Threads through time

Jobigblue Jo here, with a story to tell that travels from June 1815 to September 2011, though as often with stories it's hard to know where to start.

The beginning

To me, the story starts in January 1991, during the Gulf War. We've become accustomed to real-time, round-the-clock reporting from wars, but January 1991 was the beginning. A reminder — this is before the World Wide Web, so no going on line to catch the latest, and certainly no Twitter! The Web came into existence in prototype in August 1991, and the first image was put there in 1992. The Web as we know it can probably be dated to about 1995.

So, back in early 1991, I like many, sat darkly enthralled watching missiles hit buildings in flares of bright light, trying to remind myself that they were real buildings containing real people because it did look all too much like a video game. Ubwwmj

In January 1991 I was particularly struck by the immediacy, because I was then writing An Unwilling Bride, the second in my Company of Rogues books, which takes place during the time of Napoleon's return to France and the Battle of Waterloo.

Waterloo.

I'd previWaterloo2ously given no thought to war reporting, but as I searched out records of when news of Waterloo reached England, and what that news was, the time lag was striking. When in the book the first news of battle reaches London, Nicholas Delaney says, "It's all happened, of course. Somewhere the living are rejoicing, the dead are dead, and the wounded are suffering under the knife. And mayby tomorrow or the next day we'll find out about it."

(The picture is a photograph taken by author Karen Harbaugh at a re-enactment at Waterloo.)

Yet each night I switched on the TV to see battle raging. I do believe that the presence of war on the TV gave depth to my writing about Waterloo as seen from those waiting helplessly in London. Water

Those waiting could not have anticipated the huge numbers who died at Waterloo. One site estimates it at 6,000 an hour, to a total of over 20,000, with many more wounded.Wellington famously said, "Believe me, nothing except a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won." 

There's a list of the officers killed, wounded, and missing on June 18th, at the main battle, here. There are lists of the dead here. Go back to this page for more.

The Reaction back in England.

The news trickled across the Channel, some of it wrong, and jubilation at news of victory was muted by rumors about the high casualty rate. When the casualty lists finally arrive, the Rogues who have gathered in London learn that a Rogue is listed among the dead. Not one of the military men who'd returned to fight Napoleon, but Lord Darius Debenham, who'd pulled strings as a duke's son to be taken on as a courier. The lightest, brightest, merriest of them all.

It is then that Nicholas makes a toast. "To all the fallen: may they be forever young in heaven. To all the wounded: may they have strength and heal. To all the bereaved: may they feel joy again. And please God, may there one day be an end to war."

An Unwilling Bride was published in 1992 and sold very well.

It created (and still does create) controversy because the hero, Lucien, hits his wife, Beth, and lives to learn from it, but that is a true part of the book because it's about a private war between two strong, intelligent, proud people forced into a marriage they each find intolerable. (Smart Bitches, Trashy Books are to discuss it as their Sizzling Book Club for September, which should be interesting!)

It won a RITA award, the Golden Leaf award, and Best Historical from Romantic Times.

And that seemed to be that. I moved on to write the next Rogues book, the last of my trad regencies, and begin to write historicals in the medieval and Georgian period.

The next part of the story.

We move on a decade to September 11th, 2001, when we all watched in real time as people died and buildings fell. A few days later, I received an e-mail from a reader, Suzanne Elliott . She'd been working on an entry for a quilt show but given the events she wanted to make a quilt to acknowledge 9/11 and she wanted permission to include Nicholas's words. Of course I gave it; it was an honor. Visit her web site here.

Here's the quilt.  (Click on any image to enlarge it.) Quiltgoldendoor small

A few years later, with the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq still claiming the lives of soldiers from many countries I was touched to find the quote being used as a sig line on a blog for military wives.

JoQuote The Final Stage.

And now, completely coincidentally, An Unwilling Bride is being reissued almost exactly on the anniversary of September 11th 2001. (With a modern bride running away, but well…. there you go! The original cover above reflects the book much better.)

It's not a book about Waterloo. As I said, it's mostly about a private war and it was only the time sequence of the Rogues books that put it in Spring 1815.

Any connection to 9/11 in only in threads through time.

As I've explained in this blog, there a synchronicity that reminds that as we weave our writer's magic from our imagination we gather in the threads of the world around us, a world that now comes into our living room with full colour immediacy every hour of every day. These threads connect like a web to all we can imagine to produce our novels, each surely shaped by the time in which they're written, no matter the time period of the story.

If it hadn't been for the Gulf War, and CNN's new way of reporting on war, I might not have decided that the truth of war demanded that the dreadful death toll at Waterloo had to include a Rogue.Ubnew

Because my mind plays a strong part, too, I couldn't leave Dare dead, but I his existence years later needed an explanation that satisfied my internal truth and so he was revealed to be a victim of drug addiction and a compulsion honour would not let him break. To my surprise, his situation wove back to the beginning of the Rogue's series, written in 1977, when Nicholas Delaney was persuaded to use his amorous skills to obtain a list of secret Napoleonic supporters in Britain. Our creative minds are very complex webs.

There's more about An Unwilling Bride here.

I have no questions to pose on this blog, but I welcome your comments and thoughts, and I will send a copy of the new edition of An Unwilling Bride to a random pick from among them.

May there one day be an end to war,

Jo

 

150 thoughts on “Threads through time”

  1. An Unwilling Bride has always been my favorite of the Rogue books and that particular section, while they wait for news of the battle remains very vivid in my mind. I believe I own two copies, the original Signet and a later reissue, both of which have seen repeated readings. I’m so glad it’s coming out again for new readers to find.

    Reply
  2. An Unwilling Bride has always been my favorite of the Rogue books and that particular section, while they wait for news of the battle remains very vivid in my mind. I believe I own two copies, the original Signet and a later reissue, both of which have seen repeated readings. I’m so glad it’s coming out again for new readers to find.

    Reply
  3. An Unwilling Bride has always been my favorite of the Rogue books and that particular section, while they wait for news of the battle remains very vivid in my mind. I believe I own two copies, the original Signet and a later reissue, both of which have seen repeated readings. I’m so glad it’s coming out again for new readers to find.

    Reply
  4. An Unwilling Bride has always been my favorite of the Rogue books and that particular section, while they wait for news of the battle remains very vivid in my mind. I believe I own two copies, the original Signet and a later reissue, both of which have seen repeated readings. I’m so glad it’s coming out again for new readers to find.

    Reply
  5. An Unwilling Bride has always been my favorite of the Rogue books and that particular section, while they wait for news of the battle remains very vivid in my mind. I believe I own two copies, the original Signet and a later reissue, both of which have seen repeated readings. I’m so glad it’s coming out again for new readers to find.

    Reply
  6. Thank you for your insights, Ms. Beverley! And I echo your sentiment about war…as Gen. Tecumseh Sherman put it, “War is cruelty; and you cannot refine it.” I also remember reading The Unwilling Bride and being struck by the tension of that waiting. That quilt is an amazing piece of artwork. Really lovely. Thanks.

    Reply
  7. Thank you for your insights, Ms. Beverley! And I echo your sentiment about war…as Gen. Tecumseh Sherman put it, “War is cruelty; and you cannot refine it.” I also remember reading The Unwilling Bride and being struck by the tension of that waiting. That quilt is an amazing piece of artwork. Really lovely. Thanks.

    Reply
  8. Thank you for your insights, Ms. Beverley! And I echo your sentiment about war…as Gen. Tecumseh Sherman put it, “War is cruelty; and you cannot refine it.” I also remember reading The Unwilling Bride and being struck by the tension of that waiting. That quilt is an amazing piece of artwork. Really lovely. Thanks.

    Reply
  9. Thank you for your insights, Ms. Beverley! And I echo your sentiment about war…as Gen. Tecumseh Sherman put it, “War is cruelty; and you cannot refine it.” I also remember reading The Unwilling Bride and being struck by the tension of that waiting. That quilt is an amazing piece of artwork. Really lovely. Thanks.

    Reply
  10. Thank you for your insights, Ms. Beverley! And I echo your sentiment about war…as Gen. Tecumseh Sherman put it, “War is cruelty; and you cannot refine it.” I also remember reading The Unwilling Bride and being struck by the tension of that waiting. That quilt is an amazing piece of artwork. Really lovely. Thanks.

