Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words?

Kingsfavorite
by Susan Holloway Scott

It’s pretty much a given here at the Wenches that we love history, and we love the past.  For most of us readers and writers alike, it’s been a long-standing love, a time and place we enjoy returning to visit by way of favorite books and authors.

But sometimes our “guide” is not a writer, but an illustrator.  In my case, it was pictures, not words, that first showed me the difference between my own present-day and the historical past.   I know how old I was, too (four), because I still have the book, with “Happy Birthday, Susan” and the date written inside in my godmother’s distinctive handwriting.  The book was Linsey Woolsey, and the author-illustrator was Tasha Tudor.

Sylvie_ann_2
The plot of Linsey Woolsey is a simple one, documenting the naughtiness of the lamb of the title and how after a traumatic encounter with a bee hive, she learns to behave, a classic cautionary tale for the very young. 

But it was the pictures I loved best. Linsey Woolsey is owned by a little girl named Sylvie Ann, living in an
unspecified 19th century American farm.  Sylvie Ann wore pantaloons, pinafores, and ruffled dresses, had the run of the sunny, cheerful farm, and while her mother (aka Mimmsy) baked her birthday cake and hosted an elaborate outdoor party, Sylvie Ann herself didn’t seem to have to do chores or go to school or do much of anything she didn’t want to.  No wonder the past looked so good. 

I was hooked.   I studied her drawings, and struggled to copy them myself.  I forced my friends to reenact Secret_garden_cover_jpg
scenes from the books.  One summer I even managed to persuade my parents to make a detour in the family vacation for a visit to Tasha Tudor’s house and garden, which was open to the public on certain days. 

Over the next decade, every birthday and Christmas included at least one book illustrated by Tasha Tudor, from Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden to Louisa May Alcott’s A Round Dozen.   The stories were always “girl-centric”, though boys, animals, and dolls were permitted, and even when the Bad Things might Alittleprincess1jpg005
happen (parents died, family fortunes were lost, George Washington’s army needed saving from the British), the plucky girls always triumphed. Granted, it’s a warm and optomistic version of the past. Family was always front and center, with Mom playing the leading roll.  Friends were also  and nobly old-fashioned virtues like loyalty and courage. Whether in softly lit watercolors or the spare line drawings, my visual impression of the past as a golden place for strong-minded girls and really cute pets was formed through the art of Tasha Tudor.

Since then I’ve come to realize that, on some hazy level, I  must have realized a kindred spirit at work.  Born in Boston in 1915 with the wonderful name of Starling Burgess, she always claimed she was reincarnated from a 19th ship captain’s wife, her reason  for feeling more at home in the past than the modern day.  She lived in an old house in rural New Hampshire, happy without electricity or running water, dressed in antique-style clothes, and raised her own food as well as four children.  She had learned to draw from her mother, also an artist, and her first illustrated book, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938.  Nearly a hundred others Tashatudor_w_flowers
followed, as well as books  that offered glimpses into her version of rural life, history, and crafts.

I’ve also discovered that I’m far from the only one who treasures the past as imagined by Tasha Tudor.  Her gentle paintings and illustrations are a constant favorite with readers and collectors. She was honored with numerous awards, including Caldecott Medals. In a modern world ruthless with marketing, this reclusive, fragile artist who seldom ventured from her farm became a “19th century Martha Stewart”, inspiring a family empire that oversees everything from greeting cards to her own museum in Marlboro, Vermont.  A Google search produces thousands of entries, with scores of blogs devoted to her and her work.  When she died this summer at 97, she was mourned around the world, and eulogized in an obituary in The New York Times.

I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world. I still have my little Linsey Woolsey, and though similar copies of the same Oxford Press Pumpkin_moonshine
edition are now being sold for $600  and beyond (gasp!), I won’t part with it, or any of the other books. Though the historical novels I write now might not appear  to have much in common with her books (Sylvie Ann, meet Nell Gwyn), there’s an undeniable love and regard for the past that I know I inherited directly from her illustrations. I’ve read that she designed the hand-drawn cover of Linsey Woolsey to resemble an old-fashioned seed packet, and the seeds that Tasha Tudor unwittingly passed along to me continue to grow, and to flourish.  May it always be so!

So what was your introduction to the past?  What were the images that complimented the words?  Was it the Garth Williams drawings in the "Little House" books, or Michael Landon as Pa on the TV series?  An American Girl doll, or Shirley Temple dressed as an antebellum girl in "The Little Colonel"?  Sleeping Beauty’s medieval castle at Disneyland, Drew Barrymore in Ever After, or a school field trip to the Cloisters in New York? I’ll give a copy of any book from my backlist (either as Miranda Jarrett or Susan Holloway Scott) to a reader chosen at random from those who post.

Oh, and one more thing: the MLB World Series begins tonight.  Go Phillies! 🙂

155 thoughts on “Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words?”

  1. I remember reading “Little Women” and I liked Jo the best. I also remember Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. After seeing the movie, I had to have the book and I went through my “wanting to be a princess” phase.

    Reply
  2. I remember reading “Little Women” and I liked Jo the best. I also remember Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. After seeing the movie, I had to have the book and I went through my “wanting to be a princess” phase.

    Reply
  3. I remember reading “Little Women” and I liked Jo the best. I also remember Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. After seeing the movie, I had to have the book and I went through my “wanting to be a princess” phase.

    Reply
  4. I remember reading “Little Women” and I liked Jo the best. I also remember Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. After seeing the movie, I had to have the book and I went through my “wanting to be a princess” phase.

    Reply
  5. I remember reading “Little Women” and I liked Jo the best. I also remember Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. After seeing the movie, I had to have the book and I went through my “wanting to be a princess” phase.

    Reply
  6. What a lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor. My experience of her art and writing was much the same as yours…I blogged about it on hearing of her death. I also admired the creativity and discipline of her 19th century lifestyle.
    My most memorable introductions to stories set in the past are numerous. Fairy tales. Doll and horse stories–Hitty: Her First Hundred Years was extremely influential! These influences certain include Tasha’s work, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louisa Alcott. And–so important–those comic book versions of literature, Classics Illustrated.

    Reply
  7. What a lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor. My experience of her art and writing was much the same as yours…I blogged about it on hearing of her death. I also admired the creativity and discipline of her 19th century lifestyle.
    My most memorable introductions to stories set in the past are numerous. Fairy tales. Doll and horse stories–Hitty: Her First Hundred Years was extremely influential! These influences certain include Tasha’s work, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louisa Alcott. And–so important–those comic book versions of literature, Classics Illustrated.

    Reply
  8. What a lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor. My experience of her art and writing was much the same as yours…I blogged about it on hearing of her death. I also admired the creativity and discipline of her 19th century lifestyle.
    My most memorable introductions to stories set in the past are numerous. Fairy tales. Doll and horse stories–Hitty: Her First Hundred Years was extremely influential! These influences certain include Tasha’s work, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louisa Alcott. And–so important–those comic book versions of literature, Classics Illustrated.

    Reply
  9. What a lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor. My experience of her art and writing was much the same as yours…I blogged about it on hearing of her death. I also admired the creativity and discipline of her 19th century lifestyle.
    My most memorable introductions to stories set in the past are numerous. Fairy tales. Doll and horse stories–Hitty: Her First Hundred Years was extremely influential! These influences certain include Tasha’s work, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louisa Alcott. And–so important–those comic book versions of literature, Classics Illustrated.

    Reply
  10. What a lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor. My experience of her art and writing was much the same as yours…I blogged about it on hearing of her death. I also admired the creativity and discipline of her 19th century lifestyle.
    My most memorable introductions to stories set in the past are numerous. Fairy tales. Doll and horse stories–Hitty: Her First Hundred Years was extremely influential! These influences certain include Tasha’s work, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Louisa Alcott. And–so important–those comic book versions of literature, Classics Illustrated.

    Reply
  11. Oh, I loved Tasha Tudor’s pictures too! I had that same version of the LITTLE PRINCESS, one of my favorite books. I still remember Sara Crew’s pink princess dress. But I did like the Disney princesses, too, and their beautiful gowns. Guess it always comes down to the dresses, lol! I agree, there were never enough pictures!

