The next generation

Candles_1

Jo here, spinning off Edith’s weekend blog about unwritten books we want.
(As we run up to Christmas, I’m using Christmas images.)

So what about children of our characters?

I don’t think I’m going there. One reason is that I don’t want to follow my characters into middle and old age. I don’t have anything against middle and old age — I think I have some good characters in those slots — but I have a strong streak of realism, so some of them would have to suffer the downside, and a few would have to die. I simply don’t want to go there.

I’m well aware that this creates a gaping hole is my Regency world, because at those glittering aristocratic events there should be quite a lot of Mallorens. The children born in the 1760s and on into the 1770s would only be in their fifties in the Regency. Their children should be very active in the social scene. Rothgar himself could well be alive, though he’d be around 90, but his heir, assuming a son of his, or one of his brothers’, would be a VIP.

I don’t want to go there, however, so I don’t.

Which takes us to the Rogues. No danger of the same gaping hole problem because I will never — this is one of the few certainties in the known universe — write a book set in the Victorian era. You will see this also means I will never write about the Rogue’s children as adults because they’d be living in the Victorian age. ::shudder:: Another problem. They’d be Victorians. ::shudder:: ::shudder::

I actually think they’d be the raging loonies, in the best possible way, of the Victorian age, led by Arabel Delaney. I can see an annual summer camp for Roguettes, where any tendency to subscribe to meaningless social conventions will be dissuaded while equal opportunity sports, arts, science and self-sufficiency are required. And the idea of then setting them loose, rich and powerful, on Victorian society is oh, so tempting….

But the thought of what they face depresses me, so I’ll stay in my bubble and imagine alternate history.

Leaving aside the Victorian age ::shudder::, what do you think of sequels in which the origincal chararacters grow old and perhaps suffer degenerative diseases and die? Do you want to read them?

How important is it to you to read about protagonists’ children growing up?

Do you do this for yourself, spinning out the characters’ lives as you wish them to be?Trarfredge_1

Jo

72 thoughts on “The next generation”

  1. Funny you should mention it, but I just recently read a book timelined in a series that dealt with the h/h from a previous book dying from some disease. I hated it. In fact I found myself unable to continue reading the book as I felt somehow betrayed. Here was a couple I had loved in “their” book and then Pffffft they were gone in this one. I know these things of course did/do happen, but heck I read romance for escapism, fun, fantasy, but not for reality. This book was a medieval and yes I expect disease/battles/infection type stuff, but not to a previous h/h. I want to believe in the HEA, not the HEA for a little while and then an icky disease ending. I’m sure many will disagree, but this is just my opinion.

    Reply
  2. Funny you should mention it, but I just recently read a book timelined in a series that dealt with the h/h from a previous book dying from some disease. I hated it. In fact I found myself unable to continue reading the book as I felt somehow betrayed. Here was a couple I had loved in “their” book and then Pffffft they were gone in this one. I know these things of course did/do happen, but heck I read romance for escapism, fun, fantasy, but not for reality. This book was a medieval and yes I expect disease/battles/infection type stuff, but not to a previous h/h. I want to believe in the HEA, not the HEA for a little while and then an icky disease ending. I’m sure many will disagree, but this is just my opinion.

    Reply
  3. Funny you should mention it, but I just recently read a book timelined in a series that dealt with the h/h from a previous book dying from some disease. I hated it. In fact I found myself unable to continue reading the book as I felt somehow betrayed. Here was a couple I had loved in “their” book and then Pffffft they were gone in this one. I know these things of course did/do happen, but heck I read romance for escapism, fun, fantasy, but not for reality. This book was a medieval and yes I expect disease/battles/infection type stuff, but not to a previous h/h. I want to believe in the HEA, not the HEA for a little while and then an icky disease ending. I’m sure many will disagree, but this is just my opinion.

    Reply
  4. Funny you should mention it, but I just recently read a book timelined in a series that dealt with the h/h from a previous book dying from some disease. I hated it. In fact I found myself unable to continue reading the book as I felt somehow betrayed. Here was a couple I had loved in “their” book and then Pffffft they were gone in this one. I know these things of course did/do happen, but heck I read romance for escapism, fun, fantasy, but not for reality. This book was a medieval and yes I expect disease/battles/infection type stuff, but not to a previous h/h. I want to believe in the HEA, not the HEA for a little while and then an icky disease ending. I’m sure many will disagree, but this is just my opinion.

    Reply
  5. I like to know what happens. I like to imagine a HEA that lasts forever, with death of natural causes at a natural time. I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off. I LOVE WALTER. You have to remember that at that at that time Walter had been my love affair in Rainbow Valley. To kill him was cruel. And in such a violent way, too *shudders*. It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated. On the other hand I’d be mightily peeved if there weren’t deaths in a war centered novel – one of the reasons I like your Rogue stories, Jo, is that you have killed two Rogues off. Granted, they died without featuring, but they did die, and their deaths have affected the others. That, to my mind, is a happy medium.
    As to old age… I think there is a lot to be said for an older heroine – there’s a certain poignancy in love when you’re middle aged (at least, that’s the impression I get watching my parents). I wouldn’t want my protagonists to die on stage, though. If they die, let them do it between books. Better yet, set the next book far enough away that they will simply be a family legend!
    I do enjoy spinning epilogues, though – for example, imagining Michael and Catherine from Shattered Rainbows’ children and family life and so forth. But in a sort of snapshot way. No one wants to see their hero fade away into a shadow of their former self. Not unless they are then rescued by a heroine!

