Things That Go Thump in the NIght

MerlinQuantum has asked for our “views/discussion of paranormal fiction, particularly with ghosts and time slip involved.” She adds, “It seems to me that plausibility is very important in grabbing reader interest, but main stream science is rather dismissive of this area. . .What do the Wenches think?”

Well, as always, the Wenches have an opinion, and we owe Quantum one free book for her excellent question, thank you!

From Pat:

I’ll let the other Wenches speak to their own beliefs, but I’m totally open to all possibilities, up to and including space aliens seeding this earth a gazillion years ago. <G> Science tends to be fact-focused, as it should be, and facts are very hard to come by when it comes to the more woo-woo aspects of our world. Scientists have their hands full measuring what they can see. Working with what they can’t see is currently beyond their abilities, and possibly, beyond the imaginations of the people who fund them.

I like to believe that people who claim to see ghosts, possess clairvoyance, or other unexplained oddities have neural pathways that we have yet to explore. And maybe one day we’ll understand what’s behind string theory and quantum physics and develop a better comprehension  of what reality means.

But lacking more than word-of-mouth evidence, I am free to create healers, dog whisperers, and psychic mediums with any characteristics I care to give them—which iRice_WhisperofMagic600s what I love to do in my various Magic series romances. Complicating life and romance with abilities that defy the known and come with equal disabilities tests my characters and their relationships in ways that entertain me greatly! And I hope that if I ground my people in enough reality, that readers will sympathize and anticipate the lessons the hero and heroine must learn to accept their differences.

From Anne:

I've never experienced any paranormal forces like ghosts and ESP but there's a part of me that isn't willing to rule out the possibilities. My grandfather was a dowser of water, and though I don't know the science behind it, I believe absolutely that he could find underground water with only a forked stick. He did it again and again, and it was an ability that was both valued and taken for granted in the rural community he lived in.

I think it's logical not to rule such things out. Our world is full of things that seem magical because we don't experience them ourselves. Dogs can hear things at frequencies we can't, they read scent as we read books. Birds can navigate by reading invisible magnetic patterns. The world is full of 'magic' of this sort.  I have often wondered whether, if 99.9% of people were colourblind, we would regard as charlatans, or deluded, the few people who claimed to be able to see red and green instead of grey. Okay, that's a small thing, and easily tested scientifically, but for me, it's no big stretch of the imagination to allow the possibility that some people have untapped abilities.

Stories of ghosts and other paranormal activities pop up again and again, over the centuries, from all cultures and from people at all walks of life, so who am I to dismiss those possibilities, merely because I haven't experienced it myself? And as a writer, I love the idea that there's a world full of hidden possibilities.

Angel fogFrom Andrea/Cara:

I’ve never personally experienced any paranormal incident—no ghosts, no awareness of being transported to another reality. But I am quite open to the possibility that there are realms of existence that at present we can’t sense or access. One has only to look at recent science to see world upon world that sounded like science fiction in the past have been discovered through sophisticated equipment and experimental techniques, and are now seen as mainstream. Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time. According to experts in the field, time and space react differently in the quantum world than they do in the classic Newtonian world. So I definitely keep an open mind, and actually think it’s rather nice that we don’t understand everything. Mystery does add a certain spice to life!

Science aside, “plausible” fiction also, IMO, depends a great deal on the writer’s skill at storytelling. A strong voice can make a reader willing, and eager, to be transported to the farthest corners of the imagination—and beyond. That’s the magic of books and language!

From Nicola:

As someone who has had a number of experiences that I would describe as “unexplained” I am very open to the idea that not everything in our universe can be explained away rationally. In fact I think it would be quite Pyle-ghostarrogant to think that we have reached the pinnacle of scientific discovery where there is a logical reason for everything. That doesn’t leave any space to learn, or discover new things. The human race’s fascination with the unexplained comes out time and again in storytelling down the ages and I love that this thread has always been a part of our lives.

 I’ve written three books now that contain supernatural elements: time travel, ghosts, magic, possession, and I absolutely love exploring paranormal issues in my writing and my reading. As with all alternative worlds, whether they be historical, science fiction or any other, I feel that the plausibility always comes back to the characters and their situations. If a reader is invested in those characters and their emotional journey then they will come with you back into the past, forward into the future, into the dragon’s lair. It’s where our imaginations can play and who knows what alternative realities may be waiting to be discovered…

From Susan:

For as long as I can remember, I've been intrigued and fascinated by the paranormal. Books and stories, TV and movies, real experiences, ghosts, time slips, fairies and dragons and angels, tarot and Celtic magical practices, meditation, energy healing, chi work, unexplained mysteries and just about any sort of woo-woo—I'm there. As a reader, I love ghost stories, time travelers, reincarnation, fairies (I am not, however, wild about vampires and monsters). I’d be thrilled to see a ghost. Scary, yes, but I'd want to help—why are you still here, can we help resolve that? That hasn't happened, but I'm always hopeful. I'm a ghost show addict—but I'm sceptical too. The experiences need real substantiation for me to buy in. In my own historical fiction, I've almost always included a trace or more of paranormal, from psychics to healers to magical elements. My own stories don't feel full enough to me without some hint of a metaphysical mystery that expands the characters and the story. I'm trained in energy healing, and I've had some hard-to-explain experiences in that and other modes. Some of that I've tapped in writing fiction. 

Whatever view we take, wherever our interests lie, I think we all get something out of beliefs and explorations that stretch our thinking beyond what science and our own senses can prove. We all find ways to ponder and decide what life is about, whether that comes through religious beliefs or the draw of paranormal elements. Paranormal refers to beyond normal, outside our everyday understanding. If we’re drawn to any of these questions, we’re prodded to think outside the box, to realize to some degree that there's way, way more to life and existence than we might think at first. 

From Mary Jo:

Stolen Magic coverHaving spent my childhood reading as much science fiction as I could get my grubby little hands on, I'm perfectly happy to assume there is much we don't know about the universe, and to include such unexplained elements in my stories.  While I've not seen ghosts or ghoulies or things that go thump in the night, I've known very credible people who have seen and done inexplicable things.  Some have abilities that can be called psychic, and sometimes my own intuition has been surprisingly good. 

I'm not actually fond of time travel stories because thinking about the paradoxes makes me want to bury my head under a pillow, but no one needs to point out that I've written four time traveling novels.  I consider that proof that a good story premise will lure a writer into all sorts of areas! 

I particularly enjoy writing about magic, which is the basis for seven of my novels and a bunch of shorter works.  I love the idea that magic might be taking place out of the corner of one's eye, out of sight but not out of imagination.  And writing about it is fun!

My Guardian stories, three novels and several shorter works, posit a world where unusual abilities run in families, and those who have such abilities have done things that made history turn out the way we know it.  This is great fun from a storytelling point of view.  What if weather mages conjured the hurricane that destroyed the vast Spanish Armada in 1588?  Or maybe they produced the highly unusual weather that allowed the British to evacuate over three hundred thousand troops from Dunkirk when the Admiralty had thought they'd manage maybe thirty thousand at best? Magic!

From Susanna:

Like Nicola, I’ve had a few encounters in my life with things I can’t explain, and I like weaving elements into my books that will challenge my characters and link the present and past. I always try to make my heroine the biggest skeptic in the novel, because Kearsleyhonestly, your first reaction when you see a ghost is not “Hey look, a ghost”, it’s “Oh no, I’m hallucinating.” Then I go looking for current research from university parapsychology departments, because if I can make the phenomenon plausible to my heroine, then I can hopefully convince the reader to suspend their disbelief, if only while they’re reading.
 
My personal belief is that many things we consider “paranormal”—from psychic abilities to ghosts and hauntings—are energy-based. Energy can’t be destroyed, it can only change form, and when we die there may be some small measure of our energy that doesn’t get transformed to heat or movement, and is left behind as what we call a ghost. Perhaps the people who see ghosts, or those who can remotely view things, are just somehow more receptive to that energy. I don’t know.
 
But I’m a great believer in science, and its continual progression. The invention of the positron microscope in 1987 allowed us to see slow, low-density beams that had previously been thought impossible to see. The Hubble telescope, launched in 1990, allowed us to see deeper into space than we were able to before, and has completely changed our knowledge of the universe. And in 2012 the Large Hadron Collider allowed us to prove the Higgs bosun particle existed.
 
So I’m confident some future scientist will invent an instrument to isolate and view the form of energy that causes all these “paranormal” things, and once they’re proven to exist by science, they’ll just be considered normal.

 

So, as you see, the wenches are all in favor of the unknown and a wider perspective than science currently allows. But we have creative imaginations. How about everyone else? Do you believe in things that go bump in the night? Do you fear the paranormal? Enjoy reading it?