    Reply
  12. Oh, I loved Tasha Tudor’s pictures too! I had that same version of the LITTLE PRINCESS, one of my favorite books. I still remember Sara Crew’s pink princess dress. But I did like the Disney princesses, too, and their beautiful gowns. Guess it always comes down to the dresses, lol! I agree, there were never enough pictures!

    Reply
  13. Oh, I loved Tasha Tudor’s pictures too! I had that same version of the LITTLE PRINCESS, one of my favorite books. I still remember Sara Crew’s pink princess dress. But I did like the Disney princesses, too, and their beautiful gowns. Guess it always comes down to the dresses, lol! I agree, there were never enough pictures!

    Reply
  14. Oh, I loved Tasha Tudor’s pictures too! I had that same version of the LITTLE PRINCESS, one of my favorite books. I still remember Sara Crew’s pink princess dress. But I did like the Disney princesses, too, and their beautiful gowns. Guess it always comes down to the dresses, lol! I agree, there were never enough pictures!

    Reply
  15. Oh, I loved Tasha Tudor’s pictures too! I had that same version of the LITTLE PRINCESS, one of my favorite books. I still remember Sara Crew’s pink princess dress. But I did like the Disney princesses, too, and their beautiful gowns. Guess it always comes down to the dresses, lol! I agree, there were never enough pictures!

    Reply
  16. Lovely blog.Picture books are often what lures children to reading, whether it’s Tasha Tudor or Japanese comics. Not limited to children, now that I think about it. Haven’t we all picked up a book because of a beautiful cover?
    Also…LET’S GO PHILLIES! Didn’t realize there were Phans here at the Wenches. My whole family has tickets for the game Saturday, & we’re keeping fingers crossed it doesn’t rain.

    Reply
  17. Lovely blog.Picture books are often what lures children to reading, whether it’s Tasha Tudor or Japanese comics. Not limited to children, now that I think about it. Haven’t we all picked up a book because of a beautiful cover?
    Also…LET’S GO PHILLIES! Didn’t realize there were Phans here at the Wenches. My whole family has tickets for the game Saturday, & we’re keeping fingers crossed it doesn’t rain.

    Reply
  18. Lovely blog.Picture books are often what lures children to reading, whether it’s Tasha Tudor or Japanese comics. Not limited to children, now that I think about it. Haven’t we all picked up a book because of a beautiful cover?
    Also…LET’S GO PHILLIES! Didn’t realize there were Phans here at the Wenches. My whole family has tickets for the game Saturday, & we’re keeping fingers crossed it doesn’t rain.

    Reply
  19. Lovely blog.Picture books are often what lures children to reading, whether it’s Tasha Tudor or Japanese comics. Not limited to children, now that I think about it. Haven’t we all picked up a book because of a beautiful cover?
    Also…LET’S GO PHILLIES! Didn’t realize there were Phans here at the Wenches. My whole family has tickets for the game Saturday, & we’re keeping fingers crossed it doesn’t rain.

    Reply
  20. Lovely blog.Picture books are often what lures children to reading, whether it’s Tasha Tudor or Japanese comics. Not limited to children, now that I think about it. Haven’t we all picked up a book because of a beautiful cover?
    Also…LET’S GO PHILLIES! Didn’t realize there were Phans here at the Wenches. My whole family has tickets for the game Saturday, & we’re keeping fingers crossed it doesn’t rain.

    Reply
  21. Susan here:
    Maggie, I had those perma-bound books, too. I remember Black Beauty, and Arabian Nights, both because of the horse pictures. Another favorite paperback, too: Sabre, the Horse from the Sea. (now how do i remember THAT?) I never rode, but I did go through a “horse phase.” Had to be the pictures, because I had zero first-hand experience with the animals themselves.
    Linda, we ALL have that fascination with princesses! I’ve been thinking of that this week, and how many little girls are going to be Beauty or Belle next week for Halloween. As for Jo March: of course Jo’s the most interesting sister. She wanted to be a writer. *g*

    Reply
  22. Susan here:
    Maggie, I had those perma-bound books, too. I remember Black Beauty, and Arabian Nights, both because of the horse pictures. Another favorite paperback, too: Sabre, the Horse from the Sea. (now how do i remember THAT?) I never rode, but I did go through a “horse phase.” Had to be the pictures, because I had zero first-hand experience with the animals themselves.
    Linda, we ALL have that fascination with princesses! I’ve been thinking of that this week, and how many little girls are going to be Beauty or Belle next week for Halloween. As for Jo March: of course Jo’s the most interesting sister. She wanted to be a writer. *g*

    Reply
  23. Susan here:
    Maggie, I had those perma-bound books, too. I remember Black Beauty, and Arabian Nights, both because of the horse pictures. Another favorite paperback, too: Sabre, the Horse from the Sea. (now how do i remember THAT?) I never rode, but I did go through a “horse phase.” Had to be the pictures, because I had zero first-hand experience with the animals themselves.
    Linda, we ALL have that fascination with princesses! I’ve been thinking of that this week, and how many little girls are going to be Beauty or Belle next week for Halloween. As for Jo March: of course Jo’s the most interesting sister. She wanted to be a writer. *g*

    Reply
  24. Susan here:
    Maggie, I had those perma-bound books, too. I remember Black Beauty, and Arabian Nights, both because of the horse pictures. Another favorite paperback, too: Sabre, the Horse from the Sea. (now how do i remember THAT?) I never rode, but I did go through a “horse phase.” Had to be the pictures, because I had zero first-hand experience with the animals themselves.
    Linda, we ALL have that fascination with princesses! I’ve been thinking of that this week, and how many little girls are going to be Beauty or Belle next week for Halloween. As for Jo March: of course Jo’s the most interesting sister. She wanted to be a writer. *g*

    Reply
  25. Susan here:
    Maggie, I had those perma-bound books, too. I remember Black Beauty, and Arabian Nights, both because of the horse pictures. Another favorite paperback, too: Sabre, the Horse from the Sea. (now how do i remember THAT?) I never rode, but I did go through a “horse phase.” Had to be the pictures, because I had zero first-hand experience with the animals themselves.
    Linda, we ALL have that fascination with princesses! I’ve been thinking of that this week, and how many little girls are going to be Beauty or Belle next week for Halloween. As for Jo March: of course Jo’s the most interesting sister. She wanted to be a writer. *g*

    Reply
  26. The earliest I remember are Roger Lancelyn Green’s books on myths and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Lost Prince”, hence my love of maps.
    “Little Women” upset me. My mother was taken aback, but agreed that it punished the girls who didn’t conform.
    My parents planned historical reading for me when we traveled. Wu Ch’Eng-En’s “Monkey” in Asia; I don’t remember whether it was illustrated, but I remember scrutinizing temple carvings to find the characters that I’d read about. David Macaulay’s “Cathedral” in Europe; that’s surely the ultimate picture book! TH White’s “The Once and Future King” and illustrated Shakespeare in the UK. Rudyard Kipling’s “Captains Courageous” on a ship. Laura Ingalls Wilder in N. America.
    Barbara Tuchman’s “The Zimmermann Telegram” may be the book that started me actively *asking* for more historical reads. No illustrations, but secret codes!

    Reply
  27. The earliest I remember are Roger Lancelyn Green’s books on myths and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Lost Prince”, hence my love of maps.
    “Little Women” upset me. My mother was taken aback, but agreed that it punished the girls who didn’t conform.
    My parents planned historical reading for me when we traveled. Wu Ch’Eng-En’s “Monkey” in Asia; I don’t remember whether it was illustrated, but I remember scrutinizing temple carvings to find the characters that I’d read about. David Macaulay’s “Cathedral” in Europe; that’s surely the ultimate picture book! TH White’s “The Once and Future King” and illustrated Shakespeare in the UK. Rudyard Kipling’s “Captains Courageous” on a ship. Laura Ingalls Wilder in N. America.
    Barbara Tuchman’s “The Zimmermann Telegram” may be the book that started me actively *asking* for more historical reads. No illustrations, but secret codes!

