There’s Something About a Soldier: Romance and the Military

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

It’s no accident that military heroes feature frequently in romances, whether they’re medieval knights or modern day SEALs.  Soldiers and sailors are generally fit and hunky, and in modern day stories, they may be tough, capable females as well as males. 

Creating a military protagonist is shorthand for a number of traits: courage, honor, loyalty, and a willingness to put the needs of others above one’s one needs.  Romance shares these powerful values, so characters with such traits make admirable heroes and heroines. 

NEVERLESSTHANALADYART Also, romances and love in general often involve nurturing, and war can create characters in grave need of nurturing and healing.  Wounded heroes are a particular specialty of mine.  The hero of my May book, Never Less Than a Lady, is one a such. 

Usually military service is back story because I want to focus on consequences and a developing relationship, but in my book Shattered Rainbows , I went onto the field of Waterloo, so I’ll be giving away a copy of that book to one commenter on this post.

I got the idea for a military appreciation blog when I read the most recent SOS America blog by Kim Lowe.  Kim is a former Air Force captain and current major in the reserves and military spouse.  Long-time Word Wench readers may remember a lovely post she did called Sisterhood of the Service, a discussion of the bonds uniting military spouses. 

Today the Word Wenches are the site of Kim’s Wandering Wednesday blog, so I encourage you to click over to her site to see how she met most of the Wenches.  In addition, I’ve asked other Wenches for their feelings on writing the military into romance, and I’ll end with a piece written by Kim Lowe. 

Larkswood Legacy Nicola Cornick:

I’ve always loved reading romance books with a military thread or background. As someone who comes from a family with military connections, it was one of the proudest moments of my life when I was given the honorary rank of major in the UK army when I worked in a military college. That role also gave me the opportunity to meet men and women in the armed forces of over 40 countries around the world and observe at close quarters the qualities I admire in them: strength of character, courage, integrity – and perfect time-keeping.

The first military hero I wrote was in my third book, The Larkswood Legacy. He was a British Navy captain who had been accused of cowardice at the Battle of Lake Champlain in 1812 and had to clear his name.

More recently I have written two military heroes in my forthcoming series. There’s Yellow_admiral_small another Navy man (yes, I’m drawn to them!) who is an explorer. A line in one of my research books summed up the idea of the nineteenth century British naval officer for me: “There were lots of young officers anxious for adventure and promotion. They were efficient and daring with polish and dash.” The series also features an American sea captain with all those qualities and more, and an Irish revolutionary hero fighting for the French!

In writing the series I was inspired by a song called Love Farewell that I heard on the Help for Heroes website. It’s a song from the Napoleonic Wars sung by folk singer and actor John Tams, best known for playing the Rifleman Daniel Hagman in the TV series Sharpe, and The Band and Bugles of The Rifles. It’s poignant and heroic and I think as relevant now as it was in the Napoleonic Wars.

Wellington Cara Elliott/Andrea Pickens:

Strength, honor, discipline—I think military heroes, especially ones in a historical romance, conjure up a certain image for most readers. There's also a swashbuckling aura of danger to them, which adds to their allure. Growing up, I loved the Horatio Hornblower series, and then became a great fan of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin books and Bernard Cornwall's Sharpe series.

Hornblower_pistol You have to admit, there's something awfully attractive about devil-may-care bravery and calm courage under fire. And then there's the uniform . . . an officer in his regimentals cuts such a dashing figure. (Remember all the excitement in Pride and Prejudice when the army takes up residence in Merryton!)

When I look at a portrait of Wellington in all his glory, I see someone who exudes an Cara_Andrea's father&mother air of quiet self-confidence.  It's hard not to find that appealing. (On a personal note, I've another reason for thinking men look quite handsome in uniform—here are my father and mother just before their wedding.)

I haven't written too many military men, but it just so happens that the hero in my just-released book is a war hero-turned-artist. For me, it was really interesting to juxtapose a soldier's stoic toughness with a softer, more sensitive side. Steel swords crossed with sable paint brushes-I hope readers will find the mix intriguing.

Secret Wedding Jo Beverley:

I realize that what fascinates me about military men is the uniqueness of the experience, which I see reflected in the writings of  Georgian and Regency military men. Some relate adventures with exuberance while others write of trials and anguish, and often there's not much to choose between what actually happened. Some look back in sorrow, but others sigh for the good old days.

In my books, Cyn Malloren (My Lady Notorious) fights his brother Rothgar to get into the  army. Christian Hill in A Secret Wedding is raring to go, as is Van Vandeimen, (The Demon's Mistress), dragging his friends, George Hawkinville and Con Somerford with him.

Con  (The Dragon's Bride) is a different type. He becomes a soldier because he's a THree Heroes second son and his friends are doing it, but he's happy to become a civilian when he inherits the family estate. Only duty sends him back, because there was such a shortage of experienced officers for Waterloo, and it almost breaks him.

The third of these "three heroes" is George Hawkinville (The Devil's Heiress), my military geek. He gets a commission in a cavalry regiment, but is soon grabbed by the Quartermaster's division and put to work on the chess-like administration of troop movements and provisioning. He loves the work but feels guilty about how rarely he sees action.

I wrote Hawk that way because I think romance novels don't pay enough attention to the support services. One day, I want to do an engineer.

Gallant Waif Anne Gracie:

I've had a number of military heroes — all former soldiers, rather than currently active. I've never set a book during the war (the Peninsular/Napoleonic  war that is) — I'll leave that to Bernard Cornwell, who wrote the magnificent, action-packed Sharpe series. My main interest is in soldiers after they return home and try to settle back into civilian life again. I often like to write about people whose lives are in transition in some form.

My very first book, Gallant Waif, had a hero who'd been a soldier, and a heroine who'd been caught up in war, too. They'd both been wounded in very different ways — he physically, she emotionally — and because they each understood the reality of what the other had endured, they were able to save and heal each other.

My current series is also about former soldiers, friends who've returned from the war and are now trying to carve out a life for themselves back home— or trying to avoid it, as the case may be. Most of them don't have strong family ties and the brotherly camaraderie that forms between soldiers during war is an important factor in what sustains them.

In Australia we call that kind of friendship mateship, and my father had it with his two brothers-in-law, who were both in the army with him. They knew they could call on the others for help at any time, and they'd get it, promptly and with no questions asked. They never would ask, of course — men of pride, one and all — but they knew they could. It's that kind of friendship that's between the men in my "devil riders" series.

Richard Sharpe 1

From our new Word Wench, who will make her bow on June 16th:

I haven't written a straightforward military hero yet, but when I wanted to put a man in charge of a band of a canny, suspicious, formidable undercover operatives, I made him a former military officer with battlefield experience. 

In the planning stages of the book I wondered — should I make my hero even more Captain Aubrey skilled and lethal than his men?  The best marksman, the best wrestler, the best knife wielder?  Should the leader of this group be the über-fighter? 

That's heroic on a visceral level.  We love a man strong enough to defend his family and his home.

But the more I looked at my story, the more convinced I became that particular fighting skills were pretty much irrelevant.  My hero ruefully admits he's not much of a knife fighter.  What I needed was somebody the others would trust and follow without question.

Officers are not necessarily the most deadly individual fighters themselves.  They have good judgement, a cool head under fire, and an absolute, practical dedication Sharpe and redcoats to the welfare of their men.  They make a military unit into a cohesive strike force instead of fifty separate fighters.

That's why I wanted a military hero.  Because of the teamwork.  Because of the leadership.

Air Force plane USAF Captain Kim Lowe (ret.):

When asked why I read romance books, I respond, “It’s an escape from military life.”   But is it?   I enjoy historicals, particularly Regencies, because I have lived in Europe.  I’ve toured picturesque towns, crumbling castles, and historic battlefields.  I’ve experience other cultures, savored different food, and seen history in the making, including the fall of the Berlin Wall.  All because of the military.  

I appreciate writers’ creativity  – they celebrate life in the past, present, and future.  They give us hope that there is a Happily Ever After as their characters experience the same problems that we experience.  Romance writers engage in free speech, echoing the cliché, “Use it or loose it.”   Writers’ characters, settings, and plots remind us why we have free speech – our world is diverse.  In respecting diversity, we respect ourselves.  

In the end, I discovered that romance writing mirrors military life.  Like the military,Chosen Men romance writers seek to improve themselves through education.  Like the military, romance writers strive for individual achievement and encourage others at the same time.   Like the military, romance writers work as a team to improve their work product and work environment.   Romance writers embrace “life, liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” that the military have taken an oath to defend. Thus, the military’s sacrifices are not in vain.

I write a monthly newsletter for Kathyrn Falk’s military charity, Support Our Soldiers (SOS) America Inc.  I promote romance reading, military issues, international travel, and Hawaiian culture.  I also publish a weekly column, Wednesday Wanderings, to visit special places around the world and Internet.  The blogsite is open to all to encourage a cultural exchange between military and non-military readers.  Come over this week for Wednesday Wandering to learn how I became a fan of the Word Wenches.

************************************************************

Shattered Rainbows 2 My thanks to Kim Lowe and my sister Wenches for sharing thoughts on the intersection of romance and the military.  As I said above, I’ll send a copy of Shattered Rainbows, my Waterloo story (though that’s only a small part of the book), to someone who comments on this post before midnight Thursday.  Share what you think about military elements in romance. (Note: when I was putting together this blog, Sean Bean as Richard Sharpe came up a lot!)

And to all those brave men and women who have served this country—thank you for your service.

Mary Jo

180 thoughts on “There’s Something About a Soldier: Romance and the Military”

  1. Anything that brings attention to the service men (and women) give to their country in its defense is a good thing. Thank you for making the military a factor in your novels.
    My grandfather is going to the WWII Memorial in Washington DC in a couple of weeks thanks to an organization called Ozark Honor Flight that takes military veterans who might not otherwise get to go to DC to see their monument. They are focused right now on the WWII vets. We are THRILLED that he has this opportunity to visit the memorial and be recognized for his service to his country.
    Thanks again!

    Reply
  2. Anything that brings attention to the service men (and women) give to their country in its defense is a good thing. Thank you for making the military a factor in your novels.
    My grandfather is going to the WWII Memorial in Washington DC in a couple of weeks thanks to an organization called Ozark Honor Flight that takes military veterans who might not otherwise get to go to DC to see their monument. They are focused right now on the WWII vets. We are THRILLED that he has this opportunity to visit the memorial and be recognized for his service to his country.
    Thanks again!

    Reply
  3. Anything that brings attention to the service men (and women) give to their country in its defense is a good thing. Thank you for making the military a factor in your novels.
    My grandfather is going to the WWII Memorial in Washington DC in a couple of weeks thanks to an organization called Ozark Honor Flight that takes military veterans who might not otherwise get to go to DC to see their monument. They are focused right now on the WWII vets. We are THRILLED that he has this opportunity to visit the memorial and be recognized for his service to his country.
    Thanks again!

    Reply
  4. Anything that brings attention to the service men (and women) give to their country in its defense is a good thing. Thank you for making the military a factor in your novels.
    My grandfather is going to the WWII Memorial in Washington DC in a couple of weeks thanks to an organization called Ozark Honor Flight that takes military veterans who might not otherwise get to go to DC to see their monument. They are focused right now on the WWII vets. We are THRILLED that he has this opportunity to visit the memorial and be recognized for his service to his country.
    Thanks again!

    Reply
  5. Anything that brings attention to the service men (and women) give to their country in its defense is a good thing. Thank you for making the military a factor in your novels.
    My grandfather is going to the WWII Memorial in Washington DC in a couple of weeks thanks to an organization called Ozark Honor Flight that takes military veterans who might not otherwise get to go to DC to see their monument. They are focused right now on the WWII vets. We are THRILLED that he has this opportunity to visit the memorial and be recognized for his service to his country.
    Thanks again!