 

 

175 thoughts on “Things That Go Thump in the NIght”

  1. Fascinating discussion!
    By plausible I really mean ‘could be easily envisioned as an extension/extrapolation of currently accepted science’
    Physical time travel seems to me to be highly implausible, due to the many paradoxes that MJP mentions, however ghosts and memories from the past seem to have some plausibility. If instinct can be transmitted through genes then maybe memories from past lives could also. So, slipping into the past as a mental time slip phenomenon is OK for me.
    Likewise certain extraordinary mental phenomena seem plausible. Scientists are only beginning to fathom the mysteries of consciousness and mind so there is plenty of scope for plausible psychic abilities to evolve in fiction.
    Quantum theory also seems to be a happy hunting ground for paranormal ideas because to quote John Wheeler “If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.” or as Andrea notes “Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time”. The concept of entanglement looks particularly fruitful. It implies that we are all connected which may, for example, offer a route to understanding remote healing in energy medicine.
    If one goes beyond the paranormal to building new worlds as in Tolkiens ‘Lord of the Rings’ or more recently the Harry Potter books, Then the sheer brilliance of the author’s writing can draw one in so that the world becomes real and one suspends belief for a while. I think the same may be true of ‘implausible’ paranormal stories.
    So, Wenches, I say use your imaginations freely, you have the talent to pull it off.
    PS Pat,it is dangerous to assume that all readers of romance are of the feminine gender, though perhaps at the quantum level I could be in either gender until I am observed! LOL

    Reply
  2. Fascinating discussion!
    By plausible I really mean ‘could be easily envisioned as an extension/extrapolation of currently accepted science’
    Physical time travel seems to me to be highly implausible, due to the many paradoxes that MJP mentions, however ghosts and memories from the past seem to have some plausibility. If instinct can be transmitted through genes then maybe memories from past lives could also. So, slipping into the past as a mental time slip phenomenon is OK for me.
    Likewise certain extraordinary mental phenomena seem plausible. Scientists are only beginning to fathom the mysteries of consciousness and mind so there is plenty of scope for plausible psychic abilities to evolve in fiction.
    Quantum theory also seems to be a happy hunting ground for paranormal ideas because to quote John Wheeler “If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.” or as Andrea notes “Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time”. The concept of entanglement looks particularly fruitful. It implies that we are all connected which may, for example, offer a route to understanding remote healing in energy medicine.
    If one goes beyond the paranormal to building new worlds as in Tolkiens ‘Lord of the Rings’ or more recently the Harry Potter books, Then the sheer brilliance of the author’s writing can draw one in so that the world becomes real and one suspends belief for a while. I think the same may be true of ‘implausible’ paranormal stories.
    So, Wenches, I say use your imaginations freely, you have the talent to pull it off.
    PS Pat,it is dangerous to assume that all readers of romance are of the feminine gender, though perhaps at the quantum level I could be in either gender until I am observed! LOL

    Reply
  3. Fascinating discussion!
    By plausible I really mean ‘could be easily envisioned as an extension/extrapolation of currently accepted science’
    Physical time travel seems to me to be highly implausible, due to the many paradoxes that MJP mentions, however ghosts and memories from the past seem to have some plausibility. If instinct can be transmitted through genes then maybe memories from past lives could also. So, slipping into the past as a mental time slip phenomenon is OK for me.
    Likewise certain extraordinary mental phenomena seem plausible. Scientists are only beginning to fathom the mysteries of consciousness and mind so there is plenty of scope for plausible psychic abilities to evolve in fiction.
    Quantum theory also seems to be a happy hunting ground for paranormal ideas because to quote John Wheeler “If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.” or as Andrea notes “Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time”. The concept of entanglement looks particularly fruitful. It implies that we are all connected which may, for example, offer a route to understanding remote healing in energy medicine.
    If one goes beyond the paranormal to building new worlds as in Tolkiens ‘Lord of the Rings’ or more recently the Harry Potter books, Then the sheer brilliance of the author’s writing can draw one in so that the world becomes real and one suspends belief for a while. I think the same may be true of ‘implausible’ paranormal stories.
    So, Wenches, I say use your imaginations freely, you have the talent to pull it off.
    PS Pat,it is dangerous to assume that all readers of romance are of the feminine gender, though perhaps at the quantum level I could be in either gender until I am observed! LOL

    Reply
  4. Fascinating discussion!
    By plausible I really mean ‘could be easily envisioned as an extension/extrapolation of currently accepted science’
    Physical time travel seems to me to be highly implausible, due to the many paradoxes that MJP mentions, however ghosts and memories from the past seem to have some plausibility. If instinct can be transmitted through genes then maybe memories from past lives could also. So, slipping into the past as a mental time slip phenomenon is OK for me.
    Likewise certain extraordinary mental phenomena seem plausible. Scientists are only beginning to fathom the mysteries of consciousness and mind so there is plenty of scope for plausible psychic abilities to evolve in fiction.
    Quantum theory also seems to be a happy hunting ground for paranormal ideas because to quote John Wheeler “If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.” or as Andrea notes “Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time”. The concept of entanglement looks particularly fruitful. It implies that we are all connected which may, for example, offer a route to understanding remote healing in energy medicine.
    If one goes beyond the paranormal to building new worlds as in Tolkiens ‘Lord of the Rings’ or more recently the Harry Potter books, Then the sheer brilliance of the author’s writing can draw one in so that the world becomes real and one suspends belief for a while. I think the same may be true of ‘implausible’ paranormal stories.
    So, Wenches, I say use your imaginations freely, you have the talent to pull it off.
    PS Pat,it is dangerous to assume that all readers of romance are of the feminine gender, though perhaps at the quantum level I could be in either gender until I am observed! LOL

    Reply
  5. Fascinating discussion!
    By plausible I really mean ‘could be easily envisioned as an extension/extrapolation of currently accepted science’
    Physical time travel seems to me to be highly implausible, due to the many paradoxes that MJP mentions, however ghosts and memories from the past seem to have some plausibility. If instinct can be transmitted through genes then maybe memories from past lives could also. So, slipping into the past as a mental time slip phenomenon is OK for me.
    Likewise certain extraordinary mental phenomena seem plausible. Scientists are only beginning to fathom the mysteries of consciousness and mind so there is plenty of scope for plausible psychic abilities to evolve in fiction.
    Quantum theory also seems to be a happy hunting ground for paranormal ideas because to quote John Wheeler “If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it.” or as Andrea notes “Quantum physics has concepts that are hard for most of us to fathom–like a particle being able to exist in two places at the same time”. The concept of entanglement looks particularly fruitful. It implies that we are all connected which may, for example, offer a route to understanding remote healing in energy medicine.
    If one goes beyond the paranormal to building new worlds as in Tolkiens ‘Lord of the Rings’ or more recently the Harry Potter books, Then the sheer brilliance of the author’s writing can draw one in so that the world becomes real and one suspends belief for a while. I think the same may be true of ‘implausible’ paranormal stories.
    So, Wenches, I say use your imaginations freely, you have the talent to pull it off.
    PS Pat,it is dangerous to assume that all readers of romance are of the feminine gender, though perhaps at the quantum level I could be in either gender until I am observed! LOL

    Reply
  6. I don’t fear the paranormal and I’m quite open to it. In my personnel life, there were several totally unexplained things that happened after my mother died that made us all believe she was still with us for a while. We found that comforting.
    As for reading material, I’m not a big fan. That is neither hear nor there. We all look for and enjoy different things. I do remember reading a book by Karla Hocker (can’t remember the title) that had a ghost named Annie who was so charming you couldn’t help but love her. I also remember a book by Barbara Metzger that involved the forces of good and evil arguing over who should get the soul of a fallen hero.
    I guess that says I enjoy the paranormal in a lighthearted way.

    Reply
  7. I don’t fear the paranormal and I’m quite open to it. In my personnel life, there were several totally unexplained things that happened after my mother died that made us all believe she was still with us for a while. We found that comforting.
    As for reading material, I’m not a big fan. That is neither hear nor there. We all look for and enjoy different things. I do remember reading a book by Karla Hocker (can’t remember the title) that had a ghost named Annie who was so charming you couldn’t help but love her. I also remember a book by Barbara Metzger that involved the forces of good and evil arguing over who should get the soul of a fallen hero.
    I guess that says I enjoy the paranormal in a lighthearted way.

    Reply
  8. I don’t fear the paranormal and I’m quite open to it. In my personnel life, there were several totally unexplained things that happened after my mother died that made us all believe she was still with us for a while. We found that comforting.
    As for reading material, I’m not a big fan. That is neither hear nor there. We all look for and enjoy different things. I do remember reading a book by Karla Hocker (can’t remember the title) that had a ghost named Annie who was so charming you couldn’t help but love her. I also remember a book by Barbara Metzger that involved the forces of good and evil arguing over who should get the soul of a fallen hero.
    I guess that says I enjoy the paranormal in a lighthearted way.

    Reply
  9. I don’t fear the paranormal and I’m quite open to it. In my personnel life, there were several totally unexplained things that happened after my mother died that made us all believe she was still with us for a while. We found that comforting.
    As for reading material, I’m not a big fan. That is neither hear nor there. We all look for and enjoy different things. I do remember reading a book by Karla Hocker (can’t remember the title) that had a ghost named Annie who was so charming you couldn’t help but love her. I also remember a book by Barbara Metzger that involved the forces of good and evil arguing over who should get the soul of a fallen hero.
    I guess that says I enjoy the paranormal in a lighthearted way.