    Reply
  28. The earliest I remember are Roger Lancelyn Green’s books on myths and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Lost Prince”, hence my love of maps.
    “Little Women” upset me. My mother was taken aback, but agreed that it punished the girls who didn’t conform.
    My parents planned historical reading for me when we traveled. Wu Ch’Eng-En’s “Monkey” in Asia; I don’t remember whether it was illustrated, but I remember scrutinizing temple carvings to find the characters that I’d read about. David Macaulay’s “Cathedral” in Europe; that’s surely the ultimate picture book! TH White’s “The Once and Future King” and illustrated Shakespeare in the UK. Rudyard Kipling’s “Captains Courageous” on a ship. Laura Ingalls Wilder in N. America.
    Barbara Tuchman’s “The Zimmermann Telegram” may be the book that started me actively *asking* for more historical reads. No illustrations, but secret codes!

    Reply
  29. The earliest I remember are Roger Lancelyn Green’s books on myths and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Lost Prince”, hence my love of maps.
    “Little Women” upset me. My mother was taken aback, but agreed that it punished the girls who didn’t conform.
    My parents planned historical reading for me when we traveled. Wu Ch’Eng-En’s “Monkey” in Asia; I don’t remember whether it was illustrated, but I remember scrutinizing temple carvings to find the characters that I’d read about. David Macaulay’s “Cathedral” in Europe; that’s surely the ultimate picture book! TH White’s “The Once and Future King” and illustrated Shakespeare in the UK. Rudyard Kipling’s “Captains Courageous” on a ship. Laura Ingalls Wilder in N. America.
    Barbara Tuchman’s “The Zimmermann Telegram” may be the book that started me actively *asking* for more historical reads. No illustrations, but secret codes!

    Reply
  30. The earliest I remember are Roger Lancelyn Green’s books on myths and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Lost Prince”, hence my love of maps.
    “Little Women” upset me. My mother was taken aback, but agreed that it punished the girls who didn’t conform.
    My parents planned historical reading for me when we traveled. Wu Ch’Eng-En’s “Monkey” in Asia; I don’t remember whether it was illustrated, but I remember scrutinizing temple carvings to find the characters that I’d read about. David Macaulay’s “Cathedral” in Europe; that’s surely the ultimate picture book! TH White’s “The Once and Future King” and illustrated Shakespeare in the UK. Rudyard Kipling’s “Captains Courageous” on a ship. Laura Ingalls Wilder in N. America.
    Barbara Tuchman’s “The Zimmermann Telegram” may be the book that started me actively *asking* for more historical reads. No illustrations, but secret codes!

    Reply
  31. I must be a different generation because the first books with historical pictures that I liked were the AMERICAN GIRLS series. You didn’t just get the pictures in the books, but the dolls and all the accessories and stuff with them. I loved those.

    Reply
  32. I must be a different generation because the first books with historical pictures that I liked were the AMERICAN GIRLS series. You didn’t just get the pictures in the books, but the dolls and all the accessories and stuff with them. I loved those.

    Reply
  33. I must be a different generation because the first books with historical pictures that I liked were the AMERICAN GIRLS series. You didn’t just get the pictures in the books, but the dolls and all the accessories and stuff with them. I loved those.

    Reply
  34. I must be a different generation because the first books with historical pictures that I liked were the AMERICAN GIRLS series. You didn’t just get the pictures in the books, but the dolls and all the accessories and stuff with them. I loved those.

    Reply
  35. I must be a different generation because the first books with historical pictures that I liked were the AMERICAN GIRLS series. You didn’t just get the pictures in the books, but the dolls and all the accessories and stuff with them. I loved those.

    Reply
  36. My visual introduction to the past was the Little House books. I read my copies to tatters and, um, appalled my mother by coloring the pictures.
    The illustrations in Marguerite Henry’s KING OF THE WIND fascinated me, too, all the way from Morocco to France and on to England. Frankly, it was mostly the beautiful horses that drew my eye, but I absorbed some of the historical atmosphere around them, too. 🙂
    I’d never heard of Tasha Tudor until a couple of Christmases ago when my mother-in-law gave my daughter Annabel two copies of Tudor’s ABC book, A is for Annabelle. Gorgeous illustrations, though Annabel isn’t as impressed with it now that she’s old enough to be picky about the spelling of her name…

    Reply
  37. My visual introduction to the past was the Little House books. I read my copies to tatters and, um, appalled my mother by coloring the pictures.
    The illustrations in Marguerite Henry’s KING OF THE WIND fascinated me, too, all the way from Morocco to France and on to England. Frankly, it was mostly the beautiful horses that drew my eye, but I absorbed some of the historical atmosphere around them, too. 🙂
    I’d never heard of Tasha Tudor until a couple of Christmases ago when my mother-in-law gave my daughter Annabel two copies of Tudor’s ABC book, A is for Annabelle. Gorgeous illustrations, though Annabel isn’t as impressed with it now that she’s old enough to be picky about the spelling of her name…

    Reply
  38. My visual introduction to the past was the Little House books. I read my copies to tatters and, um, appalled my mother by coloring the pictures.
    The illustrations in Marguerite Henry’s KING OF THE WIND fascinated me, too, all the way from Morocco to France and on to England. Frankly, it was mostly the beautiful horses that drew my eye, but I absorbed some of the historical atmosphere around them, too. 🙂
    I’d never heard of Tasha Tudor until a couple of Christmases ago when my mother-in-law gave my daughter Annabel two copies of Tudor’s ABC book, A is for Annabelle. Gorgeous illustrations, though Annabel isn’t as impressed with it now that she’s old enough to be picky about the spelling of her name…

    Reply
  39. My visual introduction to the past was the Little House books. I read my copies to tatters and, um, appalled my mother by coloring the pictures.
    The illustrations in Marguerite Henry’s KING OF THE WIND fascinated me, too, all the way from Morocco to France and on to England. Frankly, it was mostly the beautiful horses that drew my eye, but I absorbed some of the historical atmosphere around them, too. 🙂
    I’d never heard of Tasha Tudor until a couple of Christmases ago when my mother-in-law gave my daughter Annabel two copies of Tudor’s ABC book, A is for Annabelle. Gorgeous illustrations, though Annabel isn’t as impressed with it now that she’s old enough to be picky about the spelling of her name…

    Reply
  40. My visual introduction to the past was the Little House books. I read my copies to tatters and, um, appalled my mother by coloring the pictures.
    The illustrations in Marguerite Henry’s KING OF THE WIND fascinated me, too, all the way from Morocco to France and on to England. Frankly, it was mostly the beautiful horses that drew my eye, but I absorbed some of the historical atmosphere around them, too. 🙂
    I’d never heard of Tasha Tudor until a couple of Christmases ago when my mother-in-law gave my daughter Annabel two copies of Tudor’s ABC book, A is for Annabelle. Gorgeous illustrations, though Annabel isn’t as impressed with it now that she’s old enough to be picky about the spelling of her name…

    Reply
  41. From Sherrie:
    Oh, Susan, thank you for the lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor!
    My first book with a historical character was a Big Little Book (remember them?) about a little princess from Hawaii named Princess Liliuokalani. I must have been 6 yo, & I sounded out her name myself.
    From there, I went on to discover Will James and his Smoky the Cowhorse series, then Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. I still have a signed 5×7 glossy of Farley with one of his harness (trotting) racehorses, and a hand-typed, hand-signed letter from him.
    One of the best historical books I ever had was a huge 1.5″ thick coloring book about US history. It was so historically accurate that I passed a history quiz by reading it!
    I grew up on TV series like Daniel Boone, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Hopalong Cassidy, Zorro (I once sent Guy Williams a green, hand-woven potholder with a yellow Z that I made myself. I’m sure he treasures it to this day!)
    To my sister and me, the “past” seemed like it was just around the corner. I distinctly remember asking my mom what it was like to cross the prairie in a covered wagon and being shocked (shocked!) to hear she made the trip by automobile!

