Titles & Audiobooks

Lady Elizabeth FosterAnswering Questions: Aristocratic Titles and Audiobooks

Compiled by Mary Jo

The Wenches invite readers to submit questions to us, and due to general overwork, two interesting questions got lost, but now are found.  So both questions are being answered today, and the questioners will each get a book from me.

Here is the first question from Rosa Berini Franco:

I would like to ask you about a question that has us debating several friends who are fond of historical romance.  The question is the following:

 When a distant relative inherits a title (e.g., earl) from someone who dies without direct heirs, do the sisters of that relative receive the courtesy title of lady?  By distant relative, I am referring to a fourth or fifth degree cousin who has no title whatsoever.

BREAKING NEWS: THE WENCHES ARE WRONG!

Two well-informed Wench readers have offered corrections, and I LOVE that this happened.  I had a vague idea about the petition process Nancy Mayer mentions, but didn't have time for a deep dive into the subtleties when a very distant relation inherits a title. So here are better facts <g> So many thanks to both Alice and Nancy, and they get books, too.:

Alice Mathewson:

Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts' website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/ . By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had 'lady' added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.

Nancy Mayer:

When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

We Wenches discussed this and the consensus was no.  Christina Courtenay clearest answer:

In order for a child to be a lord/lady they have to be the son/daughter of a duke or a marquess, and in the case of just lady also the daughters of earls. So if the cousin's father wasn't the duke/marquess/earl I don't see how his siblings can get a courtesy title.

Pat: Courtesy titles represent an additional title, for the most part. If the cousin inherited both an earldom and a viscountcy, his son might take the viscountcy and be called Lord. His wife would be Lady. But his sisters, as Christina says, did not have a father in the peerage.

(Above is a portrait of Bess, the mistress and the second wife of the Duke of Devonshire.  She was born Elizabeth Hervey and her father was the Bishop of Derry. He later became the fourth Earl of Bristol and all his children acquired titles. She became Lady Elizabeth because her father was an earl.)

 

Here's a fun link that gives lots and LOTS of information about titles.    

 

MerelyMagicFreeThe second question is about audiobooks and comes from Janice Jacobson:

With the popularity of audiobooks and the increasing ease of obtaining them,  I am seeing more comments and reviews from readers talking about books they listened to rather than read in print.

 Has the new popularity of audio media affected your writing process at all?   I know when I have to compose something I hear the words in my head and then I put them on the paper. I know some people put the words on the paper and then read them aloud or in their heads.   The sound and the rhythm are very important – but I don't have to think about how they will sound if someone else says them. Is this a consideration for you?

Wenchly replies:

Pat Rice:

I suspect most writers are visual, not aural, except for those script-writing types who write mostly dialogue. I can't even listen to myself read a page from my books. If I had to worry about how what I'm writing will sound in audio, I'd go bonkers and never pick up a keyboard again!

Hiddeningthe MistsChristina Courtenay: 

As for audio books – I've often been advised to read my dialogue out loud to myself in any case just to make it sure it doesn't sound stilted or not the way a normal person would talk, but I don't do it with audio books in mind specifically. In fact, the few times I've made myself listen to the audio version of my own books I cringe! But then I'm not a fan of audio books anyway, I prefer to read.

Andrea Penrose:

As for audiobooks, I don’t like hearing a story that way, so I never listen to them. I don’t even like MurderattheSerpentineBridgereading my scene aloud while I’m writing to test them. That just doesn’t resonate with me. I ma a traditional reader—I need to see the words on paper.

Susan King:

LadymacbethaudioThis question about audio is interesting – I listen to audiobooks now and then, and my youngest son is a narrator. So I've heard some from him about reading aloud, but I've never thought about audio while writing a book. It's worth pondering. 

Anne Gracie:

I don't listen to my books in audio once they're produced, but I do listen to my computer read scenes back to me. It's a kind of proof-read. Hearing it, I pick up awkward phrasing, repetition, missed words and typos. Before this technology, I used to read scenes aloud, just to check them, but I would often "see" the word I meant it to be, and so would read that, rather than the word that was actually there on the page, so the computer is more accurate. 

AudioM4071_MarryScarletThe only other time I read any of my work aloud is for a live reading in front of an audience, and then, with that added pressure, I become aware of things I could have done better — sentences I could have made tighter and occasionally phrasing that could be tricky to read aloud — that sort of thing. So these days I generally read a passage aloud to myself before reading to a live (or virtual) audience.

Mary Jo Putney:

We seem to be getting a preponderance of Wenchly opinion toward "authors not thinking much about their audio versions."  Add me to that list!  I can't imagine listening to a book when I could be reading it myself. Listening makes sense in a car, but I work at home and don't spend a lot of time on the road.  And think of the horror of getting to one's destination in the middle of an exciting scene and then having to get out of the car!

But I take audiobooks seriously because so many people enjoy them, particularly those with long commutes.  This is why I've made a Riverof Firepoint of gradually getting older books into audio.  Most of my self-produced audios have been narrated by Siobhan Waring. I love her voice and could listen to her read the phone book. (If we still had phone books. <G>)   

I think narrators are hugely important.  Bad narration can kill one's desire to listen to a good book, and good narration can make you willing to listen to that book more than once.  This is subjective, of course, but it explains why it's good to listen to an audio sample before you buy. 

MarryInScarletAudiobooks often have different covers from the print version because the print publisher created and owns the artwork.  I assume that the audio company would have to pay more to use that proprietary art, so sometimes they'll design a cover of their own. 

So there it is!  If you listen to audiobooks, what do you like or dislike about them?

Mary Jo

195 thoughts on “Titles & Audiobooks”

  1. I now listen to audiobooks because I have a problem with my sight that will only worsen with time. As a lifelong reader and retired librarian, I hate the thought of not seeing well enough to read. But I’m grateful for the burgeoning number of audio titles! At least I can hear your stories. A good reader makes a big difference. I would listen to Roslyn Landor read “the back of the cereal box” as the saying goes. I have a hard time with male readers whose female characters always sound odd to me. But for nonfiction, either sex is fine. One author who read his own works well, in my opinion, was the late historian David McCullough. I’ve enjoyed his readings of 1776, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers.

    Reply
  2. I now listen to audiobooks because I have a problem with my sight that will only worsen with time. As a lifelong reader and retired librarian, I hate the thought of not seeing well enough to read. But I’m grateful for the burgeoning number of audio titles! At least I can hear your stories. A good reader makes a big difference. I would listen to Roslyn Landor read “the back of the cereal box” as the saying goes. I have a hard time with male readers whose female characters always sound odd to me. But for nonfiction, either sex is fine. One author who read his own works well, in my opinion, was the late historian David McCullough. I’ve enjoyed his readings of 1776, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers.

    Reply
  3. I now listen to audiobooks because I have a problem with my sight that will only worsen with time. As a lifelong reader and retired librarian, I hate the thought of not seeing well enough to read. But I’m grateful for the burgeoning number of audio titles! At least I can hear your stories. A good reader makes a big difference. I would listen to Roslyn Landor read “the back of the cereal box” as the saying goes. I have a hard time with male readers whose female characters always sound odd to me. But for nonfiction, either sex is fine. One author who read his own works well, in my opinion, was the late historian David McCullough. I’ve enjoyed his readings of 1776, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers.

    Reply
  4. I now listen to audiobooks because I have a problem with my sight that will only worsen with time. As a lifelong reader and retired librarian, I hate the thought of not seeing well enough to read. But I’m grateful for the burgeoning number of audio titles! At least I can hear your stories. A good reader makes a big difference. I would listen to Roslyn Landor read “the back of the cereal box” as the saying goes. I have a hard time with male readers whose female characters always sound odd to me. But for nonfiction, either sex is fine. One author who read his own works well, in my opinion, was the late historian David McCullough. I’ve enjoyed his readings of 1776, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers.

    Reply
  5. I now listen to audiobooks because I have a problem with my sight that will only worsen with time. As a lifelong reader and retired librarian, I hate the thought of not seeing well enough to read. But I’m grateful for the burgeoning number of audio titles! At least I can hear your stories. A good reader makes a big difference. I would listen to Roslyn Landor read “the back of the cereal box” as the saying goes. I have a hard time with male readers whose female characters always sound odd to me. But for nonfiction, either sex is fine. One author who read his own works well, in my opinion, was the late historian David McCullough. I’ve enjoyed his readings of 1776, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers.

    Reply
  6. I really like audiobooks. They are something I can listen to while I am doing things around the house or going for a walk (with or without the dog). But in the evening I will still grab a book and read. To me, the best of both worlds.

    Reply
  7. I really like audiobooks. They are something I can listen to while I am doing things around the house or going for a walk (with or without the dog). But in the evening I will still grab a book and read. To me, the best of both worlds.

    Reply
  8. I really like audiobooks. They are something I can listen to while I am doing things around the house or going for a walk (with or without the dog). But in the evening I will still grab a book and read. To me, the best of both worlds.

    Reply
  9. I really like audiobooks. They are something I can listen to while I am doing things around the house or going for a walk (with or without the dog). But in the evening I will still grab a book and read. To me, the best of both worlds.

    Reply
  10. I really like audiobooks. They are something I can listen to while I am doing things around the house or going for a walk (with or without the dog). But in the evening I will still grab a book and read. To me, the best of both worlds.