    Reply
  10. I don’t fear the paranormal and I’m quite open to it. In my personnel life, there were several totally unexplained things that happened after my mother died that made us all believe she was still with us for a while. We found that comforting.
    As for reading material, I’m not a big fan. That is neither hear nor there. We all look for and enjoy different things. I do remember reading a book by Karla Hocker (can’t remember the title) that had a ghost named Annie who was so charming you couldn’t help but love her. I also remember a book by Barbara Metzger that involved the forces of good and evil arguing over who should get the soul of a fallen hero.
    I guess that says I enjoy the paranormal in a lighthearted way.

    Reply
  11. In real life, I’m a skeptic, but I think adding paranormal, supernatural or other non-normal elements can make a very entertaining read. But, like spice, a little goes a long way–I don’t like tons of this stuff, and like Susan, enough of the werewolves and vampires. They belong in horror stories.
    I don’t care to read alternative history at all. In a way, that’s sad–what if poor Princess Charlotte had lived? We know she died, and that would color the whole alternative history, no matter how happy the book. Not exactly the same thing, but steampunk doesn’t do anything for me, either. Too gimmicky.

    Reply
  12. In real life, I’m a skeptic, but I think adding paranormal, supernatural or other non-normal elements can make a very entertaining read. But, like spice, a little goes a long way–I don’t like tons of this stuff, and like Susan, enough of the werewolves and vampires. They belong in horror stories.
    I don’t care to read alternative history at all. In a way, that’s sad–what if poor Princess Charlotte had lived? We know she died, and that would color the whole alternative history, no matter how happy the book. Not exactly the same thing, but steampunk doesn’t do anything for me, either. Too gimmicky.

    Reply
  13. In real life, I’m a skeptic, but I think adding paranormal, supernatural or other non-normal elements can make a very entertaining read. But, like spice, a little goes a long way–I don’t like tons of this stuff, and like Susan, enough of the werewolves and vampires. They belong in horror stories.
    I don’t care to read alternative history at all. In a way, that’s sad–what if poor Princess Charlotte had lived? We know she died, and that would color the whole alternative history, no matter how happy the book. Not exactly the same thing, but steampunk doesn’t do anything for me, either. Too gimmicky.

    Reply
  14. In real life, I’m a skeptic, but I think adding paranormal, supernatural or other non-normal elements can make a very entertaining read. But, like spice, a little goes a long way–I don’t like tons of this stuff, and like Susan, enough of the werewolves and vampires. They belong in horror stories.
    I don’t care to read alternative history at all. In a way, that’s sad–what if poor Princess Charlotte had lived? We know she died, and that would color the whole alternative history, no matter how happy the book. Not exactly the same thing, but steampunk doesn’t do anything for me, either. Too gimmicky.

    Reply
  15. In real life, I’m a skeptic, but I think adding paranormal, supernatural or other non-normal elements can make a very entertaining read. But, like spice, a little goes a long way–I don’t like tons of this stuff, and like Susan, enough of the werewolves and vampires. They belong in horror stories.
    I don’t care to read alternative history at all. In a way, that’s sad–what if poor Princess Charlotte had lived? We know she died, and that would color the whole alternative history, no matter how happy the book. Not exactly the same thing, but steampunk doesn’t do anything for me, either. Too gimmicky.

    Reply
  16. I enjoy the paranormal in the aspect it is discussed here. When I was first drawn to Susanna’s books with The Winter Sea it was not only because of the history/romance aspect and the fabulous writing, it was because she included possibilities. Possibilities of DNA stamping and psychometry and slipping into a tear in time, etc. I despise the vampire/werewolf trend. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the things in our lives that are unexplained are just that:outside of our conceptualization and as real as we are.

    Reply
  17. I enjoy the paranormal in the aspect it is discussed here. When I was first drawn to Susanna’s books with The Winter Sea it was not only because of the history/romance aspect and the fabulous writing, it was because she included possibilities. Possibilities of DNA stamping and psychometry and slipping into a tear in time, etc. I despise the vampire/werewolf trend. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the things in our lives that are unexplained are just that:outside of our conceptualization and as real as we are.

    Reply
  18. I enjoy the paranormal in the aspect it is discussed here. When I was first drawn to Susanna’s books with The Winter Sea it was not only because of the history/romance aspect and the fabulous writing, it was because she included possibilities. Possibilities of DNA stamping and psychometry and slipping into a tear in time, etc. I despise the vampire/werewolf trend. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the things in our lives that are unexplained are just that:outside of our conceptualization and as real as we are.

    Reply
  19. I enjoy the paranormal in the aspect it is discussed here. When I was first drawn to Susanna’s books with The Winter Sea it was not only because of the history/romance aspect and the fabulous writing, it was because she included possibilities. Possibilities of DNA stamping and psychometry and slipping into a tear in time, etc. I despise the vampire/werewolf trend. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the things in our lives that are unexplained are just that:outside of our conceptualization and as real as we are.

    Reply
  20. I enjoy the paranormal in the aspect it is discussed here. When I was first drawn to Susanna’s books with The Winter Sea it was not only because of the history/romance aspect and the fabulous writing, it was because she included possibilities. Possibilities of DNA stamping and psychometry and slipping into a tear in time, etc. I despise the vampire/werewolf trend. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the things in our lives that are unexplained are just that:outside of our conceptualization and as real as we are.

    Reply
  21. Quantum, I’m sorry, I meant to scrub any reference to gender but I tend to lean toward “she” rather than awkward constructions like “s/he.” Or as one of my transgender friends said “it.” I want to develop a single gender pronoun but so far, we haven’t found a good one yet–just some very funny and not so funny combinations.
    And with almost no understanding of physics but just a mind that soaks up bits and pieces, I think we can develop interesting theories about time existing in different spatial interfaces. I’m not a time travel fan, per se, but I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space.

    Reply
  22. Quantum, I’m sorry, I meant to scrub any reference to gender but I tend to lean toward “she” rather than awkward constructions like “s/he.” Or as one of my transgender friends said “it.” I want to develop a single gender pronoun but so far, we haven’t found a good one yet–just some very funny and not so funny combinations.
    And with almost no understanding of physics but just a mind that soaks up bits and pieces, I think we can develop interesting theories about time existing in different spatial interfaces. I’m not a time travel fan, per se, but I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space.

    Reply
  23. Quantum, I’m sorry, I meant to scrub any reference to gender but I tend to lean toward “she” rather than awkward constructions like “s/he.” Or as one of my transgender friends said “it.” I want to develop a single gender pronoun but so far, we haven’t found a good one yet–just some very funny and not so funny combinations.
    And with almost no understanding of physics but just a mind that soaks up bits and pieces, I think we can develop interesting theories about time existing in different spatial interfaces. I’m not a time travel fan, per se, but I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space.

    Reply
  24. Quantum, I’m sorry, I meant to scrub any reference to gender but I tend to lean toward “she” rather than awkward constructions like “s/he.” Or as one of my transgender friends said “it.” I want to develop a single gender pronoun but so far, we haven’t found a good one yet–just some very funny and not so funny combinations.
    And with almost no understanding of physics but just a mind that soaks up bits and pieces, I think we can develop interesting theories about time existing in different spatial interfaces. I’m not a time travel fan, per se, but I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space.

    Reply
  25. Quantum, I’m sorry, I meant to scrub any reference to gender but I tend to lean toward “she” rather than awkward constructions like “s/he.” Or as one of my transgender friends said “it.” I want to develop a single gender pronoun but so far, we haven’t found a good one yet–just some very funny and not so funny combinations.
    And with almost no understanding of physics but just a mind that soaks up bits and pieces, I think we can develop interesting theories about time existing in different spatial interfaces. I’m not a time travel fan, per se, but I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space.

    Reply
  26. I enjoy a good steampunk story that’s written with characters and a plot that make sense with reality as I know it. But the ones that go far out on a limb, inventing people and monsters, go too far into fantasy for me.
    We need to do a poll sometime to see how many romance readers read horror. I’m thinking the numbers are slim.

    Reply
  27. I enjoy a good steampunk story that’s written with characters and a plot that make sense with reality as I know it. But the ones that go far out on a limb, inventing people and monsters, go too far into fantasy for me.
    We need to do a poll sometime to see how many romance readers read horror. I’m thinking the numbers are slim.

    Reply
  28. I enjoy a good steampunk story that’s written with characters and a plot that make sense with reality as I know it. But the ones that go far out on a limb, inventing people and monsters, go too far into fantasy for me.
    We need to do a poll sometime to see how many romance readers read horror. I’m thinking the numbers are slim.

    Reply
  29. I enjoy a good steampunk story that’s written with characters and a plot that make sense with reality as I know it. But the ones that go far out on a limb, inventing people and monsters, go too far into fantasy for me.
    We need to do a poll sometime to see how many romance readers read horror. I’m thinking the numbers are slim.