    Reply
  42. From Sherrie:
    Oh, Susan, thank you for the lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor!
    My first book with a historical character was a Big Little Book (remember them?) about a little princess from Hawaii named Princess Liliuokalani. I must have been 6 yo, & I sounded out her name myself.
    From there, I went on to discover Will James and his Smoky the Cowhorse series, then Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. I still have a signed 5×7 glossy of Farley with one of his harness (trotting) racehorses, and a hand-typed, hand-signed letter from him.
    One of the best historical books I ever had was a huge 1.5″ thick coloring book about US history. It was so historically accurate that I passed a history quiz by reading it!
    I grew up on TV series like Daniel Boone, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Hopalong Cassidy, Zorro (I once sent Guy Williams a green, hand-woven potholder with a yellow Z that I made myself. I’m sure he treasures it to this day!)
    To my sister and me, the “past” seemed like it was just around the corner. I distinctly remember asking my mom what it was like to cross the prairie in a covered wagon and being shocked (shocked!) to hear she made the trip by automobile!

    Reply
  43. From Sherrie:
    Oh, Susan, thank you for the lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor!
    My first book with a historical character was a Big Little Book (remember them?) about a little princess from Hawaii named Princess Liliuokalani. I must have been 6 yo, & I sounded out her name myself.
    From there, I went on to discover Will James and his Smoky the Cowhorse series, then Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. I still have a signed 5×7 glossy of Farley with one of his harness (trotting) racehorses, and a hand-typed, hand-signed letter from him.
    One of the best historical books I ever had was a huge 1.5″ thick coloring book about US history. It was so historically accurate that I passed a history quiz by reading it!
    I grew up on TV series like Daniel Boone, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Hopalong Cassidy, Zorro (I once sent Guy Williams a green, hand-woven potholder with a yellow Z that I made myself. I’m sure he treasures it to this day!)
    To my sister and me, the “past” seemed like it was just around the corner. I distinctly remember asking my mom what it was like to cross the prairie in a covered wagon and being shocked (shocked!) to hear she made the trip by automobile!

    Reply
  44. From Sherrie:
    Oh, Susan, thank you for the lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor!
    My first book with a historical character was a Big Little Book (remember them?) about a little princess from Hawaii named Princess Liliuokalani. I must have been 6 yo, & I sounded out her name myself.
    From there, I went on to discover Will James and his Smoky the Cowhorse series, then Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. I still have a signed 5×7 glossy of Farley with one of his harness (trotting) racehorses, and a hand-typed, hand-signed letter from him.
    One of the best historical books I ever had was a huge 1.5″ thick coloring book about US history. It was so historically accurate that I passed a history quiz by reading it!
    I grew up on TV series like Daniel Boone, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Hopalong Cassidy, Zorro (I once sent Guy Williams a green, hand-woven potholder with a yellow Z that I made myself. I’m sure he treasures it to this day!)
    To my sister and me, the “past” seemed like it was just around the corner. I distinctly remember asking my mom what it was like to cross the prairie in a covered wagon and being shocked (shocked!) to hear she made the trip by automobile!

    Reply
  45. From Sherrie:
    Oh, Susan, thank you for the lovely tribute to Tasha Tudor!
    My first book with a historical character was a Big Little Book (remember them?) about a little princess from Hawaii named Princess Liliuokalani. I must have been 6 yo, & I sounded out her name myself.
    From there, I went on to discover Will James and his Smoky the Cowhorse series, then Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series. I still have a signed 5×7 glossy of Farley with one of his harness (trotting) racehorses, and a hand-typed, hand-signed letter from him.
    One of the best historical books I ever had was a huge 1.5″ thick coloring book about US history. It was so historically accurate that I passed a history quiz by reading it!
    I grew up on TV series like Daniel Boone, The Adventures of Jim Bowie, Hopalong Cassidy, Zorro (I once sent Guy Williams a green, hand-woven potholder with a yellow Z that I made myself. I’m sure he treasures it to this day!)
    To my sister and me, the “past” seemed like it was just around the corner. I distinctly remember asking my mom what it was like to cross the prairie in a covered wagon and being shocked (shocked!) to hear she made the trip by automobile!

    Reply
  46. Oh, I forgot to mention that the reason my MIL gave my daughter two copies of A is for Annabelle is that one was new, for her to read now, and the other was a first edition for her to display in the future.

    Reply
  47. Oh, I forgot to mention that the reason my MIL gave my daughter two copies of A is for Annabelle is that one was new, for her to read now, and the other was a first edition for her to display in the future.

    Reply
  48. Oh, I forgot to mention that the reason my MIL gave my daughter two copies of A is for Annabelle is that one was new, for her to read now, and the other was a first edition for her to display in the future.

    Reply
  49. Oh, I forgot to mention that the reason my MIL gave my daughter two copies of A is for Annabelle is that one was new, for her to read now, and the other was a first edition for her to display in the future.

    Reply
  50. Oh, I forgot to mention that the reason my MIL gave my daughter two copies of A is for Annabelle is that one was new, for her to read now, and the other was a first edition for her to display in the future.

    Reply
  51. While we’re discussing favorite horse books, what about the ones by Margeurite O’Henry, with pictures by Wesley Dennis? Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, all stories that launched a lot of girl and horse dreams. Great books!

    Reply
  52. While we’re discussing favorite horse books, what about the ones by Margeurite O’Henry, with pictures by Wesley Dennis? Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, all stories that launched a lot of girl and horse dreams. Great books!

    Reply
  53. While we’re discussing favorite horse books, what about the ones by Margeurite O’Henry, with pictures by Wesley Dennis? Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, all stories that launched a lot of girl and horse dreams. Great books!

    Reply
  54. While we’re discussing favorite horse books, what about the ones by Margeurite O’Henry, with pictures by Wesley Dennis? Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, all stories that launched a lot of girl and horse dreams. Great books!

    Reply
  55. While we’re discussing favorite horse books, what about the ones by Margeurite O’Henry, with pictures by Wesley Dennis? Misty of Chincoteague, Sea Star, Justin Morgan Had a Horse, all stories that launched a lot of girl and horse dreams. Great books!

    Reply
  56. As soon as I learned to read, I loved to read any kind of historical fiction, classic girl books and biographies of women that I could find. I don’t know what was the first historical book I read and am kind of jealous that you can.
    I have to admit that the drawings in some of those books did not make as much of an impression, but tv shows/miniseries/old movies did – particularly Little House on a Prarie reruns, the Anne of Green Gables miniseries, and some of the old movies for P&P, Little Women, etc. shown on tv.
    I’m a little too old for American Girl – I think I was in jr high when they first came out – but I did really enjoy those Sunflower YA novels. Amanda, anyone?
    I’m also dorky enough to admit that I’m looking forward to learning who the new word wench will be and have actually spent some time speculating.

    Reply
  57. As soon as I learned to read, I loved to read any kind of historical fiction, classic girl books and biographies of women that I could find. I don’t know what was the first historical book I read and am kind of jealous that you can.
    I have to admit that the drawings in some of those books did not make as much of an impression, but tv shows/miniseries/old movies did – particularly Little House on a Prarie reruns, the Anne of Green Gables miniseries, and some of the old movies for P&P, Little Women, etc. shown on tv.
    I’m a little too old for American Girl – I think I was in jr high when they first came out – but I did really enjoy those Sunflower YA novels. Amanda, anyone?
    I’m also dorky enough to admit that I’m looking forward to learning who the new word wench will be and have actually spent some time speculating.

    Reply
  58. As soon as I learned to read, I loved to read any kind of historical fiction, classic girl books and biographies of women that I could find. I don’t know what was the first historical book I read and am kind of jealous that you can.
    I have to admit that the drawings in some of those books did not make as much of an impression, but tv shows/miniseries/old movies did – particularly Little House on a Prarie reruns, the Anne of Green Gables miniseries, and some of the old movies for P&P, Little Women, etc. shown on tv.
    I’m a little too old for American Girl – I think I was in jr high when they first came out – but I did really enjoy those Sunflower YA novels. Amanda, anyone?
    I’m also dorky enough to admit that I’m looking forward to learning who the new word wench will be and have actually spent some time speculating.

    Reply
  59. As soon as I learned to read, I loved to read any kind of historical fiction, classic girl books and biographies of women that I could find. I don’t know what was the first historical book I read and am kind of jealous that you can.
    I have to admit that the drawings in some of those books did not make as much of an impression, but tv shows/miniseries/old movies did – particularly Little House on a Prarie reruns, the Anne of Green Gables miniseries, and some of the old movies for P&P, Little Women, etc. shown on tv.
    I’m a little too old for American Girl – I think I was in jr high when they first came out – but I did really enjoy those Sunflower YA novels. Amanda, anyone?
    I’m also dorky enough to admit that I’m looking forward to learning who the new word wench will be and have actually spent some time speculating.