    Reply
  11. I know that for centuries it was the norm for casualty lists to give the names of officers only, but it has always bothered me. Every time I see those lists, I cannot help thinking about the families of all those enlisted men. Many of them would never know what had become of their son/brother/husband unless someone happened to return to tell them.
    I join you. May there one day be an end to war.

    Reply
  12. I know that for centuries it was the norm for casualty lists to give the names of officers only, but it has always bothered me. Every time I see those lists, I cannot help thinking about the families of all those enlisted men. Many of them would never know what had become of their son/brother/husband unless someone happened to return to tell them.
    I join you. May there one day be an end to war.

    Reply
  13. I know that for centuries it was the norm for casualty lists to give the names of officers only, but it has always bothered me. Every time I see those lists, I cannot help thinking about the families of all those enlisted men. Many of them would never know what had become of their son/brother/husband unless someone happened to return to tell them.
    I join you. May there one day be an end to war.

    Reply
  14. I know that for centuries it was the norm for casualty lists to give the names of officers only, but it has always bothered me. Every time I see those lists, I cannot help thinking about the families of all those enlisted men. Many of them would never know what had become of their son/brother/husband unless someone happened to return to tell them.
    I join you. May there one day be an end to war.

    Reply
  15. I know that for centuries it was the norm for casualty lists to give the names of officers only, but it has always bothered me. Every time I see those lists, I cannot help thinking about the families of all those enlisted men. Many of them would never know what had become of their son/brother/husband unless someone happened to return to tell them.
    I join you. May there one day be an end to war.

    Reply
  16. I remember watching CNN through the night because my brother, a US Marine, was there. I’d forgotten that nail biting worry, something I’m sure many of us experienced during the Vietnam War – just the worst type of worrying. Because something bad really was happening.

    Reply
  17. I remember watching CNN through the night because my brother, a US Marine, was there. I’d forgotten that nail biting worry, something I’m sure many of us experienced during the Vietnam War – just the worst type of worrying. Because something bad really was happening.

    Reply
  18. I remember watching CNN through the night because my brother, a US Marine, was there. I’d forgotten that nail biting worry, something I’m sure many of us experienced during the Vietnam War – just the worst type of worrying. Because something bad really was happening.

    Reply
  19. I remember watching CNN through the night because my brother, a US Marine, was there. I’d forgotten that nail biting worry, something I’m sure many of us experienced during the Vietnam War – just the worst type of worrying. Because something bad really was happening.

    Reply
  20. I remember watching CNN through the night because my brother, a US Marine, was there. I’d forgotten that nail biting worry, something I’m sure many of us experienced during the Vietnam War – just the worst type of worrying. Because something bad really was happening.

    Reply
  21. Jo here. Jane, I agree about the lack of names of the enlisted men. I believe it was that situation in WW I that led to the building of the War Memorials all around Britain to record by name all soldiers of that community, no matter how small, who died.
    Jo

    Reply
  22. Jo here. Jane, I agree about the lack of names of the enlisted men. I believe it was that situation in WW I that led to the building of the War Memorials all around Britain to record by name all soldiers of that community, no matter how small, who died.
    Jo

    Reply
  23. Jo here. Jane, I agree about the lack of names of the enlisted men. I believe it was that situation in WW I that led to the building of the War Memorials all around Britain to record by name all soldiers of that community, no matter how small, who died.
    Jo

    Reply
  24. Jo here. Jane, I agree about the lack of names of the enlisted men. I believe it was that situation in WW I that led to the building of the War Memorials all around Britain to record by name all soldiers of that community, no matter how small, who died.
    Jo

    Reply
  25. Jo here. Jane, I agree about the lack of names of the enlisted men. I believe it was that situation in WW I that led to the building of the War Memorials all around Britain to record by name all soldiers of that community, no matter how small, who died.
    Jo

    Reply
  26. Jo, thanks for the haunting post. When I first read that toast by Nicholas in the book, I think I vaguely assumed it was an actual historical quote you’d found and used–but certainly Nicholas is a character who was capable of such eloquence. The words are perfect for the beautiful quilt, and it’s so very moving that they’ve become a sig line for military wives.
    Violence and war haunt the human race, so it’s not surprising if the Napoleonic wars haunt those of us who write in the Regency. It’s a theme I’ve used with again again, from my first book, where the hero is a post Waterloo wounded veteran, to the book I just finished, where the hero’s life is changed irrevocably by the ending of the Truce of Amiens. Fertile fictional material–but please God, someday and end to war!

    Reply
  27. Jo, thanks for the haunting post. When I first read that toast by Nicholas in the book, I think I vaguely assumed it was an actual historical quote you’d found and used–but certainly Nicholas is a character who was capable of such eloquence. The words are perfect for the beautiful quilt, and it’s so very moving that they’ve become a sig line for military wives.
    Violence and war haunt the human race, so it’s not surprising if the Napoleonic wars haunt those of us who write in the Regency. It’s a theme I’ve used with again again, from my first book, where the hero is a post Waterloo wounded veteran, to the book I just finished, where the hero’s life is changed irrevocably by the ending of the Truce of Amiens. Fertile fictional material–but please God, someday and end to war!

    Reply
  28. Jo, thanks for the haunting post. When I first read that toast by Nicholas in the book, I think I vaguely assumed it was an actual historical quote you’d found and used–but certainly Nicholas is a character who was capable of such eloquence. The words are perfect for the beautiful quilt, and it’s so very moving that they’ve become a sig line for military wives.
    Violence and war haunt the human race, so it’s not surprising if the Napoleonic wars haunt those of us who write in the Regency. It’s a theme I’ve used with again again, from my first book, where the hero is a post Waterloo wounded veteran, to the book I just finished, where the hero’s life is changed irrevocably by the ending of the Truce of Amiens. Fertile fictional material–but please God, someday and end to war!

    Reply
  29. Jo, thanks for the haunting post. When I first read that toast by Nicholas in the book, I think I vaguely assumed it was an actual historical quote you’d found and used–but certainly Nicholas is a character who was capable of such eloquence. The words are perfect for the beautiful quilt, and it’s so very moving that they’ve become a sig line for military wives.
    Violence and war haunt the human race, so it’s not surprising if the Napoleonic wars haunt those of us who write in the Regency. It’s a theme I’ve used with again again, from my first book, where the hero is a post Waterloo wounded veteran, to the book I just finished, where the hero’s life is changed irrevocably by the ending of the Truce of Amiens. Fertile fictional material–but please God, someday and end to war!

    Reply
  30. Jo, thanks for the haunting post. When I first read that toast by Nicholas in the book, I think I vaguely assumed it was an actual historical quote you’d found and used–but certainly Nicholas is a character who was capable of such eloquence. The words are perfect for the beautiful quilt, and it’s so very moving that they’ve become a sig line for military wives.
    Violence and war haunt the human race, so it’s not surprising if the Napoleonic wars haunt those of us who write in the Regency. It’s a theme I’ve used with again again, from my first book, where the hero is a post Waterloo wounded veteran, to the book I just finished, where the hero’s life is changed irrevocably by the ending of the Truce of Amiens. Fertile fictional material–but please God, someday and end to war!

    Reply
  31. Jo here. Thea, I’m sure it is a particular kind of tension when loved ones are involved in action we’re seeing live on TV. I’m not sure human beings were designed to live in such an immediate world.
    Jo

    Reply
  32. Jo here. Thea, I’m sure it is a particular kind of tension when loved ones are involved in action we’re seeing live on TV. I’m not sure human beings were designed to live in such an immediate world.
    Jo

    Reply
  33. Jo here. Thea, I’m sure it is a particular kind of tension when loved ones are involved in action we’re seeing live on TV. I’m not sure human beings were designed to live in such an immediate world.
    Jo

    Reply
  34. Jo here. Thea, I’m sure it is a particular kind of tension when loved ones are involved in action we’re seeing live on TV. I’m not sure human beings were designed to live in such an immediate world.
    Jo

    Reply
  35. Jo here. Thea, I’m sure it is a particular kind of tension when loved ones are involved in action we’re seeing live on TV. I’m not sure human beings were designed to live in such an immediate world.
    Jo

    Reply
  36. I too remember watching CNN. I sat mesmerized by it all. Frightened, appalled, fascinated, all of those feelings sped through me as I sat and watched until I dozed off at 4am, then woke again before 5 because I just couldn’t seem to drag myself away. I’m not sure which would be more frightening though. Watching it first hand or waiting for the post to arrive with so many others all with one common thought. Did he live…
    That quilt is amazing! She did a beautiful job on it.
    As a side note, what a list for character names. And provided they’re not villains, a remembrance of sorts as well.