    Reply
  30. I enjoy a good steampunk story that’s written with characters and a plot that make sense with reality as I know it. But the ones that go far out on a limb, inventing people and monsters, go too far into fantasy for me.
    We need to do a poll sometime to see how many romance readers read horror. I’m thinking the numbers are slim.

    Reply
  31. In real life,I believe that “ESP” is “unproven;” I also feel strongly that there are things we don’t yet know about. Too many “co-instances” occur in our daily lives for coincidence to be totally believed in.
    As for stories, I like paranormal the way the wenches use it, or the the controlled way Mercedes Lackey explains magic in her Elemental Masters series. (This series is probably shelved as Fantasy, and that wouldn’t be wrong, but it is more structured and logic-bound than the fantasies in her better-know Valdamar series, which I also love).
    So, if the author does it “right” in the various ways there are to do it right, I tend to enjoy the magic. And like many of the other responders, I don’t care much for vampires, werewolves, and so on.

    Reply
  32. In real life,I believe that “ESP” is “unproven;” I also feel strongly that there are things we don’t yet know about. Too many “co-instances” occur in our daily lives for coincidence to be totally believed in.
    As for stories, I like paranormal the way the wenches use it, or the the controlled way Mercedes Lackey explains magic in her Elemental Masters series. (This series is probably shelved as Fantasy, and that wouldn’t be wrong, but it is more structured and logic-bound than the fantasies in her better-know Valdamar series, which I also love).
    So, if the author does it “right” in the various ways there are to do it right, I tend to enjoy the magic. And like many of the other responders, I don’t care much for vampires, werewolves, and so on.

    Reply
  33. In real life,I believe that “ESP” is “unproven;” I also feel strongly that there are things we don’t yet know about. Too many “co-instances” occur in our daily lives for coincidence to be totally believed in.
    As for stories, I like paranormal the way the wenches use it, or the the controlled way Mercedes Lackey explains magic in her Elemental Masters series. (This series is probably shelved as Fantasy, and that wouldn’t be wrong, but it is more structured and logic-bound than the fantasies in her better-know Valdamar series, which I also love).
    So, if the author does it “right” in the various ways there are to do it right, I tend to enjoy the magic. And like many of the other responders, I don’t care much for vampires, werewolves, and so on.

    Reply
  34. In real life,I believe that “ESP” is “unproven;” I also feel strongly that there are things we don’t yet know about. Too many “co-instances” occur in our daily lives for coincidence to be totally believed in.
    As for stories, I like paranormal the way the wenches use it, or the the controlled way Mercedes Lackey explains magic in her Elemental Masters series. (This series is probably shelved as Fantasy, and that wouldn’t be wrong, but it is more structured and logic-bound than the fantasies in her better-know Valdamar series, which I also love).
    So, if the author does it “right” in the various ways there are to do it right, I tend to enjoy the magic. And like many of the other responders, I don’t care much for vampires, werewolves, and so on.

    Reply
  35. In real life,I believe that “ESP” is “unproven;” I also feel strongly that there are things we don’t yet know about. Too many “co-instances” occur in our daily lives for coincidence to be totally believed in.
    As for stories, I like paranormal the way the wenches use it, or the the controlled way Mercedes Lackey explains magic in her Elemental Masters series. (This series is probably shelved as Fantasy, and that wouldn’t be wrong, but it is more structured and logic-bound than the fantasies in her better-know Valdamar series, which I also love).
    So, if the author does it “right” in the various ways there are to do it right, I tend to enjoy the magic. And like many of the other responders, I don’t care much for vampires, werewolves, and so on.

    Reply
  36. Linda, I used to think Vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column.
    I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the possibility of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  37. Linda, I used to think Vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column.
    I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the possibility of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  38. Linda, I used to think Vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column.
    I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the possibility of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  39. Linda, I used to think Vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column.
    I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the possibility of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  40. Linda, I used to think Vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column.
    I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the possibility of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  41. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too.
    I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  42. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too.
    I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  43. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too.
    I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  44. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too.
    I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  45. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too.
    I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  46. I don’t think I actually believe in paranormal stuff, except…I got a really weird feeling when I was at Harpers Ferry, and it happened to me a couple of other times. And there was the time my sister and I had the same consoling dream after our uncle died.
    So I really don’t believe in paranormal stuff. Probably.
    But I do love a ghost story where it really is a ghost.
    (Closing my eyes tight and insisting that there’s no such thing as ghosts.)

    Reply
  47. I don’t think I actually believe in paranormal stuff, except…I got a really weird feeling when I was at Harpers Ferry, and it happened to me a couple of other times. And there was the time my sister and I had the same consoling dream after our uncle died.
    So I really don’t believe in paranormal stuff. Probably.
    But I do love a ghost story where it really is a ghost.
    (Closing my eyes tight and insisting that there’s no such thing as ghosts.)

    Reply
  48. I don’t think I actually believe in paranormal stuff, except…I got a really weird feeling when I was at Harpers Ferry, and it happened to me a couple of other times. And there was the time my sister and I had the same consoling dream after our uncle died.
    So I really don’t believe in paranormal stuff. Probably.
    But I do love a ghost story where it really is a ghost.
    (Closing my eyes tight and insisting that there’s no such thing as ghosts.)

    Reply
  49. I don’t think I actually believe in paranormal stuff, except…I got a really weird feeling when I was at Harpers Ferry, and it happened to me a couple of other times. And there was the time my sister and I had the same consoling dream after our uncle died.
    So I really don’t believe in paranormal stuff. Probably.
    But I do love a ghost story where it really is a ghost.
    (Closing my eyes tight and insisting that there’s no such thing as ghosts.)

    Reply
  50. I don’t think I actually believe in paranormal stuff, except…I got a really weird feeling when I was at Harpers Ferry, and it happened to me a couple of other times. And there was the time my sister and I had the same consoling dream after our uncle died.
    So I really don’t believe in paranormal stuff. Probably.
    But I do love a ghost story where it really is a ghost.
    (Closing my eyes tight and insisting that there’s no such thing as ghosts.)

    Reply
  51. I love fantasy. I also believe in the unexplained because really, electricity was unexplained at one point. Science tells us we use such a small percentage of our brains that who knows what could happen if we could harness more? As for ESP, the women in our family might argue for it! 😉 And I’ve been married to my husband for so long now that he accuses me of ‘thinking too loud’! So I’m very open to the discussion of ESP.
    I adore fantasy and I’ve loved how Mary Jo and Pat have both incorrporated the ‘extra’ into some of their stories. I’ve devoured all I could get my hands on.
    As for the horror aspect, well, while I don’t want my vampires to sparkle, it depends on who does the writing. Linda Lael Miller did some wonderful stories about Vampires and I’ve read some great wherewolf stories, but it was really the author who sold it. Not the gore as I don’t like gore. They were first and foremost romances and I looked at how the author’s used the characters uniqueness-es as a kind of metaphor for all of us who don’t feel like we fit in and just long for someone to accept and love us as we are. Not trying to ‘fix’ us but simply to ‘accept’ us. Everyone’s hope and why we read romances.
    But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!

    Reply
  52. I love fantasy. I also believe in the unexplained because really, electricity was unexplained at one point. Science tells us we use such a small percentage of our brains that who knows what could happen if we could harness more? As for ESP, the women in our family might argue for it! 😉 And I’ve been married to my husband for so long now that he accuses me of ‘thinking too loud’! So I’m very open to the discussion of ESP.
    I adore fantasy and I’ve loved how Mary Jo and Pat have both incorrporated the ‘extra’ into some of their stories. I’ve devoured all I could get my hands on.
    As for the horror aspect, well, while I don’t want my vampires to sparkle, it depends on who does the writing. Linda Lael Miller did some wonderful stories about Vampires and I’ve read some great wherewolf stories, but it was really the author who sold it. Not the gore as I don’t like gore. They were first and foremost romances and I looked at how the author’s used the characters uniqueness-es as a kind of metaphor for all of us who don’t feel like we fit in and just long for someone to accept and love us as we are. Not trying to ‘fix’ us but simply to ‘accept’ us. Everyone’s hope and why we read romances.
    But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!

    Reply
  53. I love fantasy. I also believe in the unexplained because really, electricity was unexplained at one point. Science tells us we use such a small percentage of our brains that who knows what could happen if we could harness more? As for ESP, the women in our family might argue for it! 😉 And I’ve been married to my husband for so long now that he accuses me of ‘thinking too loud’! So I’m very open to the discussion of ESP.
    I adore fantasy and I’ve loved how Mary Jo and Pat have both incorrporated the ‘extra’ into some of their stories. I’ve devoured all I could get my hands on.
    As for the horror aspect, well, while I don’t want my vampires to sparkle, it depends on who does the writing. Linda Lael Miller did some wonderful stories about Vampires and I’ve read some great wherewolf stories, but it was really the author who sold it. Not the gore as I don’t like gore. They were first and foremost romances and I looked at how the author’s used the characters uniqueness-es as a kind of metaphor for all of us who don’t feel like we fit in and just long for someone to accept and love us as we are. Not trying to ‘fix’ us but simply to ‘accept’ us. Everyone’s hope and why we read romances.
    But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!