    Reply
  60. As soon as I learned to read, I loved to read any kind of historical fiction, classic girl books and biographies of women that I could find. I don’t know what was the first historical book I read and am kind of jealous that you can.
    I have to admit that the drawings in some of those books did not make as much of an impression, but tv shows/miniseries/old movies did – particularly Little House on a Prarie reruns, the Anne of Green Gables miniseries, and some of the old movies for P&P, Little Women, etc. shown on tv.
    I’m a little too old for American Girl – I think I was in jr high when they first came out – but I did really enjoy those Sunflower YA novels. Amanda, anyone?
    I’m also dorky enough to admit that I’m looking forward to learning who the new word wench will be and have actually spent some time speculating.

    Reply
  61. Susan here again:
    Margaret, I knew you were another Tasha Tudor fan! I have to admit, I didn’t realize how fascinating her long life was until I read the various obituaries. What a fascinating biography that would be!
    Janet, I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for the Phillies themselves. The Rays are going to be tough. May your family’s cheers on the weekend help them to a win.
    RfP, Your parents came up with quite a reading list for you — those books must represent some unforgettable travels. I’m jealous. 🙂

    Reply
  62. Susan here again:
    Margaret, I knew you were another Tasha Tudor fan! I have to admit, I didn’t realize how fascinating her long life was until I read the various obituaries. What a fascinating biography that would be!
    Janet, I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for the Phillies themselves. The Rays are going to be tough. May your family’s cheers on the weekend help them to a win.
    RfP, Your parents came up with quite a reading list for you — those books must represent some unforgettable travels. I’m jealous. 🙂

    Reply
  63. Susan here again:
    Margaret, I knew you were another Tasha Tudor fan! I have to admit, I didn’t realize how fascinating her long life was until I read the various obituaries. What a fascinating biography that would be!
    Janet, I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for the Phillies themselves. The Rays are going to be tough. May your family’s cheers on the weekend help them to a win.
    RfP, Your parents came up with quite a reading list for you — those books must represent some unforgettable travels. I’m jealous. 🙂

    Reply
  64. Susan here again:
    Margaret, I knew you were another Tasha Tudor fan! I have to admit, I didn’t realize how fascinating her long life was until I read the various obituaries. What a fascinating biography that would be!
    Janet, I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for the Phillies themselves. The Rays are going to be tough. May your family’s cheers on the weekend help them to a win.
    RfP, Your parents came up with quite a reading list for you — those books must represent some unforgettable travels. I’m jealous. 🙂

    Reply
  65. Susan here again:
    Margaret, I knew you were another Tasha Tudor fan! I have to admit, I didn’t realize how fascinating her long life was until I read the various obituaries. What a fascinating biography that would be!
    Janet, I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for the Phillies themselves. The Rays are going to be tough. May your family’s cheers on the weekend help them to a win.
    RfP, Your parents came up with quite a reading list for you — those books must represent some unforgettable travels. I’m jealous. 🙂

    Reply
  66. Thank you Susan for the wonderful to Tasha Tudor.
    If found my first memorable introduction to the past in my 6th grade history book. I will never forget it. It was small (about the size of a man’s hand), had tattered green cloth covered boards, and was filled with tiny line drawings of medieval life. I’ve longed to experience the distant past ever since.

    Reply
  67. Thank you Susan for the wonderful to Tasha Tudor.
    If found my first memorable introduction to the past in my 6th grade history book. I will never forget it. It was small (about the size of a man’s hand), had tattered green cloth covered boards, and was filled with tiny line drawings of medieval life. I’ve longed to experience the distant past ever since.

    Reply
  68. Thank you Susan for the wonderful to Tasha Tudor.
    If found my first memorable introduction to the past in my 6th grade history book. I will never forget it. It was small (about the size of a man’s hand), had tattered green cloth covered boards, and was filled with tiny line drawings of medieval life. I’ve longed to experience the distant past ever since.

    Reply
  69. Thank you Susan for the wonderful to Tasha Tudor.
    If found my first memorable introduction to the past in my 6th grade history book. I will never forget it. It was small (about the size of a man’s hand), had tattered green cloth covered boards, and was filled with tiny line drawings of medieval life. I’ve longed to experience the distant past ever since.

    Reply
  70. Thank you Susan for the wonderful to Tasha Tudor.
    If found my first memorable introduction to the past in my 6th grade history book. I will never forget it. It was small (about the size of a man’s hand), had tattered green cloth covered boards, and was filled with tiny line drawings of medieval life. I’ve longed to experience the distant past ever since.

    Reply
  71. Susan here again:
    Susan Wilbanks, I love that your Annabel has not one, but two, copies of “A is for Annabelle”! Beautiful name, too. Funny how no one ever got around to a “S is for Susan”, isn’t it? *g*
    Sherrie, clearly the horse books made a more lasting impression on you! And I agree with you about the sense of the past when growing up — I was very vague about what was 100 years ago, and what was just, well, in another part of the country.
    Deb P. & Susan W., reminding me of Marguerite Henry — and the Wesley Dennis drawings.Nothing like heroic horses.
    Michelle, the only reason I can remember the first historically-set book I read is because I NEVER seem to get rid of books — any books — and I still have it. You can imagine the bookshelves in my house–!
    Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    Nina P, I have to admit I don’t remember many history books from school, which is probably because I’m from the day when girls and women didn’t appear much in them. I’m so glad to see that the text books my kids finally admit that there’s another gender of history-makers. *g*

    Reply
  72. Susan here again:
    Susan Wilbanks, I love that your Annabel has not one, but two, copies of “A is for Annabelle”! Beautiful name, too. Funny how no one ever got around to a “S is for Susan”, isn’t it? *g*
    Sherrie, clearly the horse books made a more lasting impression on you! And I agree with you about the sense of the past when growing up — I was very vague about what was 100 years ago, and what was just, well, in another part of the country.
    Deb P. & Susan W., reminding me of Marguerite Henry — and the Wesley Dennis drawings.Nothing like heroic horses.
    Michelle, the only reason I can remember the first historically-set book I read is because I NEVER seem to get rid of books — any books — and I still have it. You can imagine the bookshelves in my house–!
    Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    Nina P, I have to admit I don’t remember many history books from school, which is probably because I’m from the day when girls and women didn’t appear much in them. I’m so glad to see that the text books my kids finally admit that there’s another gender of history-makers. *g*

    Reply
  73. Susan here again:
    Susan Wilbanks, I love that your Annabel has not one, but two, copies of “A is for Annabelle”! Beautiful name, too. Funny how no one ever got around to a “S is for Susan”, isn’t it? *g*
    Sherrie, clearly the horse books made a more lasting impression on you! And I agree with you about the sense of the past when growing up — I was very vague about what was 100 years ago, and what was just, well, in another part of the country.
    Deb P. & Susan W., reminding me of Marguerite Henry — and the Wesley Dennis drawings.Nothing like heroic horses.
    Michelle, the only reason I can remember the first historically-set book I read is because I NEVER seem to get rid of books — any books — and I still have it. You can imagine the bookshelves in my house–!
    Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    Nina P, I have to admit I don’t remember many history books from school, which is probably because I’m from the day when girls and women didn’t appear much in them. I’m so glad to see that the text books my kids finally admit that there’s another gender of history-makers. *g*

    Reply
  74. Susan here again:
    Susan Wilbanks, I love that your Annabel has not one, but two, copies of “A is for Annabelle”! Beautiful name, too. Funny how no one ever got around to a “S is for Susan”, isn’t it? *g*
    Sherrie, clearly the horse books made a more lasting impression on you! And I agree with you about the sense of the past when growing up — I was very vague about what was 100 years ago, and what was just, well, in another part of the country.
    Deb P. & Susan W., reminding me of Marguerite Henry — and the Wesley Dennis drawings.Nothing like heroic horses.
    Michelle, the only reason I can remember the first historically-set book I read is because I NEVER seem to get rid of books — any books — and I still have it. You can imagine the bookshelves in my house–!
    Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    Nina P, I have to admit I don’t remember many history books from school, which is probably because I’m from the day when girls and women didn’t appear much in them. I’m so glad to see that the text books my kids finally admit that there’s another gender of history-makers. *g*