    Reply
  11. Thanks for the discussion on titles, which I often find confounding. As for audiobooks – the one time I’ve ever listened to (part of) one was when I was in a car and the driver had queued up an audio book of one of Mary Jo’s novels. And yes, we had to leave the car when we arrived at our destination-in the midst of a scene. Otherwise, I have no desire to read audiobooks. I have a bad habit that dates back to when I was ten years old: I’ll be reading a book and realize I need to check on something that I’ve read earlier. I’m here to tell you that flipping printed pages or even e-reader pages is much easier than trying to find an elusive passage somewhere in an audio book. Just sayin’…

    Reply
  12. Thanks for the discussion on titles, which I often find confounding. As for audiobooks – the one time I’ve ever listened to (part of) one was when I was in a car and the driver had queued up an audio book of one of Mary Jo’s novels. And yes, we had to leave the car when we arrived at our destination-in the midst of a scene. Otherwise, I have no desire to read audiobooks. I have a bad habit that dates back to when I was ten years old: I’ll be reading a book and realize I need to check on something that I’ve read earlier. I’m here to tell you that flipping printed pages or even e-reader pages is much easier than trying to find an elusive passage somewhere in an audio book. Just sayin’…

    Reply
  13. Thanks for the discussion on titles, which I often find confounding. As for audiobooks – the one time I’ve ever listened to (part of) one was when I was in a car and the driver had queued up an audio book of one of Mary Jo’s novels. And yes, we had to leave the car when we arrived at our destination-in the midst of a scene. Otherwise, I have no desire to read audiobooks. I have a bad habit that dates back to when I was ten years old: I’ll be reading a book and realize I need to check on something that I’ve read earlier. I’m here to tell you that flipping printed pages or even e-reader pages is much easier than trying to find an elusive passage somewhere in an audio book. Just sayin’…

    Reply
  14. Thanks for the discussion on titles, which I often find confounding. As for audiobooks – the one time I’ve ever listened to (part of) one was when I was in a car and the driver had queued up an audio book of one of Mary Jo’s novels. And yes, we had to leave the car when we arrived at our destination-in the midst of a scene. Otherwise, I have no desire to read audiobooks. I have a bad habit that dates back to when I was ten years old: I’ll be reading a book and realize I need to check on something that I’ve read earlier. I’m here to tell you that flipping printed pages or even e-reader pages is much easier than trying to find an elusive passage somewhere in an audio book. Just sayin’…

    Reply
  15. Thanks for the discussion on titles, which I often find confounding. As for audiobooks – the one time I’ve ever listened to (part of) one was when I was in a car and the driver had queued up an audio book of one of Mary Jo’s novels. And yes, we had to leave the car when we arrived at our destination-in the midst of a scene. Otherwise, I have no desire to read audiobooks. I have a bad habit that dates back to when I was ten years old: I’ll be reading a book and realize I need to check on something that I’ve read earlier. I’m here to tell you that flipping printed pages or even e-reader pages is much easier than trying to find an elusive passage somewhere in an audio book. Just sayin’…

    Reply
  16. I think audiobooks are terrific for times when I can’t be reading a print book, and I think they have a real place in the literary world. I wouldn’t try to study from one – for that I need print and quiet – but I like very much to listen to them when I am doing other things, as an alternative to listening to music or the radio. I have a player next to my bed and I do love curling up to a Georgette Heyer when it’s time to sleep (since I pretty much know most of those by heart, it doesn’t matter where I pick up or doze off).
    My reading paradise would be a nice big comfy sofa, with my feet up, a good light over my shoulder on my print book and a nice warm cat on my lap. But in situations when that’s not available, audiobooks fill the gap.

    Reply
  17. I think audiobooks are terrific for times when I can’t be reading a print book, and I think they have a real place in the literary world. I wouldn’t try to study from one – for that I need print and quiet – but I like very much to listen to them when I am doing other things, as an alternative to listening to music or the radio. I have a player next to my bed and I do love curling up to a Georgette Heyer when it’s time to sleep (since I pretty much know most of those by heart, it doesn’t matter where I pick up or doze off).
    My reading paradise would be a nice big comfy sofa, with my feet up, a good light over my shoulder on my print book and a nice warm cat on my lap. But in situations when that’s not available, audiobooks fill the gap.

    Reply
  18. I think audiobooks are terrific for times when I can’t be reading a print book, and I think they have a real place in the literary world. I wouldn’t try to study from one – for that I need print and quiet – but I like very much to listen to them when I am doing other things, as an alternative to listening to music or the radio. I have a player next to my bed and I do love curling up to a Georgette Heyer when it’s time to sleep (since I pretty much know most of those by heart, it doesn’t matter where I pick up or doze off).
    My reading paradise would be a nice big comfy sofa, with my feet up, a good light over my shoulder on my print book and a nice warm cat on my lap. But in situations when that’s not available, audiobooks fill the gap.

    Reply
  19. I think audiobooks are terrific for times when I can’t be reading a print book, and I think they have a real place in the literary world. I wouldn’t try to study from one – for that I need print and quiet – but I like very much to listen to them when I am doing other things, as an alternative to listening to music or the radio. I have a player next to my bed and I do love curling up to a Georgette Heyer when it’s time to sleep (since I pretty much know most of those by heart, it doesn’t matter where I pick up or doze off).
    My reading paradise would be a nice big comfy sofa, with my feet up, a good light over my shoulder on my print book and a nice warm cat on my lap. But in situations when that’s not available, audiobooks fill the gap.

    Reply
  20. I think audiobooks are terrific for times when I can’t be reading a print book, and I think they have a real place in the literary world. I wouldn’t try to study from one – for that I need print and quiet – but I like very much to listen to them when I am doing other things, as an alternative to listening to music or the radio. I have a player next to my bed and I do love curling up to a Georgette Heyer when it’s time to sleep (since I pretty much know most of those by heart, it doesn’t matter where I pick up or doze off).
    My reading paradise would be a nice big comfy sofa, with my feet up, a good light over my shoulder on my print book and a nice warm cat on my lap. But in situations when that’s not available, audiobooks fill the gap.

    Reply
  21. I wish audio books worked for me, since I could be doing something productive with my hands while listening. (Note: doing sudoku on my iPhone counts as productive!) But I suffer from monkey brain and rabbitholeitis—ANYTHING can lead me to think of anything else, leading to another anything and … book be gone! Only exception is a long drive with an entertaining book. Even then, I lose the thread sometimes.
    The sub-titles issue (whose kid is or isn’t a Lady or Lord?) interests me from an authenticity-in-writing POV. It took me a long time to figure out, for example, that a duchess does not become a dowager duchess when the duke dies and a son (or “removed” heir) inherits, but only when the new duke marries. (Now, I can Google it in two minutes, but back in the day …) Who’s an Honorable? What’s the formal difference between “Duchess XXX of YYY” and “XXX, Duchess of YYY”? Maybe I shouldn’t inquire, as the knowing just makes me crabby when an author gets it wrong. 🥴

    Reply
  22. I wish audio books worked for me, since I could be doing something productive with my hands while listening. (Note: doing sudoku on my iPhone counts as productive!) But I suffer from monkey brain and rabbitholeitis—ANYTHING can lead me to think of anything else, leading to another anything and … book be gone! Only exception is a long drive with an entertaining book. Even then, I lose the thread sometimes.
    The sub-titles issue (whose kid is or isn’t a Lady or Lord?) interests me from an authenticity-in-writing POV. It took me a long time to figure out, for example, that a duchess does not become a dowager duchess when the duke dies and a son (or “removed” heir) inherits, but only when the new duke marries. (Now, I can Google it in two minutes, but back in the day …) Who’s an Honorable? What’s the formal difference between “Duchess XXX of YYY” and “XXX, Duchess of YYY”? Maybe I shouldn’t inquire, as the knowing just makes me crabby when an author gets it wrong. 🥴

    Reply
  23. I wish audio books worked for me, since I could be doing something productive with my hands while listening. (Note: doing sudoku on my iPhone counts as productive!) But I suffer from monkey brain and rabbitholeitis—ANYTHING can lead me to think of anything else, leading to another anything and … book be gone! Only exception is a long drive with an entertaining book. Even then, I lose the thread sometimes.
    The sub-titles issue (whose kid is or isn’t a Lady or Lord?) interests me from an authenticity-in-writing POV. It took me a long time to figure out, for example, that a duchess does not become a dowager duchess when the duke dies and a son (or “removed” heir) inherits, but only when the new duke marries. (Now, I can Google it in two minutes, but back in the day …) Who’s an Honorable? What’s the formal difference between “Duchess XXX of YYY” and “XXX, Duchess of YYY”? Maybe I shouldn’t inquire, as the knowing just makes me crabby when an author gets it wrong. 🥴

    Reply
  24. I wish audio books worked for me, since I could be doing something productive with my hands while listening. (Note: doing sudoku on my iPhone counts as productive!) But I suffer from monkey brain and rabbitholeitis—ANYTHING can lead me to think of anything else, leading to another anything and … book be gone! Only exception is a long drive with an entertaining book. Even then, I lose the thread sometimes.
    The sub-titles issue (whose kid is or isn’t a Lady or Lord?) interests me from an authenticity-in-writing POV. It took me a long time to figure out, for example, that a duchess does not become a dowager duchess when the duke dies and a son (or “removed” heir) inherits, but only when the new duke marries. (Now, I can Google it in two minutes, but back in the day …) Who’s an Honorable? What’s the formal difference between “Duchess XXX of YYY” and “XXX, Duchess of YYY”? Maybe I shouldn’t inquire, as the knowing just makes me crabby when an author gets it wrong. 🥴

    Reply
  25. I wish audio books worked for me, since I could be doing something productive with my hands while listening. (Note: doing sudoku on my iPhone counts as productive!) But I suffer from monkey brain and rabbitholeitis—ANYTHING can lead me to think of anything else, leading to another anything and … book be gone! Only exception is a long drive with an entertaining book. Even then, I lose the thread sometimes.
    The sub-titles issue (whose kid is or isn’t a Lady or Lord?) interests me from an authenticity-in-writing POV. It took me a long time to figure out, for example, that a duchess does not become a dowager duchess when the duke dies and a son (or “removed” heir) inherits, but only when the new duke marries. (Now, I can Google it in two minutes, but back in the day …) Who’s an Honorable? What’s the formal difference between “Duchess XXX of YYY” and “XXX, Duchess of YYY”? Maybe I shouldn’t inquire, as the knowing just makes me crabby when an author gets it wrong. 🥴

    Reply
  26. Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts’ website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/. By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had ‘lady’ added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.
    As to audio books, I am like Mary M and find that my mind wanders and I have missed several ‘pages’! So paper or kindle for me.