    Reply
  37. I too remember watching CNN. I sat mesmerized by it all. Frightened, appalled, fascinated, all of those feelings sped through me as I sat and watched until I dozed off at 4am, then woke again before 5 because I just couldn’t seem to drag myself away. I’m not sure which would be more frightening though. Watching it first hand or waiting for the post to arrive with so many others all with one common thought. Did he live…
    That quilt is amazing! She did a beautiful job on it.
    As a side note, what a list for character names. And provided they’re not villains, a remembrance of sorts as well.

    Reply
  38. I too remember watching CNN. I sat mesmerized by it all. Frightened, appalled, fascinated, all of those feelings sped through me as I sat and watched until I dozed off at 4am, then woke again before 5 because I just couldn’t seem to drag myself away. I’m not sure which would be more frightening though. Watching it first hand or waiting for the post to arrive with so many others all with one common thought. Did he live…
    That quilt is amazing! She did a beautiful job on it.
    As a side note, what a list for character names. And provided they’re not villains, a remembrance of sorts as well.

    Reply
  39. I too remember watching CNN. I sat mesmerized by it all. Frightened, appalled, fascinated, all of those feelings sped through me as I sat and watched until I dozed off at 4am, then woke again before 5 because I just couldn’t seem to drag myself away. I’m not sure which would be more frightening though. Watching it first hand or waiting for the post to arrive with so many others all with one common thought. Did he live…
    That quilt is amazing! She did a beautiful job on it.
    As a side note, what a list for character names. And provided they’re not villains, a remembrance of sorts as well.

    Reply
  40. I too remember watching CNN. I sat mesmerized by it all. Frightened, appalled, fascinated, all of those feelings sped through me as I sat and watched until I dozed off at 4am, then woke again before 5 because I just couldn’t seem to drag myself away. I’m not sure which would be more frightening though. Watching it first hand or waiting for the post to arrive with so many others all with one common thought. Did he live…
    That quilt is amazing! She did a beautiful job on it.
    As a side note, what a list for character names. And provided they’re not villains, a remembrance of sorts as well.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie here. Jo, your post was touching in so many ways. I read it with tears in my eyes. When I clicked on the link for that beautiful quilt, the tears spilled over. Such a beautiful artistic rendition of an ugly event in America’s history. I loved the doves rising up from the Twin Towers.
    Being able to see war unfold before our television eyes makes it so very real. I remember when Operation Desert Storm began. The president of the large company I worked for turned on the big TV in the conference room and left it on for several days, allowing employees to stop and watch whenever they wished. That first day, a group of us stood in the doorway, watching in speechless fascination and horror. Nobody talked. There were no words to express what we were seeing in real time. It made war very real for me.
    Jo, you must be very proud to have your quote be so widely used. It is a beautiful sentiment.

    Reply
  42. Sherrie here. Jo, your post was touching in so many ways. I read it with tears in my eyes. When I clicked on the link for that beautiful quilt, the tears spilled over. Such a beautiful artistic rendition of an ugly event in America’s history. I loved the doves rising up from the Twin Towers.
    Being able to see war unfold before our television eyes makes it so very real. I remember when Operation Desert Storm began. The president of the large company I worked for turned on the big TV in the conference room and left it on for several days, allowing employees to stop and watch whenever they wished. That first day, a group of us stood in the doorway, watching in speechless fascination and horror. Nobody talked. There were no words to express what we were seeing in real time. It made war very real for me.
    Jo, you must be very proud to have your quote be so widely used. It is a beautiful sentiment.

    Reply
  43. Sherrie here. Jo, your post was touching in so many ways. I read it with tears in my eyes. When I clicked on the link for that beautiful quilt, the tears spilled over. Such a beautiful artistic rendition of an ugly event in America’s history. I loved the doves rising up from the Twin Towers.
    Being able to see war unfold before our television eyes makes it so very real. I remember when Operation Desert Storm began. The president of the large company I worked for turned on the big TV in the conference room and left it on for several days, allowing employees to stop and watch whenever they wished. That first day, a group of us stood in the doorway, watching in speechless fascination and horror. Nobody talked. There were no words to express what we were seeing in real time. It made war very real for me.
    Jo, you must be very proud to have your quote be so widely used. It is a beautiful sentiment.

    Reply
  44. Sherrie here. Jo, your post was touching in so many ways. I read it with tears in my eyes. When I clicked on the link for that beautiful quilt, the tears spilled over. Such a beautiful artistic rendition of an ugly event in America’s history. I loved the doves rising up from the Twin Towers.
    Being able to see war unfold before our television eyes makes it so very real. I remember when Operation Desert Storm began. The president of the large company I worked for turned on the big TV in the conference room and left it on for several days, allowing employees to stop and watch whenever they wished. That first day, a group of us stood in the doorway, watching in speechless fascination and horror. Nobody talked. There were no words to express what we were seeing in real time. It made war very real for me.
    Jo, you must be very proud to have your quote be so widely used. It is a beautiful sentiment.

    Reply
  45. Sherrie here. Jo, your post was touching in so many ways. I read it with tears in my eyes. When I clicked on the link for that beautiful quilt, the tears spilled over. Such a beautiful artistic rendition of an ugly event in America’s history. I loved the doves rising up from the Twin Towers.
    Being able to see war unfold before our television eyes makes it so very real. I remember when Operation Desert Storm began. The president of the large company I worked for turned on the big TV in the conference room and left it on for several days, allowing employees to stop and watch whenever they wished. That first day, a group of us stood in the doorway, watching in speechless fascination and horror. Nobody talked. There were no words to express what we were seeing in real time. It made war very real for me.
    Jo, you must be very proud to have your quote be so widely used. It is a beautiful sentiment.

    Reply
  46. Thank you. I LOVED the Rogues series and Dare was a favorite.
    I remembered being a child and seeing/hearing my mom take the phone call that my brother had been killed in 1969. He wasn’t killed in Viet Nam, but he was training pilots to go over there. The Christmas before, he told me he should be there, rather than being safe at home.
    I also remember being in a hotel room, when a friend got a call that we were to watch the TV at a certain time by another friend with military connections. We turned it on just in time to see the opening salvos of Operation Desert Storm.
    Too many fine men and women have fallen as a result of war and violence. I hope by bringing our real feelings into our writing we can ease the pain of the survivors. Thanks again. juleejadams at gmail dot com

    Reply
  47. Thank you. I LOVED the Rogues series and Dare was a favorite.
    I remembered being a child and seeing/hearing my mom take the phone call that my brother had been killed in 1969. He wasn’t killed in Viet Nam, but he was training pilots to go over there. The Christmas before, he told me he should be there, rather than being safe at home.
    I also remember being in a hotel room, when a friend got a call that we were to watch the TV at a certain time by another friend with military connections. We turned it on just in time to see the opening salvos of Operation Desert Storm.
    Too many fine men and women have fallen as a result of war and violence. I hope by bringing our real feelings into our writing we can ease the pain of the survivors. Thanks again. juleejadams at gmail dot com

    Reply
  48. Thank you. I LOVED the Rogues series and Dare was a favorite.
    I remembered being a child and seeing/hearing my mom take the phone call that my brother had been killed in 1969. He wasn’t killed in Viet Nam, but he was training pilots to go over there. The Christmas before, he told me he should be there, rather than being safe at home.
    I also remember being in a hotel room, when a friend got a call that we were to watch the TV at a certain time by another friend with military connections. We turned it on just in time to see the opening salvos of Operation Desert Storm.
    Too many fine men and women have fallen as a result of war and violence. I hope by bringing our real feelings into our writing we can ease the pain of the survivors. Thanks again. juleejadams at gmail dot com

