association. Their name was originally Robertson, so when my daughters were little, they had Robertson plaid kilts. So cute.

    Reply
  50. I’ve been to Scotland three times and it’s not enough. I think it’s truly the most beautiful place on earth. The fact that everyone I meet there is named Margaret is pretty fun too! My husband’s family is from Scotland by way of Nova Scotia, so I get to be Scottish by association. Their name was originally Robertson, so when my daughters were little, they had Robertson plaid kilts. So cute.

    Reply
  51. Maggie, that was my grandmother’s name, Margaret!! Too funny!
    They were Wallaces and MacLeods but the families moved to the Lowlands about 100 years before my grandparents came here because things were so difficult in the Highlands at the time.
    And didn’t people ask you what your clan was? They never ask your last name, they ask your clan.

    Reply
  52. Maggie, that was my grandmother’s name, Margaret!! Too funny!
    They were Wallaces and MacLeods but the families moved to the Lowlands about 100 years before my grandparents came here because things were so difficult in the Highlands at the time.
    And didn’t people ask you what your clan was? They never ask your last name, they ask your clan.

    Reply
  53. Maggie, that was my grandmother’s name, Margaret!! Too funny!
    They were Wallaces and MacLeods but the families moved to the Lowlands about 100 years before my grandparents came here because things were so difficult in the Highlands at the time.
    And didn’t people ask you what your clan was? They never ask your last name, they ask your clan.

    Reply
  54. Maggie, that was my grandmother’s name, Margaret!! Too funny!
    They were Wallaces and MacLeods but the families moved to the Lowlands about 100 years before my grandparents came here because things were so difficult in the Highlands at the time.
    And didn’t people ask you what your clan was? They never ask your last name, they ask your clan.

    Reply
  55. Maggie, that was my grandmother’s name, Margaret!! Too funny!
    They were Wallaces and MacLeods but the families moved to the Lowlands about 100 years before my grandparents came here because things were so difficult in the Highlands at the time.
    And didn’t people ask you what your clan was? They never ask your last name, they ask your clan.

    Reply
  56. My mother’s grandfather’s family were Ewarts, but descended from the Gordons of Kirkcudbright. I was told that at one point only the life of one sickly child stood between my grandfather and a Scottish baronetcy.
    Obviously he got better.
    Susan Sarah, be sure to pack properly:
    http://tinyurl.com/5839ky

    Reply
  57. My mother’s grandfather’s family were Ewarts, but descended from the Gordons of Kirkcudbright. I was told that at one point only the life of one sickly child stood between my grandfather and a Scottish baronetcy.
    Obviously he got better.
    Susan Sarah, be sure to pack properly:
    http://tinyurl.com/5839ky

    Reply
  58. My mother’s grandfather’s family were Ewarts, but descended from the Gordons of Kirkcudbright. I was told that at one point only the life of one sickly child stood between my grandfather and a Scottish baronetcy.
    Obviously he got better.
    Susan Sarah, be sure to pack properly:
    http://tinyurl.com/5839ky

    Reply
  59. My mother’s grandfather’s family were Ewarts, but descended from the Gordons of Kirkcudbright. I was told that at one point only the life of one sickly child stood between my grandfather and a Scottish baronetcy.
    Obviously he got better.
    Susan Sarah, be sure to pack properly:
    http://tinyurl.com/5839ky

    Reply
  60. My mother’s grandfather’s family were Ewarts, but descended from the Gordons of Kirkcudbright. I was told that at one point only the life of one sickly child stood between my grandfather and a Scottish baronetcy.
    Obviously he got better.
    Susan Sarah, be sure to pack properly:
    http://tinyurl.com/5839ky

    Reply
  61. My maternal grandmother’s people were Orrocks, and they left Scotland because they had converted to another faith and weren’t welcome there anymore. I’ve never been there myself but it’s lack of inclination to travel alone, not any sort of lingering grudge.
    All I want you to do, Susan Sarah, is if you run into David Tennant, tell him we all said hello and thank you 😉

    Reply
  62. My maternal grandmother’s people were Orrocks, and they left Scotland because they had converted to another faith and weren’t welcome there anymore. I’ve never been there myself but it’s lack of inclination to travel alone, not any sort of lingering grudge.
    All I want you to do, Susan Sarah, is if you run into David Tennant, tell him we all said hello and thank you 😉