    Reply
  6. I like reading about military men as well. I can see why Sean Bean’s name came up a lot; he portrayed Sharpe so well in the Sharpe’s Eagle mini-series. When I read the books, I pictured Sean as Sharpe.
    My dad is a Korean War vet and my little hometown has created a brick wall memorial for all of the local “boys” (living and deceased) who fought in wars from WWI to the latest conflict in Afghanistan. It is a wonderful memorial and is proudly displayed in the center of town.

    Reply
  7. I like reading about military men as well. I can see why Sean Bean’s name came up a lot; he portrayed Sharpe so well in the Sharpe’s Eagle mini-series. When I read the books, I pictured Sean as Sharpe.
    My dad is a Korean War vet and my little hometown has created a brick wall memorial for all of the local “boys” (living and deceased) who fought in wars from WWI to the latest conflict in Afghanistan. It is a wonderful memorial and is proudly displayed in the center of town.

    Reply
  8. I like reading about military men as well. I can see why Sean Bean’s name came up a lot; he portrayed Sharpe so well in the Sharpe’s Eagle mini-series. When I read the books, I pictured Sean as Sharpe.
    My dad is a Korean War vet and my little hometown has created a brick wall memorial for all of the local “boys” (living and deceased) who fought in wars from WWI to the latest conflict in Afghanistan. It is a wonderful memorial and is proudly displayed in the center of town.

    Reply
  9. I like reading about military men as well. I can see why Sean Bean’s name came up a lot; he portrayed Sharpe so well in the Sharpe’s Eagle mini-series. When I read the books, I pictured Sean as Sharpe.
    My dad is a Korean War vet and my little hometown has created a brick wall memorial for all of the local “boys” (living and deceased) who fought in wars from WWI to the latest conflict in Afghanistan. It is a wonderful memorial and is proudly displayed in the center of town.

    Reply
  10. I like reading about military men as well. I can see why Sean Bean’s name came up a lot; he portrayed Sharpe so well in the Sharpe’s Eagle mini-series. When I read the books, I pictured Sean as Sharpe.
    My dad is a Korean War vet and my little hometown has created a brick wall memorial for all of the local “boys” (living and deceased) who fought in wars from WWI to the latest conflict in Afghanistan. It is a wonderful memorial and is proudly displayed in the center of town.

    Reply
  11. I come from a family with a long tradition of military service. Just in recent generations, my father spent his first few years after high school stationed in Germany during the Cold War, one of my brothers joined the Marines after high school, another went to West Point and spent 20+ years in the Army before retiring as a Lt Col, and my oldest nephew (the Marine brother’s son) is a captain in the National Guard and has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    So I suppose it’s not surprising that I’m so fascinated by the Napoleonic Wars as a reader and a writer. Though I have to admit the incredibly attractive uniforms don’t hurt.
    And Cara, I share your admiration for Wellington. When I first started researching the era, I was predisposed to dislike him as the ultimate aristocratic snob, but I’ve ended up developing something of a crush on him. He was just so cool-headed and competent and snarky that I couldn’t help it.

    Reply
  12. I come from a family with a long tradition of military service. Just in recent generations, my father spent his first few years after high school stationed in Germany during the Cold War, one of my brothers joined the Marines after high school, another went to West Point and spent 20+ years in the Army before retiring as a Lt Col, and my oldest nephew (the Marine brother’s son) is a captain in the National Guard and has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    So I suppose it’s not surprising that I’m so fascinated by the Napoleonic Wars as a reader and a writer. Though I have to admit the incredibly attractive uniforms don’t hurt.
    And Cara, I share your admiration for Wellington. When I first started researching the era, I was predisposed to dislike him as the ultimate aristocratic snob, but I’ve ended up developing something of a crush on him. He was just so cool-headed and competent and snarky that I couldn’t help it.

    Reply
  13. I come from a family with a long tradition of military service. Just in recent generations, my father spent his first few years after high school stationed in Germany during the Cold War, one of my brothers joined the Marines after high school, another went to West Point and spent 20+ years in the Army before retiring as a Lt Col, and my oldest nephew (the Marine brother’s son) is a captain in the National Guard and has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    So I suppose it’s not surprising that I’m so fascinated by the Napoleonic Wars as a reader and a writer. Though I have to admit the incredibly attractive uniforms don’t hurt.
    And Cara, I share your admiration for Wellington. When I first started researching the era, I was predisposed to dislike him as the ultimate aristocratic snob, but I’ve ended up developing something of a crush on him. He was just so cool-headed and competent and snarky that I couldn’t help it.

    Reply
  14. I come from a family with a long tradition of military service. Just in recent generations, my father spent his first few years after high school stationed in Germany during the Cold War, one of my brothers joined the Marines after high school, another went to West Point and spent 20+ years in the Army before retiring as a Lt Col, and my oldest nephew (the Marine brother’s son) is a captain in the National Guard and has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    So I suppose it’s not surprising that I’m so fascinated by the Napoleonic Wars as a reader and a writer. Though I have to admit the incredibly attractive uniforms don’t hurt.
    And Cara, I share your admiration for Wellington. When I first started researching the era, I was predisposed to dislike him as the ultimate aristocratic snob, but I’ve ended up developing something of a crush on him. He was just so cool-headed and competent and snarky that I couldn’t help it.

    Reply
  15. I come from a family with a long tradition of military service. Just in recent generations, my father spent his first few years after high school stationed in Germany during the Cold War, one of my brothers joined the Marines after high school, another went to West Point and spent 20+ years in the Army before retiring as a Lt Col, and my oldest nephew (the Marine brother’s son) is a captain in the National Guard and has served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    So I suppose it’s not surprising that I’m so fascinated by the Napoleonic Wars as a reader and a writer. Though I have to admit the incredibly attractive uniforms don’t hurt.
    And Cara, I share your admiration for Wellington. When I first started researching the era, I was predisposed to dislike him as the ultimate aristocratic snob, but I’ve ended up developing something of a crush on him. He was just so cool-headed and competent and snarky that I couldn’t help it.

    Reply
  16. Wonderful post, Mary Jo! Right now, I am on a WWII obsession. I just watched the Ken Burns series, “The War,” an outstanding documentary he did in 2007. It was awesome, and it really showed the impact the war had on individuals and their hometowns. He had so much war footage never before seen. It was like watching a riveting movie. I highly recommend it.
    And Susanna, I’m with you re Wellington. He had me the moment I found out he told Harriet Wilson, “Publish and be damned.”

    Reply
  17. Wonderful post, Mary Jo! Right now, I am on a WWII obsession. I just watched the Ken Burns series, “The War,” an outstanding documentary he did in 2007. It was awesome, and it really showed the impact the war had on individuals and their hometowns. He had so much war footage never before seen. It was like watching a riveting movie. I highly recommend it.
    And Susanna, I’m with you re Wellington. He had me the moment I found out he told Harriet Wilson, “Publish and be damned.”

    Reply
  18. Wonderful post, Mary Jo! Right now, I am on a WWII obsession. I just watched the Ken Burns series, “The War,” an outstanding documentary he did in 2007. It was awesome, and it really showed the impact the war had on individuals and their hometowns. He had so much war footage never before seen. It was like watching a riveting movie. I highly recommend it.
    And Susanna, I’m with you re Wellington. He had me the moment I found out he told Harriet Wilson, “Publish and be damned.”

    Reply
  19. Wonderful post, Mary Jo! Right now, I am on a WWII obsession. I just watched the Ken Burns series, “The War,” an outstanding documentary he did in 2007. It was awesome, and it really showed the impact the war had on individuals and their hometowns. He had so much war footage never before seen. It was like watching a riveting movie. I highly recommend it.
    And Susanna, I’m with you re Wellington. He had me the moment I found out he told Harriet Wilson, “Publish and be damned.”

    Reply
  20. Wonderful post, Mary Jo! Right now, I am on a WWII obsession. I just watched the Ken Burns series, “The War,” an outstanding documentary he did in 2007. It was awesome, and it really showed the impact the war had on individuals and their hometowns. He had so much war footage never before seen. It was like watching a riveting movie. I highly recommend it.
    And Susanna, I’m with you re Wellington. He had me the moment I found out he told Harriet Wilson, “Publish and be damned.”

    Reply
  21. Jo here. I’m a Wellington fan, too. I agree with our mystery Wench that it’s the leadership qualities of good officers that make them heroes.
    I have a huge thing about the value of honor and the willingness to sacrifice for duty, but I apply that to all my heroic characters, military and civilian, male and female.
    Military people make great villains, too, of course, as we see in the Sharpe series many a time, along with the in-between’uns, just surviving as best they can.
    Jo

    Reply
  22. Jo here. I’m a Wellington fan, too. I agree with our mystery Wench that it’s the leadership qualities of good officers that make them heroes.
    I have a huge thing about the value of honor and the willingness to sacrifice for duty, but I apply that to all my heroic characters, military and civilian, male and female.
    Military people make great villains, too, of course, as we see in the Sharpe series many a time, along with the in-between’uns, just surviving as best they can.
    Jo

    Reply
  23. Jo here. I’m a Wellington fan, too. I agree with our mystery Wench that it’s the leadership qualities of good officers that make them heroes.
    I have a huge thing about the value of honor and the willingness to sacrifice for duty, but I apply that to all my heroic characters, military and civilian, male and female.
    Military people make great villains, too, of course, as we see in the Sharpe series many a time, along with the in-between’uns, just surviving as best they can.
    Jo

    Reply
  24. Jo here. I’m a Wellington fan, too. I agree with our mystery Wench that it’s the leadership qualities of good officers that make them heroes.
    I have a huge thing about the value of honor and the willingness to sacrifice for duty, but I apply that to all my heroic characters, military and civilian, male and female.
    Military people make great villains, too, of course, as we see in the Sharpe series many a time, along with the in-between’uns, just surviving as best they can.
    Jo

    Reply
  25. Jo here. I’m a Wellington fan, too. I agree with our mystery Wench that it’s the leadership qualities of good officers that make them heroes.
    I have a huge thing about the value of honor and the willingness to sacrifice for duty, but I apply that to all my heroic characters, military and civilian, male and female.
    Military people make great villains, too, of course, as we see in the Sharpe series many a time, along with the in-between’uns, just surviving as best they can.
    Jo

    Reply
  26. No matter how brief or long, a man’s association with the military changes him. My husband (USCG 1973-2000) says the military’s first is to take a boy, break him down, then build him into a man. For my father, (US Army, Fort Bragg, 1953-55) his Army days still figure prominently in his stories. As an only child, I think he finally found his “Band of Brothers” that he so desperately wanted. Unfortunately, Army housing didn’t have air conditioning in 1955 and my mother, a true Yankee, couldn’t bear the thought of going to Oklahoma for their next post. If AC was widely available in 1955, I would have grown up as an Army brat.

    Reply
  27. No matter how brief or long, a man’s association with the military changes him. My husband (USCG 1973-2000) says the military’s first is to take a boy, break him down, then build him into a man. For my father, (US Army, Fort Bragg, 1953-55) his Army days still figure prominently in his stories. As an only child, I think he finally found his “Band of Brothers” that he so desperately wanted. Unfortunately, Army housing didn’t have air conditioning in 1955 and my mother, a true Yankee, couldn’t bear the thought of going to Oklahoma for their next post. If AC was widely available in 1955, I would have grown up as an Army brat.

    Reply
  28. No matter how brief or long, a man’s association with the military changes him. My husband (USCG 1973-2000) says the military’s first is to take a boy, break him down, then build him into a man. For my father, (US Army, Fort Bragg, 1953-55) his Army days still figure prominently in his stories. As an only child, I think he finally found his “Band of Brothers” that he so desperately wanted. Unfortunately, Army housing didn’t have air conditioning in 1955 and my mother, a true Yankee, couldn’t bear the thought of going to Oklahoma for their next post. If AC was widely available in 1955, I would have grown up as an Army brat.

    Reply
  29. No matter how brief or long, a man’s association with the military changes him. My husband (USCG 1973-2000) says the military’s first is to take a boy, break him down, then build him into a man. For my father, (US Army, Fort Bragg, 1953-55) his Army days still figure prominently in his stories. As an only child, I think he finally found his “Band of Brothers” that he so desperately wanted. Unfortunately, Army housing didn’t have air conditioning in 1955 and my mother, a true Yankee, couldn’t bear the thought of going to Oklahoma for their next post. If AC was widely available in 1955, I would have grown up as an Army brat.