    Reply
  49. Thank you. I LOVED the Rogues series and Dare was a favorite.
    I remembered being a child and seeing/hearing my mom take the phone call that my brother had been killed in 1969. He wasn’t killed in Viet Nam, but he was training pilots to go over there. The Christmas before, he told me he should be there, rather than being safe at home.
    I also remember being in a hotel room, when a friend got a call that we were to watch the TV at a certain time by another friend with military connections. We turned it on just in time to see the opening salvos of Operation Desert Storm.
    Too many fine men and women have fallen as a result of war and violence. I hope by bringing our real feelings into our writing we can ease the pain of the survivors. Thanks again. juleejadams at gmail dot com

    Reply
  50. Thank you. I LOVED the Rogues series and Dare was a favorite.
    I remembered being a child and seeing/hearing my mom take the phone call that my brother had been killed in 1969. He wasn’t killed in Viet Nam, but he was training pilots to go over there. The Christmas before, he told me he should be there, rather than being safe at home.
    I also remember being in a hotel room, when a friend got a call that we were to watch the TV at a certain time by another friend with military connections. We turned it on just in time to see the opening salvos of Operation Desert Storm.
    Too many fine men and women have fallen as a result of war and violence. I hope by bringing our real feelings into our writing we can ease the pain of the survivors. Thanks again. juleejadams at gmail dot com

    Reply
  51. Amazing post, Jo and that quilt is a work of art. I am not surprised that Nicholas’s quote is used so often as it captures the essence of the “war at home” to perfection. My father served in the Army in Korea and in the Air Force in Vietnam. He only ever talked about it one time. I had to interview a veteran for an American History assignment in high school. I don’t think I ever realized what an amazing man my father was until that interview.

    Reply
  52. Amazing post, Jo and that quilt is a work of art. I am not surprised that Nicholas’s quote is used so often as it captures the essence of the “war at home” to perfection. My father served in the Army in Korea and in the Air Force in Vietnam. He only ever talked about it one time. I had to interview a veteran for an American History assignment in high school. I don’t think I ever realized what an amazing man my father was until that interview.

    Reply
  53. Amazing post, Jo and that quilt is a work of art. I am not surprised that Nicholas’s quote is used so often as it captures the essence of the “war at home” to perfection. My father served in the Army in Korea and in the Air Force in Vietnam. He only ever talked about it one time. I had to interview a veteran for an American History assignment in high school. I don’t think I ever realized what an amazing man my father was until that interview.

    Reply
  54. Amazing post, Jo and that quilt is a work of art. I am not surprised that Nicholas’s quote is used so often as it captures the essence of the “war at home” to perfection. My father served in the Army in Korea and in the Air Force in Vietnam. He only ever talked about it one time. I had to interview a veteran for an American History assignment in high school. I don’t think I ever realized what an amazing man my father was until that interview.

    Reply
  55. Amazing post, Jo and that quilt is a work of art. I am not surprised that Nicholas’s quote is used so often as it captures the essence of the “war at home” to perfection. My father served in the Army in Korea and in the Air Force in Vietnam. He only ever talked about it one time. I had to interview a veteran for an American History assignment in high school. I don’t think I ever realized what an amazing man my father was until that interview.

    Reply
  56. I’ll be watching for the re-release. It sounds like a great story.
    I remember the Gulf War coverage and being mesmerized by it. And, had forgotten that there really wasn’t internet available. I don’t know if it was worse to be glued to the screen watching events unfold or if it would be worse waiting to hear via letter.
    Those casualty lists are stupendous. And, somewhere there was a blurb that this was only representing 5% of the total men at the battle (only officer ranks). Wonder if there are any lists on the enlisted casualties beyond estimated losses. Can you imagine having to write the letters to the families? Did enlisted men’s families even get letters? This is a particularly poignant topic because I am in the middle of a Spanish Bride re-read with some 95th Rifles history books as references. Some of those names become more than just names… Did I miss seeing Fitzroy Somerset on the casualty lists? So, perhaps not a complete listing afterall? And, what are half-pay officers doing in the middle of the fight? (sorry repressed historian gene springs out with more questions –don’t expect you to answer but these things just struck me in glancing through the lists).

    Reply
  57. I’ll be watching for the re-release. It sounds like a great story.
    I remember the Gulf War coverage and being mesmerized by it. And, had forgotten that there really wasn’t internet available. I don’t know if it was worse to be glued to the screen watching events unfold or if it would be worse waiting to hear via letter.
    Those casualty lists are stupendous. And, somewhere there was a blurb that this was only representing 5% of the total men at the battle (only officer ranks). Wonder if there are any lists on the enlisted casualties beyond estimated losses. Can you imagine having to write the letters to the families? Did enlisted men’s families even get letters? This is a particularly poignant topic because I am in the middle of a Spanish Bride re-read with some 95th Rifles history books as references. Some of those names become more than just names… Did I miss seeing Fitzroy Somerset on the casualty lists? So, perhaps not a complete listing afterall? And, what are half-pay officers doing in the middle of the fight? (sorry repressed historian gene springs out with more questions –don’t expect you to answer but these things just struck me in glancing through the lists).

    Reply
  58. I’ll be watching for the re-release. It sounds like a great story.
    I remember the Gulf War coverage and being mesmerized by it. And, had forgotten that there really wasn’t internet available. I don’t know if it was worse to be glued to the screen watching events unfold or if it would be worse waiting to hear via letter.
    Those casualty lists are stupendous. And, somewhere there was a blurb that this was only representing 5% of the total men at the battle (only officer ranks). Wonder if there are any lists on the enlisted casualties beyond estimated losses. Can you imagine having to write the letters to the families? Did enlisted men’s families even get letters? This is a particularly poignant topic because I am in the middle of a Spanish Bride re-read with some 95th Rifles history books as references. Some of those names become more than just names… Did I miss seeing Fitzroy Somerset on the casualty lists? So, perhaps not a complete listing afterall? And, what are half-pay officers doing in the middle of the fight? (sorry repressed historian gene springs out with more questions –don’t expect you to answer but these things just struck me in glancing through the lists).

    Reply
  59. I’ll be watching for the re-release. It sounds like a great story.
    I remember the Gulf War coverage and being mesmerized by it. And, had forgotten that there really wasn’t internet available. I don’t know if it was worse to be glued to the screen watching events unfold or if it would be worse waiting to hear via letter.
    Those casualty lists are stupendous. And, somewhere there was a blurb that this was only representing 5% of the total men at the battle (only officer ranks). Wonder if there are any lists on the enlisted casualties beyond estimated losses. Can you imagine having to write the letters to the families? Did enlisted men’s families even get letters? This is a particularly poignant topic because I am in the middle of a Spanish Bride re-read with some 95th Rifles history books as references. Some of those names become more than just names… Did I miss seeing Fitzroy Somerset on the casualty lists? So, perhaps not a complete listing afterall? And, what are half-pay officers doing in the middle of the fight? (sorry repressed historian gene springs out with more questions –don’t expect you to answer but these things just struck me in glancing through the lists).

    Reply
  60. I’ll be watching for the re-release. It sounds like a great story.
    I remember the Gulf War coverage and being mesmerized by it. And, had forgotten that there really wasn’t internet available. I don’t know if it was worse to be glued to the screen watching events unfold or if it would be worse waiting to hear via letter.
    Those casualty lists are stupendous. And, somewhere there was a blurb that this was only representing 5% of the total men at the battle (only officer ranks). Wonder if there are any lists on the enlisted casualties beyond estimated losses. Can you imagine having to write the letters to the families? Did enlisted men’s families even get letters? This is a particularly poignant topic because I am in the middle of a Spanish Bride re-read with some 95th Rifles history books as references. Some of those names become more than just names… Did I miss seeing Fitzroy Somerset on the casualty lists? So, perhaps not a complete listing afterall? And, what are half-pay officers doing in the middle of the fight? (sorry repressed historian gene springs out with more questions –don’t expect you to answer but these things just struck me in glancing through the lists).

    Reply
  61. Wonderful post, Jo, and that toast by Nicholas is beautiful, as is that quilt. In country towns here, as well as various memorials to the fallen, there is often an “Avenue of Honour” lined with trees, one for each soldier.

    Reply
  62. Wonderful post, Jo, and that toast by Nicholas is beautiful, as is that quilt. In country towns here, as well as various memorials to the fallen, there is often an “Avenue of Honour” lined with trees, one for each soldier.

    Reply
  63. Wonderful post, Jo, and that toast by Nicholas is beautiful, as is that quilt. In country towns here, as well as various memorials to the fallen, there is often an “Avenue of Honour” lined with trees, one for each soldier.