    Reply
  27. Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts’ website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/. By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had ‘lady’ added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.
    As to audio books, I am like Mary M and find that my mind wanders and I have missed several ‘pages’! So paper or kindle for me.

    Reply
  28. Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts’ website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/. By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had ‘lady’ added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.
    As to audio books, I am like Mary M and find that my mind wanders and I have missed several ‘pages’! So paper or kindle for me.

    Reply
  29. Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts’ website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/. By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had ‘lady’ added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.
    As to audio books, I am like Mary M and find that my mind wanders and I have missed several ‘pages’! So paper or kindle for me.

    Reply
  30. Many apologies for having to disagree with the Word Wenches but siblings do get courtesy titles if their brother inherits a title from a distant relative, ie they may not be the child of a peer but they are the brother or sister of one. Please see this exert from Debretts’ website https://debretts.com/peerage/courtesy-titles/. By example, the current Duke of Sutherland was born to Mr Egerton. When he inherited the title from his cousin, his three sisters had ‘lady’ added to their names. Two more interesting points about this title 1) the current duke has two sons but seven granddaughters 2) there is also an Earl of Sutherland – they were once the same person but the earldom is a Scottish title and so can pass down the female line. Therefore the titles have separated and are now held by two different families.
    As to audio books, I am like Mary M and find that my mind wanders and I have missed several ‘pages’! So paper or kindle for me.

    Reply
  31. Like Linda my reading vision has deteriorated so that I rely on audio more and more; I also like Rosalyn Landor (though not for reading off cereal packets LOL). Like Anne I also use computer voices a lot for proof reading and reading web pages, though for this I have specialised software with good pronunciation editing, though heteronyms remain problematic!. I think many readers with kindles like to use ‘whispersync’ so that they can switch between reading and listening at will.
    As a dedicated audio book fan, I find that authors who focus on small groups of characters come across best as it puts less strain on the memory. For series I like to hear the same narrator throughout as I associate a particular voice pronunciation with a character. For example in M C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, Penelope Keith as narrator has become Agatha in my mind. LOL

    Reply
  32. Like Linda my reading vision has deteriorated so that I rely on audio more and more; I also like Rosalyn Landor (though not for reading off cereal packets LOL). Like Anne I also use computer voices a lot for proof reading and reading web pages, though for this I have specialised software with good pronunciation editing, though heteronyms remain problematic!. I think many readers with kindles like to use ‘whispersync’ so that they can switch between reading and listening at will.
    As a dedicated audio book fan, I find that authors who focus on small groups of characters come across best as it puts less strain on the memory. For series I like to hear the same narrator throughout as I associate a particular voice pronunciation with a character. For example in M C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, Penelope Keith as narrator has become Agatha in my mind. LOL

    Reply
  33. Like Linda my reading vision has deteriorated so that I rely on audio more and more; I also like Rosalyn Landor (though not for reading off cereal packets LOL). Like Anne I also use computer voices a lot for proof reading and reading web pages, though for this I have specialised software with good pronunciation editing, though heteronyms remain problematic!. I think many readers with kindles like to use ‘whispersync’ so that they can switch between reading and listening at will.
    As a dedicated audio book fan, I find that authors who focus on small groups of characters come across best as it puts less strain on the memory. For series I like to hear the same narrator throughout as I associate a particular voice pronunciation with a character. For example in M C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, Penelope Keith as narrator has become Agatha in my mind. LOL

    Reply
  34. Like Linda my reading vision has deteriorated so that I rely on audio more and more; I also like Rosalyn Landor (though not for reading off cereal packets LOL). Like Anne I also use computer voices a lot for proof reading and reading web pages, though for this I have specialised software with good pronunciation editing, though heteronyms remain problematic!. I think many readers with kindles like to use ‘whispersync’ so that they can switch between reading and listening at will.
    As a dedicated audio book fan, I find that authors who focus on small groups of characters come across best as it puts less strain on the memory. For series I like to hear the same narrator throughout as I associate a particular voice pronunciation with a character. For example in M C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, Penelope Keith as narrator has become Agatha in my mind. LOL

    Reply
  35. Like Linda my reading vision has deteriorated so that I rely on audio more and more; I also like Rosalyn Landor (though not for reading off cereal packets LOL). Like Anne I also use computer voices a lot for proof reading and reading web pages, though for this I have specialised software with good pronunciation editing, though heteronyms remain problematic!. I think many readers with kindles like to use ‘whispersync’ so that they can switch between reading and listening at will.
    As a dedicated audio book fan, I find that authors who focus on small groups of characters come across best as it puts less strain on the memory. For series I like to hear the same narrator throughout as I associate a particular voice pronunciation with a character. For example in M C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, Penelope Keith as narrator has become Agatha in my mind. LOL

    Reply
  36. I’m so thankful for the availability of audiobooks, especially for those who have trouble seeing or holding books.
    But I find that listening is not as satisfying as actually reading. Reading takes me into the story, while listening or watching a dramatization gives me the feeling of being on the outside. I also have the same issue that Bennie Syril Braunstein has of wanting to go back and check something. It’s easier with a book.
    But at age 78, I can foresee a day when I will NEED the audiobook – so you ladies keep cranking them out (smile).

    Reply
  37. I’m so thankful for the availability of audiobooks, especially for those who have trouble seeing or holding books.
    But I find that listening is not as satisfying as actually reading. Reading takes me into the story, while listening or watching a dramatization gives me the feeling of being on the outside. I also have the same issue that Bennie Syril Braunstein has of wanting to go back and check something. It’s easier with a book.
    But at age 78, I can foresee a day when I will NEED the audiobook – so you ladies keep cranking them out (smile).

    Reply
  38. I’m so thankful for the availability of audiobooks, especially for those who have trouble seeing or holding books.
    But I find that listening is not as satisfying as actually reading. Reading takes me into the story, while listening or watching a dramatization gives me the feeling of being on the outside. I also have the same issue that Bennie Syril Braunstein has of wanting to go back and check something. It’s easier with a book.
    But at age 78, I can foresee a day when I will NEED the audiobook – so you ladies keep cranking them out (smile).

    Reply
  39. I’m so thankful for the availability of audiobooks, especially for those who have trouble seeing or holding books.
    But I find that listening is not as satisfying as actually reading. Reading takes me into the story, while listening or watching a dramatization gives me the feeling of being on the outside. I also have the same issue that Bennie Syril Braunstein has of wanting to go back and check something. It’s easier with a book.
    But at age 78, I can foresee a day when I will NEED the audiobook – so you ladies keep cranking them out (smile).

    Reply
  40. I’m so thankful for the availability of audiobooks, especially for those who have trouble seeing or holding books.
    But I find that listening is not as satisfying as actually reading. Reading takes me into the story, while listening or watching a dramatization gives me the feeling of being on the outside. I also have the same issue that Bennie Syril Braunstein has of wanting to go back and check something. It’s easier with a book.
    But at age 78, I can foresee a day when I will NEED the audiobook – so you ladies keep cranking them out (smile).

    Reply
  41. When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

    Reply
  42. When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

    Reply
  43. When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

    Reply
  44. When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

    Reply
  45. When a man succeeds to a title whether that of a grandfather, uncle , or distant cousin, he or his siblings can request grants of special precedence. My Debrett of the 1840s has pages of grants of special precedence. Even married sisters with higher titles can receive that grant.The reasoning is , if the father ( and rarely) the mother had lived, the children would have received those honors.

    Reply
  46. I do not listen to audio books. I seldom listen to anything with earphones. I tried using the gadget that played music when I was riding the bu but either the noise around me was too great or I didn’t like not being able to hear what was going on around me. As for novels, I prefer reading them than hearing them.

    Reply
  47. I do not listen to audio books. I seldom listen to anything with earphones. I tried using the gadget that played music when I was riding the bu but either the noise around me was too great or I didn’t like not being able to hear what was going on around me. As for novels, I prefer reading them than hearing them.

    Reply
  48. I do not listen to audio books. I seldom listen to anything with earphones. I tried using the gadget that played music when I was riding the bu but either the noise around me was too great or I didn’t like not being able to hear what was going on around me. As for novels, I prefer reading them than hearing them.

    Reply
  49. I do not listen to audio books. I seldom listen to anything with earphones. I tried using the gadget that played music when I was riding the bu but either the noise around me was too great or I didn’t like not being able to hear what was going on around me. As for novels, I prefer reading them than hearing them.

    Reply
  50. I do not listen to audio books. I seldom listen to anything with earphones. I tried using the gadget that played music when I was riding the bu but either the noise around me was too great or I didn’t like not being able to hear what was going on around me. As for novels, I prefer reading them than hearing them.

    Reply
  51. I enjoy audiobooks, probably because I’ve always liked being read to. Most of the time I use it while I travel. I remember listening to John Grisham’s _Painted House_ while traveling to North Dakota for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was narrated by Paul Newman who gravelly voice was compelling, yet soothingly familiar at the same time. On the way back my Mom listened to it and slept through most of it. Audiobooks make dreaded chores seem to go faster. I’ll wear my headphones through out the house and garden. I don’t take them on the trail with me when I hike, it would be a safety hazzard as I would pay more attention to the book than the surroundings.

    Reply
  52. I enjoy audiobooks, probably because I’ve always liked being read to. Most of the time I use it while I travel. I remember listening to John Grisham’s _Painted House_ while traveling to North Dakota for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was narrated by Paul Newman who gravelly voice was compelling, yet soothingly familiar at the same time. On the way back my Mom listened to it and slept through most of it. Audiobooks make dreaded chores seem to go faster. I’ll wear my headphones through out the house and garden. I don’t take them on the trail with me when I hike, it would be a safety hazzard as I would pay more attention to the book than the surroundings.