    Reply
  63. My maternal grandmother’s people were Orrocks, and they left Scotland because they had converted to another faith and weren’t welcome there anymore. I’ve never been there myself but it’s lack of inclination to travel alone, not any sort of lingering grudge.
    All I want you to do, Susan Sarah, is if you run into David Tennant, tell him we all said hello and thank you 😉

    Reply
  64. My maternal grandmother’s people were Orrocks, and they left Scotland because they had converted to another faith and weren’t welcome there anymore. I’ve never been there myself but it’s lack of inclination to travel alone, not any sort of lingering grudge.
    All I want you to do, Susan Sarah, is if you run into David Tennant, tell him we all said hello and thank you 😉

    Reply
  65. My maternal grandmother’s people were Orrocks, and they left Scotland because they had converted to another faith and weren’t welcome there anymore. I’ve never been there myself but it’s lack of inclination to travel alone, not any sort of lingering grudge.
    All I want you to do, Susan Sarah, is if you run into David Tennant, tell him we all said hello and thank you 😉

    Reply
  66. It’s been almost 25 years since I was in Scotland. Truly a beautiful place and wonderful people. What I noticed most of all was the quality of the light (I felt it had blue undertones rather than the yellow quality I was used to in the American South–is that weird?)–and the vividness and saturation of the colors that infused the sky, sea, grass, and mountains.

    Reply
  67. It’s been almost 25 years since I was in Scotland. Truly a beautiful place and wonderful people. What I noticed most of all was the quality of the light (I felt it had blue undertones rather than the yellow quality I was used to in the American South–is that weird?)–and the vividness and saturation of the colors that infused the sky, sea, grass, and mountains.

    Reply
  68. It’s been almost 25 years since I was in Scotland. Truly a beautiful place and wonderful people. What I noticed most of all was the quality of the light (I felt it had blue undertones rather than the yellow quality I was used to in the American South–is that weird?)–and the vividness and saturation of the colors that infused the sky, sea, grass, and mountains.

    Reply
  69. It’s been almost 25 years since I was in Scotland. Truly a beautiful place and wonderful people. What I noticed most of all was the quality of the light (I felt it had blue undertones rather than the yellow quality I was used to in the American South–is that weird?)–and the vividness and saturation of the colors that infused the sky, sea, grass, and mountains.

    Reply
  70. It’s been almost 25 years since I was in Scotland. Truly a beautiful place and wonderful people. What I noticed most of all was the quality of the light (I felt it had blue undertones rather than the yellow quality I was used to in the American South–is that weird?)–and the vividness and saturation of the colors that infused the sky, sea, grass, and mountains.

    Reply
  71. One of my best friends went to Scotland with her family every year before she died unexpectedly. I love reading books set in Scotland, since they bring back memories of her stories and photos. I really enoy books with a realistic, well developed setting since it makes me feel like I’m there!

    Reply
  72. One of my best friends went to Scotland with her family every year before she died unexpectedly. I love reading books set in Scotland, since they bring back memories of her stories and photos. I really enoy books with a realistic, well developed setting since it makes me feel like I’m there!

    Reply
  73. One of my best friends went to Scotland with her family every year before she died unexpectedly. I love reading books set in Scotland, since they bring back memories of her stories and photos. I really enoy books with a realistic, well developed setting since it makes me feel like I’m there!

    Reply
  74. One of my best friends went to Scotland with her family every year before she died unexpectedly. I love reading books set in Scotland, since they bring back memories of her stories and photos. I really enoy books with a realistic, well developed setting since it makes me feel like I’m there!

    Reply
  75. One of my best friends went to Scotland with her family every year before she died unexpectedly. I love reading books set in Scotland, since they bring back memories of her stories and photos. I really enoy books with a realistic, well developed setting since it makes me feel like I’m there!

    Reply
  76. My husband and I have talked much of a “whisky tour”, but our daughter is going to get there first. Her high school theater program was selected as one of 55 American schools to perform at the AHSTF at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, next August. They go to London, take a class at the Globe and then are on to Edinburgh to perform 4 times. They are madley fund raising as the cost is up to $6000 per student. (gas and exchange rate have increased about $1500) It is an honor. I may even give up buying books to send her.
    P.S. Husband and daughter have convinced me not to chaperone. I need to let her fly on her own.