    Reply
  6. I like to know what happens. I like to imagine a HEA that lasts forever, with death of natural causes at a natural time. I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off. I LOVE WALTER. You have to remember that at that at that time Walter had been my love affair in Rainbow Valley. To kill him was cruel. And in such a violent way, too *shudders*. It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated. On the other hand I’d be mightily peeved if there weren’t deaths in a war centered novel – one of the reasons I like your Rogue stories, Jo, is that you have killed two Rogues off. Granted, they died without featuring, but they did die, and their deaths have affected the others. That, to my mind, is a happy medium.
    As to old age… I think there is a lot to be said for an older heroine – there’s a certain poignancy in love when you’re middle aged (at least, that’s the impression I get watching my parents). I wouldn’t want my protagonists to die on stage, though. If they die, let them do it between books. Better yet, set the next book far enough away that they will simply be a family legend!
    I do enjoy spinning epilogues, though – for example, imagining Michael and Catherine from Shattered Rainbows’ children and family life and so forth. But in a sort of snapshot way. No one wants to see their hero fade away into a shadow of their former self. Not unless they are then rescued by a heroine!

    Reply
  7. I like to know what happens. I like to imagine a HEA that lasts forever, with death of natural causes at a natural time. I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off. I LOVE WALTER. You have to remember that at that at that time Walter had been my love affair in Rainbow Valley. To kill him was cruel. And in such a violent way, too *shudders*. It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated. On the other hand I’d be mightily peeved if there weren’t deaths in a war centered novel – one of the reasons I like your Rogue stories, Jo, is that you have killed two Rogues off. Granted, they died without featuring, but they did die, and their deaths have affected the others. That, to my mind, is a happy medium.
    As to old age… I think there is a lot to be said for an older heroine – there’s a certain poignancy in love when you’re middle aged (at least, that’s the impression I get watching my parents). I wouldn’t want my protagonists to die on stage, though. If they die, let them do it between books. Better yet, set the next book far enough away that they will simply be a family legend!
    I do enjoy spinning epilogues, though – for example, imagining Michael and Catherine from Shattered Rainbows’ children and family life and so forth. But in a sort of snapshot way. No one wants to see their hero fade away into a shadow of their former self. Not unless they are then rescued by a heroine!

    Reply
  8. I like to know what happens. I like to imagine a HEA that lasts forever, with death of natural causes at a natural time. I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off. I LOVE WALTER. You have to remember that at that at that time Walter had been my love affair in Rainbow Valley. To kill him was cruel. And in such a violent way, too *shudders*. It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated. On the other hand I’d be mightily peeved if there weren’t deaths in a war centered novel – one of the reasons I like your Rogue stories, Jo, is that you have killed two Rogues off. Granted, they died without featuring, but they did die, and their deaths have affected the others. That, to my mind, is a happy medium.
    As to old age… I think there is a lot to be said for an older heroine – there’s a certain poignancy in love when you’re middle aged (at least, that’s the impression I get watching my parents). I wouldn’t want my protagonists to die on stage, though. If they die, let them do it between books. Better yet, set the next book far enough away that they will simply be a family legend!
    I do enjoy spinning epilogues, though – for example, imagining Michael and Catherine from Shattered Rainbows’ children and family life and so forth. But in a sort of snapshot way. No one wants to see their hero fade away into a shadow of their former self. Not unless they are then rescued by a heroine!

    Reply
  9. I posted elsewhere about bills, babies and middle-aged spread not being such fodder for romance. Actually, the babies are pretty cute, but raising the teenagers they grow up to be is far from romantic!
    I read somewhere that authors write the beginning of relationships, when all is new and shiny. As a reader, I’m happy with that limitation, because as a human, I know what the future may hold and it’s not quite so bright!
    I don’t mind seeing characters recur in sequels, but I don’t want to watch them degenerate and die. Now if they’re feisty and still full of vinegar, that’s different. I enjoyed Heyer’s Devil’s Cub for that very reason.
    I choose romance because it’s an escape from the harsh realities of life. I don’t mind some grit and historical accuracy (climbing boys, the pox, the stews, etc.) but I’m passing on the death part!

    Reply
  10. I posted elsewhere about bills, babies and middle-aged spread not being such fodder for romance. Actually, the babies are pretty cute, but raising the teenagers they grow up to be is far from romantic!
    I read somewhere that authors write the beginning of relationships, when all is new and shiny. As a reader, I’m happy with that limitation, because as a human, I know what the future may hold and it’s not quite so bright!
    I don’t mind seeing characters recur in sequels, but I don’t want to watch them degenerate and die. Now if they’re feisty and still full of vinegar, that’s different. I enjoyed Heyer’s Devil’s Cub for that very reason.
    I choose romance because it’s an escape from the harsh realities of life. I don’t mind some grit and historical accuracy (climbing boys, the pox, the stews, etc.) but I’m passing on the death part!

    Reply
  11. I posted elsewhere about bills, babies and middle-aged spread not being such fodder for romance. Actually, the babies are pretty cute, but raising the teenagers they grow up to be is far from romantic!
    I read somewhere that authors write the beginning of relationships, when all is new and shiny. As a reader, I’m happy with that limitation, because as a human, I know what the future may hold and it’s not quite so bright!
    I don’t mind seeing characters recur in sequels, but I don’t want to watch them degenerate and die. Now if they’re feisty and still full of vinegar, that’s different. I enjoyed Heyer’s Devil’s Cub for that very reason.
    I choose romance because it’s an escape from the harsh realities of life. I don’t mind some grit and historical accuracy (climbing boys, the pox, the stews, etc.) but I’m passing on the death part!