    Reply
  64. Wonderful post, Jo, and that toast by Nicholas is beautiful, as is that quilt. In country towns here, as well as various memorials to the fallen, there is often an “Avenue of Honour” lined with trees, one for each soldier.

    Reply
  65. Wonderful post, Jo, and that toast by Nicholas is beautiful, as is that quilt. In country towns here, as well as various memorials to the fallen, there is often an “Avenue of Honour” lined with trees, one for each soldier.

    Reply
  66. Dee, I assume the half pay officers were those who’d been put on half pay in 1814 when everyone thought they had peace. A large part of the active army was sent to North America to the trouble there, so when Napoleon returned and it became clear there would be a battle, there was no time to bring them back.
    The call went out for experienced officers to return to active service — men such as Con Somerford, Lord Amleigh — and they responded. There probably wasn’t time to do the paperwork to get them formally back in the regiments.
    A lot of civilian gentlemen rushed to help, too, but the army didn’t really want them because they had no experience or training.
    Jo

    Reply
  67. Dee, I assume the half pay officers were those who’d been put on half pay in 1814 when everyone thought they had peace. A large part of the active army was sent to North America to the trouble there, so when Napoleon returned and it became clear there would be a battle, there was no time to bring them back.
    The call went out for experienced officers to return to active service — men such as Con Somerford, Lord Amleigh — and they responded. There probably wasn’t time to do the paperwork to get them formally back in the regiments.
    A lot of civilian gentlemen rushed to help, too, but the army didn’t really want them because they had no experience or training.
    Jo

    Reply
  68. Dee, I assume the half pay officers were those who’d been put on half pay in 1814 when everyone thought they had peace. A large part of the active army was sent to North America to the trouble there, so when Napoleon returned and it became clear there would be a battle, there was no time to bring them back.
    The call went out for experienced officers to return to active service — men such as Con Somerford, Lord Amleigh — and they responded. There probably wasn’t time to do the paperwork to get them formally back in the regiments.
    A lot of civilian gentlemen rushed to help, too, but the army didn’t really want them because they had no experience or training.
    Jo

    Reply
  69. Dee, I assume the half pay officers were those who’d been put on half pay in 1814 when everyone thought they had peace. A large part of the active army was sent to North America to the trouble there, so when Napoleon returned and it became clear there would be a battle, there was no time to bring them back.
    The call went out for experienced officers to return to active service — men such as Con Somerford, Lord Amleigh — and they responded. There probably wasn’t time to do the paperwork to get them formally back in the regiments.
    A lot of civilian gentlemen rushed to help, too, but the army didn’t really want them because they had no experience or training.
    Jo

    Reply
  70. Dee, I assume the half pay officers were those who’d been put on half pay in 1814 when everyone thought they had peace. A large part of the active army was sent to North America to the trouble there, so when Napoleon returned and it became clear there would be a battle, there was no time to bring them back.
    The call went out for experienced officers to return to active service — men such as Con Somerford, Lord Amleigh — and they responded. There probably wasn’t time to do the paperwork to get them formally back in the regiments.
    A lot of civilian gentlemen rushed to help, too, but the army didn’t really want them because they had no experience or training.
    Jo

    Reply
  71. I wept into my tea as I read your post, Jo. What an extraordianry honor to have your words used in such ways.
    I’ve already resolved not to watch/read any of the 9/11 coverage. I made the mistake of reading the latest New York Magazine as I traveled last weekend and it all seems much too fresh.

    Reply
  72. I wept into my tea as I read your post, Jo. What an extraordianry honor to have your words used in such ways.
    I’ve already resolved not to watch/read any of the 9/11 coverage. I made the mistake of reading the latest New York Magazine as I traveled last weekend and it all seems much too fresh.

    Reply
  73. I wept into my tea as I read your post, Jo. What an extraordianry honor to have your words used in such ways.
    I’ve already resolved not to watch/read any of the 9/11 coverage. I made the mistake of reading the latest New York Magazine as I traveled last weekend and it all seems much too fresh.

    Reply
  74. I wept into my tea as I read your post, Jo. What an extraordianry honor to have your words used in such ways.
    I’ve already resolved not to watch/read any of the 9/11 coverage. I made the mistake of reading the latest New York Magazine as I traveled last weekend and it all seems much too fresh.

    Reply
  75. I wept into my tea as I read your post, Jo. What an extraordianry honor to have your words used in such ways.
    I’ve already resolved not to watch/read any of the 9/11 coverage. I made the mistake of reading the latest New York Magazine as I traveled last weekend and it all seems much too fresh.

    Reply
  76. Jo, I wrote a post on memorable moments in romance novels that are not part of the romance at Heroes and Heartbreakers last week. Nicholas’s toast was #1 on my list. It has remained vivid and heart-stirring since I read An Unwilling Bride the first time shortly after its release. One of the reasons the book is on my list of all-time favorites is that it contains one of the most poignant moments in my romance reading (the toast) and one of the moments that earns my biggest smile (Belcraven meeting the motley crew in all their costumed glory).

    Reply
  77. Jo, I wrote a post on memorable moments in romance novels that are not part of the romance at Heroes and Heartbreakers last week. Nicholas’s toast was #1 on my list. It has remained vivid and heart-stirring since I read An Unwilling Bride the first time shortly after its release. One of the reasons the book is on my list of all-time favorites is that it contains one of the most poignant moments in my romance reading (the toast) and one of the moments that earns my biggest smile (Belcraven meeting the motley crew in all their costumed glory).

    Reply
  78. Jo, I wrote a post on memorable moments in romance novels that are not part of the romance at Heroes and Heartbreakers last week. Nicholas’s toast was #1 on my list. It has remained vivid and heart-stirring since I read An Unwilling Bride the first time shortly after its release. One of the reasons the book is on my list of all-time favorites is that it contains one of the most poignant moments in my romance reading (the toast) and one of the moments that earns my biggest smile (Belcraven meeting the motley crew in all their costumed glory).

    Reply
  79. Jo, I wrote a post on memorable moments in romance novels that are not part of the romance at Heroes and Heartbreakers last week. Nicholas’s toast was #1 on my list. It has remained vivid and heart-stirring since I read An Unwilling Bride the first time shortly after its release. One of the reasons the book is on my list of all-time favorites is that it contains one of the most poignant moments in my romance reading (the toast) and one of the moments that earns my biggest smile (Belcraven meeting the motley crew in all their costumed glory).

    Reply
  80. Jo, I wrote a post on memorable moments in romance novels that are not part of the romance at Heroes and Heartbreakers last week. Nicholas’s toast was #1 on my list. It has remained vivid and heart-stirring since I read An Unwilling Bride the first time shortly after its release. One of the reasons the book is on my list of all-time favorites is that it contains one of the most poignant moments in my romance reading (the toast) and one of the moments that earns my biggest smile (Belcraven meeting the motley crew in all their costumed glory).

    Reply
  81. Hi, Jo. Thanks so much for sharing my quilt with your readers. (I would remark upon their intelligence and sensitivity, but as a fan myself, that would be immodest =cough=.)
    Thanks also to all those who have mentioned my quilt. “Golden Door” was in an Empire Quilters guild show in Manhattan in early 2002, but other than that it’s been stored away, and I’m so grateful to Jo for remembering it and posting it. It came to me in a burst of inspiration; I literally stayed up all night before the show deadline finishing it.
    For the quilters among you: There are six fabrics forming the sky, plus the background of the city–which I fudged by adding in some of Chicago because the repeat was too small! The sun, doves, and quote were ironed on; I wish I still had some of those fabrics, but they went to a good cause.
    I think Jo’s lines deserve to be widely known and I hope they pass into the culture through every possible medium, like quilts.
    Very best wishes,
    Suzie Elliott

    Reply
  82. Hi, Jo. Thanks so much for sharing my quilt with your readers. (I would remark upon their intelligence and sensitivity, but as a fan myself, that would be immodest =cough=.)
    Thanks also to all those who have mentioned my quilt. “Golden Door” was in an Empire Quilters guild show in Manhattan in early 2002, but other than that it’s been stored away, and I’m so grateful to Jo for remembering it and posting it. It came to me in a burst of inspiration; I literally stayed up all night before the show deadline finishing it.
    For the quilters among you: There are six fabrics forming the sky, plus the background of the city–which I fudged by adding in some of Chicago because the repeat was too small! The sun, doves, and quote were ironed on; I wish I still had some of those fabrics, but they went to a good cause.
    I think Jo’s lines deserve to be widely known and I hope they pass into the culture through every possible medium, like quilts.
    Very best wishes,
    Suzie Elliott