    Reply
  54. I love fantasy. I also believe in the unexplained because really, electricity was unexplained at one point. Science tells us we use such a small percentage of our brains that who knows what could happen if we could harness more? As for ESP, the women in our family might argue for it! 😉 And I’ve been married to my husband for so long now that he accuses me of ‘thinking too loud’! So I’m very open to the discussion of ESP.
    I adore fantasy and I’ve loved how Mary Jo and Pat have both incorrporated the ‘extra’ into some of their stories. I’ve devoured all I could get my hands on.
    As for the horror aspect, well, while I don’t want my vampires to sparkle, it depends on who does the writing. Linda Lael Miller did some wonderful stories about Vampires and I’ve read some great wherewolf stories, but it was really the author who sold it. Not the gore as I don’t like gore. They were first and foremost romances and I looked at how the author’s used the characters uniqueness-es as a kind of metaphor for all of us who don’t feel like we fit in and just long for someone to accept and love us as we are. Not trying to ‘fix’ us but simply to ‘accept’ us. Everyone’s hope and why we read romances.
    But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!

    Reply
  55. I love fantasy. I also believe in the unexplained because really, electricity was unexplained at one point. Science tells us we use such a small percentage of our brains that who knows what could happen if we could harness more? As for ESP, the women in our family might argue for it! 😉 And I’ve been married to my husband for so long now that he accuses me of ‘thinking too loud’! So I’m very open to the discussion of ESP.
    I adore fantasy and I’ve loved how Mary Jo and Pat have both incorrporated the ‘extra’ into some of their stories. I’ve devoured all I could get my hands on.
    As for the horror aspect, well, while I don’t want my vampires to sparkle, it depends on who does the writing. Linda Lael Miller did some wonderful stories about Vampires and I’ve read some great wherewolf stories, but it was really the author who sold it. Not the gore as I don’t like gore. They were first and foremost romances and I looked at how the author’s used the characters uniqueness-es as a kind of metaphor for all of us who don’t feel like we fit in and just long for someone to accept and love us as we are. Not trying to ‘fix’ us but simply to ‘accept’ us. Everyone’s hope and why we read romances.
    But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!

    Reply
  56. Pat, no apology needed! The onus was really on me to use my true name to remove any ambiguity.
    “I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space. ”
    I think this is reasonable as a mental phenomenon … slipping from one time to another and back again …. rather like a dream world.
    As for transporting macroscopic objects through time, Paul Davies has a book “How to build a time machine* which discusses the possibilities …. a must for any budding time travel author!

    Reply
  57. Pat, no apology needed! The onus was really on me to use my true name to remove any ambiguity.
    “I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space. ”
    I think this is reasonable as a mental phenomenon … slipping from one time to another and back again …. rather like a dream world.
    As for transporting macroscopic objects through time, Paul Davies has a book “How to build a time machine* which discusses the possibilities …. a must for any budding time travel author!

    Reply
  58. Pat, no apology needed! The onus was really on me to use my true name to remove any ambiguity.
    “I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space. ”
    I think this is reasonable as a mental phenomenon … slipping from one time to another and back again …. rather like a dream world.
    As for transporting macroscopic objects through time, Paul Davies has a book “How to build a time machine* which discusses the possibilities …. a must for any budding time travel author!

    Reply
  59. Pat, no apology needed! The onus was really on me to use my true name to remove any ambiguity.
    “I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space. ”
    I think this is reasonable as a mental phenomenon … slipping from one time to another and back again …. rather like a dream world.
    As for transporting macroscopic objects through time, Paul Davies has a book “How to build a time machine* which discusses the possibilities …. a must for any budding time travel author!

    Reply
  60. Pat, no apology needed! The onus was really on me to use my true name to remove any ambiguity.
    “I can see potential for different versions of time living in the same space. ”
    I think this is reasonable as a mental phenomenon … slipping from one time to another and back again …. rather like a dream world.
    As for transporting macroscopic objects through time, Paul Davies has a book “How to build a time machine* which discusses the possibilities …. a must for any budding time travel author!

    Reply
  61. “But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!”
    I’m with you 100% Karen. Have you tried her brainship series where the brains of horribly deformed, but highly intelligent children are integrated with the computers of a space ship, giving the person mobility and a useful, fulfilling, active, adventurous life?
    It is Way beyond current scientific capability but to my mind highly plausible for future development.

    Reply
  62. “But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!”
    I’m with you 100% Karen. Have you tried her brainship series where the brains of horribly deformed, but highly intelligent children are integrated with the computers of a space ship, giving the person mobility and a useful, fulfilling, active, adventurous life?
    It is Way beyond current scientific capability but to my mind highly plausible for future development.

    Reply
  63. “But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!”
    I’m with you 100% Karen. Have you tried her brainship series where the brains of horribly deformed, but highly intelligent children are integrated with the computers of a space ship, giving the person mobility and a useful, fulfilling, active, adventurous life?
    It is Way beyond current scientific capability but to my mind highly plausible for future development.

    Reply
  64. “But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!”
    I’m with you 100% Karen. Have you tried her brainship series where the brains of horribly deformed, but highly intelligent children are integrated with the computers of a space ship, giving the person mobility and a useful, fulfilling, active, adventurous life?
    It is Way beyond current scientific capability but to my mind highly plausible for future development.

    Reply
  65. “But I like my fantasy. Some I really loved were Anne McCaffrey’s Rowan series and Pegasus series. They had nice romantic elements too. 🙂 So I was good with them. And a HEA!”
    I’m with you 100% Karen. Have you tried her brainship series where the brains of horribly deformed, but highly intelligent children are integrated with the computers of a space ship, giving the person mobility and a useful, fulfilling, active, adventurous life?
    It is Way beyond current scientific capability but to my mind highly plausible for future development.

    Reply
  66. In a recent energy healing summit from sounds true there was a video session by Nand Harjani entitled
    “Angels and Guides: How to Connect and Communicate with Supportive Energy Sources”
    In it the author shows photographs of angels and guides as orbs of light surrounding a person. It could be that we all end up like this after death?
    I’m not sure how much of this to believe. As a scientist and sceptic I would want some reproducible controlled measurements … even then I would want convincing that they were free of trickery!
    But I’m always open to possibilities … you never know!

    Reply
  67. In a recent energy healing summit from sounds true there was a video session by Nand Harjani entitled
    “Angels and Guides: How to Connect and Communicate with Supportive Energy Sources”
    In it the author shows photographs of angels and guides as orbs of light surrounding a person. It could be that we all end up like this after death?
    I’m not sure how much of this to believe. As a scientist and sceptic I would want some reproducible controlled measurements … even then I would want convincing that they were free of trickery!
    But I’m always open to possibilities … you never know!

    Reply
  68. In a recent energy healing summit from sounds true there was a video session by Nand Harjani entitled
    “Angels and Guides: How to Connect and Communicate with Supportive Energy Sources”
    In it the author shows photographs of angels and guides as orbs of light surrounding a person. It could be that we all end up like this after death?
    I’m not sure how much of this to believe. As a scientist and sceptic I would want some reproducible controlled measurements … even then I would want convincing that they were free of trickery!
    But I’m always open to possibilities … you never know!

    Reply
  69. In a recent energy healing summit from sounds true there was a video session by Nand Harjani entitled
    “Angels and Guides: How to Connect and Communicate with Supportive Energy Sources”
    In it the author shows photographs of angels and guides as orbs of light surrounding a person. It could be that we all end up like this after death?
    I’m not sure how much of this to believe. As a scientist and sceptic I would want some reproducible controlled measurements … even then I would want convincing that they were free of trickery!
    But I’m always open to possibilities … you never know!

    Reply
  70. In a recent energy healing summit from sounds true there was a video session by Nand Harjani entitled
    “Angels and Guides: How to Connect and Communicate with Supportive Energy Sources”
    In it the author shows photographs of angels and guides as orbs of light surrounding a person. It could be that we all end up like this after death?
    I’m not sure how much of this to believe. As a scientist and sceptic I would want some reproducible controlled measurements … even then I would want convincing that they were free of trickery!
    But I’m always open to possibilities … you never know!

    Reply
  71. My morning coffee nearly spurted over my computer screen on reading your quantum gender suggestion! Perhaps you have scholarly scientific paper there!
    All of your above observations are so fascinating, especially the entanglement principle’s possibility for healing.
    I’ve a good friend who’s very knowledgeable on physics, and he got me interested enough to read Manjit Kumar’s book “Quantum” which is so thought-provoking! My feeble brain isn’t capable of comprehending most of the concepts, but the book really highlights how little we understand of the universe. What we think we know is being constantly challenged.
    Scientific exploration requires imagination, and so there’s a nice bond between that discipline and what we do. We both ask, “what if” and then delve into exploring it. Writers do it by creating stories and often other worlds. As you say, really good authors can draw you into those worlds and they become wonderfully real.
    Thank you for the wonderful question, which has sparked such interesting answers and comments!