    Reply
  77. My husband and I have talked much of a “whisky tour”, but our daughter is going to get there first. Her high school theater program was selected as one of 55 American schools to perform at the AHSTF at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, next August. They go to London, take a class at the Globe and then are on to Edinburgh to perform 4 times. They are madley fund raising as the cost is up to $6000 per student. (gas and exchange rate have increased about $1500) It is an honor. I may even give up buying books to send her.
    P.S. Husband and daughter have convinced me not to chaperone. I need to let her fly on her own.

    Reply
  78. My husband and I have talked much of a “whisky tour”, but our daughter is going to get there first. Her high school theater program was selected as one of 55 American schools to perform at the AHSTF at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, next August. They go to London, take a class at the Globe and then are on to Edinburgh to perform 4 times. They are madley fund raising as the cost is up to $6000 per student. (gas and exchange rate have increased about $1500) It is an honor. I may even give up buying books to send her.
    P.S. Husband and daughter have convinced me not to chaperone. I need to let her fly on her own.

    Reply
  79. My husband and I have talked much of a “whisky tour”, but our daughter is going to get there first. Her high school theater program was selected as one of 55 American schools to perform at the AHSTF at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, next August. They go to London, take a class at the Globe and then are on to Edinburgh to perform 4 times. They are madley fund raising as the cost is up to $6000 per student. (gas and exchange rate have increased about $1500) It is an honor. I may even give up buying books to send her.
    P.S. Husband and daughter have convinced me not to chaperone. I need to let her fly on her own.

    Reply
  80. My husband and I have talked much of a “whisky tour”, but our daughter is going to get there first. Her high school theater program was selected as one of 55 American schools to perform at the AHSTF at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, next August. They go to London, take a class at the Globe and then are on to Edinburgh to perform 4 times. They are madley fund raising as the cost is up to $6000 per student. (gas and exchange rate have increased about $1500) It is an honor. I may even give up buying books to send her.
    P.S. Husband and daughter have convinced me not to chaperone. I need to let her fly on her own.

    Reply
  81. I’ve been fascinated by Scotland ever since 1976, when I first saw (on TV) a movie called “I Know Where I’m Going,” with Roger Livsey and Wendy Hiller. VERY romantic. It led me to subscribe to Highlands Magazine, where I came across an article about an incident in the history of Clan Campbell.
    Here it is, copied from http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel-a.html
    It’s about “Muriella, daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder of Calder, now Cawdor, near Nairn.
    “According to tradition, she was captured in childhood by Sir John Campbell and a party of the Campbells, while out with her nurse near Calder castle. Her uncles pursued and overtook the division of the Campbells to whose care she had been intrusted, and would have rescued her but for the presence of mind of Campbell of Inverliver, who, seeing their approach, inverted a large camp kettle as if to conceal her, and commanding his seven sons to defend it to the death, hurried on with his prize. The young men were all slain, and when the Calders lifted up the kettle, no Muriel was there. Meanwhile so much time had been gained that further pursuit was useless. The nurse, just before the child was seized, bit off a joint of her little finger, in order to mark her identity – a precaution which seems to have been necessary, from Campbell of Auchinbreck’s reply to one who, in the midst of their congratulations on arriving safely in Argyll with their charge, asked what was to be done should the child die before she was marriageable. ‘She can never die’, said he, ‘as long as a red-haired lassie can be found on either side of Lochawe!'”
    Wow, huh? Muriella ended up marrying her abductor (or perhaps another Sir John Campbell; the names can get so confusing!), who eventually inherited Muriella’s father’s estate and title, Calder, which eventually evolved into Cawdor. I was determined to write a novel based on the story of her abduction, etc., until I discovered that someone had beaten me to it.
    In spite of all that, my first choice for travel remains Spain. It’s warmer, and it has better food!