    Reply
  12. I posted elsewhere about bills, babies and middle-aged spread not being such fodder for romance. Actually, the babies are pretty cute, but raising the teenagers they grow up to be is far from romantic!
    I read somewhere that authors write the beginning of relationships, when all is new and shiny. As a reader, I’m happy with that limitation, because as a human, I know what the future may hold and it’s not quite so bright!
    I don’t mind seeing characters recur in sequels, but I don’t want to watch them degenerate and die. Now if they’re feisty and still full of vinegar, that’s different. I enjoyed Heyer’s Devil’s Cub for that very reason.
    I choose romance because it’s an escape from the harsh realities of life. I don’t mind some grit and historical accuracy (climbing boys, the pox, the stews, etc.) but I’m passing on the death part!

    Reply
  13. Jo,
    I agree with everything you just posted in your blog about not revisiting the characters in much later life (eeeekkkkk).
    BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular. Had never read the genre until a few years ago, and one of your book covers caught my attention. I did a little research online,read the book, and I’ve been hooked ever since. Love your work in any era you care to place your beloved characters – I’m there!
    Joy

    Reply
  14. Jo,
    I agree with everything you just posted in your blog about not revisiting the characters in much later life (eeeekkkkk).
    BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular. Had never read the genre until a few years ago, and one of your book covers caught my attention. I did a little research online,read the book, and I’ve been hooked ever since. Love your work in any era you care to place your beloved characters – I’m there!
    Joy

    Reply
  15. Jo,
    I agree with everything you just posted in your blog about not revisiting the characters in much later life (eeeekkkkk).
    BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular. Had never read the genre until a few years ago, and one of your book covers caught my attention. I did a little research online,read the book, and I’ve been hooked ever since. Love your work in any era you care to place your beloved characters – I’m there!
    Joy

    Reply
  16. Jo,
    I agree with everything you just posted in your blog about not revisiting the characters in much later life (eeeekkkkk).
    BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular. Had never read the genre until a few years ago, and one of your book covers caught my attention. I did a little research online,read the book, and I’ve been hooked ever since. Love your work in any era you care to place your beloved characters – I’m there!
    Joy

    Reply
  17. Jo, here.
    Hallie said, “It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated.”
    Amen, amen! I think being stuck in unrelenting reality would be a form of torture,and I truly pity people who feel it’s their moral duty to try for that.
    “BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular”
    Thank, you, Joy. And what an appropriate name. 🙂
    As a writer, I aim to please. Literally. I strive to provide a soaring escape from reality with a true smile at the end.
    But, as I said, I have that strong streak of realism in me. Though I enjoy a bit of complete fluff now and then, mostly it doesn’t work for me. To really get into a book, it has to have that feeling of reality.
    Doesn’t matter if it’s the past seen through a selective prism, or involving magic or vampires — they don’t affect the fundamental, believable illusion of reality. Then I can really enjoy the illusion.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  18. Jo, here.
    Hallie said, “It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated.”
    Amen, amen! I think being stuck in unrelenting reality would be a form of torture,and I truly pity people who feel it’s their moral duty to try for that.
    “BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular”
    Thank, you, Joy. And what an appropriate name. 🙂
    As a writer, I aim to please. Literally. I strive to provide a soaring escape from reality with a true smile at the end.
    But, as I said, I have that strong streak of realism in me. Though I enjoy a bit of complete fluff now and then, mostly it doesn’t work for me. To really get into a book, it has to have that feeling of reality.
    Doesn’t matter if it’s the past seen through a selective prism, or involving magic or vampires — they don’t affect the fundamental, believable illusion of reality. Then I can really enjoy the illusion.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  19. Jo, here.
    Hallie said, “It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated.”
    Amen, amen! I think being stuck in unrelenting reality would be a form of torture,and I truly pity people who feel it’s their moral duty to try for that.
    “BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular”
    Thank, you, Joy. And what an appropriate name. 🙂
    As a writer, I aim to please. Literally. I strive to provide a soaring escape from reality with a true smile at the end.
    But, as I said, I have that strong streak of realism in me. Though I enjoy a bit of complete fluff now and then, mostly it doesn’t work for me. To really get into a book, it has to have that feeling of reality.
    Doesn’t matter if it’s the past seen through a selective prism, or involving magic or vampires — they don’t affect the fundamental, believable illusion of reality. Then I can really enjoy the illusion.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  20. Jo, here.
    Hallie said, “It’s very realistic, of course, but…sometimes realism is overrated.”
    Amen, amen! I think being stuck in unrelenting reality would be a form of torture,and I truly pity people who feel it’s their moral duty to try for that.
    “BTW, Jo, you are the reason I have become mesmerized with historical romances and Regencies in particular”
    Thank, you, Joy. And what an appropriate name. 🙂
    As a writer, I aim to please. Literally. I strive to provide a soaring escape from reality with a true smile at the end.
    But, as I said, I have that strong streak of realism in me. Though I enjoy a bit of complete fluff now and then, mostly it doesn’t work for me. To really get into a book, it has to have that feeling of reality.
    Doesn’t matter if it’s the past seen through a selective prism, or involving magic or vampires — they don’t affect the fundamental, believable illusion of reality. Then I can really enjoy the illusion.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  21. I too share a horror of the Victorians. *GRIN* I love how deep it seems to run in Jo, though. LOL!
    I’m not sure how big I am on seeing character’s children, though I did really enjoy getting to revist Avon and Lione from THESE OLD SHADES in DEVIL’S CUB, and I thought it was kind of cool to see a tiny cameo of Dominic and Mary in AN INFAMOUS ARMY.
    The brats running around my first book (a Georgian) will be marriage-aged smack in the middle of the Regency, and I will admit writing their stories is tempting . . .