    Reply
  83. Hi, Jo. Thanks so much for sharing my quilt with your readers. (I would remark upon their intelligence and sensitivity, but as a fan myself, that would be immodest =cough=.)
    Thanks also to all those who have mentioned my quilt. “Golden Door” was in an Empire Quilters guild show in Manhattan in early 2002, but other than that it’s been stored away, and I’m so grateful to Jo for remembering it and posting it. It came to me in a burst of inspiration; I literally stayed up all night before the show deadline finishing it.
    For the quilters among you: There are six fabrics forming the sky, plus the background of the city–which I fudged by adding in some of Chicago because the repeat was too small! The sun, doves, and quote were ironed on; I wish I still had some of those fabrics, but they went to a good cause.
    I think Jo’s lines deserve to be widely known and I hope they pass into the culture through every possible medium, like quilts.
    Very best wishes,
    Suzie Elliott

    Reply
  84. Hi, Jo. Thanks so much for sharing my quilt with your readers. (I would remark upon their intelligence and sensitivity, but as a fan myself, that would be immodest =cough=.)
    Thanks also to all those who have mentioned my quilt. “Golden Door” was in an Empire Quilters guild show in Manhattan in early 2002, but other than that it’s been stored away, and I’m so grateful to Jo for remembering it and posting it. It came to me in a burst of inspiration; I literally stayed up all night before the show deadline finishing it.
    For the quilters among you: There are six fabrics forming the sky, plus the background of the city–which I fudged by adding in some of Chicago because the repeat was too small! The sun, doves, and quote were ironed on; I wish I still had some of those fabrics, but they went to a good cause.
    I think Jo’s lines deserve to be widely known and I hope they pass into the culture through every possible medium, like quilts.
    Very best wishes,
    Suzie Elliott

    Reply
  85. Hi, Jo. Thanks so much for sharing my quilt with your readers. (I would remark upon their intelligence and sensitivity, but as a fan myself, that would be immodest =cough=.)
    Thanks also to all those who have mentioned my quilt. “Golden Door” was in an Empire Quilters guild show in Manhattan in early 2002, but other than that it’s been stored away, and I’m so grateful to Jo for remembering it and posting it. It came to me in a burst of inspiration; I literally stayed up all night before the show deadline finishing it.
    For the quilters among you: There are six fabrics forming the sky, plus the background of the city–which I fudged by adding in some of Chicago because the repeat was too small! The sun, doves, and quote were ironed on; I wish I still had some of those fabrics, but they went to a good cause.
    I think Jo’s lines deserve to be widely known and I hope they pass into the culture through every possible medium, like quilts.
    Very best wishes,
    Suzie Elliott

    Reply
  86. If Nicholas’ toast is extremely moving, what brings me to tears every time I read it is the last sentences in “The Trouble With Heroes”. Trouble is Jo’s entry in the ‘Irresistible Forces’ anthology, a science-fiction story – but the SF is ever so secondary, a disguise, really, about how a society sends people to fight its wars and then would rather they slip conveniently away, only to be remembered in street names.
    “The trouble with heroes is that they want to come home. But home needs its heroes, and home is also their just reward.”
    Home is their just reward.

    Reply
  87. If Nicholas’ toast is extremely moving, what brings me to tears every time I read it is the last sentences in “The Trouble With Heroes”. Trouble is Jo’s entry in the ‘Irresistible Forces’ anthology, a science-fiction story – but the SF is ever so secondary, a disguise, really, about how a society sends people to fight its wars and then would rather they slip conveniently away, only to be remembered in street names.
    “The trouble with heroes is that they want to come home. But home needs its heroes, and home is also their just reward.”
    Home is their just reward.

    Reply
  88. If Nicholas’ toast is extremely moving, what brings me to tears every time I read it is the last sentences in “The Trouble With Heroes”. Trouble is Jo’s entry in the ‘Irresistible Forces’ anthology, a science-fiction story – but the SF is ever so secondary, a disguise, really, about how a society sends people to fight its wars and then would rather they slip conveniently away, only to be remembered in street names.
    “The trouble with heroes is that they want to come home. But home needs its heroes, and home is also their just reward.”
    Home is their just reward.

    Reply
  89. If Nicholas’ toast is extremely moving, what brings me to tears every time I read it is the last sentences in “The Trouble With Heroes”. Trouble is Jo’s entry in the ‘Irresistible Forces’ anthology, a science-fiction story – but the SF is ever so secondary, a disguise, really, about how a society sends people to fight its wars and then would rather they slip conveniently away, only to be remembered in street names.
    “The trouble with heroes is that they want to come home. But home needs its heroes, and home is also their just reward.”
    Home is their just reward.

    Reply
  90. If Nicholas’ toast is extremely moving, what brings me to tears every time I read it is the last sentences in “The Trouble With Heroes”. Trouble is Jo’s entry in the ‘Irresistible Forces’ anthology, a science-fiction story – but the SF is ever so secondary, a disguise, really, about how a society sends people to fight its wars and then would rather they slip conveniently away, only to be remembered in street names.
    “The trouble with heroes is that they want to come home. But home needs its heroes, and home is also their just reward.”
    Home is their just reward.

    Reply
  91. Thanks for dropping by, Suzie, and for creating such a lovely quilt.
    Thanks for the comment, Helene. I have a thing about heroes, I think, and the very complex demands we make on them. That was a special story for me.
    Jo

    Reply
  92. Thanks for dropping by, Suzie, and for creating such a lovely quilt.
    Thanks for the comment, Helene. I have a thing about heroes, I think, and the very complex demands we make on them. That was a special story for me.
    Jo

    Reply
  93. Thanks for dropping by, Suzie, and for creating such a lovely quilt.
    Thanks for the comment, Helene. I have a thing about heroes, I think, and the very complex demands we make on them. That was a special story for me.
    Jo

    Reply
  94. Thanks for dropping by, Suzie, and for creating such a lovely quilt.
    Thanks for the comment, Helene. I have a thing about heroes, I think, and the very complex demands we make on them. That was a special story for me.
    Jo

    Reply
  95. Thanks for dropping by, Suzie, and for creating such a lovely quilt.
    Thanks for the comment, Helene. I have a thing about heroes, I think, and the very complex demands we make on them. That was a special story for me.
    Jo

    Reply
  96. I have not read An Unwilling Bride but will be looking for it. What an honor to have your words used. I hate the thought of war but we have lived with wars going on I guess since the beginning of time. I guess its just a fact of life that we will live with. My father was in war war II I think he went in toward the end.

    Reply
  97. I have not read An Unwilling Bride but will be looking for it. What an honor to have your words used. I hate the thought of war but we have lived with wars going on I guess since the beginning of time. I guess its just a fact of life that we will live with. My father was in war war II I think he went in toward the end.

    Reply
  98. I have not read An Unwilling Bride but will be looking for it. What an honor to have your words used. I hate the thought of war but we have lived with wars going on I guess since the beginning of time. I guess its just a fact of life that we will live with. My father was in war war II I think he went in toward the end.

    Reply
  99. I have not read An Unwilling Bride but will be looking for it. What an honor to have your words used. I hate the thought of war but we have lived with wars going on I guess since the beginning of time. I guess its just a fact of life that we will live with. My father was in war war II I think he went in toward the end.

    Reply
  100. I have not read An Unwilling Bride but will be looking for it. What an honor to have your words used. I hate the thought of war but we have lived with wars going on I guess since the beginning of time. I guess its just a fact of life that we will live with. My father was in war war II I think he went in toward the end.

    Reply
  101. I love the rogue series, and An Unwilling Bride is one of my favorites. With respect to casualty lists only listing officers, I am reminded of a line from Much Ado about Nothing, which opens with returning soldiers. When asked if any were lost in battle, the messenger replies, “but few of any kind, and none of name.” I love that play, but that line brings me up short every time I read it.