    Reply
  82. I’ve been fascinated by Scotland ever since 1976, when I first saw (on TV) a movie called “I Know Where I’m Going,” with Roger Livsey and Wendy Hiller. VERY romantic. It led me to subscribe to Highlands Magazine, where I came across an article about an incident in the history of Clan Campbell.
    Here it is, copied from http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel-a.html
    It’s about “Muriella, daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder of Calder, now Cawdor, near Nairn.
    “According to tradition, she was captured in childhood by Sir John Campbell and a party of the Campbells, while out with her nurse near Calder castle. Her uncles pursued and overtook the division of the Campbells to whose care she had been intrusted, and would have rescued her but for the presence of mind of Campbell of Inverliver, who, seeing their approach, inverted a large camp kettle as if to conceal her, and commanding his seven sons to defend it to the death, hurried on with his prize. The young men were all slain, and when the Calders lifted up the kettle, no Muriel was there. Meanwhile so much time had been gained that further pursuit was useless. The nurse, just before the child was seized, bit off a joint of her little finger, in order to mark her identity – a precaution which seems to have been necessary, from Campbell of Auchinbreck’s reply to one who, in the midst of their congratulations on arriving safely in Argyll with their charge, asked what was to be done should the child die before she was marriageable. ‘She can never die’, said he, ‘as long as a red-haired lassie can be found on either side of Lochawe!'”
    Wow, huh? Muriella ended up marrying her abductor (or perhaps another Sir John Campbell; the names can get so confusing!), who eventually inherited Muriella’s father’s estate and title, Calder, which eventually evolved into Cawdor. I was determined to write a novel based on the story of her abduction, etc., until I discovered that someone had beaten me to it.
    In spite of all that, my first choice for travel remains Spain. It’s warmer, and it has better food!

    Reply
  83. I’ve been fascinated by Scotland ever since 1976, when I first saw (on TV) a movie called “I Know Where I’m Going,” with Roger Livsey and Wendy Hiller. VERY romantic. It led me to subscribe to Highlands Magazine, where I came across an article about an incident in the history of Clan Campbell.
    Here it is, copied from http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel-a.html
    It’s about “Muriella, daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder of Calder, now Cawdor, near Nairn.
    “According to tradition, she was captured in childhood by Sir John Campbell and a party of the Campbells, while out with her nurse near Calder castle. Her uncles pursued and overtook the division of the Campbells to whose care she had been intrusted, and would have rescued her but for the presence of mind of Campbell of Inverliver, who, seeing their approach, inverted a large camp kettle as if to conceal her, and commanding his seven sons to defend it to the death, hurried on with his prize. The young men were all slain, and when the Calders lifted up the kettle, no Muriel was there. Meanwhile so much time had been gained that further pursuit was useless. The nurse, just before the child was seized, bit off a joint of her little finger, in order to mark her identity – a precaution which seems to have been necessary, from Campbell of Auchinbreck’s reply to one who, in the midst of their congratulations on arriving safely in Argyll with their charge, asked what was to be done should the child die before she was marriageable. ‘She can never die’, said he, ‘as long as a red-haired lassie can be found on either side of Lochawe!'”
    Wow, huh? Muriella ended up marrying her abductor (or perhaps another Sir John Campbell; the names can get so confusing!), who eventually inherited Muriella’s father’s estate and title, Calder, which eventually evolved into Cawdor. I was determined to write a novel based on the story of her abduction, etc., until I discovered that someone had beaten me to it.
    In spite of all that, my first choice for travel remains Spain. It’s warmer, and it has better food!

    Reply
  84. I’ve been fascinated by Scotland ever since 1976, when I first saw (on TV) a movie called “I Know Where I’m Going,” with Roger Livsey and Wendy Hiller. VERY romantic. It led me to subscribe to Highlands Magazine, where I came across an article about an incident in the history of Clan Campbell.
    Here it is, copied from http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel-a.html
    It’s about “Muriella, daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder of Calder, now Cawdor, near Nairn.
    “According to tradition, she was captured in childhood by Sir John Campbell and a party of the Campbells, while out with her nurse near Calder castle. Her uncles pursued and overtook the division of the Campbells to whose care she had been intrusted, and would have rescued her but for the presence of mind of Campbell of Inverliver, who, seeing their approach, inverted a large camp kettle as if to conceal her, and commanding his seven sons to defend it to the death, hurried on with his prize. The young men were all slain, and when the Calders lifted up the kettle, no Muriel was there. Meanwhile so much time had been gained that further pursuit was useless. The nurse, just before the child was seized, bit off a joint of her little finger, in order to mark her identity – a precaution which seems to have been necessary, from Campbell of Auchinbreck’s reply to one who, in the midst of their congratulations on arriving safely in Argyll with their charge, asked what was to be done should the child die before she was marriageable. ‘She can never die’, said he, ‘as long as a red-haired lassie can be found on either side of Lochawe!'”
    Wow, huh? Muriella ended up marrying her abductor (or perhaps another Sir John Campbell; the names can get so confusing!), who eventually inherited Muriella’s father’s estate and title, Calder, which eventually evolved into Cawdor. I was determined to write a novel based on the story of her abduction, etc., until I discovered that someone had beaten me to it.
    In spite of all that, my first choice for travel remains Spain. It’s warmer, and it has better food!

