To Catch a Bride: An Interview with Anne Gracie

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo 

Anne, you’ve been on quite a roll lately!  At the August Romance Writers of Australia conference in Brisbane, you were the essential member of the all day workshop on storytelling we did together (I’d have been helpless without your teacher skills); you were presented with the organization’s service award for the year: and then you won the Ruby award (RWAust’s RITA) for best long romance of 2008 for The Stolen Princess, first in your Devil Riders Regency historical series.
 
Then while you were recovering from the conference, word arrived that Library Cover Journal had given you a starred review for your new September release, To Catch a Bride.  Way to go!  Among other things, LJ said:
 
“English Regency society and the back streets of early 19th-century Cairo spring to vibrant life in this enthralling and thought-provoking tale of survival, secrets, and social class.   VERDICT: Threaded with charm and humor, this action-rich, emotionally compelling story is the third in Gracie's popular "Devil Riders" series. Though it stands on its own, it is sure to entice readers to read the others.” 
 
MJP:   Having been fortunate to read the book early, I couldn’t agree more.  So, for starters, can you tell us about your Devil Riders series?  How did you come up with it, how long will it be, are there any ongoing themes?
 
Anne picture AG: Thanks, Mary Jo. I wanted to do a series about four men, friends since school, who'd been at war together. When I discussed it with my editor, she suggested I make all the men younger sons, who not only had to adjust to peacetime, but who had to make their own way in the world. It's strayed a little from that beginning — as you know, characters tend to have a life of their own once they hit the page. The series was originally supposed to be four books, but it might stretch to more. I don't know yet.  My publisher will decide on that. I have no shortage of stories. Or heroes.

As for themes, I don't consciously set out to write books with themes, I just work on characterization and plot. But redemption through love is often a theme that crops up in my work.
 
MJP:  Can you tell us about To Catch a Bride?
 
AG: It's a story about Rafe, a younger son who grew up estranged from his father and older brother. Now his brother, the Earl of Axbridge, married for ten years but childless, has urged Rafe to marry. It's Rafe's duty to provide the next generation, the son who will eventually inherit the title. (After the Earl, then Rafe dies.)

Ayishasketch Rafe agrees, but then discovers his brother has made an unholy bargain with his bride-to-be. So on a whim, he agrees to look for the long-lost granddaughter of Lady Cleeve — she's missing in Egypt. All he has is this sketch of her, when she was 12.
 
 MJP:  I adore exotic settings, and loved that part of TCAB is set in Cairo.  The setting seemed very authentic to me.  How hard was it to research?
 
Alexandria AG: Research is a mix of so many factors. For a start, I had visited Egypt briefly when I was a child, and my father was there as a young man, so I have photos from that time and an echo of sensory details. Mostly I used travellers' diaries from the Regency period and books published about Egypt at that time. And I use maps — I love maps —and images such as engravings and paintings of the period to help me imagine that world. I use a lot of images — I made a really spectacular collage for this story, but I can't show it because it gives too much of the story away. Here are a couple of images that helped me.
 
MJP:  Were there any Really Cool Facts that turned up in your research, but you couldn’t fit them into the story?  If so, now is your chance to tell us about them!
 
AG: I became really interested in attitudes to the plague. Yes, the plague — bubonic plague that wiped out half of Europe a few centuries before. It still um… plagued Alleyway Egypt during Regency times — I knew there was disease, but I hadn't realized it was the actual plague.

I became fascinated by the factions that had formed around beliefs as to how one caught/prevented it. Some contemporary accounts refer with utter scorn to the ridiculous notions of contagionists, and there were all sorts of mad (to us now) beliefs about how you caught it and how to prevent it. Pretty much everyone, from all factions, was agreed that there was no cure for it, once caught.

Egyptian_Mau-Cat_1 I also came up with a Really Cool Cat that I did manage to incorporate into the story.  😉 An Egyptian Mau cat – the breed wasn't established as such, but the antecedents of the Mau were there (and Mau is Egyptian for cat) and when I saw this picture, I couldn't resist.  
 
MJP: The hero, Rafe Ramsey, received a well-deserved KISS award from Romantic Times magazine.  Was he challenging to write?
 
AG: Not really. As all good heroes are, he was a bit recalcitrant at times, but once I stopped trying to make him do what he didn't want to do, he moved along just fine. I love writing the sort of hero who thinks he's in perfect control of his life. It's so much fun when he meets the heroine and suddenly his well-ordered world turns upside down. And Rafe is lovely — he's so cool and elegant and buttoned-down, and yet so protective and honorable.  
 
MJP:  The heroine, Ayisha, is a rare handful.  Was she a challenge to develop, or did she spring into your mind fully formed? 
 
AG: Pretty much fully formed. I was talking to a friend of mine about Rafe  and the kind of heroine who'd bring out the best in him, and she said, he's always cool, and in control. What you need is the sort of girl he's never had to deal with, who doesn't play by his rules. And suddenly Ayisha sprang into life. She's had a tough life, Circassian_girl-1 and she's got serious secrets — the kind of thing that could destroy her. But she has a wonderful zest for life, and she battles to make a good life for herself and those she loves. She's very loyal and loving and she and Rafe are really made for each other — though neither one of them realizes it at first.
  
MJP:  What’s are you working on now? 
 
AG: I'm writing Nash's story. I'd started the fourth story of the series and realized by the end of the first chapter that this hero wasn't Luke at all, but was Nash. It's a lighter story — Nash is a bit of a bad boy. The way he's shaping up, he's a little bit like Gideon in Perfect Rake. Possibly naughtier. And the heroine keeps bees. Being a beekeeper myself, I've always wanted to write a story with bees in it, but you can't force these things. I was well into this story when I suddenly realized she kept bees. 
 
MJP: Here’s an excerpt which gives a good idea about Rafe and Ayisha: 

He felt her body soften under his. Rafe relaxed. The skirmish was over. Miss Cleeve had decided to be sensible.



"Having exchanged compliments, I suppose I should introduce myself. Rafe Ramsey, at your service." He released her and started to sit up.



A mistake. The moment she felt him shift off her, she exploded into action. He wrestled her back down beneath him. In three seconds he had her pinned under him again, only not quite so neatly this time. Lord, but the girl was all bones. And piss and vinegar.



"This is extremely tiresome of you, you know. I mean you no harm."



"You'll break my arm," she growled.



"Probably," he agreed. "If you keep struggling like that. It won't be intentional on my part — "



At that moment a ray of moonlight lit her face. Rafe stared at his prisoner. She was… lovely. Her eyes were rather fine — blue, or green, or somewhere in between — fringed with dark lashes and set at an intriguing angle. Her nose was small and straight, her lips full and lush. And her skin, under the truly amazing amount of dirt, felt soft and smooth.



"My God," he whispered. "What a rare little beauty."



She jerked her head back and biffed him on the nose, hard. 



"Oof!" It hurt like the very devil. He had to hand it to the little demon. She didn't give up easily. Without letting go of her wrists, he managed to plant an arm over her head and held it pressed to the floor. His nose ached. His eyes watered.



She gave him a smug look.



"Whoever brought Cleopatra to Rome wrapped in a rug knew his business," he told her with feeling. 



The rather fine green eyes narrowed to furious cat-slits.

the full extract is here:

http://www.annegracie.com/books/CatchaBride.html  

:
MJP:  Any final words about the book?
 
Moroccan rugs AG: I had a lot of fun writing this one. I hope people like it. I'm a little worried about readers reactions to the Egyptian setting, which is a fair part of the book. I love the occasional venture into other countries, but I'm told many readers hate foreign settings in books. What do you think? Do you like or dislike unusual settings, and why?

MJP:  Anne will be giving away a signed copy of To Catch A Bride to someone who comments on this post by midnight Thursday.  Happy reading!
 

205 thoughts on “To Catch a Bride: An Interview with Anne Gracie”

  1. I read it this weekend and loved it! And I like exotic settings if it feels like authenticity, not just like home-with-some-foreign-people-around. This was definitely a good one!

    Reply
  2. I read it this weekend and loved it! And I like exotic settings if it feels like authenticity, not just like home-with-some-foreign-people-around. This was definitely a good one!

    Reply
  3. I read it this weekend and loved it! And I like exotic settings if it feels like authenticity, not just like home-with-some-foreign-people-around. This was definitely a good one!

    Reply
  4. I read it this weekend and loved it! And I like exotic settings if it feels like authenticity, not just like home-with-some-foreign-people-around. This was definitely a good one!

    Reply
  5. I read it this weekend and loved it! And I like exotic settings if it feels like authenticity, not just like home-with-some-foreign-people-around. This was definitely a good one!

    Reply
  6. I got my copy last night for my birthday (inspired present!) and am LOVING it already. The Egyptian setting is exciting and really adds to the story, i think. I say MORE foreign settings with lovely regency heroes being very dashing in them!

    Reply
  7. I got my copy last night for my birthday (inspired present!) and am LOVING it already. The Egyptian setting is exciting and really adds to the story, i think. I say MORE foreign settings with lovely regency heroes being very dashing in them!

    Reply
  8. I got my copy last night for my birthday (inspired present!) and am LOVING it already. The Egyptian setting is exciting and really adds to the story, i think. I say MORE foreign settings with lovely regency heroes being very dashing in them!

    Reply
  9. I got my copy last night for my birthday (inspired present!) and am LOVING it already. The Egyptian setting is exciting and really adds to the story, i think. I say MORE foreign settings with lovely regency heroes being very dashing in them!

    Reply
  10. I got my copy last night for my birthday (inspired present!) and am LOVING it already. The Egyptian setting is exciting and really adds to the story, i think. I say MORE foreign settings with lovely regency heroes being very dashing in them!