    Reply
  102. I love the rogue series, and An Unwilling Bride is one of my favorites. With respect to casualty lists only listing officers, I am reminded of a line from Much Ado about Nothing, which opens with returning soldiers. When asked if any were lost in battle, the messenger replies, “but few of any kind, and none of name.” I love that play, but that line brings me up short every time I read it.

    Reply
  103. I love the rogue series, and An Unwilling Bride is one of my favorites. With respect to casualty lists only listing officers, I am reminded of a line from Much Ado about Nothing, which opens with returning soldiers. When asked if any were lost in battle, the messenger replies, “but few of any kind, and none of name.” I love that play, but that line brings me up short every time I read it.

    Reply
  104. I love the rogue series, and An Unwilling Bride is one of my favorites. With respect to casualty lists only listing officers, I am reminded of a line from Much Ado about Nothing, which opens with returning soldiers. When asked if any were lost in battle, the messenger replies, “but few of any kind, and none of name.” I love that play, but that line brings me up short every time I read it.

    Reply
  105. I love the rogue series, and An Unwilling Bride is one of my favorites. With respect to casualty lists only listing officers, I am reminded of a line from Much Ado about Nothing, which opens with returning soldiers. When asked if any were lost in battle, the messenger replies, “but few of any kind, and none of name.” I love that play, but that line brings me up short every time I read it.

    Reply
  106. An Unwilling Bride was the second book of Jo’s that I had read, and the one that put her on my “seek out” list.
    I had already read An Arranged Marriage and realized that she was writing a series.
    Jo, I have to say that the excellent picture on the original cover is what drew me to the book. And it so closely reflects the scene you had written that it really stayed with me.
    I am happy to see Nicolas’ words used in current context. They really bring to mind the consequences of war, something that is all too often glossed over in “patriotism” and “glory”.

    Reply
  107. An Unwilling Bride was the second book of Jo’s that I had read, and the one that put her on my “seek out” list.
    I had already read An Arranged Marriage and realized that she was writing a series.
    Jo, I have to say that the excellent picture on the original cover is what drew me to the book. And it so closely reflects the scene you had written that it really stayed with me.
    I am happy to see Nicolas’ words used in current context. They really bring to mind the consequences of war, something that is all too often glossed over in “patriotism” and “glory”.

    Reply
  108. An Unwilling Bride was the second book of Jo’s that I had read, and the one that put her on my “seek out” list.
    I had already read An Arranged Marriage and realized that she was writing a series.
    Jo, I have to say that the excellent picture on the original cover is what drew me to the book. And it so closely reflects the scene you had written that it really stayed with me.
    I am happy to see Nicolas’ words used in current context. They really bring to mind the consequences of war, something that is all too often glossed over in “patriotism” and “glory”.

    Reply
  109. An Unwilling Bride was the second book of Jo’s that I had read, and the one that put her on my “seek out” list.
    I had already read An Arranged Marriage and realized that she was writing a series.
    Jo, I have to say that the excellent picture on the original cover is what drew me to the book. And it so closely reflects the scene you had written that it really stayed with me.
    I am happy to see Nicolas’ words used in current context. They really bring to mind the consequences of war, something that is all too often glossed over in “patriotism” and “glory”.

    Reply
  110. An Unwilling Bride was the second book of Jo’s that I had read, and the one that put her on my “seek out” list.
    I had already read An Arranged Marriage and realized that she was writing a series.
    Jo, I have to say that the excellent picture on the original cover is what drew me to the book. And it so closely reflects the scene you had written that it really stayed with me.
    I am happy to see Nicolas’ words used in current context. They really bring to mind the consequences of war, something that is all too often glossed over in “patriotism” and “glory”.

    Reply
  111. Hello Jo. I followed the link from your newsletter. Thx for the interesting post – Nicholas’ toast is something that is as relevant today as it was in 1815 (or 1991!).
    My question is just slightly off topic. I have read and loved all of your Rogues books (as well as many others of course) and Nicholas remains a favourite. You refer in your post to Nicholas using his amorous skills – I was in a mini-debate recently about this very thing. I had always thought that he had dated and wooed the evil villainess witch but not actually cheated on Eleanor but another poster said, no I was wrong, he totally cheated, but it was “for England” and so he got a pass. Is that right? I had always thought he went to maybe 2nd base but not all the way. Was I just reading through rose coloured glasses?

    Reply
  112. Hello Jo. I followed the link from your newsletter. Thx for the interesting post – Nicholas’ toast is something that is as relevant today as it was in 1815 (or 1991!).
    My question is just slightly off topic. I have read and loved all of your Rogues books (as well as many others of course) and Nicholas remains a favourite. You refer in your post to Nicholas using his amorous skills – I was in a mini-debate recently about this very thing. I had always thought that he had dated and wooed the evil villainess witch but not actually cheated on Eleanor but another poster said, no I was wrong, he totally cheated, but it was “for England” and so he got a pass. Is that right? I had always thought he went to maybe 2nd base but not all the way. Was I just reading through rose coloured glasses?

    Reply
  113. Hello Jo. I followed the link from your newsletter. Thx for the interesting post – Nicholas’ toast is something that is as relevant today as it was in 1815 (or 1991!).
    My question is just slightly off topic. I have read and loved all of your Rogues books (as well as many others of course) and Nicholas remains a favourite. You refer in your post to Nicholas using his amorous skills – I was in a mini-debate recently about this very thing. I had always thought that he had dated and wooed the evil villainess witch but not actually cheated on Eleanor but another poster said, no I was wrong, he totally cheated, but it was “for England” and so he got a pass. Is that right? I had always thought he went to maybe 2nd base but not all the way. Was I just reading through rose coloured glasses?

    Reply
  114. Hello Jo. I followed the link from your newsletter. Thx for the interesting post – Nicholas’ toast is something that is as relevant today as it was in 1815 (or 1991!).
    My question is just slightly off topic. I have read and loved all of your Rogues books (as well as many others of course) and Nicholas remains a favourite. You refer in your post to Nicholas using his amorous skills – I was in a mini-debate recently about this very thing. I had always thought that he had dated and wooed the evil villainess witch but not actually cheated on Eleanor but another poster said, no I was wrong, he totally cheated, but it was “for England” and so he got a pass. Is that right? I had always thought he went to maybe 2nd base but not all the way. Was I just reading through rose coloured glasses?

    Reply
  115. Hello Jo. I followed the link from your newsletter. Thx for the interesting post – Nicholas’ toast is something that is as relevant today as it was in 1815 (or 1991!).
    My question is just slightly off topic. I have read and loved all of your Rogues books (as well as many others of course) and Nicholas remains a favourite. You refer in your post to Nicholas using his amorous skills – I was in a mini-debate recently about this very thing. I had always thought that he had dated and wooed the evil villainess witch but not actually cheated on Eleanor but another poster said, no I was wrong, he totally cheated, but it was “for England” and so he got a pass. Is that right? I had always thought he went to maybe 2nd base but not all the way. Was I just reading through rose coloured glasses?

    Reply
  116. Hi Kaetrin, your friend is right. Nicholas is playing the part of Therese’s lover because that’s the only way to get the names of the traitors, and he’d been doing that before the wedding. She wouldn’t put up with half measures, and I imply that she’s very, and very kinkily, demanding. And of course, that he’s not enjoying it.
    SPOILER follows
    As we find out, she’s playing a deep game and enjoying tormenting him because he’s the one man who walked away from her.

    Reply
  117. Hi Kaetrin, your friend is right. Nicholas is playing the part of Therese’s lover because that’s the only way to get the names of the traitors, and he’d been doing that before the wedding. She wouldn’t put up with half measures, and I imply that she’s very, and very kinkily, demanding. And of course, that he’s not enjoying it.
    SPOILER follows
    As we find out, she’s playing a deep game and enjoying tormenting him because he’s the one man who walked away from her.

    Reply
  118. Hi Kaetrin, your friend is right. Nicholas is playing the part of Therese’s lover because that’s the only way to get the names of the traitors, and he’d been doing that before the wedding. She wouldn’t put up with half measures, and I imply that she’s very, and very kinkily, demanding. And of course, that he’s not enjoying it.
    SPOILER follows
    As we find out, she’s playing a deep game and enjoying tormenting him because he’s the one man who walked away from her.