    Reply
  53. I enjoy audiobooks, probably because I’ve always liked being read to. Most of the time I use it while I travel. I remember listening to John Grisham’s _Painted House_ while traveling to North Dakota for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was narrated by Paul Newman who gravelly voice was compelling, yet soothingly familiar at the same time. On the way back my Mom listened to it and slept through most of it. Audiobooks make dreaded chores seem to go faster. I’ll wear my headphones through out the house and garden. I don’t take them on the trail with me when I hike, it would be a safety hazzard as I would pay more attention to the book than the surroundings.

    Reply
  54. I enjoy audiobooks, probably because I’ve always liked being read to. Most of the time I use it while I travel. I remember listening to John Grisham’s _Painted House_ while traveling to North Dakota for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was narrated by Paul Newman who gravelly voice was compelling, yet soothingly familiar at the same time. On the way back my Mom listened to it and slept through most of it. Audiobooks make dreaded chores seem to go faster. I’ll wear my headphones through out the house and garden. I don’t take them on the trail with me when I hike, it would be a safety hazzard as I would pay more attention to the book than the surroundings.

    Reply
  55. I enjoy audiobooks, probably because I’ve always liked being read to. Most of the time I use it while I travel. I remember listening to John Grisham’s _Painted House_ while traveling to North Dakota for my Grandmother’s funeral. It was narrated by Paul Newman who gravelly voice was compelling, yet soothingly familiar at the same time. On the way back my Mom listened to it and slept through most of it. Audiobooks make dreaded chores seem to go faster. I’ll wear my headphones through out the house and garden. I don’t take them on the trail with me when I hike, it would be a safety hazzard as I would pay more attention to the book than the surroundings.

    Reply
  56. I have trouble listening to audio books in the car. If I get engrossed in a story, I won’t be paying attention to the road. I’ve missed my exit while listening to a podcast, or on a phone call using Bluetooth! Conversely, if I do have to pay attention to directions or traffic, I’ll miss part of the story, and keep having to rewind. I’m sure there are cognitive reasons why I can listen to a news program or music while driving without the same problems.
    However I’m glad so many audio books are available, and I’m sure I’d learn to adjust if I became vision impaired and had no choice.

    Reply
  57. I have trouble listening to audio books in the car. If I get engrossed in a story, I won’t be paying attention to the road. I’ve missed my exit while listening to a podcast, or on a phone call using Bluetooth! Conversely, if I do have to pay attention to directions or traffic, I’ll miss part of the story, and keep having to rewind. I’m sure there are cognitive reasons why I can listen to a news program or music while driving without the same problems.
    However I’m glad so many audio books are available, and I’m sure I’d learn to adjust if I became vision impaired and had no choice.

    Reply
  58. I have trouble listening to audio books in the car. If I get engrossed in a story, I won’t be paying attention to the road. I’ve missed my exit while listening to a podcast, or on a phone call using Bluetooth! Conversely, if I do have to pay attention to directions or traffic, I’ll miss part of the story, and keep having to rewind. I’m sure there are cognitive reasons why I can listen to a news program or music while driving without the same problems.
    However I’m glad so many audio books are available, and I’m sure I’d learn to adjust if I became vision impaired and had no choice.

    Reply
  59. I have trouble listening to audio books in the car. If I get engrossed in a story, I won’t be paying attention to the road. I’ve missed my exit while listening to a podcast, or on a phone call using Bluetooth! Conversely, if I do have to pay attention to directions or traffic, I’ll miss part of the story, and keep having to rewind. I’m sure there are cognitive reasons why I can listen to a news program or music while driving without the same problems.
    However I’m glad so many audio books are available, and I’m sure I’d learn to adjust if I became vision impaired and had no choice.

    Reply
  60. I have trouble listening to audio books in the car. If I get engrossed in a story, I won’t be paying attention to the road. I’ve missed my exit while listening to a podcast, or on a phone call using Bluetooth! Conversely, if I do have to pay attention to directions or traffic, I’ll miss part of the story, and keep having to rewind. I’m sure there are cognitive reasons why I can listen to a news program or music while driving without the same problems.
    However I’m glad so many audio books are available, and I’m sure I’d learn to adjust if I became vision impaired and had no choice.

    Reply
  61. Linda, it’s one of the tragedies of being book lovers that our eyesight doesn’t hold up as well as we’d like! But audiobooks and e-readers that allow type to be enlarged are a blessing. I agree that male narrators don’t always do female voices well; in my experience, female readers may be better with male voices, but I’ve not done exhaustive research.

    Reply
  62. Linda, it’s one of the tragedies of being book lovers that our eyesight doesn’t hold up as well as we’d like! But audiobooks and e-readers that allow type to be enlarged are a blessing. I agree that male narrators don’t always do female voices well; in my experience, female readers may be better with male voices, but I’ve not done exhaustive research.

    Reply
  63. Linda, it’s one of the tragedies of being book lovers that our eyesight doesn’t hold up as well as we’d like! But audiobooks and e-readers that allow type to be enlarged are a blessing. I agree that male narrators don’t always do female voices well; in my experience, female readers may be better with male voices, but I’ve not done exhaustive research.

    Reply
  64. Linda, it’s one of the tragedies of being book lovers that our eyesight doesn’t hold up as well as we’d like! But audiobooks and e-readers that allow type to be enlarged are a blessing. I agree that male narrators don’t always do female voices well; in my experience, female readers may be better with male voices, but I’ve not done exhaustive research.

    Reply
  65. Linda, it’s one of the tragedies of being book lovers that our eyesight doesn’t hold up as well as we’d like! But audiobooks and e-readers that allow type to be enlarged are a blessing. I agree that male narrators don’t always do female voices well; in my experience, female readers may be better with male voices, but I’ve not done exhaustive research.

    Reply
  66. Quantum, I was sure you’d have several interesting things to say about audiobooks, and you did not fail to please. *G* I agree that with a series, it’s best if the the same narrator can be used throughout.

    Reply
  67. Quantum, I was sure you’d have several interesting things to say about audiobooks, and you did not fail to please. *G* I agree that with a series, it’s best if the the same narrator can be used throughout.

    Reply
  68. Quantum, I was sure you’d have several interesting things to say about audiobooks, and you did not fail to please. *G* I agree that with a series, it’s best if the the same narrator can be used throughout.

    Reply
  69. Quantum, I was sure you’d have several interesting things to say about audiobooks, and you did not fail to please. *G* I agree that with a series, it’s best if the the same narrator can be used throughout.

    Reply
  70. Quantum, I was sure you’d have several interesting things to say about audiobooks, and you did not fail to please. *G* I agree that with a series, it’s best if the the same narrator can be used throughout.

    Reply
  71. Thanks so much, Nancy. I had a vague idea that petitions for special precedence could be made, but didn’t even know what the process was called and I didn’t want to go even farther out on my limb. *G*

    Reply
  72. Thanks so much, Nancy. I had a vague idea that petitions for special precedence could be made, but didn’t even know what the process was called and I didn’t want to go even farther out on my limb. *G*

    Reply
  73. Thanks so much, Nancy. I had a vague idea that petitions for special precedence could be made, but didn’t even know what the process was called and I didn’t want to go even farther out on my limb. *G*

    Reply
  74. Thanks so much, Nancy. I had a vague idea that petitions for special precedence could be made, but didn’t even know what the process was called and I didn’t want to go even farther out on my limb. *G*

    Reply
  75. Thanks so much, Nancy. I had a vague idea that petitions for special precedence could be made, but didn’t even know what the process was called and I didn’t want to go even farther out on my limb. *G*

    Reply
  76. Pamela, Paul Newman would be a good companion on a sad journey. Good that you don’t listen when hiking or walking on the street–there are some audio and phone addicts who risk becoming road kill!

    Reply
  77. Pamela, Paul Newman would be a good companion on a sad journey. Good that you don’t listen when hiking or walking on the street–there are some audio and phone addicts who risk becoming road kill!

    Reply
  78. Pamela, Paul Newman would be a good companion on a sad journey. Good that you don’t listen when hiking or walking on the street–there are some audio and phone addicts who risk becoming road kill!

    Reply
  79. Pamela, Paul Newman would be a good companion on a sad journey. Good that you don’t listen when hiking or walking on the street–there are some audio and phone addicts who risk becoming road kill!

    Reply
  80. Pamela, Paul Newman would be a good companion on a sad journey. Good that you don’t listen when hiking or walking on the street–there are some audio and phone addicts who risk becoming road kill!

    Reply
  81. I have never been a fan of audio books. To be honest, I just love to read and have been doing it since I was 4.
    But, that being said, I listened to Stephen Fry’s Winnie the Pooh audio books. And I fell in love. Of course that was not a regular audio book. But, it was magical for me.
    So, my suggestion to all you authors, don’t have just one narrator, find entire talented casts of famous actors and everyone will love audio books.
    Actually when I was writing for newspapers, I wrote and then read it out loud to me in order to make certain that anyone who read it would find it easy to follow. It was important to me to make sure that any reader could get a grasp of what was being said.
    I know audio books are blessings for many, but so far, I simply must be able to read things. I reckon when I get to the point that my Kindle only shows one word at a time because I had to enlarge the print, I will jump on audio books like a duck on a June bug.
    Y’all take care.

    Reply
  82. I have never been a fan of audio books. To be honest, I just love to read and have been doing it since I was 4.
    But, that being said, I listened to Stephen Fry’s Winnie the Pooh audio books. And I fell in love. Of course that was not a regular audio book. But, it was magical for me.
    So, my suggestion to all you authors, don’t have just one narrator, find entire talented casts of famous actors and everyone will love audio books.
    Actually when I was writing for newspapers, I wrote and then read it out loud to me in order to make certain that anyone who read it would find it easy to follow. It was important to me to make sure that any reader could get a grasp of what was being said.
    I know audio books are blessings for many, but so far, I simply must be able to read things. I reckon when I get to the point that my Kindle only shows one word at a time because I had to enlarge the print, I will jump on audio books like a duck on a June bug.
    Y’all take care.