    Reply
  11. I like Egyptian settings too; that one that Loretta Chase did about Rupert & the lady linguist is a favorite. I got hooked at an early age when I read Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I reread that book endlessly; I don’t think any other kid in my school got a chance to read it as I usually had it! (And it’s still a great romance and a cracking good read!)
    The more Egyptian settings, be they ancient or more modern, the better, I say, and other foreign settings as well. I like seeing how the English lady and gentleman types comport themselves when faced with cultures so alien to their own.

    Reply
  12. I like Egyptian settings too; that one that Loretta Chase did about Rupert & the lady linguist is a favorite. I got hooked at an early age when I read Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I reread that book endlessly; I don’t think any other kid in my school got a chance to read it as I usually had it! (And it’s still a great romance and a cracking good read!)
    The more Egyptian settings, be they ancient or more modern, the better, I say, and other foreign settings as well. I like seeing how the English lady and gentleman types comport themselves when faced with cultures so alien to their own.

    Reply
  13. I like Egyptian settings too; that one that Loretta Chase did about Rupert & the lady linguist is a favorite. I got hooked at an early age when I read Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I reread that book endlessly; I don’t think any other kid in my school got a chance to read it as I usually had it! (And it’s still a great romance and a cracking good read!)
    The more Egyptian settings, be they ancient or more modern, the better, I say, and other foreign settings as well. I like seeing how the English lady and gentleman types comport themselves when faced with cultures so alien to their own.

    Reply
  14. I like Egyptian settings too; that one that Loretta Chase did about Rupert & the lady linguist is a favorite. I got hooked at an early age when I read Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I reread that book endlessly; I don’t think any other kid in my school got a chance to read it as I usually had it! (And it’s still a great romance and a cracking good read!)
    The more Egyptian settings, be they ancient or more modern, the better, I say, and other foreign settings as well. I like seeing how the English lady and gentleman types comport themselves when faced with cultures so alien to their own.

    Reply
  15. I like Egyptian settings too; that one that Loretta Chase did about Rupert & the lady linguist is a favorite. I got hooked at an early age when I read Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I reread that book endlessly; I don’t think any other kid in my school got a chance to read it as I usually had it! (And it’s still a great romance and a cracking good read!)
    The more Egyptian settings, be they ancient or more modern, the better, I say, and other foreign settings as well. I like seeing how the English lady and gentleman types comport themselves when faced with cultures so alien to their own.

    Reply
  16. Firstly, Mary Jo, you and Anne were a superb team and everyone adored hearing you speak. Anne, can’t wait to read To Catch A Bride. I love exotic settings, particularly for the Regency genre where most books move from drawing room to ballroom to country estate. Exotic settings give the story a largeness which is harder to achieve in tightly structured English world. And Nash -naughtier than Gideon? Can’t wait 🙂

    Reply
  17. Firstly, Mary Jo, you and Anne were a superb team and everyone adored hearing you speak. Anne, can’t wait to read To Catch A Bride. I love exotic settings, particularly for the Regency genre where most books move from drawing room to ballroom to country estate. Exotic settings give the story a largeness which is harder to achieve in tightly structured English world. And Nash -naughtier than Gideon? Can’t wait 🙂

    Reply
  18. Firstly, Mary Jo, you and Anne were a superb team and everyone adored hearing you speak. Anne, can’t wait to read To Catch A Bride. I love exotic settings, particularly for the Regency genre where most books move from drawing room to ballroom to country estate. Exotic settings give the story a largeness which is harder to achieve in tightly structured English world. And Nash -naughtier than Gideon? Can’t wait 🙂

    Reply
  19. Firstly, Mary Jo, you and Anne were a superb team and everyone adored hearing you speak. Anne, can’t wait to read To Catch A Bride. I love exotic settings, particularly for the Regency genre where most books move from drawing room to ballroom to country estate. Exotic settings give the story a largeness which is harder to achieve in tightly structured English world. And Nash -naughtier than Gideon? Can’t wait 🙂

    Reply
  20. Firstly, Mary Jo, you and Anne were a superb team and everyone adored hearing you speak. Anne, can’t wait to read To Catch A Bride. I love exotic settings, particularly for the Regency genre where most books move from drawing room to ballroom to country estate. Exotic settings give the story a largeness which is harder to achieve in tightly structured English world. And Nash -naughtier than Gideon? Can’t wait 🙂

    Reply
  21. I somehow got hold of this a couple of weeks ago, and I loved it. Ayisha was a lot of fun, and poor Rafe on the boat XD I’ve been really enjoying the reaccuring themes of family relationships and parentage in this series.
    Can’t wait to read Nash’s story – and I’m so pleased that he’s getting his own tale, especially if he’s like Gideon. Any plans for Marcus?
    But Luke! I’m dying to know more about Luke. I’ve been intrigued by him from the beginning, especially with all those hints you’ve dropped *sigh* And his attempts to balance Rafe in the prologue.
    Loving the Devil Rider’s series, in case you couldn’t tell ;D

    Reply
  22. I somehow got hold of this a couple of weeks ago, and I loved it. Ayisha was a lot of fun, and poor Rafe on the boat XD I’ve been really enjoying the reaccuring themes of family relationships and parentage in this series.
    Can’t wait to read Nash’s story – and I’m so pleased that he’s getting his own tale, especially if he’s like Gideon. Any plans for Marcus?
    But Luke! I’m dying to know more about Luke. I’ve been intrigued by him from the beginning, especially with all those hints you’ve dropped *sigh* And his attempts to balance Rafe in the prologue.
    Loving the Devil Rider’s series, in case you couldn’t tell ;D

    Reply
  23. I somehow got hold of this a couple of weeks ago, and I loved it. Ayisha was a lot of fun, and poor Rafe on the boat XD I’ve been really enjoying the reaccuring themes of family relationships and parentage in this series.
    Can’t wait to read Nash’s story – and I’m so pleased that he’s getting his own tale, especially if he’s like Gideon. Any plans for Marcus?
    But Luke! I’m dying to know more about Luke. I’ve been intrigued by him from the beginning, especially with all those hints you’ve dropped *sigh* And his attempts to balance Rafe in the prologue.
    Loving the Devil Rider’s series, in case you couldn’t tell ;D

    Reply
  24. I somehow got hold of this a couple of weeks ago, and I loved it. Ayisha was a lot of fun, and poor Rafe on the boat XD I’ve been really enjoying the reaccuring themes of family relationships and parentage in this series.
    Can’t wait to read Nash’s story – and I’m so pleased that he’s getting his own tale, especially if he’s like Gideon. Any plans for Marcus?
    But Luke! I’m dying to know more about Luke. I’ve been intrigued by him from the beginning, especially with all those hints you’ve dropped *sigh* And his attempts to balance Rafe in the prologue.
    Loving the Devil Rider’s series, in case you couldn’t tell ;D

    Reply
  25. I somehow got hold of this a couple of weeks ago, and I loved it. Ayisha was a lot of fun, and poor Rafe on the boat XD I’ve been really enjoying the reaccuring themes of family relationships and parentage in this series.
    Can’t wait to read Nash’s story – and I’m so pleased that he’s getting his own tale, especially if he’s like Gideon. Any plans for Marcus?
    But Luke! I’m dying to know more about Luke. I’ve been intrigued by him from the beginning, especially with all those hints you’ve dropped *sigh* And his attempts to balance Rafe in the prologue.
    Loving the Devil Rider’s series, in case you couldn’t tell ;D

    Reply
  26. I am looking forward to the Egyptain setting. I trust you to make it interesting! Once I find an author I like it doesn’t matter where the story is set, I will read it because I like the author’s style of writing. So, I am jealous that some people already have the book, I will have to get to the store!

    Reply
  27. I am looking forward to the Egyptain setting. I trust you to make it interesting! Once I find an author I like it doesn’t matter where the story is set, I will read it because I like the author’s style of writing. So, I am jealous that some people already have the book, I will have to get to the store!

    Reply
  28. I am looking forward to the Egyptain setting. I trust you to make it interesting! Once I find an author I like it doesn’t matter where the story is set, I will read it because I like the author’s style of writing. So, I am jealous that some people already have the book, I will have to get to the store!

    Reply
  29. I am looking forward to the Egyptain setting. I trust you to make it interesting! Once I find an author I like it doesn’t matter where the story is set, I will read it because I like the author’s style of writing. So, I am jealous that some people already have the book, I will have to get to the store!

    Reply
  30. I am looking forward to the Egyptain setting. I trust you to make it interesting! Once I find an author I like it doesn’t matter where the story is set, I will read it because I like the author’s style of writing. So, I am jealous that some people already have the book, I will have to get to the store!

    Reply
  31. I for one am looking forward to the exotic setting. The Amelia Peabody series is set in Egypt and that is one of my favorites.
    Nothing makes me smile more than the thought of a new Anne Gracie book. I am really looking forward to it.

    Reply
  32. I for one am looking forward to the exotic setting. The Amelia Peabody series is set in Egypt and that is one of my favorites.
    Nothing makes me smile more than the thought of a new Anne Gracie book. I am really looking forward to it.

    Reply
  33. I for one am looking forward to the exotic setting. The Amelia Peabody series is set in Egypt and that is one of my favorites.
    Nothing makes me smile more than the thought of a new Anne Gracie book. I am really looking forward to it.

    Reply
  34. I for one am looking forward to the exotic setting. The Amelia Peabody series is set in Egypt and that is one of my favorites.
    Nothing makes me smile more than the thought of a new Anne Gracie book. I am really looking forward to it.

    Reply
  35. I for one am looking forward to the exotic setting. The Amelia Peabody series is set in Egypt and that is one of my favorites.
    Nothing makes me smile more than the thought of a new Anne Gracie book. I am really looking forward to it.