    Reply
  30. No matter how brief or long, a man’s association with the military changes him. My husband (USCG 1973-2000) says the military’s first is to take a boy, break him down, then build him into a man. For my father, (US Army, Fort Bragg, 1953-55) his Army days still figure prominently in his stories. As an only child, I think he finally found his “Band of Brothers” that he so desperately wanted. Unfortunately, Army housing didn’t have air conditioning in 1955 and my mother, a true Yankee, couldn’t bear the thought of going to Oklahoma for their next post. If AC was widely available in 1955, I would have grown up as an Army brat.

    Reply
  31. From MJP:
    Gina, how lovely that your grandfather is being taken to DC to see the monument and be honored for his service. That WWII generation is disappearing all too fast. War is enough of a constant through history that most of us know those who have served. (My father was a WWII MP.)
    My favorite Wellington story is when he threw a bunch of his officer out of a house they had taken over and had wounded common soldiers moved in instead. And THEN, that night, he rode back, found the officers had moved back in again, and -really- raised holy hell. He knew how to take care of his men.
    MJ, I can only imagine what Oklahoma would be like in summertime with no AC! As a Yankee, I can see your mom’s point.
    Jo, I agree that that quality of heroism is an essential part of romance. One reason I love writing this genre is because it’s about the best in people.

    Reply
  32. From MJP:
    Gina, how lovely that your grandfather is being taken to DC to see the monument and be honored for his service. That WWII generation is disappearing all too fast. War is enough of a constant through history that most of us know those who have served. (My father was a WWII MP.)
    My favorite Wellington story is when he threw a bunch of his officer out of a house they had taken over and had wounded common soldiers moved in instead. And THEN, that night, he rode back, found the officers had moved back in again, and -really- raised holy hell. He knew how to take care of his men.
    MJ, I can only imagine what Oklahoma would be like in summertime with no AC! As a Yankee, I can see your mom’s point.
    Jo, I agree that that quality of heroism is an essential part of romance. One reason I love writing this genre is because it’s about the best in people.

    Reply
  33. From MJP:
    Gina, how lovely that your grandfather is being taken to DC to see the monument and be honored for his service. That WWII generation is disappearing all too fast. War is enough of a constant through history that most of us know those who have served. (My father was a WWII MP.)
    My favorite Wellington story is when he threw a bunch of his officer out of a house they had taken over and had wounded common soldiers moved in instead. And THEN, that night, he rode back, found the officers had moved back in again, and -really- raised holy hell. He knew how to take care of his men.
    MJ, I can only imagine what Oklahoma would be like in summertime with no AC! As a Yankee, I can see your mom’s point.
    Jo, I agree that that quality of heroism is an essential part of romance. One reason I love writing this genre is because it’s about the best in people.

    Reply
  34. From MJP:
    Gina, how lovely that your grandfather is being taken to DC to see the monument and be honored for his service. That WWII generation is disappearing all too fast. War is enough of a constant through history that most of us know those who have served. (My father was a WWII MP.)
    My favorite Wellington story is when he threw a bunch of his officer out of a house they had taken over and had wounded common soldiers moved in instead. And THEN, that night, he rode back, found the officers had moved back in again, and -really- raised holy hell. He knew how to take care of his men.
    MJ, I can only imagine what Oklahoma would be like in summertime with no AC! As a Yankee, I can see your mom’s point.
    Jo, I agree that that quality of heroism is an essential part of romance. One reason I love writing this genre is because it’s about the best in people.

    Reply
  35. From MJP:
    Gina, how lovely that your grandfather is being taken to DC to see the monument and be honored for his service. That WWII generation is disappearing all too fast. War is enough of a constant through history that most of us know those who have served. (My father was a WWII MP.)
    My favorite Wellington story is when he threw a bunch of his officer out of a house they had taken over and had wounded common soldiers moved in instead. And THEN, that night, he rode back, found the officers had moved back in again, and -really- raised holy hell. He knew how to take care of his men.
    MJ, I can only imagine what Oklahoma would be like in summertime with no AC! As a Yankee, I can see your mom’s point.
    Jo, I agree that that quality of heroism is an essential part of romance. One reason I love writing this genre is because it’s about the best in people.

    Reply
  36. Aloha, Word Wenches and readers!
    I posted the Wednesday Wanderings from the military resort at Disney World – military families are grateful for the opportunity to vacation here in Orlando. There are plenty of smiling children, happy to see their parents home from deployments.
    Thank you, Word Wenches, for this “joint” adventure … and can I take home Sean Bean?!?

    Reply
  37. Aloha, Word Wenches and readers!
    I posted the Wednesday Wanderings from the military resort at Disney World – military families are grateful for the opportunity to vacation here in Orlando. There are plenty of smiling children, happy to see their parents home from deployments.
    Thank you, Word Wenches, for this “joint” adventure … and can I take home Sean Bean?!?

    Reply
  38. Aloha, Word Wenches and readers!
    I posted the Wednesday Wanderings from the military resort at Disney World – military families are grateful for the opportunity to vacation here in Orlando. There are plenty of smiling children, happy to see their parents home from deployments.
    Thank you, Word Wenches, for this “joint” adventure … and can I take home Sean Bean?!?

    Reply
  39. Aloha, Word Wenches and readers!
    I posted the Wednesday Wanderings from the military resort at Disney World – military families are grateful for the opportunity to vacation here in Orlando. There are plenty of smiling children, happy to see their parents home from deployments.
    Thank you, Word Wenches, for this “joint” adventure … and can I take home Sean Bean?!?

    Reply
  40. Aloha, Word Wenches and readers!
    I posted the Wednesday Wanderings from the military resort at Disney World – military families are grateful for the opportunity to vacation here in Orlando. There are plenty of smiling children, happy to see their parents home from deployments.
    Thank you, Word Wenches, for this “joint” adventure … and can I take home Sean Bean?!?

    Reply
  41. I appreciate the admirable reasons and ideals that soldiers uphold. They are truly heroes and I thank them for their service.

    Reply
  42. I appreciate the admirable reasons and ideals that soldiers uphold. They are truly heroes and I thank them for their service.

    Reply
  43. I appreciate the admirable reasons and ideals that soldiers uphold. They are truly heroes and I thank them for their service.

    Reply
  44. I appreciate the admirable reasons and ideals that soldiers uphold. They are truly heroes and I thank them for their service.

    Reply
  45. I appreciate the admirable reasons and ideals that soldiers uphold. They are truly heroes and I thank them for their service.

    Reply
  46. My father and his brothers were WWII veterans and my oldest son served in a medical unit in Iraq, so our family definitely has a connection to the military.
    Last week I watched the Memorial Day parade here in Washington, DC and realized at one point that I had tears in my eyes. My father’s experiences were before I was born and so seemed almost life the history I would read in books, but my son’s experiences during his years in the Army and living through a period with a child in a war zone made me far more sensitive to what it means to be part of a military family. My son was lucky enough to get his wish to come home with “two arms, two legs, and a fully functioning brain”, but I could not help but see all those young people (men and women both) through a mother’s eyes and think of how vulnerable they are and how fragile life can be. It makes me appreciate their courage and honor and willingness to serve all the more.

    Reply
  47. My father and his brothers were WWII veterans and my oldest son served in a medical unit in Iraq, so our family definitely has a connection to the military.
    Last week I watched the Memorial Day parade here in Washington, DC and realized at one point that I had tears in my eyes. My father’s experiences were before I was born and so seemed almost life the history I would read in books, but my son’s experiences during his years in the Army and living through a period with a child in a war zone made me far more sensitive to what it means to be part of a military family. My son was lucky enough to get his wish to come home with “two arms, two legs, and a fully functioning brain”, but I could not help but see all those young people (men and women both) through a mother’s eyes and think of how vulnerable they are and how fragile life can be. It makes me appreciate their courage and honor and willingness to serve all the more.

    Reply
  48. My father and his brothers were WWII veterans and my oldest son served in a medical unit in Iraq, so our family definitely has a connection to the military.
    Last week I watched the Memorial Day parade here in Washington, DC and realized at one point that I had tears in my eyes. My father’s experiences were before I was born and so seemed almost life the history I would read in books, but my son’s experiences during his years in the Army and living through a period with a child in a war zone made me far more sensitive to what it means to be part of a military family. My son was lucky enough to get his wish to come home with “two arms, two legs, and a fully functioning brain”, but I could not help but see all those young people (men and women both) through a mother’s eyes and think of how vulnerable they are and how fragile life can be. It makes me appreciate their courage and honor and willingness to serve all the more.

    Reply
  49. My father and his brothers were WWII veterans and my oldest son served in a medical unit in Iraq, so our family definitely has a connection to the military.
    Last week I watched the Memorial Day parade here in Washington, DC and realized at one point that I had tears in my eyes. My father’s experiences were before I was born and so seemed almost life the history I would read in books, but my son’s experiences during his years in the Army and living through a period with a child in a war zone made me far more sensitive to what it means to be part of a military family. My son was lucky enough to get his wish to come home with “two arms, two legs, and a fully functioning brain”, but I could not help but see all those young people (men and women both) through a mother’s eyes and think of how vulnerable they are and how fragile life can be. It makes me appreciate their courage and honor and willingness to serve all the more.

    Reply
  50. My father and his brothers were WWII veterans and my oldest son served in a medical unit in Iraq, so our family definitely has a connection to the military.
    Last week I watched the Memorial Day parade here in Washington, DC and realized at one point that I had tears in my eyes. My father’s experiences were before I was born and so seemed almost life the history I would read in books, but my son’s experiences during his years in the Army and living through a period with a child in a war zone made me far more sensitive to what it means to be part of a military family. My son was lucky enough to get his wish to come home with “two arms, two legs, and a fully functioning brain”, but I could not help but see all those young people (men and women both) through a mother’s eyes and think of how vulnerable they are and how fragile life can be. It makes me appreciate their courage and honor and willingness to serve all the more.

    Reply
  51. That’s some serious jiving hunk in the video! Glad to see our heroes have a sense of humor in the war zone. (trying to imagine what our Regency heroes might do…)
    I’m with Susan/DC. I’ve seen what war can do to men and families and wish our heroes could use their skills and intelligence to fight the Gulf Oil Spill, but I’m grateful they’re there to make the sacrifice of protecting us, wherever they’re stationed.

    Reply
  52. That’s some serious jiving hunk in the video! Glad to see our heroes have a sense of humor in the war zone. (trying to imagine what our Regency heroes might do…)
    I’m with Susan/DC. I’ve seen what war can do to men and families and wish our heroes could use their skills and intelligence to fight the Gulf Oil Spill, but I’m grateful they’re there to make the sacrifice of protecting us, wherever they’re stationed.

    Reply
  53. That’s some serious jiving hunk in the video! Glad to see our heroes have a sense of humor in the war zone. (trying to imagine what our Regency heroes might do…)
    I’m with Susan/DC. I’ve seen what war can do to men and families and wish our heroes could use their skills and intelligence to fight the Gulf Oil Spill, but I’m grateful they’re there to make the sacrifice of protecting us, wherever they’re stationed.

    Reply
  54. That’s some serious jiving hunk in the video! Glad to see our heroes have a sense of humor in the war zone. (trying to imagine what our Regency heroes might do…)
    I’m with Susan/DC. I’ve seen what war can do to men and families and wish our heroes could use their skills and intelligence to fight the Gulf Oil Spill, but I’m grateful they’re there to make the sacrifice of protecting us, wherever they’re stationed.

    Reply
  55. That’s some serious jiving hunk in the video! Glad to see our heroes have a sense of humor in the war zone. (trying to imagine what our Regency heroes might do…)
    I’m with Susan/DC. I’ve seen what war can do to men and families and wish our heroes could use their skills and intelligence to fight the Gulf Oil Spill, but I’m grateful they’re there to make the sacrifice of protecting us, wherever they’re stationed.