    Reply
  83. I have never been a fan of audio books. To be honest, I just love to read and have been doing it since I was 4.
    But, that being said, I listened to Stephen Fry’s Winnie the Pooh audio books. And I fell in love. Of course that was not a regular audio book. But, it was magical for me.
    So, my suggestion to all you authors, don’t have just one narrator, find entire talented casts of famous actors and everyone will love audio books.
    Actually when I was writing for newspapers, I wrote and then read it out loud to me in order to make certain that anyone who read it would find it easy to follow. It was important to me to make sure that any reader could get a grasp of what was being said.
    I know audio books are blessings for many, but so far, I simply must be able to read things. I reckon when I get to the point that my Kindle only shows one word at a time because I had to enlarge the print, I will jump on audio books like a duck on a June bug.
    Y’all take care.

    Reply
  84. I have never been a fan of audio books. To be honest, I just love to read and have been doing it since I was 4.
    But, that being said, I listened to Stephen Fry’s Winnie the Pooh audio books. And I fell in love. Of course that was not a regular audio book. But, it was magical for me.
    So, my suggestion to all you authors, don’t have just one narrator, find entire talented casts of famous actors and everyone will love audio books.
    Actually when I was writing for newspapers, I wrote and then read it out loud to me in order to make certain that anyone who read it would find it easy to follow. It was important to me to make sure that any reader could get a grasp of what was being said.
    I know audio books are blessings for many, but so far, I simply must be able to read things. I reckon when I get to the point that my Kindle only shows one word at a time because I had to enlarge the print, I will jump on audio books like a duck on a June bug.
    Y’all take care.

    Reply
  85. I have never been a fan of audio books. To be honest, I just love to read and have been doing it since I was 4.
    But, that being said, I listened to Stephen Fry’s Winnie the Pooh audio books. And I fell in love. Of course that was not a regular audio book. But, it was magical for me.
    So, my suggestion to all you authors, don’t have just one narrator, find entire talented casts of famous actors and everyone will love audio books.
    Actually when I was writing for newspapers, I wrote and then read it out loud to me in order to make certain that anyone who read it would find it easy to follow. It was important to me to make sure that any reader could get a grasp of what was being said.
    I know audio books are blessings for many, but so far, I simply must be able to read things. I reckon when I get to the point that my Kindle only shows one word at a time because I had to enlarge the print, I will jump on audio books like a duck on a June bug.
    Y’all take care.

    Reply
  86. I use audio books when traveling (I’d fall asleep otherwise from the monotony of the road. I also use audio books when I walk for exercise–it’s my reward for exercising (which I hate). You’re right about being important to have a reader that has an interesting voice and is a good reader. I once listened to a book tape the author read himself. He was so terrible I didn’t finish it and vowed never to listen to a book read by it’s author again. I listened to a Regency romance read by an actress from a soap opera once. She evidently had no experience with book tapes or the Regency but my children, who were traveling with me, requested it over and over so they could laugh at her tape. They even memorized lines and quote her to this day! There was a company many years ago that was like a sort of book-of-the-month club for book tapes. They were wonderful because they had males for male voices and females for female voices and even sound effects. They only lasted a few months though. Guess it was too expensive to make such tapes.

    Reply
  87. I use audio books when traveling (I’d fall asleep otherwise from the monotony of the road. I also use audio books when I walk for exercise–it’s my reward for exercising (which I hate). You’re right about being important to have a reader that has an interesting voice and is a good reader. I once listened to a book tape the author read himself. He was so terrible I didn’t finish it and vowed never to listen to a book read by it’s author again. I listened to a Regency romance read by an actress from a soap opera once. She evidently had no experience with book tapes or the Regency but my children, who were traveling with me, requested it over and over so they could laugh at her tape. They even memorized lines and quote her to this day! There was a company many years ago that was like a sort of book-of-the-month club for book tapes. They were wonderful because they had males for male voices and females for female voices and even sound effects. They only lasted a few months though. Guess it was too expensive to make such tapes.

    Reply
  88. I use audio books when traveling (I’d fall asleep otherwise from the monotony of the road. I also use audio books when I walk for exercise–it’s my reward for exercising (which I hate). You’re right about being important to have a reader that has an interesting voice and is a good reader. I once listened to a book tape the author read himself. He was so terrible I didn’t finish it and vowed never to listen to a book read by it’s author again. I listened to a Regency romance read by an actress from a soap opera once. She evidently had no experience with book tapes or the Regency but my children, who were traveling with me, requested it over and over so they could laugh at her tape. They even memorized lines and quote her to this day! There was a company many years ago that was like a sort of book-of-the-month club for book tapes. They were wonderful because they had males for male voices and females for female voices and even sound effects. They only lasted a few months though. Guess it was too expensive to make such tapes.

    Reply
  89. I use audio books when traveling (I’d fall asleep otherwise from the monotony of the road. I also use audio books when I walk for exercise–it’s my reward for exercising (which I hate). You’re right about being important to have a reader that has an interesting voice and is a good reader. I once listened to a book tape the author read himself. He was so terrible I didn’t finish it and vowed never to listen to a book read by it’s author again. I listened to a Regency romance read by an actress from a soap opera once. She evidently had no experience with book tapes or the Regency but my children, who were traveling with me, requested it over and over so they could laugh at her tape. They even memorized lines and quote her to this day! There was a company many years ago that was like a sort of book-of-the-month club for book tapes. They were wonderful because they had males for male voices and females for female voices and even sound effects. They only lasted a few months though. Guess it was too expensive to make such tapes.

    Reply
  90. I use audio books when traveling (I’d fall asleep otherwise from the monotony of the road. I also use audio books when I walk for exercise–it’s my reward for exercising (which I hate). You’re right about being important to have a reader that has an interesting voice and is a good reader. I once listened to a book tape the author read himself. He was so terrible I didn’t finish it and vowed never to listen to a book read by it’s author again. I listened to a Regency romance read by an actress from a soap opera once. She evidently had no experience with book tapes or the Regency but my children, who were traveling with me, requested it over and over so they could laugh at her tape. They even memorized lines and quote her to this day! There was a company many years ago that was like a sort of book-of-the-month club for book tapes. They were wonderful because they had males for male voices and females for female voices and even sound effects. They only lasted a few months though. Guess it was too expensive to make such tapes.

    Reply
  91. I agree with you Binnie – I have that same problem with e-books. I am not yet a fan of audio books as so many of the narrators have a voice, an accent, or a way of saying things that do not match mine. I still pronounce each word in my head as I read a book. I so often want to flip back a few pages or chapters which is harder for me to do with these other modes of reading/listening. I buy books for those authors that I love and know I will need to flip back and forth also those I want to read again and again.

    Reply
  92. I agree with you Binnie – I have that same problem with e-books. I am not yet a fan of audio books as so many of the narrators have a voice, an accent, or a way of saying things that do not match mine. I still pronounce each word in my head as I read a book. I so often want to flip back a few pages or chapters which is harder for me to do with these other modes of reading/listening. I buy books for those authors that I love and know I will need to flip back and forth also those I want to read again and again.

    Reply
  93. I agree with you Binnie – I have that same problem with e-books. I am not yet a fan of audio books as so many of the narrators have a voice, an accent, or a way of saying things that do not match mine. I still pronounce each word in my head as I read a book. I so often want to flip back a few pages or chapters which is harder for me to do with these other modes of reading/listening. I buy books for those authors that I love and know I will need to flip back and forth also those I want to read again and again.

    Reply
  94. I agree with you Binnie – I have that same problem with e-books. I am not yet a fan of audio books as so many of the narrators have a voice, an accent, or a way of saying things that do not match mine. I still pronounce each word in my head as I read a book. I so often want to flip back a few pages or chapters which is harder for me to do with these other modes of reading/listening. I buy books for those authors that I love and know I will need to flip back and forth also those I want to read again and again.

    Reply
  95. I agree with you Binnie – I have that same problem with e-books. I am not yet a fan of audio books as so many of the narrators have a voice, an accent, or a way of saying things that do not match mine. I still pronounce each word in my head as I read a book. I so often want to flip back a few pages or chapters which is harder for me to do with these other modes of reading/listening. I buy books for those authors that I love and know I will need to flip back and forth also those I want to read again and again.

    Reply
  96. Thank you all for this post, Word Wenches; I’ve enjoyed the original answers and the comments.
    I recall borrowing a book on tape (yes, on cassettes) when I was painting our living room. I listened to the first paragraph or so and then I heard the tape switch off; clearly I am not an attentive listener! My husband enjoys listening to audio books on road trips, but it’s the rare book/narrator I can stay awake to listen to. (The Martian with its original narrator kept me listening as did the first Johannes Cabal book.)

    Reply
  97. Thank you all for this post, Word Wenches; I’ve enjoyed the original answers and the comments.
    I recall borrowing a book on tape (yes, on cassettes) when I was painting our living room. I listened to the first paragraph or so and then I heard the tape switch off; clearly I am not an attentive listener! My husband enjoys listening to audio books on road trips, but it’s the rare book/narrator I can stay awake to listen to. (The Martian with its original narrator kept me listening as did the first Johannes Cabal book.)

    Reply
  98. Thank you all for this post, Word Wenches; I’ve enjoyed the original answers and the comments.
    I recall borrowing a book on tape (yes, on cassettes) when I was painting our living room. I listened to the first paragraph or so and then I heard the tape switch off; clearly I am not an attentive listener! My husband enjoys listening to audio books on road trips, but it’s the rare book/narrator I can stay awake to listen to. (The Martian with its original narrator kept me listening as did the first Johannes Cabal book.)