    Reply
  36. I like a good story, and I don’t much care where it takes place, as long as it’s a Regency. Although I do stray to other eras occasionally.
    I have to like both the hero and heroine. I like strong heroines, and especially unconventional ones. Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine.
    I’ve always liked your heroes. From what I’ve seen so far, and I assume Rafe is the same, your heroes are decent men who’ve been kicked around and it’s made them better men. Exactly what I want in a hero.

    Reply
  37. I like a good story, and I don’t much care where it takes place, as long as it’s a Regency. Although I do stray to other eras occasionally.
    I have to like both the hero and heroine. I like strong heroines, and especially unconventional ones. Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine.
    I’ve always liked your heroes. From what I’ve seen so far, and I assume Rafe is the same, your heroes are decent men who’ve been kicked around and it’s made them better men. Exactly what I want in a hero.

    Reply
  38. I like a good story, and I don’t much care where it takes place, as long as it’s a Regency. Although I do stray to other eras occasionally.
    I have to like both the hero and heroine. I like strong heroines, and especially unconventional ones. Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine.
    I’ve always liked your heroes. From what I’ve seen so far, and I assume Rafe is the same, your heroes are decent men who’ve been kicked around and it’s made them better men. Exactly what I want in a hero.

    Reply
  39. I like a good story, and I don’t much care where it takes place, as long as it’s a Regency. Although I do stray to other eras occasionally.
    I have to like both the hero and heroine. I like strong heroines, and especially unconventional ones. Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine.
    I’ve always liked your heroes. From what I’ve seen so far, and I assume Rafe is the same, your heroes are decent men who’ve been kicked around and it’s made them better men. Exactly what I want in a hero.

    Reply
  40. I like a good story, and I don’t much care where it takes place, as long as it’s a Regency. Although I do stray to other eras occasionally.
    I have to like both the hero and heroine. I like strong heroines, and especially unconventional ones. Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine.
    I’ve always liked your heroes. From what I’ve seen so far, and I assume Rafe is the same, your heroes are decent men who’ve been kicked around and it’s made them better men. Exactly what I want in a hero.

    Reply
  41. Anne –
    First, I wanted to say thank you for the two books you had mailed to me for winning a contest a little while ago.
    I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess and loved Gabriel Renfrew’s character. He was a little different from the typical hero and that made him even more appealing to the reader. This was the first book I’ve read by you, and I look forward to reading all the rest!
    And I love the fact that your next book takes place in Egypt.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  42. Anne –
    First, I wanted to say thank you for the two books you had mailed to me for winning a contest a little while ago.
    I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess and loved Gabriel Renfrew’s character. He was a little different from the typical hero and that made him even more appealing to the reader. This was the first book I’ve read by you, and I look forward to reading all the rest!
    And I love the fact that your next book takes place in Egypt.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  43. Anne –
    First, I wanted to say thank you for the two books you had mailed to me for winning a contest a little while ago.
    I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess and loved Gabriel Renfrew’s character. He was a little different from the typical hero and that made him even more appealing to the reader. This was the first book I’ve read by you, and I look forward to reading all the rest!
    And I love the fact that your next book takes place in Egypt.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  44. Anne –
    First, I wanted to say thank you for the two books you had mailed to me for winning a contest a little while ago.
    I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess and loved Gabriel Renfrew’s character. He was a little different from the typical hero and that made him even more appealing to the reader. This was the first book I’ve read by you, and I look forward to reading all the rest!
    And I love the fact that your next book takes place in Egypt.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  45. Anne –
    First, I wanted to say thank you for the two books you had mailed to me for winning a contest a little while ago.
    I really enjoyed The Stolen Princess and loved Gabriel Renfrew’s character. He was a little different from the typical hero and that made him even more appealing to the reader. This was the first book I’ve read by you, and I look forward to reading all the rest!
    And I love the fact that your next book takes place in Egypt.
    Good luck!

    Reply
  46. This sounds great! I’ll have to pick up the others in this series. Love a series! The characters are always so much more developed:)
    And I have just recently discovered Regencies being in diff locales, they are fascinating!

    Reply
  47. This sounds great! I’ll have to pick up the others in this series. Love a series! The characters are always so much more developed:)
    And I have just recently discovered Regencies being in diff locales, they are fascinating!

    Reply
  48. This sounds great! I’ll have to pick up the others in this series. Love a series! The characters are always so much more developed:)
    And I have just recently discovered Regencies being in diff locales, they are fascinating!

    Reply
  49. This sounds great! I’ll have to pick up the others in this series. Love a series! The characters are always so much more developed:)
    And I have just recently discovered Regencies being in diff locales, they are fascinating!

    Reply
  50. This sounds great! I’ll have to pick up the others in this series. Love a series! The characters are always so much more developed:)
    And I have just recently discovered Regencies being in diff locales, they are fascinating!

    Reply
  51. From MJP:
    Anne’s on Down Under time so she probably won’t be here for a while, but I’m enjoying the comments. Glad I’m not the only one who loves the exotic settings–they enrich the story possibilities so much.
    Louise, I’m glad you enjoyed the storytelling workship in Bribane. I was more worried about that than anything else in the three week trip! But Anne showed how to stitch it all together. And I learned about conflict from her, too. *g*
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  52. From MJP:
    Anne’s on Down Under time so she probably won’t be here for a while, but I’m enjoying the comments. Glad I’m not the only one who loves the exotic settings–they enrich the story possibilities so much.
    Louise, I’m glad you enjoyed the storytelling workship in Bribane. I was more worried about that than anything else in the three week trip! But Anne showed how to stitch it all together. And I learned about conflict from her, too. *g*
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  53. From MJP:
    Anne’s on Down Under time so she probably won’t be here for a while, but I’m enjoying the comments. Glad I’m not the only one who loves the exotic settings–they enrich the story possibilities so much.
    Louise, I’m glad you enjoyed the storytelling workship in Bribane. I was more worried about that than anything else in the three week trip! But Anne showed how to stitch it all together. And I learned about conflict from her, too. *g*
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  54. From MJP:
    Anne’s on Down Under time so she probably won’t be here for a while, but I’m enjoying the comments. Glad I’m not the only one who loves the exotic settings–they enrich the story possibilities so much.
    Louise, I’m glad you enjoyed the storytelling workship in Bribane. I was more worried about that than anything else in the three week trip! But Anne showed how to stitch it all together. And I learned about conflict from her, too. *g*
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  55. From MJP:
    Anne’s on Down Under time so she probably won’t be here for a while, but I’m enjoying the comments. Glad I’m not the only one who loves the exotic settings–they enrich the story possibilities so much.
    Louise, I’m glad you enjoyed the storytelling workship in Bribane. I was more worried about that than anything else in the three week trip! But Anne showed how to stitch it all together. And I learned about conflict from her, too. *g*
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  56. I started To Catch a Bride last night and stayed up too late because it’s so very entertaining. Everything in it is working for me,and Ayisha is my kind of girl.

    Reply
  57. I started To Catch a Bride last night and stayed up too late because it’s so very entertaining. Everything in it is working for me,and Ayisha is my kind of girl.

    Reply
  58. I started To Catch a Bride last night and stayed up too late because it’s so very entertaining. Everything in it is working for me,and Ayisha is my kind of girl.

    Reply
  59. I started To Catch a Bride last night and stayed up too late because it’s so very entertaining. Everything in it is working for me,and Ayisha is my kind of girl.

    Reply
  60. I started To Catch a Bride last night and stayed up too late because it’s so very entertaining. Everything in it is working for me,and Ayisha is my kind of girl.

    Reply
  61. Since two of my favorite romances have Egyptian settings–Loretta Chase’s Mr. Impossible and Connie Brockway’s As You Desire–I looked at the Cairo scenes in To Catch a Bride as a plus. And another setting would not have produced Ayisha. Frankly, Anne, I can’t imagine your writing a book I wouldn’t like.
    I’m delighted that you’re writing Nash’s story. I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed that we’d get his story and Marcus’s since I first read The Stolen Princess.

    Reply
  62. Since two of my favorite romances have Egyptian settings–Loretta Chase’s Mr. Impossible and Connie Brockway’s As You Desire–I looked at the Cairo scenes in To Catch a Bride as a plus. And another setting would not have produced Ayisha. Frankly, Anne, I can’t imagine your writing a book I wouldn’t like.
    I’m delighted that you’re writing Nash’s story. I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed that we’d get his story and Marcus’s since I first read The Stolen Princess.

    Reply
  63. Since two of my favorite romances have Egyptian settings–Loretta Chase’s Mr. Impossible and Connie Brockway’s As You Desire–I looked at the Cairo scenes in To Catch a Bride as a plus. And another setting would not have produced Ayisha. Frankly, Anne, I can’t imagine your writing a book I wouldn’t like.
    I’m delighted that you’re writing Nash’s story. I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed that we’d get his story and Marcus’s since I first read The Stolen Princess.

    Reply
  64. Since two of my favorite romances have Egyptian settings–Loretta Chase’s Mr. Impossible and Connie Brockway’s As You Desire–I looked at the Cairo scenes in To Catch a Bride as a plus. And another setting would not have produced Ayisha. Frankly, Anne, I can’t imagine your writing a book I wouldn’t like.
    I’m delighted that you’re writing Nash’s story. I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed that we’d get his story and Marcus’s since I first read The Stolen Princess.

    Reply
  65. Since two of my favorite romances have Egyptian settings–Loretta Chase’s Mr. Impossible and Connie Brockway’s As You Desire–I looked at the Cairo scenes in To Catch a Bride as a plus. And another setting would not have produced Ayisha. Frankly, Anne, I can’t imagine your writing a book I wouldn’t like.
    I’m delighted that you’re writing Nash’s story. I’ve been keeping my fingers crossed that we’d get his story and Marcus’s since I first read The Stolen Princess.