    Reply
  56. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. The theme obviously strikes a chord within many of us. Jo, I agree that leadership—that calm command under pressure—is something we admire in any individual, military or civilian. Wellington certainly had it in spades.To add another anecdote about the iron Duke, in Apsley House, there is a wonderful little room that he had filled with military portraits, including many of his adversaries. So clearly he admired men based on their qualities of characters, not on their uniforms.
    And Kim—sorry, Sean Bean’s already been spoken for! He’s coming to Connecticut (but you’re invited to visit :))

    Reply
  57. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. The theme obviously strikes a chord within many of us. Jo, I agree that leadership—that calm command under pressure—is something we admire in any individual, military or civilian. Wellington certainly had it in spades.To add another anecdote about the iron Duke, in Apsley House, there is a wonderful little room that he had filled with military portraits, including many of his adversaries. So clearly he admired men based on their qualities of characters, not on their uniforms.
    And Kim—sorry, Sean Bean’s already been spoken for! He’s coming to Connecticut (but you’re invited to visit :))

    Reply
  58. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. The theme obviously strikes a chord within many of us. Jo, I agree that leadership—that calm command under pressure—is something we admire in any individual, military or civilian. Wellington certainly had it in spades.To add another anecdote about the iron Duke, in Apsley House, there is a wonderful little room that he had filled with military portraits, including many of his adversaries. So clearly he admired men based on their qualities of characters, not on their uniforms.
    And Kim—sorry, Sean Bean’s already been spoken for! He’s coming to Connecticut (but you’re invited to visit :))

    Reply
  59. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. The theme obviously strikes a chord within many of us. Jo, I agree that leadership—that calm command under pressure—is something we admire in any individual, military or civilian. Wellington certainly had it in spades.To add another anecdote about the iron Duke, in Apsley House, there is a wonderful little room that he had filled with military portraits, including many of his adversaries. So clearly he admired men based on their qualities of characters, not on their uniforms.
    And Kim—sorry, Sean Bean’s already been spoken for! He’s coming to Connecticut (but you’re invited to visit :))

    Reply
  60. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. The theme obviously strikes a chord within many of us. Jo, I agree that leadership—that calm command under pressure—is something we admire in any individual, military or civilian. Wellington certainly had it in spades.To add another anecdote about the iron Duke, in Apsley House, there is a wonderful little room that he had filled with military portraits, including many of his adversaries. So clearly he admired men based on their qualities of characters, not on their uniforms.
    And Kim—sorry, Sean Bean’s already been spoken for! He’s coming to Connecticut (but you’re invited to visit :))

    Reply
  61. Leadership, bravery and intelligence – just a few factors of real-life and fictional military heroes. I have absolutely no ties to military life, but my late father had many friends and relatives who served in WWII. Every yer on Rememberance Day (Nov. 11, Canada’s version of your American Veteran’s Day) if we were together, he’d insist we honor those men with two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. If we were at school, when the day was over and he came home from work, he’d always ask us if we’d had those moments of silence in the classroom. I’m pleased to say that even today, my kids (10 and 13) have school assemblies and visits from our Canadian Peace Keepers each Nov. 11.
    As for military heroes in historical romance novels – bring ’em on! I love reading about them and writing about them too. A long time ago, I attempted to write a musical set during WWI, using some of the Big Band music of the time. I guess I fancied myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, but “Serenade in Blue” was no “Phantom of the Opera!”
    My second novel, “Coming Home,” however, has a veteran of the Irish Brigade, a hero at Antietem during the American Civil War. And I’m working on a series of stories set just after the War, featuring other Irigh Brigade heroes!
    Thanks for a great post, Mary Jo!

    Reply
  62. Leadership, bravery and intelligence – just a few factors of real-life and fictional military heroes. I have absolutely no ties to military life, but my late father had many friends and relatives who served in WWII. Every yer on Rememberance Day (Nov. 11, Canada’s version of your American Veteran’s Day) if we were together, he’d insist we honor those men with two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. If we were at school, when the day was over and he came home from work, he’d always ask us if we’d had those moments of silence in the classroom. I’m pleased to say that even today, my kids (10 and 13) have school assemblies and visits from our Canadian Peace Keepers each Nov. 11.
    As for military heroes in historical romance novels – bring ’em on! I love reading about them and writing about them too. A long time ago, I attempted to write a musical set during WWI, using some of the Big Band music of the time. I guess I fancied myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, but “Serenade in Blue” was no “Phantom of the Opera!”
    My second novel, “Coming Home,” however, has a veteran of the Irish Brigade, a hero at Antietem during the American Civil War. And I’m working on a series of stories set just after the War, featuring other Irigh Brigade heroes!
    Thanks for a great post, Mary Jo!

    Reply
  63. Leadership, bravery and intelligence – just a few factors of real-life and fictional military heroes. I have absolutely no ties to military life, but my late father had many friends and relatives who served in WWII. Every yer on Rememberance Day (Nov. 11, Canada’s version of your American Veteran’s Day) if we were together, he’d insist we honor those men with two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. If we were at school, when the day was over and he came home from work, he’d always ask us if we’d had those moments of silence in the classroom. I’m pleased to say that even today, my kids (10 and 13) have school assemblies and visits from our Canadian Peace Keepers each Nov. 11.
    As for military heroes in historical romance novels – bring ’em on! I love reading about them and writing about them too. A long time ago, I attempted to write a musical set during WWI, using some of the Big Band music of the time. I guess I fancied myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, but “Serenade in Blue” was no “Phantom of the Opera!”
    My second novel, “Coming Home,” however, has a veteran of the Irish Brigade, a hero at Antietem during the American Civil War. And I’m working on a series of stories set just after the War, featuring other Irigh Brigade heroes!
    Thanks for a great post, Mary Jo!

    Reply
  64. Leadership, bravery and intelligence – just a few factors of real-life and fictional military heroes. I have absolutely no ties to military life, but my late father had many friends and relatives who served in WWII. Every yer on Rememberance Day (Nov. 11, Canada’s version of your American Veteran’s Day) if we were together, he’d insist we honor those men with two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. If we were at school, when the day was over and he came home from work, he’d always ask us if we’d had those moments of silence in the classroom. I’m pleased to say that even today, my kids (10 and 13) have school assemblies and visits from our Canadian Peace Keepers each Nov. 11.
    As for military heroes in historical romance novels – bring ’em on! I love reading about them and writing about them too. A long time ago, I attempted to write a musical set during WWI, using some of the Big Band music of the time. I guess I fancied myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, but “Serenade in Blue” was no “Phantom of the Opera!”
    My second novel, “Coming Home,” however, has a veteran of the Irish Brigade, a hero at Antietem during the American Civil War. And I’m working on a series of stories set just after the War, featuring other Irigh Brigade heroes!
    Thanks for a great post, Mary Jo!

    Reply
  65. Leadership, bravery and intelligence – just a few factors of real-life and fictional military heroes. I have absolutely no ties to military life, but my late father had many friends and relatives who served in WWII. Every yer on Rememberance Day (Nov. 11, Canada’s version of your American Veteran’s Day) if we were together, he’d insist we honor those men with two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. If we were at school, when the day was over and he came home from work, he’d always ask us if we’d had those moments of silence in the classroom. I’m pleased to say that even today, my kids (10 and 13) have school assemblies and visits from our Canadian Peace Keepers each Nov. 11.
    As for military heroes in historical romance novels – bring ’em on! I love reading about them and writing about them too. A long time ago, I attempted to write a musical set during WWI, using some of the Big Band music of the time. I guess I fancied myself a female version of Andrew Lloyd Weber, but “Serenade in Blue” was no “Phantom of the Opera!”
    My second novel, “Coming Home,” however, has a veteran of the Irish Brigade, a hero at Antietem during the American Civil War. And I’m working on a series of stories set just after the War, featuring other Irigh Brigade heroes!
    Thanks for a great post, Mary Jo!

    Reply
  66. Thank you for a terrific post! Wonderful comments and pictures.
    I am very empathetic to anyone who suffers the effects of wartime. Whether they served in the armed forces, or they are a loved one or family member, I keep them all in my prayers. World War II, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the current War on Terrorism. I have friends and family from all of those groups who have so gallantly served our country. They all remain affected by their wartime experiences. Some hide it better than others, but the horror never really leaves. Please keep our armed service members and their loved ones in your prayers.
    Earlier this year, I read a very touching soldier’s story: “Jenna’s Cowboy” by Sharon Gillenwater. This is a bittersweet, ultimately healing tale of the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on the one who suffers the nightmare and also on those who care for him.
    The current military conflicts have made me more aware, and given me a new appreciation, of military fiction and romances with military themes.

    Reply
  67. Thank you for a terrific post! Wonderful comments and pictures.
    I am very empathetic to anyone who suffers the effects of wartime. Whether they served in the armed forces, or they are a loved one or family member, I keep them all in my prayers. World War II, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the current War on Terrorism. I have friends and family from all of those groups who have so gallantly served our country. They all remain affected by their wartime experiences. Some hide it better than others, but the horror never really leaves. Please keep our armed service members and their loved ones in your prayers.
    Earlier this year, I read a very touching soldier’s story: “Jenna’s Cowboy” by Sharon Gillenwater. This is a bittersweet, ultimately healing tale of the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on the one who suffers the nightmare and also on those who care for him.
    The current military conflicts have made me more aware, and given me a new appreciation, of military fiction and romances with military themes.

    Reply
  68. Thank you for a terrific post! Wonderful comments and pictures.
    I am very empathetic to anyone who suffers the effects of wartime. Whether they served in the armed forces, or they are a loved one or family member, I keep them all in my prayers. World War II, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the current War on Terrorism. I have friends and family from all of those groups who have so gallantly served our country. They all remain affected by their wartime experiences. Some hide it better than others, but the horror never really leaves. Please keep our armed service members and their loved ones in your prayers.
    Earlier this year, I read a very touching soldier’s story: “Jenna’s Cowboy” by Sharon Gillenwater. This is a bittersweet, ultimately healing tale of the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on the one who suffers the nightmare and also on those who care for him.
    The current military conflicts have made me more aware, and given me a new appreciation, of military fiction and romances with military themes.

    Reply
  69. Thank you for a terrific post! Wonderful comments and pictures.
    I am very empathetic to anyone who suffers the effects of wartime. Whether they served in the armed forces, or they are a loved one or family member, I keep them all in my prayers. World War II, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the current War on Terrorism. I have friends and family from all of those groups who have so gallantly served our country. They all remain affected by their wartime experiences. Some hide it better than others, but the horror never really leaves. Please keep our armed service members and their loved ones in your prayers.
    Earlier this year, I read a very touching soldier’s story: “Jenna’s Cowboy” by Sharon Gillenwater. This is a bittersweet, ultimately healing tale of the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on the one who suffers the nightmare and also on those who care for him.
    The current military conflicts have made me more aware, and given me a new appreciation, of military fiction and romances with military themes.

    Reply
  70. Thank you for a terrific post! Wonderful comments and pictures.
    I am very empathetic to anyone who suffers the effects of wartime. Whether they served in the armed forces, or they are a loved one or family member, I keep them all in my prayers. World War II, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the current War on Terrorism. I have friends and family from all of those groups who have so gallantly served our country. They all remain affected by their wartime experiences. Some hide it better than others, but the horror never really leaves. Please keep our armed service members and their loved ones in your prayers.
    Earlier this year, I read a very touching soldier’s story: “Jenna’s Cowboy” by Sharon Gillenwater. This is a bittersweet, ultimately healing tale of the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on the one who suffers the nightmare and also on those who care for him.
    The current military conflicts have made me more aware, and given me a new appreciation, of military fiction and romances with military themes.