    Reply
  72. My morning coffee nearly spurted over my computer screen on reading your quantum gender suggestion! Perhaps you have scholarly scientific paper there!
    All of your above observations are so fascinating, especially the entanglement principle’s possibility for healing.
    I’ve a good friend who’s very knowledgeable on physics, and he got me interested enough to read Manjit Kumar’s book “Quantum” which is so thought-provoking! My feeble brain isn’t capable of comprehending most of the concepts, but the book really highlights how little we understand of the universe. What we think we know is being constantly challenged.
    Scientific exploration requires imagination, and so there’s a nice bond between that discipline and what we do. We both ask, “what if” and then delve into exploring it. Writers do it by creating stories and often other worlds. As you say, really good authors can draw you into those worlds and they become wonderfully real.
    Thank you for the wonderful question, which has sparked such interesting answers and comments!

    Reply
  73. My morning coffee nearly spurted over my computer screen on reading your quantum gender suggestion! Perhaps you have scholarly scientific paper there!
    All of your above observations are so fascinating, especially the entanglement principle’s possibility for healing.
    I’ve a good friend who’s very knowledgeable on physics, and he got me interested enough to read Manjit Kumar’s book “Quantum” which is so thought-provoking! My feeble brain isn’t capable of comprehending most of the concepts, but the book really highlights how little we understand of the universe. What we think we know is being constantly challenged.
    Scientific exploration requires imagination, and so there’s a nice bond between that discipline and what we do. We both ask, “what if” and then delve into exploring it. Writers do it by creating stories and often other worlds. As you say, really good authors can draw you into those worlds and they become wonderfully real.
    Thank you for the wonderful question, which has sparked such interesting answers and comments!

    Reply
  74. My morning coffee nearly spurted over my computer screen on reading your quantum gender suggestion! Perhaps you have scholarly scientific paper there!
    All of your above observations are so fascinating, especially the entanglement principle’s possibility for healing.
    I’ve a good friend who’s very knowledgeable on physics, and he got me interested enough to read Manjit Kumar’s book “Quantum” which is so thought-provoking! My feeble brain isn’t capable of comprehending most of the concepts, but the book really highlights how little we understand of the universe. What we think we know is being constantly challenged.
    Scientific exploration requires imagination, and so there’s a nice bond between that discipline and what we do. We both ask, “what if” and then delve into exploring it. Writers do it by creating stories and often other worlds. As you say, really good authors can draw you into those worlds and they become wonderfully real.
    Thank you for the wonderful question, which has sparked such interesting answers and comments!

    Reply
  75. My morning coffee nearly spurted over my computer screen on reading your quantum gender suggestion! Perhaps you have scholarly scientific paper there!
    All of your above observations are so fascinating, especially the entanglement principle’s possibility for healing.
    I’ve a good friend who’s very knowledgeable on physics, and he got me interested enough to read Manjit Kumar’s book “Quantum” which is so thought-provoking! My feeble brain isn’t capable of comprehending most of the concepts, but the book really highlights how little we understand of the universe. What we think we know is being constantly challenged.
    Scientific exploration requires imagination, and so there’s a nice bond between that discipline and what we do. We both ask, “what if” and then delve into exploring it. Writers do it by creating stories and often other worlds. As you say, really good authors can draw you into those worlds and they become wonderfully real.
    Thank you for the wonderful question, which has sparked such interesting answers and comments!

    Reply
  76. Absolutely fascinating, Quantum! What forms of energy we might “become” is an intriguing question. I tend to be a skeptic on existence after physical death. But I also am open to the possibility that there truly are realms we haven’t yet begun to explore or understand about matter, energy and, well, existence. Astrophysicists are talking about some really wild ideas concerning the universe.

    Reply
  77. Absolutely fascinating, Quantum! What forms of energy we might “become” is an intriguing question. I tend to be a skeptic on existence after physical death. But I also am open to the possibility that there truly are realms we haven’t yet begun to explore or understand about matter, energy and, well, existence. Astrophysicists are talking about some really wild ideas concerning the universe.

    Reply
  78. Absolutely fascinating, Quantum! What forms of energy we might “become” is an intriguing question. I tend to be a skeptic on existence after physical death. But I also am open to the possibility that there truly are realms we haven’t yet begun to explore or understand about matter, energy and, well, existence. Astrophysicists are talking about some really wild ideas concerning the universe.

    Reply
  79. Absolutely fascinating, Quantum! What forms of energy we might “become” is an intriguing question. I tend to be a skeptic on existence after physical death. But I also am open to the possibility that there truly are realms we haven’t yet begun to explore or understand about matter, energy and, well, existence. Astrophysicists are talking about some really wild ideas concerning the universe.

    Reply
  80. Absolutely fascinating, Quantum! What forms of energy we might “become” is an intriguing question. I tend to be a skeptic on existence after physical death. But I also am open to the possibility that there truly are realms we haven’t yet begun to explore or understand about matter, energy and, well, existence. Astrophysicists are talking about some really wild ideas concerning the universe.

    Reply
  81. I believe in ghosts but I’m not over fanciful or anything like that. We moved into our present home, which is newly built, about ten years ago. Even though it’s new there is something here. It’s just a shadow. No real substance but all of us in the house have seen it now. Also while sitting watching tv at night, several times, I’ve called out to see which of the kids had walked into the kitchen, no one there. You can feel the actual presence. But we’ve never felt scared. Whatever it is, it’s not malevolent.
    Love reading ghost stories and time travel.

    Reply
  82. I believe in ghosts but I’m not over fanciful or anything like that. We moved into our present home, which is newly built, about ten years ago. Even though it’s new there is something here. It’s just a shadow. No real substance but all of us in the house have seen it now. Also while sitting watching tv at night, several times, I’ve called out to see which of the kids had walked into the kitchen, no one there. You can feel the actual presence. But we’ve never felt scared. Whatever it is, it’s not malevolent.
    Love reading ghost stories and time travel.

    Reply
  83. I believe in ghosts but I’m not over fanciful or anything like that. We moved into our present home, which is newly built, about ten years ago. Even though it’s new there is something here. It’s just a shadow. No real substance but all of us in the house have seen it now. Also while sitting watching tv at night, several times, I’ve called out to see which of the kids had walked into the kitchen, no one there. You can feel the actual presence. But we’ve never felt scared. Whatever it is, it’s not malevolent.
    Love reading ghost stories and time travel.

    Reply
  84. I believe in ghosts but I’m not over fanciful or anything like that. We moved into our present home, which is newly built, about ten years ago. Even though it’s new there is something here. It’s just a shadow. No real substance but all of us in the house have seen it now. Also while sitting watching tv at night, several times, I’ve called out to see which of the kids had walked into the kitchen, no one there. You can feel the actual presence. But we’ve never felt scared. Whatever it is, it’s not malevolent.
    Love reading ghost stories and time travel.

    Reply
  85. I believe in ghosts but I’m not over fanciful or anything like that. We moved into our present home, which is newly built, about ten years ago. Even though it’s new there is something here. It’s just a shadow. No real substance but all of us in the house have seen it now. Also while sitting watching tv at night, several times, I’ve called out to see which of the kids had walked into the kitchen, no one there. You can feel the actual presence. But we’ve never felt scared. Whatever it is, it’s not malevolent.
    Love reading ghost stories and time travel.

    Reply
  86. I’m not certain that ghosts as portrayed by movies are believable, but I, too, have felt the unhappy energies on battlefields. And I do think that humans have an essence, an energy field, that connects us, which is why people talk of the power of prayer. But beyond that, it’s hard to speculate.

    Reply
  87. I’m not certain that ghosts as portrayed by movies are believable, but I, too, have felt the unhappy energies on battlefields. And I do think that humans have an essence, an energy field, that connects us, which is why people talk of the power of prayer. But beyond that, it’s hard to speculate.

    Reply
  88. I’m not certain that ghosts as portrayed by movies are believable, but I, too, have felt the unhappy energies on battlefields. And I do think that humans have an essence, an energy field, that connects us, which is why people talk of the power of prayer. But beyond that, it’s hard to speculate.

    Reply
  89. I’m not certain that ghosts as portrayed by movies are believable, but I, too, have felt the unhappy energies on battlefields. And I do think that humans have an essence, an energy field, that connects us, which is why people talk of the power of prayer. But beyond that, it’s hard to speculate.

    Reply
  90. I’m not certain that ghosts as portrayed by movies are believable, but I, too, have felt the unhappy energies on battlefields. And I do think that humans have an essence, an energy field, that connects us, which is why people talk of the power of prayer. But beyond that, it’s hard to speculate.

    Reply
  91. ooo, that’s spooky enough for me. Wonder if there might have been a graveyard in that spot at one time? Or if a much-beloved house had been taken down on that lot? Glad it’s not malevolent!

    Reply
  92. ooo, that’s spooky enough for me. Wonder if there might have been a graveyard in that spot at one time? Or if a much-beloved house had been taken down on that lot? Glad it’s not malevolent!

    Reply
  93. ooo, that’s spooky enough for me. Wonder if there might have been a graveyard in that spot at one time? Or if a much-beloved house had been taken down on that lot? Glad it’s not malevolent!