    Reply
  66. I adore Eygptian settings in the hands of a good writer. Your book is winging its way to me now.
    But I must say, your editor has a great mind if all great minds think the same–I’m also writing a series about younger sons! Turned in the first book months ago. So far, none of them are likely to be in Egypt. “G”

    Reply
  67. I adore Eygptian settings in the hands of a good writer. Your book is winging its way to me now.
    But I must say, your editor has a great mind if all great minds think the same–I’m also writing a series about younger sons! Turned in the first book months ago. So far, none of them are likely to be in Egypt. “G”

    Reply
  68. I adore Eygptian settings in the hands of a good writer. Your book is winging its way to me now.
    But I must say, your editor has a great mind if all great minds think the same–I’m also writing a series about younger sons! Turned in the first book months ago. So far, none of them are likely to be in Egypt. “G”

    Reply
  69. I adore Eygptian settings in the hands of a good writer. Your book is winging its way to me now.
    But I must say, your editor has a great mind if all great minds think the same–I’m also writing a series about younger sons! Turned in the first book months ago. So far, none of them are likely to be in Egypt. “G”

    Reply
  70. I adore Eygptian settings in the hands of a good writer. Your book is winging its way to me now.
    But I must say, your editor has a great mind if all great minds think the same–I’m also writing a series about younger sons! Turned in the first book months ago. So far, none of them are likely to be in Egypt. “G”

    Reply
  71. Phyllis, I’m delighted you enjoyed the book and liked the Egyptian setting.
    Robyn, happy birthday! I hope you had a gorgeous day with lots of fun and celebrations. I’s so nice that you’ve started it so soon and are enjoying it — thanks!

    Reply
  72. Phyllis, I’m delighted you enjoyed the book and liked the Egyptian setting.
    Robyn, happy birthday! I hope you had a gorgeous day with lots of fun and celebrations. I’s so nice that you’ve started it so soon and are enjoying it — thanks!

    Reply
  73. Phyllis, I’m delighted you enjoyed the book and liked the Egyptian setting.
    Robyn, happy birthday! I hope you had a gorgeous day with lots of fun and celebrations. I’s so nice that you’ve started it so soon and are enjoying it — thanks!

    Reply
  74. Phyllis, I’m delighted you enjoyed the book and liked the Egyptian setting.
    Robyn, happy birthday! I hope you had a gorgeous day with lots of fun and celebrations. I’s so nice that you’ve started it so soon and are enjoying it — thanks!

    Reply
  75. Phyllis, I’m delighted you enjoyed the book and liked the Egyptian setting.
    Robyn, happy birthday! I hope you had a gorgeous day with lots of fun and celebrations. I’s so nice that you’ve started it so soon and are enjoying it — thanks!

    Reply
  76. Janice, I haven’t heard of Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I’ll look her up. Loretta’s Mr Impossible is a fantastic book, isn’t it? I loved Rupert with his gallantry and love of her braininess. I also loved a Laura Kinsale book set in Egypt — forgotten the name — and also, Elizabeth Peter’s Crocodile of the Sandbank is probably my all time favorite Egyptian story. Not that mine has anything to do with Egyptian antiquities, as most of those do.

    Reply
  77. Janice, I haven’t heard of Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I’ll look her up. Loretta’s Mr Impossible is a fantastic book, isn’t it? I loved Rupert with his gallantry and love of her braininess. I also loved a Laura Kinsale book set in Egypt — forgotten the name — and also, Elizabeth Peter’s Crocodile of the Sandbank is probably my all time favorite Egyptian story. Not that mine has anything to do with Egyptian antiquities, as most of those do.

    Reply
  78. Janice, I haven’t heard of Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I’ll look her up. Loretta’s Mr Impossible is a fantastic book, isn’t it? I loved Rupert with his gallantry and love of her braininess. I also loved a Laura Kinsale book set in Egypt — forgotten the name — and also, Elizabeth Peter’s Crocodile of the Sandbank is probably my all time favorite Egyptian story. Not that mine has anything to do with Egyptian antiquities, as most of those do.

    Reply
  79. Janice, I haven’t heard of Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I’ll look her up. Loretta’s Mr Impossible is a fantastic book, isn’t it? I loved Rupert with his gallantry and love of her braininess. I also loved a Laura Kinsale book set in Egypt — forgotten the name — and also, Elizabeth Peter’s Crocodile of the Sandbank is probably my all time favorite Egyptian story. Not that mine has anything to do with Egyptian antiquities, as most of those do.

    Reply
  80. Janice, I haven’t heard of Eloise Jarvis McGraw. I’ll look her up. Loretta’s Mr Impossible is a fantastic book, isn’t it? I loved Rupert with his gallantry and love of her braininess. I also loved a Laura Kinsale book set in Egypt — forgotten the name — and also, Elizabeth Peter’s Crocodile of the Sandbank is probably my all time favorite Egyptian story. Not that mine has anything to do with Egyptian antiquities, as most of those do.

    Reply
  81. Louise, thank you. I must say I loved tag-teaming with MJP — our different approaches dovetailed beautifully, I thought. And it was fun! But Mary Jo was far too modest saying she’d be lost without my teacher skills that day — she inspired us all. The aussie romance loops were a-buzz with her wisdom and insights for weeks after the conference.
    Re settings, I must admit I do like to get away from that English ballroom/country house setting from time to time.

    Reply
  82. Louise, thank you. I must say I loved tag-teaming with MJP — our different approaches dovetailed beautifully, I thought. And it was fun! But Mary Jo was far too modest saying she’d be lost without my teacher skills that day — she inspired us all. The aussie romance loops were a-buzz with her wisdom and insights for weeks after the conference.
    Re settings, I must admit I do like to get away from that English ballroom/country house setting from time to time.

    Reply
  83. Louise, thank you. I must say I loved tag-teaming with MJP — our different approaches dovetailed beautifully, I thought. And it was fun! But Mary Jo was far too modest saying she’d be lost without my teacher skills that day — she inspired us all. The aussie romance loops were a-buzz with her wisdom and insights for weeks after the conference.
    Re settings, I must admit I do like to get away from that English ballroom/country house setting from time to time.

    Reply
  84. Louise, thank you. I must say I loved tag-teaming with MJP — our different approaches dovetailed beautifully, I thought. And it was fun! But Mary Jo was far too modest saying she’d be lost without my teacher skills that day — she inspired us all. The aussie romance loops were a-buzz with her wisdom and insights for weeks after the conference.
    Re settings, I must admit I do like to get away from that English ballroom/country house setting from time to time.

    Reply
  85. Louise, thank you. I must say I loved tag-teaming with MJP — our different approaches dovetailed beautifully, I thought. And it was fun! But Mary Jo was far too modest saying she’d be lost without my teacher skills that day — she inspired us all. The aussie romance loops were a-buzz with her wisdom and insights for weeks after the conference.
    Re settings, I must admit I do like to get away from that English ballroom/country house setting from time to time.

    Reply
  86. Becca, where were you when Mary Jo was asking me about themes? 😉 I almost never notice themes in my stories — it’s always some clever reader that notices and points them out to me. I suppose the theme arises unconsciously for me.
    Now, when asked about themes and this series, I’ll say, “family relationships and parentage.” LOL.
    In my previous series, (with ‘perfect” in the titles) it was WW regular Theo who pointed out the underlying themes in the books to me – surprising me with her insights, and making me feel as if I’d done something clever-and-writerly, when the truth was, it was all subconscious. But I suppose if you go deep enough into characters, theme will emerge.
    Nash’s story is, I think, going to be fun. Luke’s story is also partly set abroad, in Spain, where the beginning of his story happened many years earlier. It’s a deeper, slightly darker story, I think.
    And I’d like to write Marcus’s story, which is beginning to spin in a quiet corner of the brain, but whether I ever do will depend on my publisher.
    I’d never planned to write Nash or Marcus, by the way — they just arrived in the stories and quietly edged themselves into potential hero status. Marcus was supposed to be (and stay) a nasty character, but he showed otherwise, didn’t he?
    I’m so pleased you’re enjoying the series. Thanks.

    Reply
  87. Becca, where were you when Mary Jo was asking me about themes? 😉 I almost never notice themes in my stories — it’s always some clever reader that notices and points them out to me. I suppose the theme arises unconsciously for me.
    Now, when asked about themes and this series, I’ll say, “family relationships and parentage.” LOL.
    In my previous series, (with ‘perfect” in the titles) it was WW regular Theo who pointed out the underlying themes in the books to me – surprising me with her insights, and making me feel as if I’d done something clever-and-writerly, when the truth was, it was all subconscious. But I suppose if you go deep enough into characters, theme will emerge.
    Nash’s story is, I think, going to be fun. Luke’s story is also partly set abroad, in Spain, where the beginning of his story happened many years earlier. It’s a deeper, slightly darker story, I think.
    And I’d like to write Marcus’s story, which is beginning to spin in a quiet corner of the brain, but whether I ever do will depend on my publisher.
    I’d never planned to write Nash or Marcus, by the way — they just arrived in the stories and quietly edged themselves into potential hero status. Marcus was supposed to be (and stay) a nasty character, but he showed otherwise, didn’t he?
    I’m so pleased you’re enjoying the series. Thanks.

    Reply
  88. Becca, where were you when Mary Jo was asking me about themes? 😉 I almost never notice themes in my stories — it’s always some clever reader that notices and points them out to me. I suppose the theme arises unconsciously for me.
    Now, when asked about themes and this series, I’ll say, “family relationships and parentage.” LOL.
    In my previous series, (with ‘perfect” in the titles) it was WW regular Theo who pointed out the underlying themes in the books to me – surprising me with her insights, and making me feel as if I’d done something clever-and-writerly, when the truth was, it was all subconscious. But I suppose if you go deep enough into characters, theme will emerge.
    Nash’s story is, I think, going to be fun. Luke’s story is also partly set abroad, in Spain, where the beginning of his story happened many years earlier. It’s a deeper, slightly darker story, I think.
    And I’d like to write Marcus’s story, which is beginning to spin in a quiet corner of the brain, but whether I ever do will depend on my publisher.
    I’d never planned to write Nash or Marcus, by the way — they just arrived in the stories and quietly edged themselves into potential hero status. Marcus was supposed to be (and stay) a nasty character, but he showed otherwise, didn’t he?
    I’m so pleased you’re enjoying the series. Thanks.