    Reply
  85. I’ve been fascinated by Scotland ever since 1976, when I first saw (on TV) a movie called “I Know Where I’m Going,” with Roger Livsey and Wendy Hiller. VERY romantic. It led me to subscribe to Highlands Magazine, where I came across an article about an incident in the history of Clan Campbell.
    Here it is, copied from http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/campbel-a.html
    It’s about “Muriella, daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder of Calder, now Cawdor, near Nairn.
    “According to tradition, she was captured in childhood by Sir John Campbell and a party of the Campbells, while out with her nurse near Calder castle. Her uncles pursued and overtook the division of the Campbells to whose care she had been intrusted, and would have rescued her but for the presence of mind of Campbell of Inverliver, who, seeing their approach, inverted a large camp kettle as if to conceal her, and commanding his seven sons to defend it to the death, hurried on with his prize. The young men were all slain, and when the Calders lifted up the kettle, no Muriel was there. Meanwhile so much time had been gained that further pursuit was useless. The nurse, just before the child was seized, bit off a joint of her little finger, in order to mark her identity – a precaution which seems to have been necessary, from Campbell of Auchinbreck’s reply to one who, in the midst of their congratulations on arriving safely in Argyll with their charge, asked what was to be done should the child die before she was marriageable. ‘She can never die’, said he, ‘as long as a red-haired lassie can be found on either side of Lochawe!'”
    Wow, huh? Muriella ended up marrying her abductor (or perhaps another Sir John Campbell; the names can get so confusing!), who eventually inherited Muriella’s father’s estate and title, Calder, which eventually evolved into Cawdor. I was determined to write a novel based on the story of her abduction, etc., until I discovered that someone had beaten me to it.
    In spite of all that, my first choice for travel remains Spain. It’s warmer, and it has better food!

    Reply
  86. I’ve never had the chance to go to Scotland! Oh, well. Maybe some day. My favorite place to travel is Canada. I’ve been there twice, hopefully I’ll be able to go there again soon.

    Reply
  87. I’ve never had the chance to go to Scotland! Oh, well. Maybe some day. My favorite place to travel is Canada. I’ve been there twice, hopefully I’ll be able to go there again soon.

    Reply
  88. I’ve never had the chance to go to Scotland! Oh, well. Maybe some day. My favorite place to travel is Canada. I’ve been there twice, hopefully I’ll be able to go there again soon.

    Reply
  89. I’ve never had the chance to go to Scotland! Oh, well. Maybe some day. My favorite place to travel is Canada. I’ve been there twice, hopefully I’ll be able to go there again soon.

    Reply
  90. I’ve never had the chance to go to Scotland! Oh, well. Maybe some day. My favorite place to travel is Canada. I’ve been there twice, hopefully I’ll be able to go there again soon.

    Reply
  91. I’ve never been to Scotland and oh, how I would love to go some day. I’m not sure I’ll ever get the chance so I experience it as much as I can in the historical romances I read. It sounds like such a beautiful place!

    Reply
  92. I’ve never been to Scotland and oh, how I would love to go some day. I’m not sure I’ll ever get the chance so I experience it as much as I can in the historical romances I read. It sounds like such a beautiful place!

    Reply
  93. I’ve never been to Scotland and oh, how I would love to go some day. I’m not sure I’ll ever get the chance so I experience it as much as I can in the historical romances I read. It sounds like such a beautiful place!

    Reply
  94. I’ve never been to Scotland and oh, how I would love to go some day. I’m not sure I’ll ever get the chance so I experience it as much as I can in the historical romances I read. It sounds like such a beautiful place!

    Reply
  95. I’ve never been to Scotland and oh, how I would love to go some day. I’m not sure I’ll ever get the chance so I experience it as much as I can in the historical romances I read. It sounds like such a beautiful place!

    Reply

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