    Reply
  22. I too share a horror of the Victorians. *GRIN* I love how deep it seems to run in Jo, though. LOL!
    I’m not sure how big I am on seeing character’s children, though I did really enjoy getting to revist Avon and Lione from THESE OLD SHADES in DEVIL’S CUB, and I thought it was kind of cool to see a tiny cameo of Dominic and Mary in AN INFAMOUS ARMY.
    The brats running around my first book (a Georgian) will be marriage-aged smack in the middle of the Regency, and I will admit writing their stories is tempting . . .

    Reply
  23. I too share a horror of the Victorians. *GRIN* I love how deep it seems to run in Jo, though. LOL!
    I’m not sure how big I am on seeing character’s children, though I did really enjoy getting to revist Avon and Lione from THESE OLD SHADES in DEVIL’S CUB, and I thought it was kind of cool to see a tiny cameo of Dominic and Mary in AN INFAMOUS ARMY.
    The brats running around my first book (a Georgian) will be marriage-aged smack in the middle of the Regency, and I will admit writing their stories is tempting . . .

    Reply
  24. I too share a horror of the Victorians. *GRIN* I love how deep it seems to run in Jo, though. LOL!
    I’m not sure how big I am on seeing character’s children, though I did really enjoy getting to revist Avon and Lione from THESE OLD SHADES in DEVIL’S CUB, and I thought it was kind of cool to see a tiny cameo of Dominic and Mary in AN INFAMOUS ARMY.
    The brats running around my first book (a Georgian) will be marriage-aged smack in the middle of the Regency, and I will admit writing their stories is tempting . . .

    Reply
  25. I don’t care a bit about the kids, as a rule. And I don’t think books that extend the storry would do all that well. but you asked about my favorite topic, ME.
    Yes, I would adore seeing the characters later in life. And no, not everyone is going to live our a long and elderly life together. I’d like to see them as sub plots estranged and working past it – I’d like to see them as main plots having to move on after losing their partner. I get so tired of the ‘second’ marriage being the ‘right’ one. Too rare is the book that admits there are many ‘perfect’ partners in life and you might have more than one.
    I’d like them to be cranky in the corner of the ballroom or wisely advising some empty headed chit in a snit. I’d like them to be walk-ons in a scene. Life is long and made up of more than the early days of your romance. (Reminding everyone, Fire Flower – OBSESSED I tell you, obsessed, I am)
    Part of the appeal of ‘lost love’ plot lines is the second chances and the moving on past the early crazy days – so why shy away after that? But all of my desires being whined and bemoaned and wailed – I don’t think I’m the majority reader and I think people would get knotted knickers till they were downright stumbling to the keyboard of outrage.

    Reply
  26. I don’t care a bit about the kids, as a rule. And I don’t think books that extend the storry would do all that well. but you asked about my favorite topic, ME.
    Yes, I would adore seeing the characters later in life. And no, not everyone is going to live our a long and elderly life together. I’d like to see them as sub plots estranged and working past it – I’d like to see them as main plots having to move on after losing their partner. I get so tired of the ‘second’ marriage being the ‘right’ one. Too rare is the book that admits there are many ‘perfect’ partners in life and you might have more than one.
    I’d like them to be cranky in the corner of the ballroom or wisely advising some empty headed chit in a snit. I’d like them to be walk-ons in a scene. Life is long and made up of more than the early days of your romance. (Reminding everyone, Fire Flower – OBSESSED I tell you, obsessed, I am)
    Part of the appeal of ‘lost love’ plot lines is the second chances and the moving on past the early crazy days – so why shy away after that? But all of my desires being whined and bemoaned and wailed – I don’t think I’m the majority reader and I think people would get knotted knickers till they were downright stumbling to the keyboard of outrage.

    Reply
  27. I don’t care a bit about the kids, as a rule. And I don’t think books that extend the storry would do all that well. but you asked about my favorite topic, ME.
    Yes, I would adore seeing the characters later in life. And no, not everyone is going to live our a long and elderly life together. I’d like to see them as sub plots estranged and working past it – I’d like to see them as main plots having to move on after losing their partner. I get so tired of the ‘second’ marriage being the ‘right’ one. Too rare is the book that admits there are many ‘perfect’ partners in life and you might have more than one.
    I’d like them to be cranky in the corner of the ballroom or wisely advising some empty headed chit in a snit. I’d like them to be walk-ons in a scene. Life is long and made up of more than the early days of your romance. (Reminding everyone, Fire Flower – OBSESSED I tell you, obsessed, I am)
    Part of the appeal of ‘lost love’ plot lines is the second chances and the moving on past the early crazy days – so why shy away after that? But all of my desires being whined and bemoaned and wailed – I don’t think I’m the majority reader and I think people would get knotted knickers till they were downright stumbling to the keyboard of outrage.