    Reply
  89. Becca, where were you when Mary Jo was asking me about themes? 😉 I almost never notice themes in my stories — it’s always some clever reader that notices and points them out to me. I suppose the theme arises unconsciously for me.
    Now, when asked about themes and this series, I’ll say, “family relationships and parentage.” LOL.
    In my previous series, (with ‘perfect” in the titles) it was WW regular Theo who pointed out the underlying themes in the books to me – surprising me with her insights, and making me feel as if I’d done something clever-and-writerly, when the truth was, it was all subconscious. But I suppose if you go deep enough into characters, theme will emerge.
    Nash’s story is, I think, going to be fun. Luke’s story is also partly set abroad, in Spain, where the beginning of his story happened many years earlier. It’s a deeper, slightly darker story, I think.
    And I’d like to write Marcus’s story, which is beginning to spin in a quiet corner of the brain, but whether I ever do will depend on my publisher.
    I’d never planned to write Nash or Marcus, by the way — they just arrived in the stories and quietly edged themselves into potential hero status. Marcus was supposed to be (and stay) a nasty character, but he showed otherwise, didn’t he?
    I’m so pleased you’re enjoying the series. Thanks.

    Reply
  90. Becca, where were you when Mary Jo was asking me about themes? 😉 I almost never notice themes in my stories — it’s always some clever reader that notices and points them out to me. I suppose the theme arises unconsciously for me.
    Now, when asked about themes and this series, I’ll say, “family relationships and parentage.” LOL.
    In my previous series, (with ‘perfect” in the titles) it was WW regular Theo who pointed out the underlying themes in the books to me – surprising me with her insights, and making me feel as if I’d done something clever-and-writerly, when the truth was, it was all subconscious. But I suppose if you go deep enough into characters, theme will emerge.
    Nash’s story is, I think, going to be fun. Luke’s story is also partly set abroad, in Spain, where the beginning of his story happened many years earlier. It’s a deeper, slightly darker story, I think.
    And I’d like to write Marcus’s story, which is beginning to spin in a quiet corner of the brain, but whether I ever do will depend on my publisher.
    I’d never planned to write Nash or Marcus, by the way — they just arrived in the stories and quietly edged themselves into potential hero status. Marcus was supposed to be (and stay) a nasty character, but he showed otherwise, didn’t he?
    I’m so pleased you’re enjoying the series. Thanks.

    Reply
  91. Janie and Jane, I’m so pleased you like exotic settings. I hope you enjoy this one.
    Beth, I love the Amelia Peabody series. The aussie romance conference kicks off with a very silly and fun costume party and this year the theme was Arabian Nights. I dressed in a blue flowing robe, studded with occasional water lilies and wearing a yellow turban thingy encrusted with plastic crocodiles. My friend Alison came in a long explorer type skirt and pith helmet and her husband came in khakis and a pith helmet and when Alison and I saw each other, we shrieked “Crocodile on the Sandbank!” She was Peabody, David was Emerson and I was the Nile with crocodiles on my sandbank. LOL.

    Reply
  92. Janie and Jane, I’m so pleased you like exotic settings. I hope you enjoy this one.
    Beth, I love the Amelia Peabody series. The aussie romance conference kicks off with a very silly and fun costume party and this year the theme was Arabian Nights. I dressed in a blue flowing robe, studded with occasional water lilies and wearing a yellow turban thingy encrusted with plastic crocodiles. My friend Alison came in a long explorer type skirt and pith helmet and her husband came in khakis and a pith helmet and when Alison and I saw each other, we shrieked “Crocodile on the Sandbank!” She was Peabody, David was Emerson and I was the Nile with crocodiles on my sandbank. LOL.

    Reply
  93. Janie and Jane, I’m so pleased you like exotic settings. I hope you enjoy this one.
    Beth, I love the Amelia Peabody series. The aussie romance conference kicks off with a very silly and fun costume party and this year the theme was Arabian Nights. I dressed in a blue flowing robe, studded with occasional water lilies and wearing a yellow turban thingy encrusted with plastic crocodiles. My friend Alison came in a long explorer type skirt and pith helmet and her husband came in khakis and a pith helmet and when Alison and I saw each other, we shrieked “Crocodile on the Sandbank!” She was Peabody, David was Emerson and I was the Nile with crocodiles on my sandbank. LOL.

    Reply
  94. Janie and Jane, I’m so pleased you like exotic settings. I hope you enjoy this one.
    Beth, I love the Amelia Peabody series. The aussie romance conference kicks off with a very silly and fun costume party and this year the theme was Arabian Nights. I dressed in a blue flowing robe, studded with occasional water lilies and wearing a yellow turban thingy encrusted with plastic crocodiles. My friend Alison came in a long explorer type skirt and pith helmet and her husband came in khakis and a pith helmet and when Alison and I saw each other, we shrieked “Crocodile on the Sandbank!” She was Peabody, David was Emerson and I was the Nile with crocodiles on my sandbank. LOL.

    Reply
  95. Janie and Jane, I’m so pleased you like exotic settings. I hope you enjoy this one.
    Beth, I love the Amelia Peabody series. The aussie romance conference kicks off with a very silly and fun costume party and this year the theme was Arabian Nights. I dressed in a blue flowing robe, studded with occasional water lilies and wearing a yellow turban thingy encrusted with plastic crocodiles. My friend Alison came in a long explorer type skirt and pith helmet and her husband came in khakis and a pith helmet and when Alison and I saw each other, we shrieked “Crocodile on the Sandbank!” She was Peabody, David was Emerson and I was the Nile with crocodiles on my sandbank. LOL.

    Reply
  96. Linda, thank you for liking my heroes. I do like a damaged hero who is strong and honorable and knows the meaning of suffering. It’s a kind of tempering in the fire for character, I think, and the good ones emerge the better for it.
    I hope you like Ayisha. She’s her own woman. For me, characters almost never are who I plan them to be before I start writing. Quite often I struggle with them, before I let go and let them be who they are. Ayisha turned out to be a gutsy little heroine and perfect (I think) for Rafe.

    Reply
  97. Linda, thank you for liking my heroes. I do like a damaged hero who is strong and honorable and knows the meaning of suffering. It’s a kind of tempering in the fire for character, I think, and the good ones emerge the better for it.
    I hope you like Ayisha. She’s her own woman. For me, characters almost never are who I plan them to be before I start writing. Quite often I struggle with them, before I let go and let them be who they are. Ayisha turned out to be a gutsy little heroine and perfect (I think) for Rafe.

    Reply
  98. Linda, thank you for liking my heroes. I do like a damaged hero who is strong and honorable and knows the meaning of suffering. It’s a kind of tempering in the fire for character, I think, and the good ones emerge the better for it.
    I hope you like Ayisha. She’s her own woman. For me, characters almost never are who I plan them to be before I start writing. Quite often I struggle with them, before I let go and let them be who they are. Ayisha turned out to be a gutsy little heroine and perfect (I think) for Rafe.

    Reply
  99. Linda, thank you for liking my heroes. I do like a damaged hero who is strong and honorable and knows the meaning of suffering. It’s a kind of tempering in the fire for character, I think, and the good ones emerge the better for it.
    I hope you like Ayisha. She’s her own woman. For me, characters almost never are who I plan them to be before I start writing. Quite often I struggle with them, before I let go and let them be who they are. Ayisha turned out to be a gutsy little heroine and perfect (I think) for Rafe.

    Reply
  100. Linda, thank you for liking my heroes. I do like a damaged hero who is strong and honorable and knows the meaning of suffering. It’s a kind of tempering in the fire for character, I think, and the good ones emerge the better for it.
    I hope you like Ayisha. She’s her own woman. For me, characters almost never are who I plan them to be before I start writing. Quite often I struggle with them, before I let go and let them be who they are. Ayisha turned out to be a gutsy little heroine and perfect (I think) for Rafe.

    Reply
  101. Kristina, I’m glad you enjoyed the book you won. I hope you liked the other one, too, by my friend, Marion Lennox (I think that’s the other one I sent you)
    Gabriel and the other guys in the Devil Riders series are my kind of hero.
    Liz, most of my books are stand alones, so you don’t need to read them in order. And there are some wonderful Regency books not set in England— Mary Jo’s “Veils of Silk” is set in India, for instance, and it’s fabulous.

    Reply
  102. Kristina, I’m glad you enjoyed the book you won. I hope you liked the other one, too, by my friend, Marion Lennox (I think that’s the other one I sent you)
    Gabriel and the other guys in the Devil Riders series are my kind of hero.
    Liz, most of my books are stand alones, so you don’t need to read them in order. And there are some wonderful Regency books not set in England— Mary Jo’s “Veils of Silk” is set in India, for instance, and it’s fabulous.

    Reply
  103. Kristina, I’m glad you enjoyed the book you won. I hope you liked the other one, too, by my friend, Marion Lennox (I think that’s the other one I sent you)
    Gabriel and the other guys in the Devil Riders series are my kind of hero.
    Liz, most of my books are stand alones, so you don’t need to read them in order. And there are some wonderful Regency books not set in England— Mary Jo’s “Veils of Silk” is set in India, for instance, and it’s fabulous.

    Reply
  104. Kristina, I’m glad you enjoyed the book you won. I hope you liked the other one, too, by my friend, Marion Lennox (I think that’s the other one I sent you)
    Gabriel and the other guys in the Devil Riders series are my kind of hero.
    Liz, most of my books are stand alones, so you don’t need to read them in order. And there are some wonderful Regency books not set in England— Mary Jo’s “Veils of Silk” is set in India, for instance, and it’s fabulous.