    Reply
  71. From MJP:
    Kim, hon–if you want to see REAL battle, try taking Sean Bean home just for you! *g* Thanks for coordinating this mutual admiration society blog.
    Susan/DC–I’m very glad to hear that your son is back and intact. That had to be a hard time for your whole family.
    Cynthia, I love that Canada has “Peace Keepers.” It’s one of the reasons Canadians are respected all over the world.
    Virginia, years ago I read a Silhouette about PTSD called SOLDIER’S HEART, which was about a Vietman nurse still scarred by what she’d seen. It was written by Eileen Dreyer, who will be our guest her on Friday. It was written under her Kathleen Korbel name, and a RITA finalist or winner, IIRC. Books like these are an example of how well the military and romance work together.

    Reply
  72. From MJP:
    Kim, hon–if you want to see REAL battle, try taking Sean Bean home just for you! *g* Thanks for coordinating this mutual admiration society blog.
    Susan/DC–I’m very glad to hear that your son is back and intact. That had to be a hard time for your whole family.
    Cynthia, I love that Canada has “Peace Keepers.” It’s one of the reasons Canadians are respected all over the world.
    Virginia, years ago I read a Silhouette about PTSD called SOLDIER’S HEART, which was about a Vietman nurse still scarred by what she’d seen. It was written by Eileen Dreyer, who will be our guest her on Friday. It was written under her Kathleen Korbel name, and a RITA finalist or winner, IIRC. Books like these are an example of how well the military and romance work together.

    Reply
  73. From MJP:
    Kim, hon–if you want to see REAL battle, try taking Sean Bean home just for you! *g* Thanks for coordinating this mutual admiration society blog.
    Susan/DC–I’m very glad to hear that your son is back and intact. That had to be a hard time for your whole family.
    Cynthia, I love that Canada has “Peace Keepers.” It’s one of the reasons Canadians are respected all over the world.
    Virginia, years ago I read a Silhouette about PTSD called SOLDIER’S HEART, which was about a Vietman nurse still scarred by what she’d seen. It was written by Eileen Dreyer, who will be our guest her on Friday. It was written under her Kathleen Korbel name, and a RITA finalist or winner, IIRC. Books like these are an example of how well the military and romance work together.

    Reply
  74. From MJP:
    Kim, hon–if you want to see REAL battle, try taking Sean Bean home just for you! *g* Thanks for coordinating this mutual admiration society blog.
    Susan/DC–I’m very glad to hear that your son is back and intact. That had to be a hard time for your whole family.
    Cynthia, I love that Canada has “Peace Keepers.” It’s one of the reasons Canadians are respected all over the world.
    Virginia, years ago I read a Silhouette about PTSD called SOLDIER’S HEART, which was about a Vietman nurse still scarred by what she’d seen. It was written by Eileen Dreyer, who will be our guest her on Friday. It was written under her Kathleen Korbel name, and a RITA finalist or winner, IIRC. Books like these are an example of how well the military and romance work together.

    Reply
  75. From MJP:
    Kim, hon–if you want to see REAL battle, try taking Sean Bean home just for you! *g* Thanks for coordinating this mutual admiration society blog.
    Susan/DC–I’m very glad to hear that your son is back and intact. That had to be a hard time for your whole family.
    Cynthia, I love that Canada has “Peace Keepers.” It’s one of the reasons Canadians are respected all over the world.
    Virginia, years ago I read a Silhouette about PTSD called SOLDIER’S HEART, which was about a Vietman nurse still scarred by what she’d seen. It was written by Eileen Dreyer, who will be our guest her on Friday. It was written under her Kathleen Korbel name, and a RITA finalist or winner, IIRC. Books like these are an example of how well the military and romance work together.

    Reply
  76. Can I just say NORTH & SOUTH the book and the mini series.
    The change in America was for the better but the romance just associated with the blue & the grey…
    Speaking of color one wore Blue
    One wore grey
    Great romance stories.
    Haave a good one Ann.

    Reply
  77. Can I just say NORTH & SOUTH the book and the mini series.
    The change in America was for the better but the romance just associated with the blue & the grey…
    Speaking of color one wore Blue
    One wore grey
    Great romance stories.
    Haave a good one Ann.

    Reply
  78. Can I just say NORTH & SOUTH the book and the mini series.
    The change in America was for the better but the romance just associated with the blue & the grey…
    Speaking of color one wore Blue
    One wore grey
    Great romance stories.
    Haave a good one Ann.

    Reply
  79. Can I just say NORTH & SOUTH the book and the mini series.
    The change in America was for the better but the romance just associated with the blue & the grey…
    Speaking of color one wore Blue
    One wore grey
    Great romance stories.
    Haave a good one Ann.

    Reply
  80. Can I just say NORTH & SOUTH the book and the mini series.
    The change in America was for the better but the romance just associated with the blue & the grey…
    Speaking of color one wore Blue
    One wore grey
    Great romance stories.
    Haave a good one Ann.

    Reply
  81. There is *something* about a military man – discipline, experience, respect, etc. – that makes him unique and perfectly suited for romance hero work. 🙂 I once started reading “The Spanish Bride” by Georgette Heyer which is the story of a young officer and the young Spanish girl he married to rescue her from the destruction of her home. It starts with an extensive description of the battle at Badajoz and made me begin to appreciate the horrors of such a battle. I didn’t finish the book for some reason, but the little I read has stuck with me.
    Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂
    Good post and I can’t wait to find out who the Mystery Wench is! 🙂

    Reply
  82. There is *something* about a military man – discipline, experience, respect, etc. – that makes him unique and perfectly suited for romance hero work. 🙂 I once started reading “The Spanish Bride” by Georgette Heyer which is the story of a young officer and the young Spanish girl he married to rescue her from the destruction of her home. It starts with an extensive description of the battle at Badajoz and made me begin to appreciate the horrors of such a battle. I didn’t finish the book for some reason, but the little I read has stuck with me.
    Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂
    Good post and I can’t wait to find out who the Mystery Wench is! 🙂

    Reply
  83. There is *something* about a military man – discipline, experience, respect, etc. – that makes him unique and perfectly suited for romance hero work. 🙂 I once started reading “The Spanish Bride” by Georgette Heyer which is the story of a young officer and the young Spanish girl he married to rescue her from the destruction of her home. It starts with an extensive description of the battle at Badajoz and made me begin to appreciate the horrors of such a battle. I didn’t finish the book for some reason, but the little I read has stuck with me.
    Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂
    Good post and I can’t wait to find out who the Mystery Wench is! 🙂

    Reply
  84. There is *something* about a military man – discipline, experience, respect, etc. – that makes him unique and perfectly suited for romance hero work. 🙂 I once started reading “The Spanish Bride” by Georgette Heyer which is the story of a young officer and the young Spanish girl he married to rescue her from the destruction of her home. It starts with an extensive description of the battle at Badajoz and made me begin to appreciate the horrors of such a battle. I didn’t finish the book for some reason, but the little I read has stuck with me.
    Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂
    Good post and I can’t wait to find out who the Mystery Wench is! 🙂

    Reply
  85. There is *something* about a military man – discipline, experience, respect, etc. – that makes him unique and perfectly suited for romance hero work. 🙂 I once started reading “The Spanish Bride” by Georgette Heyer which is the story of a young officer and the young Spanish girl he married to rescue her from the destruction of her home. It starts with an extensive description of the battle at Badajoz and made me begin to appreciate the horrors of such a battle. I didn’t finish the book for some reason, but the little I read has stuck with me.
    Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂
    Good post and I can’t wait to find out who the Mystery Wench is! 🙂

    Reply
  86. Though I’ve never seen much use in recreational or entertainment fighting, I have great respect for the men and women who fight for their country and wherever they may be sent.
    My father fought in World War II, and though he personally never talked about his experiences, we found some things from my mother. I think that you have to have respect for anyone who is prepared to lay down his/her life.
    I think that is one of the attractions of military heroes. And who doesn’t admire a man who is brave and capable in battle?
    My soldier reading goes from Alexander the Great onward and all of them are admirable unless they resort unnecessarily to brute strength and indiscriminate slaughter. In fiction, it’s only their enemies who do that.
    At the moment I’m thinking of two of the Bedwyn brothers in Mary Balogh’s Slightly… series. First is Aidan, the second son who was more or less destined by his birth for the military. He is a conscientious soldier and a dedicated leader for his men. However, it is slowly revealed that he’s never really liked the military life but followed it because it was expected of him. He was to become a feted general–which would provide him with all the honours that his family expected of him. When he marries the heroine to enable her to provide for two orphans, he begins to love her as well as all that is hers. When the youngest brother Alleyne loses his memory in a fall during the Battle of Waterloo, it’s assumed that he is a soldier. When he starts thinking about being a soldier, he realizes that he doesn’t really feel comfortable in that role. As it turns out, he was on a diplomatic mission to the battlefield. These two were reluctant soldiers, though we know that one of them filled the role in an exemplary way. And I’m sure that there have been many men and women like that, whose honour did not let them do less than their best. This sense of honour and discipline are the traits that endear them to me.
    P.S. My father wanted to become a doctor but didn’t get the chance. By the time the war finally ended, he had a family and considering the length of medical studies, he decided to become an architect.

    Reply
  87. Though I’ve never seen much use in recreational or entertainment fighting, I have great respect for the men and women who fight for their country and wherever they may be sent.
    My father fought in World War II, and though he personally never talked about his experiences, we found some things from my mother. I think that you have to have respect for anyone who is prepared to lay down his/her life.
    I think that is one of the attractions of military heroes. And who doesn’t admire a man who is brave and capable in battle?
    My soldier reading goes from Alexander the Great onward and all of them are admirable unless they resort unnecessarily to brute strength and indiscriminate slaughter. In fiction, it’s only their enemies who do that.
    At the moment I’m thinking of two of the Bedwyn brothers in Mary Balogh’s Slightly… series. First is Aidan, the second son who was more or less destined by his birth for the military. He is a conscientious soldier and a dedicated leader for his men. However, it is slowly revealed that he’s never really liked the military life but followed it because it was expected of him. He was to become a feted general–which would provide him with all the honours that his family expected of him. When he marries the heroine to enable her to provide for two orphans, he begins to love her as well as all that is hers. When the youngest brother Alleyne loses his memory in a fall during the Battle of Waterloo, it’s assumed that he is a soldier. When he starts thinking about being a soldier, he realizes that he doesn’t really feel comfortable in that role. As it turns out, he was on a diplomatic mission to the battlefield. These two were reluctant soldiers, though we know that one of them filled the role in an exemplary way. And I’m sure that there have been many men and women like that, whose honour did not let them do less than their best. This sense of honour and discipline are the traits that endear them to me.
    P.S. My father wanted to become a doctor but didn’t get the chance. By the time the war finally ended, he had a family and considering the length of medical studies, he decided to become an architect.

    Reply
  88. Though I’ve never seen much use in recreational or entertainment fighting, I have great respect for the men and women who fight for their country and wherever they may be sent.
    My father fought in World War II, and though he personally never talked about his experiences, we found some things from my mother. I think that you have to have respect for anyone who is prepared to lay down his/her life.
    I think that is one of the attractions of military heroes. And who doesn’t admire a man who is brave and capable in battle?
    My soldier reading goes from Alexander the Great onward and all of them are admirable unless they resort unnecessarily to brute strength and indiscriminate slaughter. In fiction, it’s only their enemies who do that.
    At the moment I’m thinking of two of the Bedwyn brothers in Mary Balogh’s Slightly… series. First is Aidan, the second son who was more or less destined by his birth for the military. He is a conscientious soldier and a dedicated leader for his men. However, it is slowly revealed that he’s never really liked the military life but followed it because it was expected of him. He was to become a feted general–which would provide him with all the honours that his family expected of him. When he marries the heroine to enable her to provide for two orphans, he begins to love her as well as all that is hers. When the youngest brother Alleyne loses his memory in a fall during the Battle of Waterloo, it’s assumed that he is a soldier. When he starts thinking about being a soldier, he realizes that he doesn’t really feel comfortable in that role. As it turns out, he was on a diplomatic mission to the battlefield. These two were reluctant soldiers, though we know that one of them filled the role in an exemplary way. And I’m sure that there have been many men and women like that, whose honour did not let them do less than their best. This sense of honour and discipline are the traits that endear them to me.
    P.S. My father wanted to become a doctor but didn’t get the chance. By the time the war finally ended, he had a family and considering the length of medical studies, he decided to become an architect.