    Reply
  28. I don’t care a bit about the kids, as a rule. And I don’t think books that extend the storry would do all that well. but you asked about my favorite topic, ME.
    Yes, I would adore seeing the characters later in life. And no, not everyone is going to live our a long and elderly life together. I’d like to see them as sub plots estranged and working past it – I’d like to see them as main plots having to move on after losing their partner. I get so tired of the ‘second’ marriage being the ‘right’ one. Too rare is the book that admits there are many ‘perfect’ partners in life and you might have more than one.
    I’d like them to be cranky in the corner of the ballroom or wisely advising some empty headed chit in a snit. I’d like them to be walk-ons in a scene. Life is long and made up of more than the early days of your romance. (Reminding everyone, Fire Flower – OBSESSED I tell you, obsessed, I am)
    Part of the appeal of ‘lost love’ plot lines is the second chances and the moving on past the early crazy days – so why shy away after that? But all of my desires being whined and bemoaned and wailed – I don’t think I’m the majority reader and I think people would get knotted knickers till they were downright stumbling to the keyboard of outrage.

    Reply
  29. Ok, ok, typos and all, I have yet more. we’ve had the drunken hero, we’ve had the sexually abused one – so it’s ok for the hero not to be ‘perfect’ and to be troubled. Why not revist that couple in later life whn one of them is infirm? Or has stress induced impotence? (suddenly assuming that dukedom can’t be all cake and pie, even if there do seem to be scads and scads of the suckers) We’ve had heros who won’t sleep with their wives for fear of knocking them up and plucky heroines who say ‘go for it! I can only die once!’ and all sorts of other dilemmas.
    I do think it’s romantic that years from now she’d be willing to spoon his soup up (or vice versa) and I think there are a lot of powerful relationship stories to tell that don’t get told because they’re ‘icky’. Once, a long, long time ago, before a Certain Signet Super Regency, it’s was ‘icky’ for the hero to have a drinking problem. Throw those doors open.

    Reply
  30. Ok, ok, typos and all, I have yet more. we’ve had the drunken hero, we’ve had the sexually abused one – so it’s ok for the hero not to be ‘perfect’ and to be troubled. Why not revist that couple in later life whn one of them is infirm? Or has stress induced impotence? (suddenly assuming that dukedom can’t be all cake and pie, even if there do seem to be scads and scads of the suckers) We’ve had heros who won’t sleep with their wives for fear of knocking them up and plucky heroines who say ‘go for it! I can only die once!’ and all sorts of other dilemmas.
    I do think it’s romantic that years from now she’d be willing to spoon his soup up (or vice versa) and I think there are a lot of powerful relationship stories to tell that don’t get told because they’re ‘icky’. Once, a long, long time ago, before a Certain Signet Super Regency, it’s was ‘icky’ for the hero to have a drinking problem. Throw those doors open.

    Reply
  31. Ok, ok, typos and all, I have yet more. we’ve had the drunken hero, we’ve had the sexually abused one – so it’s ok for the hero not to be ‘perfect’ and to be troubled. Why not revist that couple in later life whn one of them is infirm? Or has stress induced impotence? (suddenly assuming that dukedom can’t be all cake and pie, even if there do seem to be scads and scads of the suckers) We’ve had heros who won’t sleep with their wives for fear of knocking them up and plucky heroines who say ‘go for it! I can only die once!’ and all sorts of other dilemmas.
    I do think it’s romantic that years from now she’d be willing to spoon his soup up (or vice versa) and I think there are a lot of powerful relationship stories to tell that don’t get told because they’re ‘icky’. Once, a long, long time ago, before a Certain Signet Super Regency, it’s was ‘icky’ for the hero to have a drinking problem. Throw those doors open.

    Reply
  32. Ok, ok, typos and all, I have yet more. we’ve had the drunken hero, we’ve had the sexually abused one – so it’s ok for the hero not to be ‘perfect’ and to be troubled. Why not revist that couple in later life whn one of them is infirm? Or has stress induced impotence? (suddenly assuming that dukedom can’t be all cake and pie, even if there do seem to be scads and scads of the suckers) We’ve had heros who won’t sleep with their wives for fear of knocking them up and plucky heroines who say ‘go for it! I can only die once!’ and all sorts of other dilemmas.
    I do think it’s romantic that years from now she’d be willing to spoon his soup up (or vice versa) and I think there are a lot of powerful relationship stories to tell that don’t get told because they’re ‘icky’. Once, a long, long time ago, before a Certain Signet Super Regency, it’s was ‘icky’ for the hero to have a drinking problem. Throw those doors open.

    Reply
  33. “I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off.”
    What always gets me when I re-read RILLA is how the characters don’t know it, and Montgomery didn’t know it because she wrote it around 1920, but the war-baby Rilla brought up, not to mention her own children with Kenneth and Jem and Faith’s, will be just the right age to fight WWII.
    Anyway. I’m fine with seeing characters from a previous book aging and dying decades later–they just need to have lived a long, happy life together so their HEA isn’t diluted.
    And who knows if I’ll ever see publication, but I can’t seem to resist linking my stories. There’s no reason at all the RAF pilot hero of the WWII story I want to write one of these days needs to be a descendant of the hero and heroine of the Regency I’m writing now, but he just *is.*