    Reply
  94. ooo, that’s spooky enough for me. Wonder if there might have been a graveyard in that spot at one time? Or if a much-beloved house had been taken down on that lot? Glad it’s not malevolent!

    Reply
  95. ooo, that’s spooky enough for me. Wonder if there might have been a graveyard in that spot at one time? Or if a much-beloved house had been taken down on that lot? Glad it’s not malevolent!

    Reply
  96. I believe that anyone who has ever been at Gettysburg’s battlefield will admit to an overwhelming “feeling” of sorrow.
    I could feel all those tears.
    I have lived in a house that had one area which was always cold, even during a hot summer in Ohio. That area made me feel as though someone was very angry and ugly and I would not allow my children to go into that area. We left there as quickly as we could.
    I have also lived in a house which had a feeling of laughter and joy. Everyone felt welcome when they walked through the door, and it was not all from our family, but partially from the house itself.

    Reply
  97. I believe that anyone who has ever been at Gettysburg’s battlefield will admit to an overwhelming “feeling” of sorrow.
    I could feel all those tears.
    I have lived in a house that had one area which was always cold, even during a hot summer in Ohio. That area made me feel as though someone was very angry and ugly and I would not allow my children to go into that area. We left there as quickly as we could.
    I have also lived in a house which had a feeling of laughter and joy. Everyone felt welcome when they walked through the door, and it was not all from our family, but partially from the house itself.

    Reply
  98. I believe that anyone who has ever been at Gettysburg’s battlefield will admit to an overwhelming “feeling” of sorrow.
    I could feel all those tears.
    I have lived in a house that had one area which was always cold, even during a hot summer in Ohio. That area made me feel as though someone was very angry and ugly and I would not allow my children to go into that area. We left there as quickly as we could.
    I have also lived in a house which had a feeling of laughter and joy. Everyone felt welcome when they walked through the door, and it was not all from our family, but partially from the house itself.

    Reply
  99. I believe that anyone who has ever been at Gettysburg’s battlefield will admit to an overwhelming “feeling” of sorrow.
    I could feel all those tears.
    I have lived in a house that had one area which was always cold, even during a hot summer in Ohio. That area made me feel as though someone was very angry and ugly and I would not allow my children to go into that area. We left there as quickly as we could.
    I have also lived in a house which had a feeling of laughter and joy. Everyone felt welcome when they walked through the door, and it was not all from our family, but partially from the house itself.

    Reply
  100. I believe that anyone who has ever been at Gettysburg’s battlefield will admit to an overwhelming “feeling” of sorrow.
    I could feel all those tears.
    I have lived in a house that had one area which was always cold, even during a hot summer in Ohio. That area made me feel as though someone was very angry and ugly and I would not allow my children to go into that area. We left there as quickly as we could.
    I have also lived in a house which had a feeling of laughter and joy. Everyone felt welcome when they walked through the door, and it was not all from our family, but partially from the house itself.

    Reply
  101. Come on, all of us who cut our teeth on Edward Eager and C.S.Lewis and then moved on to Mary Stewart have no choice but to believe in magic. It’s part of our literary DNA! I am always grateful when good writers incorporate what is to me just a slightly less obvious part of reality into their stories (thank you, Susanna, Mary Jo, Nicola, Pat, and so many others). Like many “grown-ups,” I loved the Harry Potter books, but one of the scenes that touched me the most was the one when Sirius went through the curtain and Harry tried to follow him. That was part of the ancient magic coming through in Rowling’s writing. As someone who knew a thing or two about throwing words together once wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . . ”

    Reply
  102. Come on, all of us who cut our teeth on Edward Eager and C.S.Lewis and then moved on to Mary Stewart have no choice but to believe in magic. It’s part of our literary DNA! I am always grateful when good writers incorporate what is to me just a slightly less obvious part of reality into their stories (thank you, Susanna, Mary Jo, Nicola, Pat, and so many others). Like many “grown-ups,” I loved the Harry Potter books, but one of the scenes that touched me the most was the one when Sirius went through the curtain and Harry tried to follow him. That was part of the ancient magic coming through in Rowling’s writing. As someone who knew a thing or two about throwing words together once wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . . ”

    Reply
  103. Come on, all of us who cut our teeth on Edward Eager and C.S.Lewis and then moved on to Mary Stewart have no choice but to believe in magic. It’s part of our literary DNA! I am always grateful when good writers incorporate what is to me just a slightly less obvious part of reality into their stories (thank you, Susanna, Mary Jo, Nicola, Pat, and so many others). Like many “grown-ups,” I loved the Harry Potter books, but one of the scenes that touched me the most was the one when Sirius went through the curtain and Harry tried to follow him. That was part of the ancient magic coming through in Rowling’s writing. As someone who knew a thing or two about throwing words together once wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . . ”

    Reply
  104. Come on, all of us who cut our teeth on Edward Eager and C.S.Lewis and then moved on to Mary Stewart have no choice but to believe in magic. It’s part of our literary DNA! I am always grateful when good writers incorporate what is to me just a slightly less obvious part of reality into their stories (thank you, Susanna, Mary Jo, Nicola, Pat, and so many others). Like many “grown-ups,” I loved the Harry Potter books, but one of the scenes that touched me the most was the one when Sirius went through the curtain and Harry tried to follow him. That was part of the ancient magic coming through in Rowling’s writing. As someone who knew a thing or two about throwing words together once wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . . ”

    Reply
  105. Come on, all of us who cut our teeth on Edward Eager and C.S.Lewis and then moved on to Mary Stewart have no choice but to believe in magic. It’s part of our literary DNA! I am always grateful when good writers incorporate what is to me just a slightly less obvious part of reality into their stories (thank you, Susanna, Mary Jo, Nicola, Pat, and so many others). Like many “grown-ups,” I loved the Harry Potter books, but one of the scenes that touched me the most was the one when Sirius went through the curtain and Harry tried to follow him. That was part of the ancient magic coming through in Rowling’s writing. As someone who knew a thing or two about throwing words together once wrote, “there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio . . . ”

    Reply
  106. Yes, Gettysburg is one of the battlefields I mentioned in an earlier comment. It’s oppressive. You can feel the dead and the sorrow and the horror.
    You must be wonderfully sensitive to notice your house ghosts! I’ve only ever found one, and it was more a matter of her finding me. 😉

    Reply
  107. Yes, Gettysburg is one of the battlefields I mentioned in an earlier comment. It’s oppressive. You can feel the dead and the sorrow and the horror.
    You must be wonderfully sensitive to notice your house ghosts! I’ve only ever found one, and it was more a matter of her finding me. 😉

    Reply
  108. Yes, Gettysburg is one of the battlefields I mentioned in an earlier comment. It’s oppressive. You can feel the dead and the sorrow and the horror.
    You must be wonderfully sensitive to notice your house ghosts! I’ve only ever found one, and it was more a matter of her finding me. 😉

    Reply
  109. Yes, Gettysburg is one of the battlefields I mentioned in an earlier comment. It’s oppressive. You can feel the dead and the sorrow and the horror.
    You must be wonderfully sensitive to notice your house ghosts! I’ve only ever found one, and it was more a matter of her finding me. 😉

    Reply
  110. Yes, Gettysburg is one of the battlefields I mentioned in an earlier comment. It’s oppressive. You can feel the dead and the sorrow and the horror.
    You must be wonderfully sensitive to notice your house ghosts! I’ve only ever found one, and it was more a matter of her finding me. 😉

    Reply
  111. Quantum and Pat — while time travel machines are possibly bit tricky to start with, there’s a very good set of instructions for build-your-own 747 in Bert Fegg’s Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, which suggests that though the chaps at Boeing use some fancy materials, “for our purposes reinforced chicken-wire will do the job nicely.” Pat, that seems more along our skill set. *g* (It will astound you to learn that the Bert Fegg book is by the Monty Python boys)

    Reply
  112. Quantum and Pat — while time travel machines are possibly bit tricky to start with, there’s a very good set of instructions for build-your-own 747 in Bert Fegg’s Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, which suggests that though the chaps at Boeing use some fancy materials, “for our purposes reinforced chicken-wire will do the job nicely.” Pat, that seems more along our skill set. *g* (It will astound you to learn that the Bert Fegg book is by the Monty Python boys)

    Reply
  113. Quantum and Pat — while time travel machines are possibly bit tricky to start with, there’s a very good set of instructions for build-your-own 747 in Bert Fegg’s Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, which suggests that though the chaps at Boeing use some fancy materials, “for our purposes reinforced chicken-wire will do the job nicely.” Pat, that seems more along our skill set. *g* (It will astound you to learn that the Bert Fegg book is by the Monty Python boys)

    Reply
  114. Quantum and Pat — while time travel machines are possibly bit tricky to start with, there’s a very good set of instructions for build-your-own 747 in Bert Fegg’s Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, which suggests that though the chaps at Boeing use some fancy materials, “for our purposes reinforced chicken-wire will do the job nicely.” Pat, that seems more along our skill set. *g* (It will astound you to learn that the Bert Fegg book is by the Monty Python boys)

    Reply
  115. Quantum and Pat — while time travel machines are possibly bit tricky to start with, there’s a very good set of instructions for build-your-own 747 in Bert Fegg’s Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, which suggests that though the chaps at Boeing use some fancy materials, “for our purposes reinforced chicken-wire will do the job nicely.” Pat, that seems more along our skill set. *g* (It will astound you to learn that the Bert Fegg book is by the Monty Python boys)

    Reply
  116. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too. I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  117. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too. I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  118. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too. I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  119. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too. I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  120. Sue, I’m a huge fan of Mercedes Lackey too. I also think Juliet Marillier incorporates very believable magic/otherness in her fantasy stories — set usually in early Ireland or other parts of Europe.