    Reply
  119. Hi Kaetrin, your friend is right. Nicholas is playing the part of Therese’s lover because that’s the only way to get the names of the traitors, and he’d been doing that before the wedding. She wouldn’t put up with half measures, and I imply that she’s very, and very kinkily, demanding. And of course, that he’s not enjoying it.
    SPOILER follows
    As we find out, she’s playing a deep game and enjoying tormenting him because he’s the one man who walked away from her.

    Reply
  120. Hi Kaetrin, your friend is right. Nicholas is playing the part of Therese’s lover because that’s the only way to get the names of the traitors, and he’d been doing that before the wedding. She wouldn’t put up with half measures, and I imply that she’s very, and very kinkily, demanding. And of course, that he’s not enjoying it.
    SPOILER follows
    As we find out, she’s playing a deep game and enjoying tormenting him because he’s the one man who walked away from her.

    Reply
  121. This has been a favorite book with me for years (but saying favorite book is like choosing a “favorite child”)
    What a beautiful post and how timely reading this is as my mother (age 93) married 50 yrs widowed 23 longs to go back to her husband (my dad) and she just entered hospice!
    This gives me hope that someday people will see the absolute futility of war!

    Reply
  122. This has been a favorite book with me for years (but saying favorite book is like choosing a “favorite child”)
    What a beautiful post and how timely reading this is as my mother (age 93) married 50 yrs widowed 23 longs to go back to her husband (my dad) and she just entered hospice!
    This gives me hope that someday people will see the absolute futility of war!

    Reply
  123. This has been a favorite book with me for years (but saying favorite book is like choosing a “favorite child”)
    What a beautiful post and how timely reading this is as my mother (age 93) married 50 yrs widowed 23 longs to go back to her husband (my dad) and she just entered hospice!
    This gives me hope that someday people will see the absolute futility of war!

    Reply
  124. This has been a favorite book with me for years (but saying favorite book is like choosing a “favorite child”)
    What a beautiful post and how timely reading this is as my mother (age 93) married 50 yrs widowed 23 longs to go back to her husband (my dad) and she just entered hospice!
    This gives me hope that someday people will see the absolute futility of war!

    Reply
  125. This has been a favorite book with me for years (but saying favorite book is like choosing a “favorite child”)
    What a beautiful post and how timely reading this is as my mother (age 93) married 50 yrs widowed 23 longs to go back to her husband (my dad) and she just entered hospice!
    This gives me hope that someday people will see the absolute futility of war!

    Reply
  126. Alle der har v?ret afsted p? skiferie, kender helt sikkert til m?rket Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance. Og det er der i hvert fald ?n meget god grund til, nemlig at de laver jakker af super god kvalitet. Og deres jakker er is?r popul?re blandt folk der skal p? skiferie.
    Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance laver jakker der er stort set perfekte n?r man skal hamre ned af pisterne. Det er lige meget om man tager syd p? og st?r p? ski, hvor temperaturen er lidt h?jere, eller om man tager til Sverige eller Norge p? skiferie, s? har Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance en jakke der vil passe perfekt til form?let.
    Logoet her har vi set et utal af gange, og mange af os t?nker “god kvalitet” n?r vi ser dette logo. “Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er bare bedst” dette h?re man ofte hvis snakken falder p? ski jakker til afterski.
    Brandet “>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke> Peak Performance blev grundlagt i Sverige tilbage i 1986, og har siden dengang lavet produkter med et flot design og med en konstant h?j kvalitet. Og jakkerne egner sig ogs? til andet end bare skiferien. Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er flotte i designet og kan ogs? sagtens benyttes b?de f?r og efter ens skiferie.
    http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke

    Reply
  127. Alle der har v?ret afsted p? skiferie, kender helt sikkert til m?rket Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance. Og det er der i hvert fald ?n meget god grund til, nemlig at de laver jakker af super god kvalitet. Og deres jakker er is?r popul?re blandt folk der skal p? skiferie.
    Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance laver jakker der er stort set perfekte n?r man skal hamre ned af pisterne. Det er lige meget om man tager syd p? og st?r p? ski, hvor temperaturen er lidt h?jere, eller om man tager til Sverige eller Norge p? skiferie, s? har Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance en jakke der vil passe perfekt til form?let.
    Logoet her har vi set et utal af gange, og mange af os t?nker “god kvalitet” n?r vi ser dette logo. “Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er bare bedst” dette h?re man ofte hvis snakken falder p? ski jakker til afterski.
    Brandet “>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke> Peak Performance blev grundlagt i Sverige tilbage i 1986, og har siden dengang lavet produkter med et flot design og med en konstant h?j kvalitet. Og jakkerne egner sig ogs? til andet end bare skiferien. Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er flotte i designet og kan ogs? sagtens benyttes b?de f?r og efter ens skiferie.
    http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke

    Reply
  128. Alle der har v?ret afsted p? skiferie, kender helt sikkert til m?rket Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance. Og det er der i hvert fald ?n meget god grund til, nemlig at de laver jakker af super god kvalitet. Og deres jakker er is?r popul?re blandt folk der skal p? skiferie.
    Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance laver jakker der er stort set perfekte n?r man skal hamre ned af pisterne. Det er lige meget om man tager syd p? og st?r p? ski, hvor temperaturen er lidt h?jere, eller om man tager til Sverige eller Norge p? skiferie, s? har Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance en jakke der vil passe perfekt til form?let.
    Logoet her har vi set et utal af gange, og mange af os t?nker “god kvalitet” n?r vi ser dette logo. “Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er bare bedst” dette h?re man ofte hvis snakken falder p? ski jakker til afterski.
    Brandet “>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke> Peak Performance blev grundlagt i Sverige tilbage i 1986, og har siden dengang lavet produkter med et flot design og med en konstant h?j kvalitet. Og jakkerne egner sig ogs? til andet end bare skiferien. Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er flotte i designet og kan ogs? sagtens benyttes b?de f?r og efter ens skiferie.
    http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke

    Reply
  129. Alle der har v?ret afsted p? skiferie, kender helt sikkert til m?rket Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance. Og det er der i hvert fald ?n meget god grund til, nemlig at de laver jakker af super god kvalitet. Og deres jakker er is?r popul?re blandt folk der skal p? skiferie.
    Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance laver jakker der er stort set perfekte n?r man skal hamre ned af pisterne. Det er lige meget om man tager syd p? og st?r p? ski, hvor temperaturen er lidt h?jere, eller om man tager til Sverige eller Norge p? skiferie, s? har Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance en jakke der vil passe perfekt til form?let.
    Logoet her har vi set et utal af gange, og mange af os t?nker “god kvalitet” n?r vi ser dette logo. “Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er bare bedst” dette h?re man ofte hvis snakken falder p? ski jakker til afterski.
    Brandet “>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke> Peak Performance blev grundlagt i Sverige tilbage i 1986, og har siden dengang lavet produkter med et flot design og med en konstant h?j kvalitet. Og jakkerne egner sig ogs? til andet end bare skiferien. Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er flotte i designet og kan ogs? sagtens benyttes b?de f?r og efter ens skiferie.
    http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke

    Reply
  130. Alle der har v?ret afsted p? skiferie, kender helt sikkert til m?rket Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance. Og det er der i hvert fald ?n meget god grund til, nemlig at de laver jakker af super god kvalitet. Og deres jakker er is?r popul?re blandt folk der skal p? skiferie.
    Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance laver jakker der er stort set perfekte n?r man skal hamre ned af pisterne. Det er lige meget om man tager syd p? og st?r p? ski, hvor temperaturen er lidt h?jere, eller om man tager til Sverige eller Norge p? skiferie, s? har Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance en jakke der vil passe perfekt til form?let.
    Logoet her har vi set et utal af gange, og mange af os t?nker “god kvalitet” n?r vi ser dette logo. “Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er bare bedst” dette h?re man ofte hvis snakken falder p? ski jakker til afterski.
    Brandet “>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke> Peak Performance blev grundlagt i Sverige tilbage i 1986, og har siden dengang lavet produkter med et flot design og med en konstant h?j kvalitet. Og jakkerne egner sig ogs? til andet end bare skiferien. Peak”>http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke>Peak Performance jakker er flotte i designet og kan ogs? sagtens benyttes b?de f?r og efter ens skiferie.
    http://www.skishop.dk/vare/2445-peak-performance-peak-cascade-jakke

    Reply

Leave a Comment