    Reply
  99. Thank you all for this post, Word Wenches; I’ve enjoyed the original answers and the comments.
    I recall borrowing a book on tape (yes, on cassettes) when I was painting our living room. I listened to the first paragraph or so and then I heard the tape switch off; clearly I am not an attentive listener! My husband enjoys listening to audio books on road trips, but it’s the rare book/narrator I can stay awake to listen to. (The Martian with its original narrator kept me listening as did the first Johannes Cabal book.)

    Reply
  100. Thank you all for this post, Word Wenches; I’ve enjoyed the original answers and the comments.
    I recall borrowing a book on tape (yes, on cassettes) when I was painting our living room. I listened to the first paragraph or so and then I heard the tape switch off; clearly I am not an attentive listener! My husband enjoys listening to audio books on road trips, but it’s the rare book/narrator I can stay awake to listen to. (The Martian with its original narrator kept me listening as did the first Johannes Cabal book.)

    Reply
  101. I only listen to audiobooks because I have Sjögren’s syndrome where my eyes no longer produce tears. If I read more than a paragraph, my eyes get so dry the print becomes fuzzy and my eyes very painful. So, I’ve been listening to audiobooks for about 20 years. I’m very excited that more books are becoming available via audiobooks, especially historical fiction and historical romance! With Mary Jo’s older titles, I recall certain scenes that I might have read 20 years ago, but the expressions and performance of the narrator makes those scenes so much more enjoyable! It’s like watching a movie but with your ears. 😉

    Reply
  102. I only listen to audiobooks because I have Sjögren’s syndrome where my eyes no longer produce tears. If I read more than a paragraph, my eyes get so dry the print becomes fuzzy and my eyes very painful. So, I’ve been listening to audiobooks for about 20 years. I’m very excited that more books are becoming available via audiobooks, especially historical fiction and historical romance! With Mary Jo’s older titles, I recall certain scenes that I might have read 20 years ago, but the expressions and performance of the narrator makes those scenes so much more enjoyable! It’s like watching a movie but with your ears. 😉

    Reply
  103. I only listen to audiobooks because I have Sjögren’s syndrome where my eyes no longer produce tears. If I read more than a paragraph, my eyes get so dry the print becomes fuzzy and my eyes very painful. So, I’ve been listening to audiobooks for about 20 years. I’m very excited that more books are becoming available via audiobooks, especially historical fiction and historical romance! With Mary Jo’s older titles, I recall certain scenes that I might have read 20 years ago, but the expressions and performance of the narrator makes those scenes so much more enjoyable! It’s like watching a movie but with your ears. 😉

    Reply
  104. I only listen to audiobooks because I have Sjögren’s syndrome where my eyes no longer produce tears. If I read more than a paragraph, my eyes get so dry the print becomes fuzzy and my eyes very painful. So, I’ve been listening to audiobooks for about 20 years. I’m very excited that more books are becoming available via audiobooks, especially historical fiction and historical romance! With Mary Jo’s older titles, I recall certain scenes that I might have read 20 years ago, but the expressions and performance of the narrator makes those scenes so much more enjoyable! It’s like watching a movie but with your ears. 😉

    Reply
  105. I only listen to audiobooks because I have Sjögren’s syndrome where my eyes no longer produce tears. If I read more than a paragraph, my eyes get so dry the print becomes fuzzy and my eyes very painful. So, I’ve been listening to audiobooks for about 20 years. I’m very excited that more books are becoming available via audiobooks, especially historical fiction and historical romance! With Mary Jo’s older titles, I recall certain scenes that I might have read 20 years ago, but the expressions and performance of the narrator makes those scenes so much more enjoyable! It’s like watching a movie but with your ears. 😉

    Reply
  106. When I used to drive a lot, I listened to audio books all the time. I ended up expanding my book reading horizons quite a bit because there were only so many audio books at the library at that time. Books I would never have found or picked up to read in book form.
    Several of my most favorite narrators were George Guidall (Cat Who), Barbara Rosenblat (Mrs Pollifax) & Simon Prebble (Dick Francis). Also Ruth Ann Phimister (Southern Sister’s Mystery) and Lisa Burgett (Rosamund Pilcher Winter Solstice)
    I totally agree if you have a series that you need the continuity of the narrator from one book to the next.
    When I used to knit afghans I would listen to audio books. Also handy if you are having to do a lot of cleaning.
    When the books were on cassette tape it was easy to arrive home and take the tape in to continue the exciting scene. Once they went to CD’s…not nearly as easy but I still managed. Because I wasn’t going to have a cliff hanger in my brain if I could help it.
    My Grama, when she got macular degeneration, that was the only way she could read – was by listening to books.

    Reply
  107. When I used to drive a lot, I listened to audio books all the time. I ended up expanding my book reading horizons quite a bit because there were only so many audio books at the library at that time. Books I would never have found or picked up to read in book form.
    Several of my most favorite narrators were George Guidall (Cat Who), Barbara Rosenblat (Mrs Pollifax) & Simon Prebble (Dick Francis). Also Ruth Ann Phimister (Southern Sister’s Mystery) and Lisa Burgett (Rosamund Pilcher Winter Solstice)
    I totally agree if you have a series that you need the continuity of the narrator from one book to the next.
    When I used to knit afghans I would listen to audio books. Also handy if you are having to do a lot of cleaning.
    When the books were on cassette tape it was easy to arrive home and take the tape in to continue the exciting scene. Once they went to CD’s…not nearly as easy but I still managed. Because I wasn’t going to have a cliff hanger in my brain if I could help it.
    My Grama, when she got macular degeneration, that was the only way she could read – was by listening to books.

    Reply
  108. When I used to drive a lot, I listened to audio books all the time. I ended up expanding my book reading horizons quite a bit because there were only so many audio books at the library at that time. Books I would never have found or picked up to read in book form.
    Several of my most favorite narrators were George Guidall (Cat Who), Barbara Rosenblat (Mrs Pollifax) & Simon Prebble (Dick Francis). Also Ruth Ann Phimister (Southern Sister’s Mystery) and Lisa Burgett (Rosamund Pilcher Winter Solstice)
    I totally agree if you have a series that you need the continuity of the narrator from one book to the next.
    When I used to knit afghans I would listen to audio books. Also handy if you are having to do a lot of cleaning.
    When the books were on cassette tape it was easy to arrive home and take the tape in to continue the exciting scene. Once they went to CD’s…not nearly as easy but I still managed. Because I wasn’t going to have a cliff hanger in my brain if I could help it.
    My Grama, when she got macular degeneration, that was the only way she could read – was by listening to books.

    Reply
  109. When I used to drive a lot, I listened to audio books all the time. I ended up expanding my book reading horizons quite a bit because there were only so many audio books at the library at that time. Books I would never have found or picked up to read in book form.
    Several of my most favorite narrators were George Guidall (Cat Who), Barbara Rosenblat (Mrs Pollifax) & Simon Prebble (Dick Francis). Also Ruth Ann Phimister (Southern Sister’s Mystery) and Lisa Burgett (Rosamund Pilcher Winter Solstice)
    I totally agree if you have a series that you need the continuity of the narrator from one book to the next.
    When I used to knit afghans I would listen to audio books. Also handy if you are having to do a lot of cleaning.
    When the books were on cassette tape it was easy to arrive home and take the tape in to continue the exciting scene. Once they went to CD’s…not nearly as easy but I still managed. Because I wasn’t going to have a cliff hanger in my brain if I could help it.
    My Grama, when she got macular degeneration, that was the only way she could read – was by listening to books.

    Reply
  110. When I used to drive a lot, I listened to audio books all the time. I ended up expanding my book reading horizons quite a bit because there were only so many audio books at the library at that time. Books I would never have found or picked up to read in book form.
    Several of my most favorite narrators were George Guidall (Cat Who), Barbara Rosenblat (Mrs Pollifax) & Simon Prebble (Dick Francis). Also Ruth Ann Phimister (Southern Sister’s Mystery) and Lisa Burgett (Rosamund Pilcher Winter Solstice)
    I totally agree if you have a series that you need the continuity of the narrator from one book to the next.
    When I used to knit afghans I would listen to audio books. Also handy if you are having to do a lot of cleaning.
    When the books were on cassette tape it was easy to arrive home and take the tape in to continue the exciting scene. Once they went to CD’s…not nearly as easy but I still managed. Because I wasn’t going to have a cliff hanger in my brain if I could help it.
    My Grama, when she got macular degeneration, that was the only way she could read – was by listening to books.

    Reply
  111. LOL, Annette! I don’t actually know what a June bug looks like, but this one sounds pretty luckless. As a newspaper journalist, I think clarity is particularly important so reading your work aloud sounds really important.
    Interesting that you mentioned Stephan Fry’s narration of Winnie the Pooh. Anne Gracie also mentioned him and I even copied the audio cover, but decide there wasn’t a good place to put it.
    Naturally I’d like to be able to hire famous actors like Stephen Fry to narrate my audiobooks, but that’s not in the budget. *G*

    Reply
  112. LOL, Annette! I don’t actually know what a June bug looks like, but this one sounds pretty luckless. As a newspaper journalist, I think clarity is particularly important so reading your work aloud sounds really important.
    Interesting that you mentioned Stephan Fry’s narration of Winnie the Pooh. Anne Gracie also mentioned him and I even copied the audio cover, but decide there wasn’t a good place to put it.
    Naturally I’d like to be able to hire famous actors like Stephen Fry to narrate my audiobooks, but that’s not in the budget. *G*

    Reply
  113. LOL, Annette! I don’t actually know what a June bug looks like, but this one sounds pretty luckless. As a newspaper journalist, I think clarity is particularly important so reading your work aloud sounds really important.
    Interesting that you mentioned Stephan Fry’s narration of Winnie the Pooh. Anne Gracie also mentioned him and I even copied the audio cover, but decide there wasn’t a good place to put it.
    Naturally I’d like to be able to hire famous actors like Stephen Fry to narrate my audiobooks, but that’s not in the budget. *G*

    Reply
  114. LOL, Annette! I don’t actually know what a June bug looks like, but this one sounds pretty luckless. As a newspaper journalist, I think clarity is particularly important so reading your work aloud sounds really important.
    Interesting that you mentioned Stephan Fry’s narration of Winnie the Pooh. Anne Gracie also mentioned him and I even copied the audio cover, but decide there wasn’t a good place to put it.
    Naturally I’d like to be able to hire famous actors like Stephen Fry to narrate my audiobooks, but that’s not in the budget. *G*

    Reply
  115. LOL, Annette! I don’t actually know what a June bug looks like, but this one sounds pretty luckless. As a newspaper journalist, I think clarity is particularly important so reading your work aloud sounds really important.
    Interesting that you mentioned Stephan Fry’s narration of Winnie the Pooh. Anne Gracie also mentioned him and I even copied the audio cover, but decide there wasn’t a good place to put it.
    Naturally I’d like to be able to hire famous actors like Stephen Fry to narrate my audiobooks, but that’s not in the budget. *G*

    Reply
  116. Laura Lee, my sympathies on the awful narrators, but at least the terrible soap opera narrator has provided much innocent fun for you discriminating offspring. *G* There are still some companies that use male and female narrators, but as you say, it’s expensive and I suspect a lot of listeners are fine with a single narrator as that person is good.