    Reply
  89. Though I’ve never seen much use in recreational or entertainment fighting, I have great respect for the men and women who fight for their country and wherever they may be sent.
    My father fought in World War II, and though he personally never talked about his experiences, we found some things from my mother. I think that you have to have respect for anyone who is prepared to lay down his/her life.
    I think that is one of the attractions of military heroes. And who doesn’t admire a man who is brave and capable in battle?
    My soldier reading goes from Alexander the Great onward and all of them are admirable unless they resort unnecessarily to brute strength and indiscriminate slaughter. In fiction, it’s only their enemies who do that.
    At the moment I’m thinking of two of the Bedwyn brothers in Mary Balogh’s Slightly… series. First is Aidan, the second son who was more or less destined by his birth for the military. He is a conscientious soldier and a dedicated leader for his men. However, it is slowly revealed that he’s never really liked the military life but followed it because it was expected of him. He was to become a feted general–which would provide him with all the honours that his family expected of him. When he marries the heroine to enable her to provide for two orphans, he begins to love her as well as all that is hers. When the youngest brother Alleyne loses his memory in a fall during the Battle of Waterloo, it’s assumed that he is a soldier. When he starts thinking about being a soldier, he realizes that he doesn’t really feel comfortable in that role. As it turns out, he was on a diplomatic mission to the battlefield. These two were reluctant soldiers, though we know that one of them filled the role in an exemplary way. And I’m sure that there have been many men and women like that, whose honour did not let them do less than their best. This sense of honour and discipline are the traits that endear them to me.
    P.S. My father wanted to become a doctor but didn’t get the chance. By the time the war finally ended, he had a family and considering the length of medical studies, he decided to become an architect.

    Reply
  90. Though I’ve never seen much use in recreational or entertainment fighting, I have great respect for the men and women who fight for their country and wherever they may be sent.
    My father fought in World War II, and though he personally never talked about his experiences, we found some things from my mother. I think that you have to have respect for anyone who is prepared to lay down his/her life.
    I think that is one of the attractions of military heroes. And who doesn’t admire a man who is brave and capable in battle?
    My soldier reading goes from Alexander the Great onward and all of them are admirable unless they resort unnecessarily to brute strength and indiscriminate slaughter. In fiction, it’s only their enemies who do that.
    At the moment I’m thinking of two of the Bedwyn brothers in Mary Balogh’s Slightly… series. First is Aidan, the second son who was more or less destined by his birth for the military. He is a conscientious soldier and a dedicated leader for his men. However, it is slowly revealed that he’s never really liked the military life but followed it because it was expected of him. He was to become a feted general–which would provide him with all the honours that his family expected of him. When he marries the heroine to enable her to provide for two orphans, he begins to love her as well as all that is hers. When the youngest brother Alleyne loses his memory in a fall during the Battle of Waterloo, it’s assumed that he is a soldier. When he starts thinking about being a soldier, he realizes that he doesn’t really feel comfortable in that role. As it turns out, he was on a diplomatic mission to the battlefield. These two were reluctant soldiers, though we know that one of them filled the role in an exemplary way. And I’m sure that there have been many men and women like that, whose honour did not let them do less than their best. This sense of honour and discipline are the traits that endear them to me.
    P.S. My father wanted to become a doctor but didn’t get the chance. By the time the war finally ended, he had a family and considering the length of medical studies, he decided to become an architect.

    Reply
  91. I’ve never read about military in romance, but it would be a fantastic topic for someone to write about! True Hero’s 🙂

    Reply
  92. I’ve never read about military in romance, but it would be a fantastic topic for someone to write about! True Hero’s 🙂

    Reply
  93. I’ve never read about military in romance, but it would be a fantastic topic for someone to write about! True Hero’s 🙂

    Reply
  94. I’ve never read about military in romance, but it would be a fantastic topic for someone to write about! True Hero’s 🙂

    Reply
  95. I’ve never read about military in romance, but it would be a fantastic topic for someone to write about! True Hero’s 🙂

    Reply
  96. From MJP:
    **Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂 **
    (MJP gives a modest blush of pleasure. *g*)
    Anne, you may remember that THE SPANISH BRIDE is based on the real love story of Harry and Juanita Smith. Heyer did several books that were very accurate history–I’ve read that her AN INFAMOUS ARMY, about Waterloo, has been taught in the royal military college of Sandhurst because she makes a complex battle very clear.
    Ranurgis, at a time when going for a soldier was one of the very few acceptable career choices, I’m sure there were a fair number of military men who did their jobs from duty rather than passionate devotion to the warrior life. As Jo Beverley commented above, people reaction to war were very, very different.

    Reply
  97. From MJP:
    **Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂 **
    (MJP gives a modest blush of pleasure. *g*)
    Anne, you may remember that THE SPANISH BRIDE is based on the real love story of Harry and Juanita Smith. Heyer did several books that were very accurate history–I’ve read that her AN INFAMOUS ARMY, about Waterloo, has been taught in the royal military college of Sandhurst because she makes a complex battle very clear.
    Ranurgis, at a time when going for a soldier was one of the very few acceptable career choices, I’m sure there were a fair number of military men who did their jobs from duty rather than passionate devotion to the warrior life. As Jo Beverley commented above, people reaction to war were very, very different.

    Reply
  98. From MJP:
    **Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂 **
    (MJP gives a modest blush of pleasure. *g*)
    Anne, you may remember that THE SPANISH BRIDE is based on the real love story of Harry and Juanita Smith. Heyer did several books that were very accurate history–I’ve read that her AN INFAMOUS ARMY, about Waterloo, has been taught in the royal military college of Sandhurst because she makes a complex battle very clear.
    Ranurgis, at a time when going for a soldier was one of the very few acceptable career choices, I’m sure there were a fair number of military men who did their jobs from duty rather than passionate devotion to the warrior life. As Jo Beverley commented above, people reaction to war were very, very different.

    Reply
  99. From MJP:
    **Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂 **
    (MJP gives a modest blush of pleasure. *g*)
    Anne, you may remember that THE SPANISH BRIDE is based on the real love story of Harry and Juanita Smith. Heyer did several books that were very accurate history–I’ve read that her AN INFAMOUS ARMY, about Waterloo, has been taught in the royal military college of Sandhurst because she makes a complex battle very clear.
    Ranurgis, at a time when going for a soldier was one of the very few acceptable career choices, I’m sure there were a fair number of military men who did their jobs from duty rather than passionate devotion to the warrior life. As Jo Beverley commented above, people reaction to war were very, very different.

    Reply
  100. From MJP:
    **Just last week, I read Never Less Than A Lady and thoroughly enjoyed it! You really do love to torture your heroes, MJ! 🙂 **
    (MJP gives a modest blush of pleasure. *g*)
    Anne, you may remember that THE SPANISH BRIDE is based on the real love story of Harry and Juanita Smith. Heyer did several books that were very accurate history–I’ve read that her AN INFAMOUS ARMY, about Waterloo, has been taught in the royal military college of Sandhurst because she makes a complex battle very clear.
    Ranurgis, at a time when going for a soldier was one of the very few acceptable career choices, I’m sure there were a fair number of military men who did their jobs from duty rather than passionate devotion to the warrior life. As Jo Beverley commented above, people reaction to war were very, very different.

    Reply
  101. I love this post. There is just something about a man (or woman) in military uniform – so I ended up marrying one! I tend to enjoy reading historical fiction best, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those “undercover” servicemen! 😀

    Reply
  102. I love this post. There is just something about a man (or woman) in military uniform – so I ended up marrying one! I tend to enjoy reading historical fiction best, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those “undercover” servicemen! 😀

    Reply
  103. I love this post. There is just something about a man (or woman) in military uniform – so I ended up marrying one! I tend to enjoy reading historical fiction best, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those “undercover” servicemen! 😀

    Reply
  104. I love this post. There is just something about a man (or woman) in military uniform – so I ended up marrying one! I tend to enjoy reading historical fiction best, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those “undercover” servicemen! 😀

    Reply
  105. I love this post. There is just something about a man (or woman) in military uniform – so I ended up marrying one! I tend to enjoy reading historical fiction best, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate those “undercover” servicemen! 😀

    Reply
  106. Anne, adding to what MJP said about that Heyer story, The Spanish Bride. Harry Smith really did marry Juana, a young Spanish girl after Badajoz, and they had what seems a brilliant marriage. Harry was later Governor of South Africa and the township LadySmith is named after Juana, who was, by then Lady Smith. So each time I hear music by Ladysmith Black Mambaza (sp?) I think of Heyer’s Juana.
    I too am an admirer of Wellington. When he went to India, he took some books to study on the long voyage out, and by the time he arrived, he was fluent in the main local language -forgotten which one, but it was the most useful.
    And Cara/Andrea, ahem, re your annexation of Sean Bean, remember your wenchly obligation and share him with your fellow wenches. 😉

    Reply
  107. Anne, adding to what MJP said about that Heyer story, The Spanish Bride. Harry Smith really did marry Juana, a young Spanish girl after Badajoz, and they had what seems a brilliant marriage. Harry was later Governor of South Africa and the township LadySmith is named after Juana, who was, by then Lady Smith. So each time I hear music by Ladysmith Black Mambaza (sp?) I think of Heyer’s Juana.
    I too am an admirer of Wellington. When he went to India, he took some books to study on the long voyage out, and by the time he arrived, he was fluent in the main local language -forgotten which one, but it was the most useful.
    And Cara/Andrea, ahem, re your annexation of Sean Bean, remember your wenchly obligation and share him with your fellow wenches. 😉

    Reply
  108. Anne, adding to what MJP said about that Heyer story, The Spanish Bride. Harry Smith really did marry Juana, a young Spanish girl after Badajoz, and they had what seems a brilliant marriage. Harry was later Governor of South Africa and the township LadySmith is named after Juana, who was, by then Lady Smith. So each time I hear music by Ladysmith Black Mambaza (sp?) I think of Heyer’s Juana.
    I too am an admirer of Wellington. When he went to India, he took some books to study on the long voyage out, and by the time he arrived, he was fluent in the main local language -forgotten which one, but it was the most useful.
    And Cara/Andrea, ahem, re your annexation of Sean Bean, remember your wenchly obligation and share him with your fellow wenches. 😉

    Reply
  109. Anne, adding to what MJP said about that Heyer story, The Spanish Bride. Harry Smith really did marry Juana, a young Spanish girl after Badajoz, and they had what seems a brilliant marriage. Harry was later Governor of South Africa and the township LadySmith is named after Juana, who was, by then Lady Smith. So each time I hear music by Ladysmith Black Mambaza (sp?) I think of Heyer’s Juana.
    I too am an admirer of Wellington. When he went to India, he took some books to study on the long voyage out, and by the time he arrived, he was fluent in the main local language -forgotten which one, but it was the most useful.
    And Cara/Andrea, ahem, re your annexation of Sean Bean, remember your wenchly obligation and share him with your fellow wenches. 😉

    Reply
  110. Anne, adding to what MJP said about that Heyer story, The Spanish Bride. Harry Smith really did marry Juana, a young Spanish girl after Badajoz, and they had what seems a brilliant marriage. Harry was later Governor of South Africa and the township LadySmith is named after Juana, who was, by then Lady Smith. So each time I hear music by Ladysmith Black Mambaza (sp?) I think of Heyer’s Juana.
    I too am an admirer of Wellington. When he went to India, he took some books to study on the long voyage out, and by the time he arrived, he was fluent in the main local language -forgotten which one, but it was the most useful.
    And Cara/Andrea, ahem, re your annexation of Sean Bean, remember your wenchly obligation and share him with your fellow wenches. 😉

    Reply
  111. It sounds like we need to appoint Sean Bean as general of a special Wench Regiment and allow all who wish to enlist to be Sean Soldier . . . or Sharpe Shooters. Of we would need very spiffy regimentals . . . perhaps Ralph Lauren would volunteer a design.