    Reply
  75. Susan here again:
    Susan Wilbanks, I love that your Annabel has not one, but two, copies of “A is for Annabelle”! Beautiful name, too. Funny how no one ever got around to a “S is for Susan”, isn’t it? *g*
    Sherrie, clearly the horse books made a more lasting impression on you! And I agree with you about the sense of the past when growing up — I was very vague about what was 100 years ago, and what was just, well, in another part of the country.
    Deb P. & Susan W., reminding me of Marguerite Henry — and the Wesley Dennis drawings.Nothing like heroic horses.
    Michelle, the only reason I can remember the first historically-set book I read is because I NEVER seem to get rid of books — any books — and I still have it. You can imagine the bookshelves in my house–!
    Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    Nina P, I have to admit I don’t remember many history books from school, which is probably because I’m from the day when girls and women didn’t appear much in them. I’m so glad to see that the text books my kids finally admit that there’s another gender of history-makers. *g*

    Reply
  76. I watched all those Disney shows, too. I bet Patrick McGoohan as “The Scarecrow of Romeny Marsh” must have influenced lots of historical romance authors! Also, later, the Poldark series, that Jo mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

    Reply
  77. I watched all those Disney shows, too. I bet Patrick McGoohan as “The Scarecrow of Romeny Marsh” must have influenced lots of historical romance authors! Also, later, the Poldark series, that Jo mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

    Reply
  78. I watched all those Disney shows, too. I bet Patrick McGoohan as “The Scarecrow of Romeny Marsh” must have influenced lots of historical romance authors! Also, later, the Poldark series, that Jo mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

    Reply
  79. I watched all those Disney shows, too. I bet Patrick McGoohan as “The Scarecrow of Romeny Marsh” must have influenced lots of historical romance authors! Also, later, the Poldark series, that Jo mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

    Reply
  80. I watched all those Disney shows, too. I bet Patrick McGoohan as “The Scarecrow of Romeny Marsh” must have influenced lots of historical romance authors! Also, later, the Poldark series, that Jo mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

    Reply
  81. I remember that I heard the story of Rapunzel and thought-wow-princes and horses and castles and long hair. And of course I always loved The Secret Garden.

    Reply
  82. I remember that I heard the story of Rapunzel and thought-wow-princes and horses and castles and long hair. And of course I always loved The Secret Garden.

    Reply
  83. I remember that I heard the story of Rapunzel and thought-wow-princes and horses and castles and long hair. And of course I always loved The Secret Garden.

    Reply
  84. I remember that I heard the story of Rapunzel and thought-wow-princes and horses and castles and long hair. And of course I always loved The Secret Garden.

    Reply
  85. I remember that I heard the story of Rapunzel and thought-wow-princes and horses and castles and long hair. And of course I always loved The Secret Garden.

    Reply
  86. The first illustrations I remember are those of Garth Williams for Margaret Wise Brown’s “Wait Till the Moon is Full”. I loved that book and the repeated refrain “wait, wait, wait till the moon is full”. Williams’ pictures of the baby racoon and his mother were so wonderfully soft yet with each animal clearly and individually portrayed. I loved the sense of this wild world that was parallel to the one I lived in a house with my own mother. And then the sense of freedom when the moon is finally full and all the young animals come out to play — it was quite marvelous.
    I also remember loving the illustrations in an anthology of short pieces and poetry (perhaps the Tall Book of Make Believe, but I’m not sure). The Walter de la Mare poem “Someone Came Knocking”, which opens, IIRC:
    “Someone came knocking
    on my wee, small door
    Someone came knocking
    I’m sure, sure, sure
    I listened, I opened,
    I looked to left and right
    But naught there was a stirring
    in the still dark night.”
    There’s more, but it’s been a very long time since I was 7, and that is all I remember.
    Neither of these readings or their illustrations directly relate to history, but I think that my taste for stories that bring another world — whether a magical one or simply another time and place in our own — was born from these early readings.

    Reply
  87. The first illustrations I remember are those of Garth Williams for Margaret Wise Brown’s “Wait Till the Moon is Full”. I loved that book and the repeated refrain “wait, wait, wait till the moon is full”. Williams’ pictures of the baby racoon and his mother were so wonderfully soft yet with each animal clearly and individually portrayed. I loved the sense of this wild world that was parallel to the one I lived in a house with my own mother. And then the sense of freedom when the moon is finally full and all the young animals come out to play — it was quite marvelous.
    I also remember loving the illustrations in an anthology of short pieces and poetry (perhaps the Tall Book of Make Believe, but I’m not sure). The Walter de la Mare poem “Someone Came Knocking”, which opens, IIRC:
    “Someone came knocking
    on my wee, small door
    Someone came knocking
    I’m sure, sure, sure
    I listened, I opened,
    I looked to left and right
    But naught there was a stirring
    in the still dark night.”
    There’s more, but it’s been a very long time since I was 7, and that is all I remember.
    Neither of these readings or their illustrations directly relate to history, but I think that my taste for stories that bring another world — whether a magical one or simply another time and place in our own — was born from these early readings.

    Reply
  88. The first illustrations I remember are those of Garth Williams for Margaret Wise Brown’s “Wait Till the Moon is Full”. I loved that book and the repeated refrain “wait, wait, wait till the moon is full”. Williams’ pictures of the baby racoon and his mother were so wonderfully soft yet with each animal clearly and individually portrayed. I loved the sense of this wild world that was parallel to the one I lived in a house with my own mother. And then the sense of freedom when the moon is finally full and all the young animals come out to play — it was quite marvelous.
    I also remember loving the illustrations in an anthology of short pieces and poetry (perhaps the Tall Book of Make Believe, but I’m not sure). The Walter de la Mare poem “Someone Came Knocking”, which opens, IIRC:
    “Someone came knocking
    on my wee, small door
    Someone came knocking
    I’m sure, sure, sure
    I listened, I opened,
    I looked to left and right
    But naught there was a stirring
    in the still dark night.”
    There’s more, but it’s been a very long time since I was 7, and that is all I remember.
    Neither of these readings or their illustrations directly relate to history, but I think that my taste for stories that bring another world — whether a magical one or simply another time and place in our own — was born from these early readings.

    Reply
  89. The first illustrations I remember are those of Garth Williams for Margaret Wise Brown’s “Wait Till the Moon is Full”. I loved that book and the repeated refrain “wait, wait, wait till the moon is full”. Williams’ pictures of the baby racoon and his mother were so wonderfully soft yet with each animal clearly and individually portrayed. I loved the sense of this wild world that was parallel to the one I lived in a house with my own mother. And then the sense of freedom when the moon is finally full and all the young animals come out to play — it was quite marvelous.
    I also remember loving the illustrations in an anthology of short pieces and poetry (perhaps the Tall Book of Make Believe, but I’m not sure). The Walter de la Mare poem “Someone Came Knocking”, which opens, IIRC:
    “Someone came knocking
    on my wee, small door
    Someone came knocking
    I’m sure, sure, sure
    I listened, I opened,
    I looked to left and right
    But naught there was a stirring
    in the still dark night.”
    There’s more, but it’s been a very long time since I was 7, and that is all I remember.
    Neither of these readings or their illustrations directly relate to history, but I think that my taste for stories that bring another world — whether a magical one or simply another time and place in our own — was born from these early readings.

    Reply
  90. The first illustrations I remember are those of Garth Williams for Margaret Wise Brown’s “Wait Till the Moon is Full”. I loved that book and the repeated refrain “wait, wait, wait till the moon is full”. Williams’ pictures of the baby racoon and his mother were so wonderfully soft yet with each animal clearly and individually portrayed. I loved the sense of this wild world that was parallel to the one I lived in a house with my own mother. And then the sense of freedom when the moon is finally full and all the young animals come out to play — it was quite marvelous.
    I also remember loving the illustrations in an anthology of short pieces and poetry (perhaps the Tall Book of Make Believe, but I’m not sure). The Walter de la Mare poem “Someone Came Knocking”, which opens, IIRC:
    “Someone came knocking
    on my wee, small door
    Someone came knocking
    I’m sure, sure, sure
    I listened, I opened,
    I looked to left and right
    But naught there was a stirring
    in the still dark night.”
    There’s more, but it’s been a very long time since I was 7, and that is all I remember.
    Neither of these readings or their illustrations directly relate to history, but I think that my taste for stories that bring another world — whether a magical one or simply another time and place in our own — was born from these early readings.