    Reply
  121. Linda, I used to think vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column. I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the suggestion of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  122. Linda, I used to think vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column. I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the suggestion of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  123. Linda, I used to think vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column. I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the suggestion of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  124. Linda, I used to think vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column. I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the suggestion of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  125. Linda, I used to think vampires and werewolves belonged in horror, a genre into which I — a wimp of the highest order — don’t venture, but I’ve been enticed to read some of the paranormal romances, and I have to admit that 1) they’re not horrific or gruesome, and 2) I’ve really enjoyed them. Pat and Mary Jo got me reading Patricia Briggs and others — some of the recommendations are in our monthly WWR column. I love alternative history stories, too. One of Mary Jo’s books had the suggestion of Napoleon being exiled to Australia. That really got the possibilities spinning in my mind.

    Reply
  126. I love paranormal fiction in most of its incarnations and it’s part of my broad reading diet. I love ghost stories too. I often think ‘that’s not how it works’ but I can suspend my disbelief and enjoy the fantasy element of a well written story.
    I am a total believer. I write straight historical fiction but to get at the history beyond the research books, I use psychic time travel. I can’t do it myself but a close friend has the ability to tune into the past – and yes, it’s an energy thing and a dimension thing. She gets it through like a film but with full sensory input and that includes thoughts and feelings. I get the information checked out by a medieval historian and she says it’s medieval mindset through and through. The other day she said to me that I was no longer a tourist in my chosen century of study, but a native speaker. The most interesting thing that has ever happened to me and Alison (psychic friend) in our adventures in time travel was the occasion when the words she was getting weren’t translated in her head into English, but for whatever reason came through in the original old French. It was a bishop talking during the divorce negotiations between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII. I wrote it down phonetically and sent it to my historian friend who reads Old French for a hobby. She said that it appeared to be legal terms and conditions concerned with land entitlement!
    Add to that, that we have a ghost dog at home that regularly clatters about (self and husband can hear his paws as he walks across the laminate floors) and also that my down to earth, pragmatic husband has had numerous experiences including talking to a guy who he later found out had died 9 months earlier, and yes I can’t not believe it. I think we’ll explain a lot of it at some point, we just don’t have the tools and understanding at the moment even though we’re making advances.
    I hate those ghost story programmes though, where it’s all about the sensationalism and screaming, and not helping the entities.

    Reply
  127. I love paranormal fiction in most of its incarnations and it’s part of my broad reading diet. I love ghost stories too. I often think ‘that’s not how it works’ but I can suspend my disbelief and enjoy the fantasy element of a well written story.
    I am a total believer. I write straight historical fiction but to get at the history beyond the research books, I use psychic time travel. I can’t do it myself but a close friend has the ability to tune into the past – and yes, it’s an energy thing and a dimension thing. She gets it through like a film but with full sensory input and that includes thoughts and feelings. I get the information checked out by a medieval historian and she says it’s medieval mindset through and through. The other day she said to me that I was no longer a tourist in my chosen century of study, but a native speaker. The most interesting thing that has ever happened to me and Alison (psychic friend) in our adventures in time travel was the occasion when the words she was getting weren’t translated in her head into English, but for whatever reason came through in the original old French. It was a bishop talking during the divorce negotiations between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII. I wrote it down phonetically and sent it to my historian friend who reads Old French for a hobby. She said that it appeared to be legal terms and conditions concerned with land entitlement!
    Add to that, that we have a ghost dog at home that regularly clatters about (self and husband can hear his paws as he walks across the laminate floors) and also that my down to earth, pragmatic husband has had numerous experiences including talking to a guy who he later found out had died 9 months earlier, and yes I can’t not believe it. I think we’ll explain a lot of it at some point, we just don’t have the tools and understanding at the moment even though we’re making advances.
    I hate those ghost story programmes though, where it’s all about the sensationalism and screaming, and not helping the entities.

    Reply
  128. I love paranormal fiction in most of its incarnations and it’s part of my broad reading diet. I love ghost stories too. I often think ‘that’s not how it works’ but I can suspend my disbelief and enjoy the fantasy element of a well written story.
    I am a total believer. I write straight historical fiction but to get at the history beyond the research books, I use psychic time travel. I can’t do it myself but a close friend has the ability to tune into the past – and yes, it’s an energy thing and a dimension thing. She gets it through like a film but with full sensory input and that includes thoughts and feelings. I get the information checked out by a medieval historian and she says it’s medieval mindset through and through. The other day she said to me that I was no longer a tourist in my chosen century of study, but a native speaker. The most interesting thing that has ever happened to me and Alison (psychic friend) in our adventures in time travel was the occasion when the words she was getting weren’t translated in her head into English, but for whatever reason came through in the original old French. It was a bishop talking during the divorce negotiations between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII. I wrote it down phonetically and sent it to my historian friend who reads Old French for a hobby. She said that it appeared to be legal terms and conditions concerned with land entitlement!
    Add to that, that we have a ghost dog at home that regularly clatters about (self and husband can hear his paws as he walks across the laminate floors) and also that my down to earth, pragmatic husband has had numerous experiences including talking to a guy who he later found out had died 9 months earlier, and yes I can’t not believe it. I think we’ll explain a lot of it at some point, we just don’t have the tools and understanding at the moment even though we’re making advances.
    I hate those ghost story programmes though, where it’s all about the sensationalism and screaming, and not helping the entities.

    Reply
  129. I love paranormal fiction in most of its incarnations and it’s part of my broad reading diet. I love ghost stories too. I often think ‘that’s not how it works’ but I can suspend my disbelief and enjoy the fantasy element of a well written story.
    I am a total believer. I write straight historical fiction but to get at the history beyond the research books, I use psychic time travel. I can’t do it myself but a close friend has the ability to tune into the past – and yes, it’s an energy thing and a dimension thing. She gets it through like a film but with full sensory input and that includes thoughts and feelings. I get the information checked out by a medieval historian and she says it’s medieval mindset through and through. The other day she said to me that I was no longer a tourist in my chosen century of study, but a native speaker. The most interesting thing that has ever happened to me and Alison (psychic friend) in our adventures in time travel was the occasion when the words she was getting weren’t translated in her head into English, but for whatever reason came through in the original old French. It was a bishop talking during the divorce negotiations between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII. I wrote it down phonetically and sent it to my historian friend who reads Old French for a hobby. She said that it appeared to be legal terms and conditions concerned with land entitlement!
    Add to that, that we have a ghost dog at home that regularly clatters about (self and husband can hear his paws as he walks across the laminate floors) and also that my down to earth, pragmatic husband has had numerous experiences including talking to a guy who he later found out had died 9 months earlier, and yes I can’t not believe it. I think we’ll explain a lot of it at some point, we just don’t have the tools and understanding at the moment even though we’re making advances.
    I hate those ghost story programmes though, where it’s all about the sensationalism and screaming, and not helping the entities.

    Reply
  130. I love paranormal fiction in most of its incarnations and it’s part of my broad reading diet. I love ghost stories too. I often think ‘that’s not how it works’ but I can suspend my disbelief and enjoy the fantasy element of a well written story.
    I am a total believer. I write straight historical fiction but to get at the history beyond the research books, I use psychic time travel. I can’t do it myself but a close friend has the ability to tune into the past – and yes, it’s an energy thing and a dimension thing. She gets it through like a film but with full sensory input and that includes thoughts and feelings. I get the information checked out by a medieval historian and she says it’s medieval mindset through and through. The other day she said to me that I was no longer a tourist in my chosen century of study, but a native speaker. The most interesting thing that has ever happened to me and Alison (psychic friend) in our adventures in time travel was the occasion when the words she was getting weren’t translated in her head into English, but for whatever reason came through in the original old French. It was a bishop talking during the divorce negotiations between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII. I wrote it down phonetically and sent it to my historian friend who reads Old French for a hobby. She said that it appeared to be legal terms and conditions concerned with land entitlement!
    Add to that, that we have a ghost dog at home that regularly clatters about (self and husband can hear his paws as he walks across the laminate floors) and also that my down to earth, pragmatic husband has had numerous experiences including talking to a guy who he later found out had died 9 months earlier, and yes I can’t not believe it. I think we’ll explain a lot of it at some point, we just don’t have the tools and understanding at the moment even though we’re making advances.
    I hate those ghost story programmes though, where it’s all about the sensationalism and screaming, and not helping the entities.

    Reply

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