    Reply
  117. Laura Lee, my sympathies on the awful narrators, but at least the terrible soap opera narrator has provided much innocent fun for you discriminating offspring. *G* There are still some companies that use male and female narrators, but as you say, it’s expensive and I suspect a lot of listeners are fine with a single narrator as that person is good.

    Reply
  118. Laura Lee, my sympathies on the awful narrators, but at least the terrible soap opera narrator has provided much innocent fun for you discriminating offspring. *G* There are still some companies that use male and female narrators, but as you say, it’s expensive and I suspect a lot of listeners are fine with a single narrator as that person is good.

    Reply
  119. Laura Lee, my sympathies on the awful narrators, but at least the terrible soap opera narrator has provided much innocent fun for you discriminating offspring. *G* There are still some companies that use male and female narrators, but as you say, it’s expensive and I suspect a lot of listeners are fine with a single narrator as that person is good.

    Reply
  120. Laura Lee, my sympathies on the awful narrators, but at least the terrible soap opera narrator has provided much innocent fun for you discriminating offspring. *G* There are still some companies that use male and female narrators, but as you say, it’s expensive and I suspect a lot of listeners are fine with a single narrator as that person is good.

    Reply
  121. LilMissMolly, you are one of the reasons I keep producing audiobooks! For some people, they are not only the best but the only choice. As you say, a good narrator brings an extra something to the story.

    Reply
  122. LilMissMolly, you are one of the reasons I keep producing audiobooks! For some people, they are not only the best but the only choice. As you say, a good narrator brings an extra something to the story.

    Reply
  123. LilMissMolly, you are one of the reasons I keep producing audiobooks! For some people, they are not only the best but the only choice. As you say, a good narrator brings an extra something to the story.

    Reply
  124. LilMissMolly, you are one of the reasons I keep producing audiobooks! For some people, they are not only the best but the only choice. As you say, a good narrator brings an extra something to the story.

    Reply
  125. LilMissMolly, you are one of the reasons I keep producing audiobooks! For some people, they are not only the best but the only choice. As you say, a good narrator brings an extra something to the story.

    Reply
  126. Vicki L, I love Barbara Rosenblat and Simon Prebble, both of whom had narrated a couple of my books, and since I love Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice, I think I should look up Lisa Burgett as well!

    Reply
  127. Vicki L, I love Barbara Rosenblat and Simon Prebble, both of whom had narrated a couple of my books, and since I love Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice, I think I should look up Lisa Burgett as well!

    Reply
  128. Vicki L, I love Barbara Rosenblat and Simon Prebble, both of whom had narrated a couple of my books, and since I love Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice, I think I should look up Lisa Burgett as well!

    Reply
  129. Vicki L, I love Barbara Rosenblat and Simon Prebble, both of whom had narrated a couple of my books, and since I love Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice, I think I should look up Lisa Burgett as well!

    Reply
  130. Vicki L, I love Barbara Rosenblat and Simon Prebble, both of whom had narrated a couple of my books, and since I love Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice, I think I should look up Lisa Burgett as well!

    Reply
  131. I had to weigh in on the subject of audio books. Though the titles discussion was and always is really interesting.
    I am whole heartedly an audio book fan. My eyesight started needing help years ago which is quite frustrating at times and worrisome too, e.g., stronger lenses, bifocals, trifocals, larger and larger fonts on my reading devices…and saying ‘no’ (boo hoo) to print giveaway books, drat. Normally, I do not purchase an audio book unless I’ve already read the book so that I already know the story and it’s like someone reading a favorite story to me. At any rate, I listen to audio books in many different situations, exercising, chores around the house, even chilling with a game of solitaire (can’t read at the same time.)
    I have a lot, not enough, of Mary Jo’s audio books and love them and have to re-listen to entire series every few years. And that’s after having reread the series a few times. I have some, not nearly enough of Anne Gracie’s audio books and again, love to revisit those stories!!
    I personally have no problem with rewinding my audio books, a few minutes, chapter/chapters to listen again to a phrase I missed or particularly loved. I usually listen from my phone and have it on my person at all times for my step count (can’t stand anything around my wrist.) I have different earphones for when I’m at my laptop. Listening to an audio book while killing redundant junk mail or saving tbr later. And I so agree that earphones are very problematic, it took me a really long time to find comfortable ones. And they ain’t cheap.
    I have to strongly agree/disagree on male narrators. I have a small collection of Georgette Heyer and the male narrators on the available GH audios varies wildly. I would never have imagined that Richard Armitage could do women’s voices as well as he does, although who wouldn’t swoon to listen to him doing John Thornton in an audio book, sigh. Some of the others are just fine, but one of my all time fave GH book’s narrator is positively nerve grating.
    I’ve listened to a couple of other male narrators who I have come to really love: Harry Frost and Benjamin Fife, and they do female voices admirably. That said, I want to acknowledge to all of you my dear authors, that I know that producing audio books for us is quite an investment on your part. And that for your older books, you often do not get any remuneration, which is horrible in my mind. Really heartbreaking. So, thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

    Reply
  132. I had to weigh in on the subject of audio books. Though the titles discussion was and always is really interesting.
    I am whole heartedly an audio book fan. My eyesight started needing help years ago which is quite frustrating at times and worrisome too, e.g., stronger lenses, bifocals, trifocals, larger and larger fonts on my reading devices…and saying ‘no’ (boo hoo) to print giveaway books, drat. Normally, I do not purchase an audio book unless I’ve already read the book so that I already know the story and it’s like someone reading a favorite story to me. At any rate, I listen to audio books in many different situations, exercising, chores around the house, even chilling with a game of solitaire (can’t read at the same time.)
    I have a lot, not enough, of Mary Jo’s audio books and love them and have to re-listen to entire series every few years. And that’s after having reread the series a few times. I have some, not nearly enough of Anne Gracie’s audio books and again, love to revisit those stories!!
    I personally have no problem with rewinding my audio books, a few minutes, chapter/chapters to listen again to a phrase I missed or particularly loved. I usually listen from my phone and have it on my person at all times for my step count (can’t stand anything around my wrist.) I have different earphones for when I’m at my laptop. Listening to an audio book while killing redundant junk mail or saving tbr later. And I so agree that earphones are very problematic, it took me a really long time to find comfortable ones. And they ain’t cheap.
    I have to strongly agree/disagree on male narrators. I have a small collection of Georgette Heyer and the male narrators on the available GH audios varies wildly. I would never have imagined that Richard Armitage could do women’s voices as well as he does, although who wouldn’t swoon to listen to him doing John Thornton in an audio book, sigh. Some of the others are just fine, but one of my all time fave GH book’s narrator is positively nerve grating.
    I’ve listened to a couple of other male narrators who I have come to really love: Harry Frost and Benjamin Fife, and they do female voices admirably. That said, I want to acknowledge to all of you my dear authors, that I know that producing audio books for us is quite an investment on your part. And that for your older books, you often do not get any remuneration, which is horrible in my mind. Really heartbreaking. So, thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

    Reply
  133. I had to weigh in on the subject of audio books. Though the titles discussion was and always is really interesting.
    I am whole heartedly an audio book fan. My eyesight started needing help years ago which is quite frustrating at times and worrisome too, e.g., stronger lenses, bifocals, trifocals, larger and larger fonts on my reading devices…and saying ‘no’ (boo hoo) to print giveaway books, drat. Normally, I do not purchase an audio book unless I’ve already read the book so that I already know the story and it’s like someone reading a favorite story to me. At any rate, I listen to audio books in many different situations, exercising, chores around the house, even chilling with a game of solitaire (can’t read at the same time.)
    I have a lot, not enough, of Mary Jo’s audio books and love them and have to re-listen to entire series every few years. And that’s after having reread the series a few times. I have some, not nearly enough of Anne Gracie’s audio books and again, love to revisit those stories!!
    I personally have no problem with rewinding my audio books, a few minutes, chapter/chapters to listen again to a phrase I missed or particularly loved. I usually listen from my phone and have it on my person at all times for my step count (can’t stand anything around my wrist.) I have different earphones for when I’m at my laptop. Listening to an audio book while killing redundant junk mail or saving tbr later. And I so agree that earphones are very problematic, it took me a really long time to find comfortable ones. And they ain’t cheap.
    I have to strongly agree/disagree on male narrators. I have a small collection of Georgette Heyer and the male narrators on the available GH audios varies wildly. I would never have imagined that Richard Armitage could do women’s voices as well as he does, although who wouldn’t swoon to listen to him doing John Thornton in an audio book, sigh. Some of the others are just fine, but one of my all time fave GH book’s narrator is positively nerve grating.
    I’ve listened to a couple of other male narrators who I have come to really love: Harry Frost and Benjamin Fife, and they do female voices admirably. That said, I want to acknowledge to all of you my dear authors, that I know that producing audio books for us is quite an investment on your part. And that for your older books, you often do not get any remuneration, which is horrible in my mind. Really heartbreaking. So, thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