    Reply
  91. Susan again:
    I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.
    Hmmmmm…..
    She’ll be here on Monday. Be ready with a warm-Wench-Welcome! 🙂

    Reply
  92. Susan again:
    I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.
    Hmmmmm…..
    She’ll be here on Monday. Be ready with a warm-Wench-Welcome! 🙂

    Reply
  93. Susan again:
    I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.
    Hmmmmm…..
    She’ll be here on Monday. Be ready with a warm-Wench-Welcome! 🙂

    Reply
  94. Susan again:
    I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.
    Hmmmmm…..
    She’ll be here on Monday. Be ready with a warm-Wench-Welcome! 🙂

    Reply
  95. Susan again:
    I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.
    Hmmmmm…..
    She’ll be here on Monday. Be ready with a warm-Wench-Welcome! 🙂

    Reply
  96. Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    I would have been surprised if it would have been familiar to you. It was made in 1943 and I think it was set in the 19th century.

    Reply
  97. Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    I would have been surprised if it would have been familiar to you. It was made in 1943 and I think it was set in the 19th century.

    Reply
  98. Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    I would have been surprised if it would have been familiar to you. It was made in 1943 and I think it was set in the 19th century.

    Reply
  99. Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    I would have been surprised if it would have been familiar to you. It was made in 1943 and I think it was set in the 19th century.

    Reply
  100. Minna, I have to admit that the “Count of Munkkiniemi” is new to me. Do you remember the time-period? Or was it just set in “long ago, far away”?
    I would have been surprised if it would have been familiar to you. It was made in 1943 and I think it was set in the 19th century.

    Reply
  101. “I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.”
    Oh, good, a clue!
    Now off to Susan/Miranda’s web site to see if I can figure out who the new wench will be!

    Reply
  102. “I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.”
    Oh, good, a clue!
    Now off to Susan/Miranda’s web site to see if I can figure out who the new wench will be!

    Reply
  103. “I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.”
    Oh, good, a clue!
    Now off to Susan/Miranda’s web site to see if I can figure out who the new wench will be!

    Reply
  104. “I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.”
    Oh, good, a clue!
    Now off to Susan/Miranda’s web site to see if I can figure out who the new wench will be!

    Reply
  105. “I forgot to add a teaser-clue for all of you trying to guess the identity of the New Wench: she and I (the Miranda Jarrrett-I) were in an anthology together long ago.”
    Oh, good, a clue!
    Now off to Susan/Miranda’s web site to see if I can figure out who the new wench will be!

    Reply
  106. ***I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world.***
    This sums up how I felt about the passing of Edward Gorey.
    My intro to the past (aside from being rasised in a family of historical re-enactors) were the books of Rosemary Sutcliff. I ate them up when I was seven or eight.

    Reply
  107. ***I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world.***
    This sums up how I felt about the passing of Edward Gorey.
    My intro to the past (aside from being rasised in a family of historical re-enactors) were the books of Rosemary Sutcliff. I ate them up when I was seven or eight.

    Reply
  108. ***I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world.***
    This sums up how I felt about the passing of Edward Gorey.
    My intro to the past (aside from being rasised in a family of historical re-enactors) were the books of Rosemary Sutcliff. I ate them up when I was seven or eight.

    Reply
  109. ***I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world.***
    This sums up how I felt about the passing of Edward Gorey.
    My intro to the past (aside from being rasised in a family of historical re-enactors) were the books of Rosemary Sutcliff. I ate them up when I was seven or eight.

    Reply
  110. ***I never met Tasha Tudor, yet on the day I learned of her death, I felt a great personal sadness, and a greater loss to the world.***
    This sums up how I felt about the passing of Edward Gorey.
    My intro to the past (aside from being rasised in a family of historical re-enactors) were the books of Rosemary Sutcliff. I ate them up when I was seven or eight.

    Reply
  111. Oh, Kalen, I LOVE Edwrd Gorey, too, and along the same dark lines, Charles Adams as well. (The old New Yorker cartoons, not so much the movie or tv show.)
    I know you’re out in California, but if you ever have the chance, I hope you can visit Edward Gorey’s house on Cape Cod. It’s a small museum now, and it’s fascinating to see how the seeds of his artistic inspiration are all around that house. Very cool!
    http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/lochours.html

    Reply
  112. Oh, Kalen, I LOVE Edwrd Gorey, too, and along the same dark lines, Charles Adams as well. (The old New Yorker cartoons, not so much the movie or tv show.)
    I know you’re out in California, but if you ever have the chance, I hope you can visit Edward Gorey’s house on Cape Cod. It’s a small museum now, and it’s fascinating to see how the seeds of his artistic inspiration are all around that house. Very cool!
    http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/lochours.html

    Reply
  113. Oh, Kalen, I LOVE Edwrd Gorey, too, and along the same dark lines, Charles Adams as well. (The old New Yorker cartoons, not so much the movie or tv show.)
    I know you’re out in California, but if you ever have the chance, I hope you can visit Edward Gorey’s house on Cape Cod. It’s a small museum now, and it’s fascinating to see how the seeds of his artistic inspiration are all around that house. Very cool!
    http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/lochours.html

    Reply
  114. Oh, Kalen, I LOVE Edwrd Gorey, too, and along the same dark lines, Charles Adams as well. (The old New Yorker cartoons, not so much the movie or tv show.)
    I know you’re out in California, but if you ever have the chance, I hope you can visit Edward Gorey’s house on Cape Cod. It’s a small museum now, and it’s fascinating to see how the seeds of his artistic inspiration are all around that house. Very cool!
    http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/lochours.html

    Reply
  115. Oh, Kalen, I LOVE Edwrd Gorey, too, and along the same dark lines, Charles Adams as well. (The old New Yorker cartoons, not so much the movie or tv show.)
    I know you’re out in California, but if you ever have the chance, I hope you can visit Edward Gorey’s house on Cape Cod. It’s a small museum now, and it’s fascinating to see how the seeds of his artistic inspiration are all around that house. Very cool!
    http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/lochours.html

    Reply
  116. OK. You’ve been in a lot of anthologies. I’m guessing long ago is the 90’s. This is what I could find – and it did not include my guess. 🙂
    ’95 – Anita Mills and Pat Potter
    ’98 – Cassandra Austin, Claire Delacroix and Judith McWilliams
    ’99 – Linda Howard, Geralyn Dawson, Jillian Hunter
    ’02 – Lynn Stone, Anne Gracie
    ’04 – Merline Lovelace
    ’05 – Terri Brisbin, Nicola Cornick, Margaret McPhee, Joanne Rock
    Is one of the above correct?

    Reply
  117. OK. You’ve been in a lot of anthologies. I’m guessing long ago is the 90’s. This is what I could find – and it did not include my guess. 🙂
    ’95 – Anita Mills and Pat Potter
    ’98 – Cassandra Austin, Claire Delacroix and Judith McWilliams
    ’99 – Linda Howard, Geralyn Dawson, Jillian Hunter
    ’02 – Lynn Stone, Anne Gracie
    ’04 – Merline Lovelace
    ’05 – Terri Brisbin, Nicola Cornick, Margaret McPhee, Joanne Rock
    Is one of the above correct?

    Reply
  118. OK. You’ve been in a lot of anthologies. I’m guessing long ago is the 90’s. This is what I could find – and it did not include my guess. 🙂
    ’95 – Anita Mills and Pat Potter
    ’98 – Cassandra Austin, Claire Delacroix and Judith McWilliams
    ’99 – Linda Howard, Geralyn Dawson, Jillian Hunter
    ’02 – Lynn Stone, Anne Gracie
    ’04 – Merline Lovelace
    ’05 – Terri Brisbin, Nicola Cornick, Margaret McPhee, Joanne Rock
    Is one of the above correct?