    Reply
  34. “I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off.”
    What always gets me when I re-read RILLA is how the characters don’t know it, and Montgomery didn’t know it because she wrote it around 1920, but the war-baby Rilla brought up, not to mention her own children with Kenneth and Jem and Faith’s, will be just the right age to fight WWII.
    Anyway. I’m fine with seeing characters from a previous book aging and dying decades later–they just need to have lived a long, happy life together so their HEA isn’t diluted.
    And who knows if I’ll ever see publication, but I can’t seem to resist linking my stories. There’s no reason at all the RAF pilot hero of the WWII story I want to write one of these days needs to be a descendant of the hero and heroine of the Regency I’m writing now, but he just *is.*

    Reply
  35. “I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off.”
    What always gets me when I re-read RILLA is how the characters don’t know it, and Montgomery didn’t know it because she wrote it around 1920, but the war-baby Rilla brought up, not to mention her own children with Kenneth and Jem and Faith’s, will be just the right age to fight WWII.
    Anyway. I’m fine with seeing characters from a previous book aging and dying decades later–they just need to have lived a long, happy life together so their HEA isn’t diluted.
    And who knows if I’ll ever see publication, but I can’t seem to resist linking my stories. There’s no reason at all the RAF pilot hero of the WWII story I want to write one of these days needs to be a descendant of the hero and heroine of the Regency I’m writing now, but he just *is.*

    Reply
  36. “I remember raging at L M Montgomery when I read Rilla of Ingleside because she killed Walter off.”
    What always gets me when I re-read RILLA is how the characters don’t know it, and Montgomery didn’t know it because she wrote it around 1920, but the war-baby Rilla brought up, not to mention her own children with Kenneth and Jem and Faith’s, will be just the right age to fight WWII.
    Anyway. I’m fine with seeing characters from a previous book aging and dying decades later–they just need to have lived a long, happy life together so their HEA isn’t diluted.
    And who knows if I’ll ever see publication, but I can’t seem to resist linking my stories. There’s no reason at all the RAF pilot hero of the WWII story I want to write one of these days needs to be a descendant of the hero and heroine of the Regency I’m writing now, but he just *is.*

    Reply
  37. If I really love a book, its characters and its world, I often think about what happens to them after the book is over. When I was reading all my favorite childhood books – those classic girl books by Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Austen, etc. – I often made up extra scenes in my head – and sometimes forced my friends to act them out with me.
    I do like when books set in the same world as other favorite books give me updates on favorite, old characters. Something would be missing if they didn’t. Of course, I sobbed when Meg and her husband died in Little Men or Jo’s Boys, but that didn’t ruin Little Women for me. I was annoyed when Sandra Brown killed off the hero of her first historical in her second historical, but he didn’t have to die that young.
    I know you just said, Jo, that you’ll never revisit the children of your heroes and heroines, but I have spent way too much time wondering what happens to the first child (daughter) of Brand and Rosamunde of Secrets of the Night. I always felt that they spent an inordinate amount of energy NOT to get married before she was born, and I personally thought she had cause to be bitter. So, I’ve wondered – did she suffer for her illegitimacy? did she know that her father’s wife really was her mom? Was she ever told? etc. etc. etc.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  38. If I really love a book, its characters and its world, I often think about what happens to them after the book is over. When I was reading all my favorite childhood books – those classic girl books by Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Austen, etc. – I often made up extra scenes in my head – and sometimes forced my friends to act them out with me.
    I do like when books set in the same world as other favorite books give me updates on favorite, old characters. Something would be missing if they didn’t. Of course, I sobbed when Meg and her husband died in Little Men or Jo’s Boys, but that didn’t ruin Little Women for me. I was annoyed when Sandra Brown killed off the hero of her first historical in her second historical, but he didn’t have to die that young.
    I know you just said, Jo, that you’ll never revisit the children of your heroes and heroines, but I have spent way too much time wondering what happens to the first child (daughter) of Brand and Rosamunde of Secrets of the Night. I always felt that they spent an inordinate amount of energy NOT to get married before she was born, and I personally thought she had cause to be bitter. So, I’ve wondered – did she suffer for her illegitimacy? did she know that her father’s wife really was her mom? Was she ever told? etc. etc. etc.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  39. If I really love a book, its characters and its world, I often think about what happens to them after the book is over. When I was reading all my favorite childhood books – those classic girl books by Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Austen, etc. – I often made up extra scenes in my head – and sometimes forced my friends to act them out with me.
    I do like when books set in the same world as other favorite books give me updates on favorite, old characters. Something would be missing if they didn’t. Of course, I sobbed when Meg and her husband died in Little Men or Jo’s Boys, but that didn’t ruin Little Women for me. I was annoyed when Sandra Brown killed off the hero of her first historical in her second historical, but he didn’t have to die that young.
    I know you just said, Jo, that you’ll never revisit the children of your heroes and heroines, but I have spent way too much time wondering what happens to the first child (daughter) of Brand and Rosamunde of Secrets of the Night. I always felt that they spent an inordinate amount of energy NOT to get married before she was born, and I personally thought she had cause to be bitter. So, I’ve wondered – did she suffer for her illegitimacy? did she know that her father’s wife really was her mom? Was she ever told? etc. etc. etc.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  40. If I really love a book, its characters and its world, I often think about what happens to them after the book is over. When I was reading all my favorite childhood books – those classic girl books by Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Austen, etc. – I often made up extra scenes in my head – and sometimes forced my friends to act them out with me.
    I do like when books set in the same world as other favorite books give me updates on favorite, old characters. Something would be missing if they didn’t. Of course, I sobbed when Meg and her husband died in Little Men or Jo’s Boys, but that didn’t ruin Little Women for me. I was annoyed when Sandra Brown killed off the hero of her first historical in her second historical, but he didn’t have to die that young.
    I know you just said, Jo, that you’ll never revisit the children of your heroes and heroines, but I have spent way too much time wondering what happens to the first child (daughter) of Brand and Rosamunde of Secrets of the Night. I always felt that they spent an inordinate amount of energy NOT to get married before she was born, and I personally thought she had cause to be bitter. So, I’ve wondered – did she suffer for her illegitimacy? did she know that her father’s wife really was her mom? Was she ever told? etc. etc. etc.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  41. I have absolutely no desire to know how a beloved couple from a favorite story are coping in middle or old age. I like to walk away from a good story knowing that the H/H will live forever in my memory as a young and fiery and vibrantly alive couple.
    Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …

    Reply
  42. I have absolutely no desire to know how a beloved couple from a favorite story are coping in middle or old age. I like to walk away from a good story knowing that the H/H will live forever in my memory as a young and fiery and vibrantly alive couple.
    Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …

    Reply
  43. I have absolutely no desire to know how a beloved couple from a favorite story are coping in middle or old age. I like to walk away from a good story knowing that the H/H will live forever in my memory as a young and fiery and vibrantly alive couple.
    Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …

    Reply
  44. I have absolutely no desire to know how a beloved couple from a favorite story are coping in middle or old age. I like to walk away from a good story knowing that the H/H will live forever in my memory as a young and fiery and vibrantly alive couple.
    Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …

    Reply
  45. Hi Jo,
    One of the unwritten books (or perhaps unwritten paragraphs?) I was going to request on Edith’s original post was a petite continuance of Rothgar and Diana telling about their baby–babies? Are they ever going to have one? And if they do can I see it (read it)? Please?
    Melinda

    Reply
  46. Hi Jo,
    One of the unwritten books (or perhaps unwritten paragraphs?) I was going to request on Edith’s original post was a petite continuance of Rothgar and Diana telling about their baby–babies? Are they ever going to have one? And if they do can I see it (read it)? Please?
    Melinda

    Reply
  47. Hi Jo,
    One of the unwritten books (or perhaps unwritten paragraphs?) I was going to request on Edith’s original post was a petite continuance of Rothgar and Diana telling about their baby–babies? Are they ever going to have one? And if they do can I see it (read it)? Please?
    Melinda

    Reply
  48. Hi Jo,
    One of the unwritten books (or perhaps unwritten paragraphs?) I was going to request on Edith’s original post was a petite continuance of Rothgar and Diana telling about their baby–babies? Are they ever going to have one? And if they do can I see it (read it)? Please?
    Melinda

    Reply
  49. Jo here.
    I will return to the Malloren World, and as time progresses, we will discover more. I assume.
    For the moment, I know no more than you, RevMelinda. That’s what makes it all fun.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  50. Jo here.
    I will return to the Malloren World, and as time progresses, we will discover more. I assume.
    For the moment, I know no more than you, RevMelinda. That’s what makes it all fun.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  51. Jo here.
    I will return to the Malloren World, and as time progresses, we will discover more. I assume.
    For the moment, I know no more than you, RevMelinda. That’s what makes it all fun.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  52. Jo here.
    I will return to the Malloren World, and as time progresses, we will discover more. I assume.
    For the moment, I know no more than you, RevMelinda. That’s what makes it all fun.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  53. I usually prefer my books, especially romance books, to be self-contained–there’s a happy ending, it’s over–but I confess to having wondered about Brand and Rosamund’s daughter too. Also the illegitimate son in _the Masquerade_ by Brenda Joyce.
    And I’m in the middle of rereading _Lord of My Heart_ and find myself wishing for a book about Aimery’s brother Leo. 🙂

    Reply
  54. I usually prefer my books, especially romance books, to be self-contained–there’s a happy ending, it’s over–but I confess to having wondered about Brand and Rosamund’s daughter too. Also the illegitimate son in _the Masquerade_ by Brenda Joyce.
    And I’m in the middle of rereading _Lord of My Heart_ and find myself wishing for a book about Aimery’s brother Leo. 🙂

    Reply
  55. I usually prefer my books, especially romance books, to be self-contained–there’s a happy ending, it’s over–but I confess to having wondered about Brand and Rosamund’s daughter too. Also the illegitimate son in _the Masquerade_ by Brenda Joyce.
    And I’m in the middle of rereading _Lord of My Heart_ and find myself wishing for a book about Aimery’s brother Leo. 🙂

    Reply
  56. I usually prefer my books, especially romance books, to be self-contained–there’s a happy ending, it’s over–but I confess to having wondered about Brand and Rosamund’s daughter too. Also the illegitimate son in _the Masquerade_ by Brenda Joyce.
    And I’m in the middle of rereading _Lord of My Heart_ and find myself wishing for a book about Aimery’s brother Leo. 🙂

    Reply
  57. P.S. This subject reminds me of_Stitches in Time_, the sequel to _Shattered Silk_ by Barbara Michaels. I absolutely adore the first book and finding out the the HEA turns sour afterwards really bums me out.
    Also, I hate hate HATE series books in which the author establishes a really beautiful love affair then destroys it later. (Sequels to _the L Shaped Room_ and _The Snow Queen_ by Joan Vinge come to mind.)