    Reply
  105. Kristina, I’m glad you enjoyed the book you won. I hope you liked the other one, too, by my friend, Marion Lennox (I think that’s the other one I sent you)
    Gabriel and the other guys in the Devil Riders series are my kind of hero.
    Liz, most of my books are stand alones, so you don’t need to read them in order. And there are some wonderful Regency books not set in England— Mary Jo’s “Veils of Silk” is set in India, for instance, and it’s fabulous.

    Reply
  106. Oh sure, MJP, learning about conflict from me — snort! LOL.
    But MJP did some things about readers at the Australian conference that you all might be interested in. I’m quoting her below, compliments of my friend Barbara Hannay’s blog. http://tinyurl.com/maabs6
    As well as being a lovely writer, Barb takes excellent notes.
    “This morning the conference started with a fabulous keynote address from highly accomplished and acclaimed author Mary Jo Putney. She totally summed up what it means to be a writer, but she had some great things to say about readers, too. I’ll share just a few.
    The ability to love a story is a great gift.
    It takes imagination to be a good reader. It requires involvement and a well furnished mind (don’t you love that phrase?)
    Most good readers, have the necessary imagination and the spark of talent to be a writer.”
    Inspiring, eh?

    Reply
  107. Oh sure, MJP, learning about conflict from me — snort! LOL.
    But MJP did some things about readers at the Australian conference that you all might be interested in. I’m quoting her below, compliments of my friend Barbara Hannay’s blog. http://tinyurl.com/maabs6
    As well as being a lovely writer, Barb takes excellent notes.
    “This morning the conference started with a fabulous keynote address from highly accomplished and acclaimed author Mary Jo Putney. She totally summed up what it means to be a writer, but she had some great things to say about readers, too. I’ll share just a few.
    The ability to love a story is a great gift.
    It takes imagination to be a good reader. It requires involvement and a well furnished mind (don’t you love that phrase?)
    Most good readers, have the necessary imagination and the spark of talent to be a writer.”
    Inspiring, eh?

    Reply
  108. Oh sure, MJP, learning about conflict from me — snort! LOL.
    But MJP did some things about readers at the Australian conference that you all might be interested in. I’m quoting her below, compliments of my friend Barbara Hannay’s blog. http://tinyurl.com/maabs6
    As well as being a lovely writer, Barb takes excellent notes.
    “This morning the conference started with a fabulous keynote address from highly accomplished and acclaimed author Mary Jo Putney. She totally summed up what it means to be a writer, but she had some great things to say about readers, too. I’ll share just a few.
    The ability to love a story is a great gift.
    It takes imagination to be a good reader. It requires involvement and a well furnished mind (don’t you love that phrase?)
    Most good readers, have the necessary imagination and the spark of talent to be a writer.”
    Inspiring, eh?

    Reply
  109. Oh sure, MJP, learning about conflict from me — snort! LOL.
    But MJP did some things about readers at the Australian conference that you all might be interested in. I’m quoting her below, compliments of my friend Barbara Hannay’s blog. http://tinyurl.com/maabs6
    As well as being a lovely writer, Barb takes excellent notes.
    “This morning the conference started with a fabulous keynote address from highly accomplished and acclaimed author Mary Jo Putney. She totally summed up what it means to be a writer, but she had some great things to say about readers, too. I’ll share just a few.
    The ability to love a story is a great gift.
    It takes imagination to be a good reader. It requires involvement and a well furnished mind (don’t you love that phrase?)
    Most good readers, have the necessary imagination and the spark of talent to be a writer.”
    Inspiring, eh?

    Reply
  110. Oh sure, MJP, learning about conflict from me — snort! LOL.
    But MJP did some things about readers at the Australian conference that you all might be interested in. I’m quoting her below, compliments of my friend Barbara Hannay’s blog. http://tinyurl.com/maabs6
    As well as being a lovely writer, Barb takes excellent notes.
    “This morning the conference started with a fabulous keynote address from highly accomplished and acclaimed author Mary Jo Putney. She totally summed up what it means to be a writer, but she had some great things to say about readers, too. I’ll share just a few.
    The ability to love a story is a great gift.
    It takes imagination to be a good reader. It requires involvement and a well furnished mind (don’t you love that phrase?)
    Most good readers, have the necessary imagination and the spark of talent to be a writer.”
    Inspiring, eh?

    Reply
  111. Karenmc, thanks. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the book and that you like Ayisha, too.
    Minna and chey, thanks for dropping in. You’re always welcome at the WW.
    Hi Janga. I blush to confess I haven’t read that Connie Brockway, but since I too like foreign settings, I’ll chase it up. And yes, Rupert.. sigh. Just gorgeous. And blushing again about your compliments.
    You can thank my editor for giving me the okay to do Nash’s story. I told her about the idea I’d had and she laughed and said, “write it.”
    Let’s hope she wants Marcus’s when it comes to that. But first I have to finish Nash and Luke.

    Reply
  112. Karenmc, thanks. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the book and that you like Ayisha, too.
    Minna and chey, thanks for dropping in. You’re always welcome at the WW.
    Hi Janga. I blush to confess I haven’t read that Connie Brockway, but since I too like foreign settings, I’ll chase it up. And yes, Rupert.. sigh. Just gorgeous. And blushing again about your compliments.
    You can thank my editor for giving me the okay to do Nash’s story. I told her about the idea I’d had and she laughed and said, “write it.”
    Let’s hope she wants Marcus’s when it comes to that. But first I have to finish Nash and Luke.

    Reply
  113. Karenmc, thanks. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the book and that you like Ayisha, too.
    Minna and chey, thanks for dropping in. You’re always welcome at the WW.
    Hi Janga. I blush to confess I haven’t read that Connie Brockway, but since I too like foreign settings, I’ll chase it up. And yes, Rupert.. sigh. Just gorgeous. And blushing again about your compliments.
    You can thank my editor for giving me the okay to do Nash’s story. I told her about the idea I’d had and she laughed and said, “write it.”
    Let’s hope she wants Marcus’s when it comes to that. But first I have to finish Nash and Luke.

    Reply
  114. Karenmc, thanks. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the book and that you like Ayisha, too.
    Minna and chey, thanks for dropping in. You’re always welcome at the WW.
    Hi Janga. I blush to confess I haven’t read that Connie Brockway, but since I too like foreign settings, I’ll chase it up. And yes, Rupert.. sigh. Just gorgeous. And blushing again about your compliments.
    You can thank my editor for giving me the okay to do Nash’s story. I told her about the idea I’d had and she laughed and said, “write it.”
    Let’s hope she wants Marcus’s when it comes to that. But first I have to finish Nash and Luke.

    Reply
  115. Karenmc, thanks. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the book and that you like Ayisha, too.
    Minna and chey, thanks for dropping in. You’re always welcome at the WW.
    Hi Janga. I blush to confess I haven’t read that Connie Brockway, but since I too like foreign settings, I’ll chase it up. And yes, Rupert.. sigh. Just gorgeous. And blushing again about your compliments.
    You can thank my editor for giving me the okay to do Nash’s story. I told her about the idea I’d had and she laughed and said, “write it.”
    Let’s hope she wants Marcus’s when it comes to that. But first I have to finish Nash and Luke.

    Reply
  116. Pat, maybe we can start a younger sons’ club. LOL. But I must warn you, you need to watch out for their older brothers — they tend to want to become heroes, too, I’ve found. One of them has already muscled into the series, and a second is quietly doing a show-don’t-tell exercise proving he’s a potential hero.
    And in To Catch a Bride, Rafe has an older brother who starts off suitably ghastly, but in the end he turns out to be not quite as painted — I won’t say more, no spoilers here. Luckily he’s already married! So beware the older brothers I say!

    Reply
  117. Pat, maybe we can start a younger sons’ club. LOL. But I must warn you, you need to watch out for their older brothers — they tend to want to become heroes, too, I’ve found. One of them has already muscled into the series, and a second is quietly doing a show-don’t-tell exercise proving he’s a potential hero.
    And in To Catch a Bride, Rafe has an older brother who starts off suitably ghastly, but in the end he turns out to be not quite as painted — I won’t say more, no spoilers here. Luckily he’s already married! So beware the older brothers I say!

    Reply
  118. Pat, maybe we can start a younger sons’ club. LOL. But I must warn you, you need to watch out for their older brothers — they tend to want to become heroes, too, I’ve found. One of them has already muscled into the series, and a second is quietly doing a show-don’t-tell exercise proving he’s a potential hero.
    And in To Catch a Bride, Rafe has an older brother who starts off suitably ghastly, but in the end he turns out to be not quite as painted — I won’t say more, no spoilers here. Luckily he’s already married! So beware the older brothers I say!

    Reply
  119. Pat, maybe we can start a younger sons’ club. LOL. But I must warn you, you need to watch out for their older brothers — they tend to want to become heroes, too, I’ve found. One of them has already muscled into the series, and a second is quietly doing a show-don’t-tell exercise proving he’s a potential hero.
    And in To Catch a Bride, Rafe has an older brother who starts off suitably ghastly, but in the end he turns out to be not quite as painted — I won’t say more, no spoilers here. Luckily he’s already married! So beware the older brothers I say!

    Reply
  120. Pat, maybe we can start a younger sons’ club. LOL. But I must warn you, you need to watch out for their older brothers — they tend to want to become heroes, too, I’ve found. One of them has already muscled into the series, and a second is quietly doing a show-don’t-tell exercise proving he’s a potential hero.
    And in To Catch a Bride, Rafe has an older brother who starts off suitably ghastly, but in the end he turns out to be not quite as painted — I won’t say more, no spoilers here. Luckily he’s already married! So beware the older brothers I say!