    Reply
  119. OK. You’ve been in a lot of anthologies. I’m guessing long ago is the 90’s. This is what I could find – and it did not include my guess. 🙂
    ’95 – Anita Mills and Pat Potter
    ’98 – Cassandra Austin, Claire Delacroix and Judith McWilliams
    ’99 – Linda Howard, Geralyn Dawson, Jillian Hunter
    ’02 – Lynn Stone, Anne Gracie
    ’04 – Merline Lovelace
    ’05 – Terri Brisbin, Nicola Cornick, Margaret McPhee, Joanne Rock
    Is one of the above correct?

    Reply
  120. OK. You’ve been in a lot of anthologies. I’m guessing long ago is the 90’s. This is what I could find – and it did not include my guess. 🙂
    ’95 – Anita Mills and Pat Potter
    ’98 – Cassandra Austin, Claire Delacroix and Judith McWilliams
    ’99 – Linda Howard, Geralyn Dawson, Jillian Hunter
    ’02 – Lynn Stone, Anne Gracie
    ’04 – Merline Lovelace
    ’05 – Terri Brisbin, Nicola Cornick, Margaret McPhee, Joanne Rock
    Is one of the above correct?

    Reply
  121. The first illustrations I remember were in a book of Snow White (the Disney version). I was very young, maybe 3 or 4, and a visiting nurse of some kind gave it to me. I thought it was a gift, not a loan, and was mighty upset when my mother said I had to give it up.
    My very favorite childhood illos were those of John R. Neill, who illustrated a slew of Oz books for 30 plus years. I loved the fanciful creatures, the quaint clothes, and the girls in their filmy delicate dresses. He could pack an awful lot of style and wit into a tiny pen and ink drawing meant for children.
    I loved Wesley Dennis too, of course, and C. W. Anderson as well. I still have copies of King of the Wind and A Touch of Greatness out where I can look at them.
    Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.

    Reply
  122. The first illustrations I remember were in a book of Snow White (the Disney version). I was very young, maybe 3 or 4, and a visiting nurse of some kind gave it to me. I thought it was a gift, not a loan, and was mighty upset when my mother said I had to give it up.
    My very favorite childhood illos were those of John R. Neill, who illustrated a slew of Oz books for 30 plus years. I loved the fanciful creatures, the quaint clothes, and the girls in their filmy delicate dresses. He could pack an awful lot of style and wit into a tiny pen and ink drawing meant for children.
    I loved Wesley Dennis too, of course, and C. W. Anderson as well. I still have copies of King of the Wind and A Touch of Greatness out where I can look at them.
    Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.

    Reply
  123. The first illustrations I remember were in a book of Snow White (the Disney version). I was very young, maybe 3 or 4, and a visiting nurse of some kind gave it to me. I thought it was a gift, not a loan, and was mighty upset when my mother said I had to give it up.
    My very favorite childhood illos were those of John R. Neill, who illustrated a slew of Oz books for 30 plus years. I loved the fanciful creatures, the quaint clothes, and the girls in their filmy delicate dresses. He could pack an awful lot of style and wit into a tiny pen and ink drawing meant for children.
    I loved Wesley Dennis too, of course, and C. W. Anderson as well. I still have copies of King of the Wind and A Touch of Greatness out where I can look at them.
    Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.

    Reply
  124. The first illustrations I remember were in a book of Snow White (the Disney version). I was very young, maybe 3 or 4, and a visiting nurse of some kind gave it to me. I thought it was a gift, not a loan, and was mighty upset when my mother said I had to give it up.
    My very favorite childhood illos were those of John R. Neill, who illustrated a slew of Oz books for 30 plus years. I loved the fanciful creatures, the quaint clothes, and the girls in their filmy delicate dresses. He could pack an awful lot of style and wit into a tiny pen and ink drawing meant for children.
    I loved Wesley Dennis too, of course, and C. W. Anderson as well. I still have copies of King of the Wind and A Touch of Greatness out where I can look at them.
    Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.

    Reply
  125. The first illustrations I remember were in a book of Snow White (the Disney version). I was very young, maybe 3 or 4, and a visiting nurse of some kind gave it to me. I thought it was a gift, not a loan, and was mighty upset when my mother said I had to give it up.
    My very favorite childhood illos were those of John R. Neill, who illustrated a slew of Oz books for 30 plus years. I loved the fanciful creatures, the quaint clothes, and the girls in their filmy delicate dresses. He could pack an awful lot of style and wit into a tiny pen and ink drawing meant for children.
    I loved Wesley Dennis too, of course, and C. W. Anderson as well. I still have copies of King of the Wind and A Touch of Greatness out where I can look at them.
    Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.

    Reply
  126. I’m going to some Australian ones! Like The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay (who’s son Philip Lindsay was a well know historical fiction authour incidently). I remember some illustrated Banjo Patterson poems too, like Mulga Bill’s Bicycle, and of course The Man From Snowy River.
    And the covers of the Mary Grant Bruce books too.

    Reply
  127. I’m going to some Australian ones! Like The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay (who’s son Philip Lindsay was a well know historical fiction authour incidently). I remember some illustrated Banjo Patterson poems too, like Mulga Bill’s Bicycle, and of course The Man From Snowy River.
    And the covers of the Mary Grant Bruce books too.

    Reply
  128. I’m going to some Australian ones! Like The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay (who’s son Philip Lindsay was a well know historical fiction authour incidently). I remember some illustrated Banjo Patterson poems too, like Mulga Bill’s Bicycle, and of course The Man From Snowy River.
    And the covers of the Mary Grant Bruce books too.

    Reply
  129. I’m going to some Australian ones! Like The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay (who’s son Philip Lindsay was a well know historical fiction authour incidently). I remember some illustrated Banjo Patterson poems too, like Mulga Bill’s Bicycle, and of course The Man From Snowy River.
    And the covers of the Mary Grant Bruce books too.

    Reply
  130. I’m going to some Australian ones! Like The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay (who’s son Philip Lindsay was a well know historical fiction authour incidently). I remember some illustrated Banjo Patterson poems too, like Mulga Bill’s Bicycle, and of course The Man From Snowy River.
    And the covers of the Mary Grant Bruce books too.

    Reply
  131. Susan here:
    Ahhh, Michelle, ask my no questions and I’ll tell you no lies! Day after tomorrow you’ll know who the new Wench is, and a fine addition she’ll be, too. 🙂
    Janice wrote: “Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.”
    I agree completely, Janice!
    Amanda, I’m afraid that Banjo Patterson slips under the American radar — but we did get to see “The Man from Snowy River”, and I remember liking that very much.

    Reply
  132. Susan here:
    Ahhh, Michelle, ask my no questions and I’ll tell you no lies! Day after tomorrow you’ll know who the new Wench is, and a fine addition she’ll be, too. 🙂
    Janice wrote: “Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.”
    I agree completely, Janice!
    Amanda, I’m afraid that Banjo Patterson slips under the American radar — but we did get to see “The Man from Snowy River”, and I remember liking that very much.

    Reply
  133. Susan here:
    Ahhh, Michelle, ask my no questions and I’ll tell you no lies! Day after tomorrow you’ll know who the new Wench is, and a fine addition she’ll be, too. 🙂
    Janice wrote: “Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.”
    I agree completely, Janice!
    Amanda, I’m afraid that Banjo Patterson slips under the American radar — but we did get to see “The Man from Snowy River”, and I remember liking that very much.

    Reply
  134. Susan here:
    Ahhh, Michelle, ask my no questions and I’ll tell you no lies! Day after tomorrow you’ll know who the new Wench is, and a fine addition she’ll be, too. 🙂
    Janice wrote: “Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.”
    I agree completely, Janice!
    Amanda, I’m afraid that Banjo Patterson slips under the American radar — but we did get to see “The Man from Snowy River”, and I remember liking that very much.

    Reply
  135. Susan here:
    Ahhh, Michelle, ask my no questions and I’ll tell you no lies! Day after tomorrow you’ll know who the new Wench is, and a fine addition she’ll be, too. 🙂
    Janice wrote: “Having any book I wanted was my idea of being “rich” when I was a kid — and it still is.”
    I agree completely, Janice!
    Amanda, I’m afraid that Banjo Patterson slips under the American radar — but we did get to see “The Man from Snowy River”, and I remember liking that very much.

    Reply

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