    Reply
  112. It sounds like we need to appoint Sean Bean as general of a special Wench Regiment and allow all who wish to enlist to be Sean Soldier . . . or Sharpe Shooters. Of we would need very spiffy regimentals . . . perhaps Ralph Lauren would volunteer a design.

    Reply
  113. It sounds like we need to appoint Sean Bean as general of a special Wench Regiment and allow all who wish to enlist to be Sean Soldier . . . or Sharpe Shooters. Of we would need very spiffy regimentals . . . perhaps Ralph Lauren would volunteer a design.

    Reply
  114. It sounds like we need to appoint Sean Bean as general of a special Wench Regiment and allow all who wish to enlist to be Sean Soldier . . . or Sharpe Shooters. Of we would need very spiffy regimentals . . . perhaps Ralph Lauren would volunteer a design.

    Reply
  115. It sounds like we need to appoint Sean Bean as general of a special Wench Regiment and allow all who wish to enlist to be Sean Soldier . . . or Sharpe Shooters. Of we would need very spiffy regimentals . . . perhaps Ralph Lauren would volunteer a design.

    Reply
  116. Chiming in late! But I just had to comment. Is there something in the water? Because Andrea/Cara is writing about a soldier turned artist and so did I in my Dec 2009 Harlequin Historical, Gallant Officer, Forbidden Lady! It amazes me when these things happen.
    Almost all my heroes are soldiers or former soldiers and the ones who weren’t usually feel badly about not doing their part. But I’m the daughter of an Army colonel and military is in my blood! (waving to Kim!)

    Reply
  117. Chiming in late! But I just had to comment. Is there something in the water? Because Andrea/Cara is writing about a soldier turned artist and so did I in my Dec 2009 Harlequin Historical, Gallant Officer, Forbidden Lady! It amazes me when these things happen.
    Almost all my heroes are soldiers or former soldiers and the ones who weren’t usually feel badly about not doing their part. But I’m the daughter of an Army colonel and military is in my blood! (waving to Kim!)

    Reply
  118. Chiming in late! But I just had to comment. Is there something in the water? Because Andrea/Cara is writing about a soldier turned artist and so did I in my Dec 2009 Harlequin Historical, Gallant Officer, Forbidden Lady! It amazes me when these things happen.
    Almost all my heroes are soldiers or former soldiers and the ones who weren’t usually feel badly about not doing their part. But I’m the daughter of an Army colonel and military is in my blood! (waving to Kim!)

    Reply
  119. Chiming in late! But I just had to comment. Is there something in the water? Because Andrea/Cara is writing about a soldier turned artist and so did I in my Dec 2009 Harlequin Historical, Gallant Officer, Forbidden Lady! It amazes me when these things happen.
    Almost all my heroes are soldiers or former soldiers and the ones who weren’t usually feel badly about not doing their part. But I’m the daughter of an Army colonel and military is in my blood! (waving to Kim!)

    Reply
  120. Chiming in late! But I just had to comment. Is there something in the water? Because Andrea/Cara is writing about a soldier turned artist and so did I in my Dec 2009 Harlequin Historical, Gallant Officer, Forbidden Lady! It amazes me when these things happen.
    Almost all my heroes are soldiers or former soldiers and the ones who weren’t usually feel badly about not doing their part. But I’m the daughter of an Army colonel and military is in my blood! (waving to Kim!)

    Reply
  121. From MJP:
    Sean Bean definitely seems to inspire the Regency lover’s fantasies. Cara, in the Sharpe sseries he had his Chosen Men. Clearly he needs Chosen Women as well. *g*
    Dianw, I think there’s just something fascinating about the idea of a tough soldier juxtaposed with a sensitive artistic soul. I did it in the late ’90s with RIVER OF FIRE, where my hero had been an exploring officer in Spain, riding alone and drawing maps, then comes home and falls into a nest of artists who bring out his inner painter. *g*
    It’s a great character set up, and there’s so much room for a writer to play with it!

    Reply
  122. From MJP:
    Sean Bean definitely seems to inspire the Regency lover’s fantasies. Cara, in the Sharpe sseries he had his Chosen Men. Clearly he needs Chosen Women as well. *g*
    Dianw, I think there’s just something fascinating about the idea of a tough soldier juxtaposed with a sensitive artistic soul. I did it in the late ’90s with RIVER OF FIRE, where my hero had been an exploring officer in Spain, riding alone and drawing maps, then comes home and falls into a nest of artists who bring out his inner painter. *g*
    It’s a great character set up, and there’s so much room for a writer to play with it!

    Reply
  123. From MJP:
    Sean Bean definitely seems to inspire the Regency lover’s fantasies. Cara, in the Sharpe sseries he had his Chosen Men. Clearly he needs Chosen Women as well. *g*
    Dianw, I think there’s just something fascinating about the idea of a tough soldier juxtaposed with a sensitive artistic soul. I did it in the late ’90s with RIVER OF FIRE, where my hero had been an exploring officer in Spain, riding alone and drawing maps, then comes home and falls into a nest of artists who bring out his inner painter. *g*
    It’s a great character set up, and there’s so much room for a writer to play with it!

    Reply
  124. From MJP:
    Sean Bean definitely seems to inspire the Regency lover’s fantasies. Cara, in the Sharpe sseries he had his Chosen Men. Clearly he needs Chosen Women as well. *g*
    Dianw, I think there’s just something fascinating about the idea of a tough soldier juxtaposed with a sensitive artistic soul. I did it in the late ’90s with RIVER OF FIRE, where my hero had been an exploring officer in Spain, riding alone and drawing maps, then comes home and falls into a nest of artists who bring out his inner painter. *g*
    It’s a great character set up, and there’s so much room for a writer to play with it!

    Reply
  125. From MJP:
    Sean Bean definitely seems to inspire the Regency lover’s fantasies. Cara, in the Sharpe sseries he had his Chosen Men. Clearly he needs Chosen Women as well. *g*
    Dianw, I think there’s just something fascinating about the idea of a tough soldier juxtaposed with a sensitive artistic soul. I did it in the late ’90s with RIVER OF FIRE, where my hero had been an exploring officer in Spain, riding alone and drawing maps, then comes home and falls into a nest of artists who bring out his inner painter. *g*
    It’s a great character set up, and there’s so much room for a writer to play with it!

    Reply
  126. What a timely post for me. I just finished the third of Carla Kelly’s trilogy about the three illegitimate daughters of Lord Ratliffe: Marrying the Captain, The Surgeon’s Lady, and Marrying the Royal Marine. All three of the heroes are on active service during the Napoleonic Wars. What I love about Kelly’s romances are that she does not hesitate to show the reality of war. You see the hundreds of casualties in Surgeon’s Lady and the horror of what many women faced (starvation, rape and death) in Marrying the Royal Marine. Despite this, the characters manage happiness. I think so often in Regencies that we don’t really get a feeling of the effect of the war on people. Their lives seem to go on with no hint of the devastation that was occurring. Of course, maybe this was really true!

    Reply
  127. What a timely post for me. I just finished the third of Carla Kelly’s trilogy about the three illegitimate daughters of Lord Ratliffe: Marrying the Captain, The Surgeon’s Lady, and Marrying the Royal Marine. All three of the heroes are on active service during the Napoleonic Wars. What I love about Kelly’s romances are that she does not hesitate to show the reality of war. You see the hundreds of casualties in Surgeon’s Lady and the horror of what many women faced (starvation, rape and death) in Marrying the Royal Marine. Despite this, the characters manage happiness. I think so often in Regencies that we don’t really get a feeling of the effect of the war on people. Their lives seem to go on with no hint of the devastation that was occurring. Of course, maybe this was really true!

    Reply
  128. What a timely post for me. I just finished the third of Carla Kelly’s trilogy about the three illegitimate daughters of Lord Ratliffe: Marrying the Captain, The Surgeon’s Lady, and Marrying the Royal Marine. All three of the heroes are on active service during the Napoleonic Wars. What I love about Kelly’s romances are that she does not hesitate to show the reality of war. You see the hundreds of casualties in Surgeon’s Lady and the horror of what many women faced (starvation, rape and death) in Marrying the Royal Marine. Despite this, the characters manage happiness. I think so often in Regencies that we don’t really get a feeling of the effect of the war on people. Their lives seem to go on with no hint of the devastation that was occurring. Of course, maybe this was really true!

    Reply
  129. What a timely post for me. I just finished the third of Carla Kelly’s trilogy about the three illegitimate daughters of Lord Ratliffe: Marrying the Captain, The Surgeon’s Lady, and Marrying the Royal Marine. All three of the heroes are on active service during the Napoleonic Wars. What I love about Kelly’s romances are that she does not hesitate to show the reality of war. You see the hundreds of casualties in Surgeon’s Lady and the horror of what many women faced (starvation, rape and death) in Marrying the Royal Marine. Despite this, the characters manage happiness. I think so often in Regencies that we don’t really get a feeling of the effect of the war on people. Their lives seem to go on with no hint of the devastation that was occurring. Of course, maybe this was really true!

    Reply
  130. What a timely post for me. I just finished the third of Carla Kelly’s trilogy about the three illegitimate daughters of Lord Ratliffe: Marrying the Captain, The Surgeon’s Lady, and Marrying the Royal Marine. All three of the heroes are on active service during the Napoleonic Wars. What I love about Kelly’s romances are that she does not hesitate to show the reality of war. You see the hundreds of casualties in Surgeon’s Lady and the horror of what many women faced (starvation, rape and death) in Marrying the Royal Marine. Despite this, the characters manage happiness. I think so often in Regencies that we don’t really get a feeling of the effect of the war on people. Their lives seem to go on with no hint of the devastation that was occurring. Of course, maybe this was really true!

    Reply
  131. From MJP:
    Sharon–
    both sides of the equation are true: Carla Kelly portrays the grim reality of war as few romance writers do. Yet the majority of people back home in England just sailed on in normal life. Jane Austen’s characters certainly don’t dwell on the wars. Of course, they didn’t have television to bring it into their homes.

    Reply
  132. From MJP:
    Sharon–
    both sides of the equation are true: Carla Kelly portrays the grim reality of war as few romance writers do. Yet the majority of people back home in England just sailed on in normal life. Jane Austen’s characters certainly don’t dwell on the wars. Of course, they didn’t have television to bring it into their homes.

    Reply
  133. From MJP:
    Sharon–
    both sides of the equation are true: Carla Kelly portrays the grim reality of war as few romance writers do. Yet the majority of people back home in England just sailed on in normal life. Jane Austen’s characters certainly don’t dwell on the wars. Of course, they didn’t have television to bring it into their homes.

    Reply
  134. From MJP:
    Sharon–
    both sides of the equation are true: Carla Kelly portrays the grim reality of war as few romance writers do. Yet the majority of people back home in England just sailed on in normal life. Jane Austen’s characters certainly don’t dwell on the wars. Of course, they didn’t have television to bring it into their homes.

    Reply
  135. From MJP:
    Sharon–
    both sides of the equation are true: Carla Kelly portrays the grim reality of war as few romance writers do. Yet the majority of people back home in England just sailed on in normal life. Jane Austen’s characters certainly don’t dwell on the wars. Of course, they didn’t have television to bring it into their homes.

    Reply
  136. I love a military man in romance novels. As a former Navy servicewoman, I’m particularly fond of Naval heroes. I love Lora Leigh’s Navy SEALs Series.
    But, I have to say my very favorite novel with military heroes is The Three Musketeers. (I read the book at least once a year.) They’re dashing, brave, loyal, and everything a hero and military man should be. And they have the best uniforms.

    Reply
  137. I love a military man in romance novels. As a former Navy servicewoman, I’m particularly fond of Naval heroes. I love Lora Leigh’s Navy SEALs Series.
    But, I have to say my very favorite novel with military heroes is The Three Musketeers. (I read the book at least once a year.) They’re dashing, brave, loyal, and everything a hero and military man should be. And they have the best uniforms.