    Reply
  121. By the way, for those who were interested in my interview with Linda Fildew, Harlequin Miils & Boon is giving away a free eBook from each line to celebrate their 10th birthday.
    http://www.everyonesreading.com/#
    The list includes Barbara Hannay’s RITA finalist book, ADOPTED OUTBACK BABY, as well as a regency historical by Juliet Landon called The Rake’s Unconventional Mistress.
    There’s also a comp for a free e-reader.

    Reply
  122. By the way, for those who were interested in my interview with Linda Fildew, Harlequin Miils & Boon is giving away a free eBook from each line to celebrate their 10th birthday.
    http://www.everyonesreading.com/#
    The list includes Barbara Hannay’s RITA finalist book, ADOPTED OUTBACK BABY, as well as a regency historical by Juliet Landon called The Rake’s Unconventional Mistress.
    There’s also a comp for a free e-reader.

    Reply
  123. By the way, for those who were interested in my interview with Linda Fildew, Harlequin Miils & Boon is giving away a free eBook from each line to celebrate their 10th birthday.
    http://www.everyonesreading.com/#
    The list includes Barbara Hannay’s RITA finalist book, ADOPTED OUTBACK BABY, as well as a regency historical by Juliet Landon called The Rake’s Unconventional Mistress.
    There’s also a comp for a free e-reader.

    Reply
  124. By the way, for those who were interested in my interview with Linda Fildew, Harlequin Miils & Boon is giving away a free eBook from each line to celebrate their 10th birthday.
    http://www.everyonesreading.com/#
    The list includes Barbara Hannay’s RITA finalist book, ADOPTED OUTBACK BABY, as well as a regency historical by Juliet Landon called The Rake’s Unconventional Mistress.
    There’s also a comp for a free e-reader.

    Reply
  125. By the way, for those who were interested in my interview with Linda Fildew, Harlequin Miils & Boon is giving away a free eBook from each line to celebrate their 10th birthday.
    http://www.everyonesreading.com/#
    The list includes Barbara Hannay’s RITA finalist book, ADOPTED OUTBACK BABY, as well as a regency historical by Juliet Landon called The Rake’s Unconventional Mistress.
    There’s also a comp for a free e-reader.

    Reply
  126. This book sounds wonderful! I think a any well written plot would be able to stand in any setting. I love books in exotic places, because I get to learn more about places I never get to visit. 🙂

    Reply
  127. This book sounds wonderful! I think a any well written plot would be able to stand in any setting. I love books in exotic places, because I get to learn more about places I never get to visit. 🙂

    Reply
  128. This book sounds wonderful! I think a any well written plot would be able to stand in any setting. I love books in exotic places, because I get to learn more about places I never get to visit. 🙂

    Reply
  129. This book sounds wonderful! I think a any well written plot would be able to stand in any setting. I love books in exotic places, because I get to learn more about places I never get to visit. 🙂

    Reply
  130. This book sounds wonderful! I think a any well written plot would be able to stand in any setting. I love books in exotic places, because I get to learn more about places I never get to visit. 🙂

    Reply
  131. Different settings give flavor to a story. I’ve always liked the Egyptian settings of the mid-1800’s to mid-1900’s. A regency is a regency, but put it in Egypt or India and you’ve added spice. Anywhere out of the usual England or Scotland, is an interesting change.
    To Catch A Bride sounds like a very good read.
    Good luck with the release.

    Reply
  132. Different settings give flavor to a story. I’ve always liked the Egyptian settings of the mid-1800’s to mid-1900’s. A regency is a regency, but put it in Egypt or India and you’ve added spice. Anywhere out of the usual England or Scotland, is an interesting change.
    To Catch A Bride sounds like a very good read.
    Good luck with the release.

    Reply
  133. Different settings give flavor to a story. I’ve always liked the Egyptian settings of the mid-1800’s to mid-1900’s. A regency is a regency, but put it in Egypt or India and you’ve added spice. Anywhere out of the usual England or Scotland, is an interesting change.
    To Catch A Bride sounds like a very good read.
    Good luck with the release.

    Reply
  134. Different settings give flavor to a story. I’ve always liked the Egyptian settings of the mid-1800’s to mid-1900’s. A regency is a regency, but put it in Egypt or India and you’ve added spice. Anywhere out of the usual England or Scotland, is an interesting change.
    To Catch A Bride sounds like a very good read.
    Good luck with the release.

    Reply
  135. Different settings give flavor to a story. I’ve always liked the Egyptian settings of the mid-1800’s to mid-1900’s. A regency is a regency, but put it in Egypt or India and you’ve added spice. Anywhere out of the usual England or Scotland, is an interesting change.
    To Catch A Bride sounds like a very good read.
    Good luck with the release.

    Reply
  136. Thanks, Anne for such a great interview. I love research and exotic setting, so can’t wait to start To Catch A Bride. (It is sitting right here on my desk for later today, a reward to finishing my revisions and sending off to my editor this morning.
    Egypt has always been a fascinating setting for me. I adore the Amelia Peabody mystery series, and long to take a trip down the Nile. Both my grandmother and my mother have traveled there (I have photos of both of them standing a a courtyard in Mena House, so I have to continue the family tradition and get one of myself in the same place!)
    Thanks again for writing such wonderful, rich books. Am looking forward to the bee-keeping heroine!

    Reply
  137. Thanks, Anne for such a great interview. I love research and exotic setting, so can’t wait to start To Catch A Bride. (It is sitting right here on my desk for later today, a reward to finishing my revisions and sending off to my editor this morning.
    Egypt has always been a fascinating setting for me. I adore the Amelia Peabody mystery series, and long to take a trip down the Nile. Both my grandmother and my mother have traveled there (I have photos of both of them standing a a courtyard in Mena House, so I have to continue the family tradition and get one of myself in the same place!)
    Thanks again for writing such wonderful, rich books. Am looking forward to the bee-keeping heroine!

    Reply
  138. Thanks, Anne for such a great interview. I love research and exotic setting, so can’t wait to start To Catch A Bride. (It is sitting right here on my desk for later today, a reward to finishing my revisions and sending off to my editor this morning.
    Egypt has always been a fascinating setting for me. I adore the Amelia Peabody mystery series, and long to take a trip down the Nile. Both my grandmother and my mother have traveled there (I have photos of both of them standing a a courtyard in Mena House, so I have to continue the family tradition and get one of myself in the same place!)
    Thanks again for writing such wonderful, rich books. Am looking forward to the bee-keeping heroine!

    Reply
  139. Thanks, Anne for such a great interview. I love research and exotic setting, so can’t wait to start To Catch A Bride. (It is sitting right here on my desk for later today, a reward to finishing my revisions and sending off to my editor this morning.
    Egypt has always been a fascinating setting for me. I adore the Amelia Peabody mystery series, and long to take a trip down the Nile. Both my grandmother and my mother have traveled there (I have photos of both of them standing a a courtyard in Mena House, so I have to continue the family tradition and get one of myself in the same place!)
    Thanks again for writing such wonderful, rich books. Am looking forward to the bee-keeping heroine!

    Reply
  140. Thanks, Anne for such a great interview. I love research and exotic setting, so can’t wait to start To Catch A Bride. (It is sitting right here on my desk for later today, a reward to finishing my revisions and sending off to my editor this morning.
    Egypt has always been a fascinating setting for me. I adore the Amelia Peabody mystery series, and long to take a trip down the Nile. Both my grandmother and my mother have traveled there (I have photos of both of them standing a a courtyard in Mena House, so I have to continue the family tradition and get one of myself in the same place!)
    Thanks again for writing such wonderful, rich books. Am looking forward to the bee-keeping heroine!

    Reply
  141. Thanks, Louis. Not many horses in this one, though.
    Nice to see you here on Word Wenches, Chelsea.
    Sherrinda, I agree, armchair traveling is a lot of fun. There are several parts of the world I feel drawn to, simply because of the books I’ve read that were set there. I plan one day to see the Outer Banks of North Carolina, because I loved the Bronwyn Williams historicals set there. And Prince Edward Island because of the LM Montgomery Anne books.

    Reply
  142. Thanks, Louis. Not many horses in this one, though.
    Nice to see you here on Word Wenches, Chelsea.
    Sherrinda, I agree, armchair traveling is a lot of fun. There are several parts of the world I feel drawn to, simply because of the books I’ve read that were set there. I plan one day to see the Outer Banks of North Carolina, because I loved the Bronwyn Williams historicals set there. And Prince Edward Island because of the LM Montgomery Anne books.

    Reply
  143. Thanks, Louis. Not many horses in this one, though.
    Nice to see you here on Word Wenches, Chelsea.
    Sherrinda, I agree, armchair traveling is a lot of fun. There are several parts of the world I feel drawn to, simply because of the books I’ve read that were set there. I plan one day to see the Outer Banks of North Carolina, because I loved the Bronwyn Williams historicals set there. And Prince Edward Island because of the LM Montgomery Anne books.

    Reply
  144. Thanks, Louis. Not many horses in this one, though.
    Nice to see you here on Word Wenches, Chelsea.
    Sherrinda, I agree, armchair traveling is a lot of fun. There are several parts of the world I feel drawn to, simply because of the books I’ve read that were set there. I plan one day to see the Outer Banks of North Carolina, because I loved the Bronwyn Williams historicals set there. And Prince Edward Island because of the LM Montgomery Anne books.

    Reply
  145. Thanks, Louis. Not many horses in this one, though.
    Nice to see you here on Word Wenches, Chelsea.
    Sherrinda, I agree, armchair traveling is a lot of fun. There are several parts of the world I feel drawn to, simply because of the books I’ve read that were set there. I plan one day to see the Outer Banks of North Carolina, because I loved the Bronwyn Williams historicals set there. And Prince Edward Island because of the LM Montgomery Anne books.