    Reply
  134. I had to weigh in on the subject of audio books. Though the titles discussion was and always is really interesting.
    I am whole heartedly an audio book fan. My eyesight started needing help years ago which is quite frustrating at times and worrisome too, e.g., stronger lenses, bifocals, trifocals, larger and larger fonts on my reading devices…and saying ‘no’ (boo hoo) to print giveaway books, drat. Normally, I do not purchase an audio book unless I’ve already read the book so that I already know the story and it’s like someone reading a favorite story to me. At any rate, I listen to audio books in many different situations, exercising, chores around the house, even chilling with a game of solitaire (can’t read at the same time.)
    I have a lot, not enough, of Mary Jo’s audio books and love them and have to re-listen to entire series every few years. And that’s after having reread the series a few times. I have some, not nearly enough of Anne Gracie’s audio books and again, love to revisit those stories!!
    I personally have no problem with rewinding my audio books, a few minutes, chapter/chapters to listen again to a phrase I missed or particularly loved. I usually listen from my phone and have it on my person at all times for my step count (can’t stand anything around my wrist.) I have different earphones for when I’m at my laptop. Listening to an audio book while killing redundant junk mail or saving tbr later. And I so agree that earphones are very problematic, it took me a really long time to find comfortable ones. And they ain’t cheap.
    I have to strongly agree/disagree on male narrators. I have a small collection of Georgette Heyer and the male narrators on the available GH audios varies wildly. I would never have imagined that Richard Armitage could do women’s voices as well as he does, although who wouldn’t swoon to listen to him doing John Thornton in an audio book, sigh. Some of the others are just fine, but one of my all time fave GH book’s narrator is positively nerve grating.
    I’ve listened to a couple of other male narrators who I have come to really love: Harry Frost and Benjamin Fife, and they do female voices admirably. That said, I want to acknowledge to all of you my dear authors, that I know that producing audio books for us is quite an investment on your part. And that for your older books, you often do not get any remuneration, which is horrible in my mind. Really heartbreaking. So, thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

    Reply
  135. I had to weigh in on the subject of audio books. Though the titles discussion was and always is really interesting.
    I am whole heartedly an audio book fan. My eyesight started needing help years ago which is quite frustrating at times and worrisome too, e.g., stronger lenses, bifocals, trifocals, larger and larger fonts on my reading devices…and saying ‘no’ (boo hoo) to print giveaway books, drat. Normally, I do not purchase an audio book unless I’ve already read the book so that I already know the story and it’s like someone reading a favorite story to me. At any rate, I listen to audio books in many different situations, exercising, chores around the house, even chilling with a game of solitaire (can’t read at the same time.)
    I have a lot, not enough, of Mary Jo’s audio books and love them and have to re-listen to entire series every few years. And that’s after having reread the series a few times. I have some, not nearly enough of Anne Gracie’s audio books and again, love to revisit those stories!!
    I personally have no problem with rewinding my audio books, a few minutes, chapter/chapters to listen again to a phrase I missed or particularly loved. I usually listen from my phone and have it on my person at all times for my step count (can’t stand anything around my wrist.) I have different earphones for when I’m at my laptop. Listening to an audio book while killing redundant junk mail or saving tbr later. And I so agree that earphones are very problematic, it took me a really long time to find comfortable ones. And they ain’t cheap.
    I have to strongly agree/disagree on male narrators. I have a small collection of Georgette Heyer and the male narrators on the available GH audios varies wildly. I would never have imagined that Richard Armitage could do women’s voices as well as he does, although who wouldn’t swoon to listen to him doing John Thornton in an audio book, sigh. Some of the others are just fine, but one of my all time fave GH book’s narrator is positively nerve grating.
    I’ve listened to a couple of other male narrators who I have come to really love: Harry Frost and Benjamin Fife, and they do female voices admirably. That said, I want to acknowledge to all of you my dear authors, that I know that producing audio books for us is quite an investment on your part. And that for your older books, you often do not get any remuneration, which is horrible in my mind. Really heartbreaking. So, thank all of you from the bottom of my heart.

    Reply
  136. Michelle, you are clearly a master class level audio lover! Story lovers like you are a big reason why I’ve been methodically producing audios of my older books. (Audio of THE DIABOLICAL BARON and CAROUSEL OF HEARTS are in the works and should be out in the next months.)
    Producing good quality audio is definitely pricey, and there would be no point in producing BAD quality audiobooks! I don’t know if I’ll ever recover the investment I’ve made in audio, but that’s okay. It’s great that people enjoy them, and ebook sales of backlist books help cover the audio costs. And really, it’s all about the stories!

    Reply
  137. Michelle, you are clearly a master class level audio lover! Story lovers like you are a big reason why I’ve been methodically producing audios of my older books. (Audio of THE DIABOLICAL BARON and CAROUSEL OF HEARTS are in the works and should be out in the next months.)
    Producing good quality audio is definitely pricey, and there would be no point in producing BAD quality audiobooks! I don’t know if I’ll ever recover the investment I’ve made in audio, but that’s okay. It’s great that people enjoy them, and ebook sales of backlist books help cover the audio costs. And really, it’s all about the stories!

    Reply
  138. Michelle, you are clearly a master class level audio lover! Story lovers like you are a big reason why I’ve been methodically producing audios of my older books. (Audio of THE DIABOLICAL BARON and CAROUSEL OF HEARTS are in the works and should be out in the next months.)
    Producing good quality audio is definitely pricey, and there would be no point in producing BAD quality audiobooks! I don’t know if I’ll ever recover the investment I’ve made in audio, but that’s okay. It’s great that people enjoy them, and ebook sales of backlist books help cover the audio costs. And really, it’s all about the stories!

    Reply
  139. Michelle, you are clearly a master class level audio lover! Story lovers like you are a big reason why I’ve been methodically producing audios of my older books. (Audio of THE DIABOLICAL BARON and CAROUSEL OF HEARTS are in the works and should be out in the next months.)
    Producing good quality audio is definitely pricey, and there would be no point in producing BAD quality audiobooks! I don’t know if I’ll ever recover the investment I’ve made in audio, but that’s okay. It’s great that people enjoy them, and ebook sales of backlist books help cover the audio costs. And really, it’s all about the stories!

    Reply
  140. Michelle, you are clearly a master class level audio lover! Story lovers like you are a big reason why I’ve been methodically producing audios of my older books. (Audio of THE DIABOLICAL BARON and CAROUSEL OF HEARTS are in the works and should be out in the next months.)
    Producing good quality audio is definitely pricey, and there would be no point in producing BAD quality audiobooks! I don’t know if I’ll ever recover the investment I’ve made in audio, but that’s okay. It’s great that people enjoy them, and ebook sales of backlist books help cover the audio costs. And really, it’s all about the stories!

    Reply
  141. I have been listening to audiobooks for several years now. I became an “audiophile” when I found that I have AMD and know that eventually I may not be able to read books, even with larger print (as other commentators have shared). I found that I enjoy listening to a book I have already read because the narration adds an extra dimension to my favorite stories. I also agree with the comments above about the impact of a narrator on the success or failure of an audio version. Happily, there are many talented narrators out there. My favorites are Kate Reading, Rosalyn Landor, Alex Wyndham (who does a lovely female voice), Kirsten Potter, and Angela Dawe, to name just a few.

    Reply
  142. I have been listening to audiobooks for several years now. I became an “audiophile” when I found that I have AMD and know that eventually I may not be able to read books, even with larger print (as other commentators have shared). I found that I enjoy listening to a book I have already read because the narration adds an extra dimension to my favorite stories. I also agree with the comments above about the impact of a narrator on the success or failure of an audio version. Happily, there are many talented narrators out there. My favorites are Kate Reading, Rosalyn Landor, Alex Wyndham (who does a lovely female voice), Kirsten Potter, and Angela Dawe, to name just a few.

    Reply
  143. I have been listening to audiobooks for several years now. I became an “audiophile” when I found that I have AMD and know that eventually I may not be able to read books, even with larger print (as other commentators have shared). I found that I enjoy listening to a book I have already read because the narration adds an extra dimension to my favorite stories. I also agree with the comments above about the impact of a narrator on the success or failure of an audio version. Happily, there are many talented narrators out there. My favorites are Kate Reading, Rosalyn Landor, Alex Wyndham (who does a lovely female voice), Kirsten Potter, and Angela Dawe, to name just a few.

    Reply
  144. I have been listening to audiobooks for several years now. I became an “audiophile” when I found that I have AMD and know that eventually I may not be able to read books, even with larger print (as other commentators have shared). I found that I enjoy listening to a book I have already read because the narration adds an extra dimension to my favorite stories. I also agree with the comments above about the impact of a narrator on the success or failure of an audio version. Happily, there are many talented narrators out there. My favorites are Kate Reading, Rosalyn Landor, Alex Wyndham (who does a lovely female voice), Kirsten Potter, and Angela Dawe, to name just a few.

    Reply
  145. I have been listening to audiobooks for several years now. I became an “audiophile” when I found that I have AMD and know that eventually I may not be able to read books, even with larger print (as other commentators have shared). I found that I enjoy listening to a book I have already read because the narration adds an extra dimension to my favorite stories. I also agree with the comments above about the impact of a narrator on the success or failure of an audio version. Happily, there are many talented narrators out there. My favorites are Kate Reading, Rosalyn Landor, Alex Wyndham (who does a lovely female voice), Kirsten Potter, and Angela Dawe, to name just a few.

    Reply

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