    Reply
  138. I love a military man in romance novels. As a former Navy servicewoman, I’m particularly fond of Naval heroes. I love Lora Leigh’s Navy SEALs Series.
    But, I have to say my very favorite novel with military heroes is The Three Musketeers. (I read the book at least once a year.) They’re dashing, brave, loyal, and everything a hero and military man should be. And they have the best uniforms.

    Reply
  139. I love a military man in romance novels. As a former Navy servicewoman, I’m particularly fond of Naval heroes. I love Lora Leigh’s Navy SEALs Series.
    But, I have to say my very favorite novel with military heroes is The Three Musketeers. (I read the book at least once a year.) They’re dashing, brave, loyal, and everything a hero and military man should be. And they have the best uniforms.

    Reply
  140. I love a military man in romance novels. As a former Navy servicewoman, I’m particularly fond of Naval heroes. I love Lora Leigh’s Navy SEALs Series.
    But, I have to say my very favorite novel with military heroes is The Three Musketeers. (I read the book at least once a year.) They’re dashing, brave, loyal, and everything a hero and military man should be. And they have the best uniforms.

    Reply
  141. Wonderful post, Mary Jo!
    All these mentions of romances with military heroes makes me want to do some rereading. I think we need a special bibliography of romances with military heroes. Two I would definitely add to the list are Jill Barnett’s Sentimental Journey and Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at the Jitterbug Lounge. Carla Kelly’s One Good Turn doesn’t have a military hero, but the heroine’s story surely places it among books that show the effects of war.

    Reply
  142. Wonderful post, Mary Jo!
    All these mentions of romances with military heroes makes me want to do some rereading. I think we need a special bibliography of romances with military heroes. Two I would definitely add to the list are Jill Barnett’s Sentimental Journey and Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at the Jitterbug Lounge. Carla Kelly’s One Good Turn doesn’t have a military hero, but the heroine’s story surely places it among books that show the effects of war.

    Reply
  143. Wonderful post, Mary Jo!
    All these mentions of romances with military heroes makes me want to do some rereading. I think we need a special bibliography of romances with military heroes. Two I would definitely add to the list are Jill Barnett’s Sentimental Journey and Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at the Jitterbug Lounge. Carla Kelly’s One Good Turn doesn’t have a military hero, but the heroine’s story surely places it among books that show the effects of war.

    Reply
  144. Wonderful post, Mary Jo!
    All these mentions of romances with military heroes makes me want to do some rereading. I think we need a special bibliography of romances with military heroes. Two I would definitely add to the list are Jill Barnett’s Sentimental Journey and Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at the Jitterbug Lounge. Carla Kelly’s One Good Turn doesn’t have a military hero, but the heroine’s story surely places it among books that show the effects of war.

    Reply
  145. Wonderful post, Mary Jo!
    All these mentions of romances with military heroes makes me want to do some rereading. I think we need a special bibliography of romances with military heroes. Two I would definitely add to the list are Jill Barnett’s Sentimental Journey and Pamela Morsi’s Last Dance at the Jitterbug Lounge. Carla Kelly’s One Good Turn doesn’t have a military hero, but the heroine’s story surely places it among books that show the effects of war.

    Reply
  146. From MJP:
    Oh, yes, Julie, how could we forget the Three Musqueteers? Soldiers have -always- been dashing heroes! Well, Achilles was something of a pouter, but there’s a lot of good ones throughout history.
    Janga, there is some romance database whose name I can’t remember, and it might well have a listing for military elements. Except that I don’t remember the name. *g* It would be a loooong list.

    Reply
  147. From MJP:
    Oh, yes, Julie, how could we forget the Three Musqueteers? Soldiers have -always- been dashing heroes! Well, Achilles was something of a pouter, but there’s a lot of good ones throughout history.
    Janga, there is some romance database whose name I can’t remember, and it might well have a listing for military elements. Except that I don’t remember the name. *g* It would be a loooong list.

    Reply
  148. From MJP:
    Oh, yes, Julie, how could we forget the Three Musqueteers? Soldiers have -always- been dashing heroes! Well, Achilles was something of a pouter, but there’s a lot of good ones throughout history.
    Janga, there is some romance database whose name I can’t remember, and it might well have a listing for military elements. Except that I don’t remember the name. *g* It would be a loooong list.

    Reply
  149. From MJP:
    Oh, yes, Julie, how could we forget the Three Musqueteers? Soldiers have -always- been dashing heroes! Well, Achilles was something of a pouter, but there’s a lot of good ones throughout history.
    Janga, there is some romance database whose name I can’t remember, and it might well have a listing for military elements. Except that I don’t remember the name. *g* It would be a loooong list.

    Reply
  150. From MJP:
    Oh, yes, Julie, how could we forget the Three Musqueteers? Soldiers have -always- been dashing heroes! Well, Achilles was something of a pouter, but there’s a lot of good ones throughout history.
    Janga, there is some romance database whose name I can’t remember, and it might well have a listing for military elements. Except that I don’t remember the name. *g* It would be a loooong list.

    Reply
  151. MJP-I am a huge, huge fan of your novels! I see from your website you have reissued One Perfect Rose. I adore that book! As well as the Fallen Angel Series it comes from. I actually have an odd copy of the book: it’s paperback sized but in hardcover. I don’t know where I got it, but I love it because I read it so often, I probably would have lost the covers by now if it were paperback.
    🙂

    Reply
  152. MJP-I am a huge, huge fan of your novels! I see from your website you have reissued One Perfect Rose. I adore that book! As well as the Fallen Angel Series it comes from. I actually have an odd copy of the book: it’s paperback sized but in hardcover. I don’t know where I got it, but I love it because I read it so often, I probably would have lost the covers by now if it were paperback.
    🙂

    Reply
  153. MJP-I am a huge, huge fan of your novels! I see from your website you have reissued One Perfect Rose. I adore that book! As well as the Fallen Angel Series it comes from. I actually have an odd copy of the book: it’s paperback sized but in hardcover. I don’t know where I got it, but I love it because I read it so often, I probably would have lost the covers by now if it were paperback.
    🙂

    Reply
  154. MJP-I am a huge, huge fan of your novels! I see from your website you have reissued One Perfect Rose. I adore that book! As well as the Fallen Angel Series it comes from. I actually have an odd copy of the book: it’s paperback sized but in hardcover. I don’t know where I got it, but I love it because I read it so often, I probably would have lost the covers by now if it were paperback.
    🙂

    Reply
  155. MJP-I am a huge, huge fan of your novels! I see from your website you have reissued One Perfect Rose. I adore that book! As well as the Fallen Angel Series it comes from. I actually have an odd copy of the book: it’s paperback sized but in hardcover. I don’t know where I got it, but I love it because I read it so often, I probably would have lost the covers by now if it were paperback.
    🙂

    Reply
  156. I love books about military heros – particularly in the Regency period and the American Civil War. I think – for the most part – it gives us a chance see the positives (and something that doesn’t always appear in real life) of the sometimes horrible things that these heroes witness on the battlefield. I also like how many times the love of a special woman can help these strong and scarred men to find themselves. And I think you’ve done this particularly well, Mary Jo.
    And, more than that, as someone who’s grown up in a family with lots of military heroes – including my brother who has serves several tours in the middle east, I like to think that in a small way, we’re honoring our heroes – past, present and future – by putting them in the written word.

    Reply
  157. I love books about military heros – particularly in the Regency period and the American Civil War. I think – for the most part – it gives us a chance see the positives (and something that doesn’t always appear in real life) of the sometimes horrible things that these heroes witness on the battlefield. I also like how many times the love of a special woman can help these strong and scarred men to find themselves. And I think you’ve done this particularly well, Mary Jo.
    And, more than that, as someone who’s grown up in a family with lots of military heroes – including my brother who has serves several tours in the middle east, I like to think that in a small way, we’re honoring our heroes – past, present and future – by putting them in the written word.

    Reply
  158. I love books about military heros – particularly in the Regency period and the American Civil War. I think – for the most part – it gives us a chance see the positives (and something that doesn’t always appear in real life) of the sometimes horrible things that these heroes witness on the battlefield. I also like how many times the love of a special woman can help these strong and scarred men to find themselves. And I think you’ve done this particularly well, Mary Jo.
    And, more than that, as someone who’s grown up in a family with lots of military heroes – including my brother who has serves several tours in the middle east, I like to think that in a small way, we’re honoring our heroes – past, present and future – by putting them in the written word.

    Reply
  159. I love books about military heros – particularly in the Regency period and the American Civil War. I think – for the most part – it gives us a chance see the positives (and something that doesn’t always appear in real life) of the sometimes horrible things that these heroes witness on the battlefield. I also like how many times the love of a special woman can help these strong and scarred men to find themselves. And I think you’ve done this particularly well, Mary Jo.
    And, more than that, as someone who’s grown up in a family with lots of military heroes – including my brother who has serves several tours in the middle east, I like to think that in a small way, we’re honoring our heroes – past, present and future – by putting them in the written word.

    Reply
  160. I love books about military heros – particularly in the Regency period and the American Civil War. I think – for the most part – it gives us a chance see the positives (and something that doesn’t always appear in real life) of the sometimes horrible things that these heroes witness on the battlefield. I also like how many times the love of a special woman can help these strong and scarred men to find themselves. And I think you’ve done this particularly well, Mary Jo.
    And, more than that, as someone who’s grown up in a family with lots of military heroes – including my brother who has serves several tours in the middle east, I like to think that in a small way, we’re honoring our heroes – past, present and future – by putting them in the written word.

    Reply
  161. From MJP:
    Julie–that lovely little hardcover was the first edition from Ballantine. They wanted to be noticed, so they put several books into the mini-hardcover format, which got lots of attention. The paper is very high quality and will last a lot longer than a regular paperback! I’m glad you enjoy One Perfect Rose, as well as other books of mine.
    Kristina, thanks for the kind words. I agree putting heroic military men into our stories is a way of honoring them and showing our respect. Plus, it enables writers to give them the happy endings they deserve. It sounds like your brother is safely home now. All honor to him.

    Reply
  162. From MJP:
    Julie–that lovely little hardcover was the first edition from Ballantine. They wanted to be noticed, so they put several books into the mini-hardcover format, which got lots of attention. The paper is very high quality and will last a lot longer than a regular paperback! I’m glad you enjoy One Perfect Rose, as well as other books of mine.
    Kristina, thanks for the kind words. I agree putting heroic military men into our stories is a way of honoring them and showing our respect. Plus, it enables writers to give them the happy endings they deserve. It sounds like your brother is safely home now. All honor to him.

    Reply
  163. From MJP:
    Julie–that lovely little hardcover was the first edition from Ballantine. They wanted to be noticed, so they put several books into the mini-hardcover format, which got lots of attention. The paper is very high quality and will last a lot longer than a regular paperback! I’m glad you enjoy One Perfect Rose, as well as other books of mine.
    Kristina, thanks for the kind words. I agree putting heroic military men into our stories is a way of honoring them and showing our respect. Plus, it enables writers to give them the happy endings they deserve. It sounds like your brother is safely home now. All honor to him.

    Reply
  164. From MJP:
    Julie–that lovely little hardcover was the first edition from Ballantine. They wanted to be noticed, so they put several books into the mini-hardcover format, which got lots of attention. The paper is very high quality and will last a lot longer than a regular paperback! I’m glad you enjoy One Perfect Rose, as well as other books of mine.
    Kristina, thanks for the kind words. I agree putting heroic military men into our stories is a way of honoring them and showing our respect. Plus, it enables writers to give them the happy endings they deserve. It sounds like your brother is safely home now. All honor to him.

    Reply
  165. From MJP:
    Julie–that lovely little hardcover was the first edition from Ballantine. They wanted to be noticed, so they put several books into the mini-hardcover format, which got lots of attention. The paper is very high quality and will last a lot longer than a regular paperback! I’m glad you enjoy One Perfect Rose, as well as other books of mine.
    Kristina, thanks for the kind words. I agree putting heroic military men into our stories is a way of honoring them and showing our respect. Plus, it enables writers to give them the happy endings they deserve. It sounds like your brother is safely home now. All honor to him.

    Reply

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