    Reply
  146. Thanks, Patricia, I agree with you about the extra spice of an exotic setting. I do hope people enjoy the change. It’s not all in Egypt, of course — it starts and ends in England.
    Cara/Andrea, I’ve always longed to sail in a felucca down the Nile. Or up it, more accurately, I suppose. . Some friends of mine did it a few years ago and I was green with envy.
    I’d love to see that photo of your mother and grandmother in the courtyard of Mena House. I have pics of my father in Egypt, too, but just in streets and outside shops and markets. Even better, let’s add another photo to the Egyptian collection and organize a wenchly excursion. 😉

    Reply
  147. Thanks, Patricia, I agree with you about the extra spice of an exotic setting. I do hope people enjoy the change. It’s not all in Egypt, of course — it starts and ends in England.
    Cara/Andrea, I’ve always longed to sail in a felucca down the Nile. Or up it, more accurately, I suppose. . Some friends of mine did it a few years ago and I was green with envy.
    I’d love to see that photo of your mother and grandmother in the courtyard of Mena House. I have pics of my father in Egypt, too, but just in streets and outside shops and markets. Even better, let’s add another photo to the Egyptian collection and organize a wenchly excursion. 😉

    Reply
  148. Thanks, Patricia, I agree with you about the extra spice of an exotic setting. I do hope people enjoy the change. It’s not all in Egypt, of course — it starts and ends in England.
    Cara/Andrea, I’ve always longed to sail in a felucca down the Nile. Or up it, more accurately, I suppose. . Some friends of mine did it a few years ago and I was green with envy.
    I’d love to see that photo of your mother and grandmother in the courtyard of Mena House. I have pics of my father in Egypt, too, but just in streets and outside shops and markets. Even better, let’s add another photo to the Egyptian collection and organize a wenchly excursion. 😉

    Reply
  149. Thanks, Patricia, I agree with you about the extra spice of an exotic setting. I do hope people enjoy the change. It’s not all in Egypt, of course — it starts and ends in England.
    Cara/Andrea, I’ve always longed to sail in a felucca down the Nile. Or up it, more accurately, I suppose. . Some friends of mine did it a few years ago and I was green with envy.
    I’d love to see that photo of your mother and grandmother in the courtyard of Mena House. I have pics of my father in Egypt, too, but just in streets and outside shops and markets. Even better, let’s add another photo to the Egyptian collection and organize a wenchly excursion. 😉

    Reply
  150. Thanks, Patricia, I agree with you about the extra spice of an exotic setting. I do hope people enjoy the change. It’s not all in Egypt, of course — it starts and ends in England.
    Cara/Andrea, I’ve always longed to sail in a felucca down the Nile. Or up it, more accurately, I suppose. . Some friends of mine did it a few years ago and I was green with envy.
    I’d love to see that photo of your mother and grandmother in the courtyard of Mena House. I have pics of my father in Egypt, too, but just in streets and outside shops and markets. Even better, let’s add another photo to the Egyptian collection and organize a wenchly excursion. 😉

    Reply
  151. Sherrie here.
    Wonderful interview, Anne (and Mary Jo!) As much as I adore Merrye Olde England as a setting for my Regencies, I love foreign settings, too, especially when they add so much flavor to the story. I like it when the author slips in little research tidbits, too.
    While I’ve always found Egypt interesting for its fascinating history, I’ll admit that it didn’t take fire until the Indiana Jones movies spiralled into my awareness. *g* After that, I couldn’t get enough of Egypt–in movies and in books!
    Anne, your Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine. I just love heroines who turn the hero’s world upside down. Even funnier are the ones who turn the heroes into adolescent schoolboys.

    Reply
  152. Sherrie here.
    Wonderful interview, Anne (and Mary Jo!) As much as I adore Merrye Olde England as a setting for my Regencies, I love foreign settings, too, especially when they add so much flavor to the story. I like it when the author slips in little research tidbits, too.
    While I’ve always found Egypt interesting for its fascinating history, I’ll admit that it didn’t take fire until the Indiana Jones movies spiralled into my awareness. *g* After that, I couldn’t get enough of Egypt–in movies and in books!
    Anne, your Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine. I just love heroines who turn the hero’s world upside down. Even funnier are the ones who turn the heroes into adolescent schoolboys.

    Reply
  153. Sherrie here.
    Wonderful interview, Anne (and Mary Jo!) As much as I adore Merrye Olde England as a setting for my Regencies, I love foreign settings, too, especially when they add so much flavor to the story. I like it when the author slips in little research tidbits, too.
    While I’ve always found Egypt interesting for its fascinating history, I’ll admit that it didn’t take fire until the Indiana Jones movies spiralled into my awareness. *g* After that, I couldn’t get enough of Egypt–in movies and in books!
    Anne, your Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine. I just love heroines who turn the hero’s world upside down. Even funnier are the ones who turn the heroes into adolescent schoolboys.

    Reply
  154. Sherrie here.
    Wonderful interview, Anne (and Mary Jo!) As much as I adore Merrye Olde England as a setting for my Regencies, I love foreign settings, too, especially when they add so much flavor to the story. I like it when the author slips in little research tidbits, too.
    While I’ve always found Egypt interesting for its fascinating history, I’ll admit that it didn’t take fire until the Indiana Jones movies spiralled into my awareness. *g* After that, I couldn’t get enough of Egypt–in movies and in books!
    Anne, your Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine. I just love heroines who turn the hero’s world upside down. Even funnier are the ones who turn the heroes into adolescent schoolboys.

    Reply
  155. Sherrie here.
    Wonderful interview, Anne (and Mary Jo!) As much as I adore Merrye Olde England as a setting for my Regencies, I love foreign settings, too, especially when they add so much flavor to the story. I like it when the author slips in little research tidbits, too.
    While I’ve always found Egypt interesting for its fascinating history, I’ll admit that it didn’t take fire until the Indiana Jones movies spiralled into my awareness. *g* After that, I couldn’t get enough of Egypt–in movies and in books!
    Anne, your Ayisha sounds like my kind of heroine. I just love heroines who turn the hero’s world upside down. Even funnier are the ones who turn the heroes into adolescent schoolboys.

    Reply
  156. My copy of To Catch a Bride should be arriving on my doorstep this week, and I can’t wait! I’m just finishing up Christian Jacq’s four part series on Ramses II, and I’m not ready to leave Egypt yet. This will be the perfect segue for me back to the (semi)real world. Every book you have written has been a joy to read, but my favorite is still Tallie’s Knight, which also took us out of Regency England for a bit. Thank you.

    Reply
  157. My copy of To Catch a Bride should be arriving on my doorstep this week, and I can’t wait! I’m just finishing up Christian Jacq’s four part series on Ramses II, and I’m not ready to leave Egypt yet. This will be the perfect segue for me back to the (semi)real world. Every book you have written has been a joy to read, but my favorite is still Tallie’s Knight, which also took us out of Regency England for a bit. Thank you.

    Reply
  158. My copy of To Catch a Bride should be arriving on my doorstep this week, and I can’t wait! I’m just finishing up Christian Jacq’s four part series on Ramses II, and I’m not ready to leave Egypt yet. This will be the perfect segue for me back to the (semi)real world. Every book you have written has been a joy to read, but my favorite is still Tallie’s Knight, which also took us out of Regency England for a bit. Thank you.

    Reply
  159. My copy of To Catch a Bride should be arriving on my doorstep this week, and I can’t wait! I’m just finishing up Christian Jacq’s four part series on Ramses II, and I’m not ready to leave Egypt yet. This will be the perfect segue for me back to the (semi)real world. Every book you have written has been a joy to read, but my favorite is still Tallie’s Knight, which also took us out of Regency England for a bit. Thank you.

    Reply
  160. My copy of To Catch a Bride should be arriving on my doorstep this week, and I can’t wait! I’m just finishing up Christian Jacq’s four part series on Ramses II, and I’m not ready to leave Egypt yet. This will be the perfect segue for me back to the (semi)real world. Every book you have written has been a joy to read, but my favorite is still Tallie’s Knight, which also took us out of Regency England for a bit. Thank you.

    Reply
  161. I thoroughly enjoyed To Catch a Bride – the hero was dashing, the heroine was feisty, and the supporting characters were wonderful.
    The setting was so well depicted that I was successfully swept away from my backyard in Ballarat and immersed in the world of 19th century Cairo and England, which was a most enjoyable place to be.
    I look forward to reading the other books in the series!

    Reply
  162. I thoroughly enjoyed To Catch a Bride – the hero was dashing, the heroine was feisty, and the supporting characters were wonderful.
    The setting was so well depicted that I was successfully swept away from my backyard in Ballarat and immersed in the world of 19th century Cairo and England, which was a most enjoyable place to be.
    I look forward to reading the other books in the series!

    Reply
  163. I thoroughly enjoyed To Catch a Bride – the hero was dashing, the heroine was feisty, and the supporting characters were wonderful.
    The setting was so well depicted that I was successfully swept away from my backyard in Ballarat and immersed in the world of 19th century Cairo and England, which was a most enjoyable place to be.
    I look forward to reading the other books in the series!

    Reply
  164. I thoroughly enjoyed To Catch a Bride – the hero was dashing, the heroine was feisty, and the supporting characters were wonderful.
    The setting was so well depicted that I was successfully swept away from my backyard in Ballarat and immersed in the world of 19th century Cairo and England, which was a most enjoyable place to be.
    I look forward to reading the other books in the series!

    Reply
  165. I thoroughly enjoyed To Catch a Bride – the hero was dashing, the heroine was feisty, and the supporting characters were wonderful.
    The setting was so well depicted that I was successfully swept away from my backyard in Ballarat and immersed in the world of 19th century Cairo and England, which was a most enjoyable place to be.
    I look forward to reading the other books in the series!

    Reply

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