    Reply
  58. P.S. This subject reminds me of_Stitches in Time_, the sequel to _Shattered Silk_ by Barbara Michaels. I absolutely adore the first book and finding out the the HEA turns sour afterwards really bums me out.
    Also, I hate hate HATE series books in which the author establishes a really beautiful love affair then destroys it later. (Sequels to _the L Shaped Room_ and _The Snow Queen_ by Joan Vinge come to mind.)

    Reply
  59. P.S. This subject reminds me of_Stitches in Time_, the sequel to _Shattered Silk_ by Barbara Michaels. I absolutely adore the first book and finding out the the HEA turns sour afterwards really bums me out.
    Also, I hate hate HATE series books in which the author establishes a really beautiful love affair then destroys it later. (Sequels to _the L Shaped Room_ and _The Snow Queen_ by Joan Vinge come to mind.)

    Reply
  60. P.S. This subject reminds me of_Stitches in Time_, the sequel to _Shattered Silk_ by Barbara Michaels. I absolutely adore the first book and finding out the the HEA turns sour afterwards really bums me out.
    Also, I hate hate HATE series books in which the author establishes a really beautiful love affair then destroys it later. (Sequels to _the L Shaped Room_ and _The Snow Queen_ by Joan Vinge come to mind.)

    Reply
  61. Sherrie said… “Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …”
    There, there, now. It’s OK. Really it is. No need to get all worried. This is your first day being one year older than you were yesterday. You’ll get use to it. I promise.

    Reply
  62. Sherrie said… “Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …”
    There, there, now. It’s OK. Really it is. No need to get all worried. This is your first day being one year older than you were yesterday. You’ll get use to it. I promise.

    Reply
  63. Sherrie said… “Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …”
    There, there, now. It’s OK. Really it is. No need to get all worried. This is your first day being one year older than you were yesterday. You’ll get use to it. I promise.

    Reply
  64. Sherrie said… “Sherrie, shocked (SHOCKED!) that I wrote such a short and concise comment, and wondering if I should go take my temperature …”
    There, there, now. It’s OK. Really it is. No need to get all worried. This is your first day being one year older than you were yesterday. You’ll get use to it. I promise.

    Reply
  65. Huh, I never read any books where you see the original characters were dead. I’ve only read ones where we see the kids get their own books but the parents from their own book are still there. Pretty sure I’d hate it if I read that. I mean, I’m sure I’m not the only one who imagines the hero/ines simply live forever after the last page. LOL 🙂 Anything that changes that, *shutter*.
    Lois

    Reply
  66. Huh, I never read any books where you see the original characters were dead. I’ve only read ones where we see the kids get their own books but the parents from their own book are still there. Pretty sure I’d hate it if I read that. I mean, I’m sure I’m not the only one who imagines the hero/ines simply live forever after the last page. LOL 🙂 Anything that changes that, *shutter*.
    Lois

    Reply
  67. Huh, I never read any books where you see the original characters were dead. I’ve only read ones where we see the kids get their own books but the parents from their own book are still there. Pretty sure I’d hate it if I read that. I mean, I’m sure I’m not the only one who imagines the hero/ines simply live forever after the last page. LOL 🙂 Anything that changes that, *shutter*.
    Lois

    Reply
  68. Huh, I never read any books where you see the original characters were dead. I’ve only read ones where we see the kids get their own books but the parents from their own book are still there. Pretty sure I’d hate it if I read that. I mean, I’m sure I’m not the only one who imagines the hero/ines simply live forever after the last page. LOL 🙂 Anything that changes that, *shutter*.
    Lois

    Reply
  69. I had to give a late final exam today, so I am late visiting, but I can’t pass up commenting on this one. I take my HEAs seriously. I have stopped reading some mystery series because a key character was killed. I read the end of the book first, and if I find it unsatisfying, I don’t read the book. I know life includes death and disease and disasters and decimation, but I don’t want the characters I fall in love with in romance novels to suffer as too many of the people I love in life do.
    Jo, you know you have tons of fans who would love Arabel Delaney’s story–Rougettes’ camp and all. 🙂

    Reply
  70. I had to give a late final exam today, so I am late visiting, but I can’t pass up commenting on this one. I take my HEAs seriously. I have stopped reading some mystery series because a key character was killed. I read the end of the book first, and if I find it unsatisfying, I don’t read the book. I know life includes death and disease and disasters and decimation, but I don’t want the characters I fall in love with in romance novels to suffer as too many of the people I love in life do.
    Jo, you know you have tons of fans who would love Arabel Delaney’s story–Rougettes’ camp and all. 🙂

    Reply
  71. I had to give a late final exam today, so I am late visiting, but I can’t pass up commenting on this one. I take my HEAs seriously. I have stopped reading some mystery series because a key character was killed. I read the end of the book first, and if I find it unsatisfying, I don’t read the book. I know life includes death and disease and disasters and decimation, but I don’t want the characters I fall in love with in romance novels to suffer as too many of the people I love in life do.
    Jo, you know you have tons of fans who would love Arabel Delaney’s story–Rougettes’ camp and all. 🙂

    Reply
  72. I had to give a late final exam today, so I am late visiting, but I can’t pass up commenting on this one. I take my HEAs seriously. I have stopped reading some mystery series because a key character was killed. I read the end of the book first, and if I find it unsatisfying, I don’t read the book. I know life includes death and disease and disasters and decimation, but I don’t want the characters I fall in love with in romance novels to suffer as too many of the people I love in life do.
    Jo, you know you have tons of fans who would love Arabel Delaney’s story–Rougettes’ camp and all. 🙂

    Reply

Leave a Comment