The Marriage Spell

The Marriage Spell

I’ve chosen to post on Fridays (plus other days as ideas strike), and I was all set to start with “Friday’s child is full of woe,” but being a careful, researching writer, I Googled and found that it’s Wednesday’s child who is full of woe.  Friday’s child is loving and giving.  Thank you, Mother Goose! 

            Actually, I was born on Monday (“Fair of face?”  Nah, strictly average!), but figure that most of us qualify for Saturday:  “Must work for a living.” (Parts of that rhyme are astrological. Saturday = Saturn, the planet associated with work. Monday = Moon Day. Etc.)

            My work includes a brand new book coming out right now!  Since we Wenches are still in our first week, we haven’t developed a protocol for announcing our books, but you don’t mind if I talk about The Marriage Spell, do you?  I’m hoping not, since I intend to go ahead and do it.  <g>

            My last several historicals have all included fantasy elements, and I just love weaving them in.  I’m a life long reader of science fiction and fantasy (nor am I the only Wench who can say that), so adding magic is trés cool.  My last two books have been in my Guardian series—Georgian settings with big themes and conflicts.

            TMS is not a Guardian book—rather, it’s an alternative Regency in a world much like the Regency we know and love, except that magic is an accepted part of life.  (This acceptance goes back to the Black Plague, when the wizards and healers came out of hiding to nurse the ill, working alongside priests and nuns.  Ever since, magic has been accepted as normal and useful.)  Most people are fine with magic—except the top levels of the nobility, who consider it dreadfully lowbrow and tacky.  Worse than being in trade, even! 

            TMS is a classic marriage of convenience, and it starts in the hunting fields of the Shires.  (Look for Jo Beverley’s RITA-winning Regency Emily and the Dark Angel for a great romance with a hunting background.)  If you want to learn more about my new book baby, go to www.maryjoputney.com for an excerpt and more plot description.

            To turn this in a more writerly direction—why do authors change the kind of book they’re writing?  In my case, I feared I was going stale on straight historicals, and I didn’t want that to happen.  (With my last two straight historicals, one started with the hero dead and the next started with the heroine dead, which is the sign of an author who is really reaching. <G>)

            Adding magic brings new dimensions and fun to the stories.  I think we all have to balance the creative demands of the Muse with the commercial demands of the marketplace—and in the long run, the Muse must have her due, or she may well pack up her marbles and go home.  Heck, that’s true even in the short run!

            Honor the Muse, and she will honor you.

Mary Jo

60 thoughts on “The Marriage Spell”

  1. I am with you Mary Jo, magic is a wonderful dimension add. Perhaps it’s because “we”, as readers, wish we had it, or perhaps because some of us think “we” do and are looking for confirmation. Either way it meets a need few are willing to confess.
    Nina
    I am new to this blog and am still trying to find my way to the “world where the Writers live.” So, please indulge me. The Muse?

    Reply
  2. I am with you Mary Jo, magic is a wonderful dimension add. Perhaps it’s because “we”, as readers, wish we had it, or perhaps because some of us think “we” do and are looking for confirmation. Either way it meets a need few are willing to confess.
    Nina
    I am new to this blog and am still trying to find my way to the “world where the Writers live.” So, please indulge me. The Muse?

    Reply
  3. I am with you Mary Jo, magic is a wonderful dimension add. Perhaps it’s because “we”, as readers, wish we had it, or perhaps because some of us think “we” do and are looking for confirmation. Either way it meets a need few are willing to confess.
    Nina
    I am new to this blog and am still trying to find my way to the “world where the Writers live.” So, please indulge me. The Muse?

    Reply
  4. Mary Jo’s Muse is Cranky, kind of like Dopey and Grumpy, but female. All right, so maybe she’s one of the Greek Muses, but she doesn’t dance or sing, I’ll swear to that right now.
    But I’ve seen Marriage Spell in the first draft, and I’ve gotta say, whatever name her Muse flies under, she’s one talented lady. You won’t believe what she’s done this hero! Killing off a hero isn’t enough any more, don’t let her fool you!
    Pat

    Reply
  5. Mary Jo’s Muse is Cranky, kind of like Dopey and Grumpy, but female. All right, so maybe she’s one of the Greek Muses, but she doesn’t dance or sing, I’ll swear to that right now.
    But I’ve seen Marriage Spell in the first draft, and I’ve gotta say, whatever name her Muse flies under, she’s one talented lady. You won’t believe what she’s done this hero! Killing off a hero isn’t enough any more, don’t let her fool you!
    Pat

    Reply
  6. Mary Jo’s Muse is Cranky, kind of like Dopey and Grumpy, but female. All right, so maybe she’s one of the Greek Muses, but she doesn’t dance or sing, I’ll swear to that right now.
    But I’ve seen Marriage Spell in the first draft, and I’ve gotta say, whatever name her Muse flies under, she’s one talented lady. You won’t believe what she’s done this hero! Killing off a hero isn’t enough any more, don’t let her fool you!
    Pat

    Reply
  7. TO NINA: Don’t worry, we’re new to this blog, too–we only launched last Monday! A lot of writers use the term “muse” as a kind of shorthand for one’s creativity, but it’s not very specific. One friend of mine calls her creative source (a very good one, too) “the Lizard Brain.” 🙂
    As Pat says, my Muse might be Cranky, but is more likely Sluggish. Takes her time showing up and settling down to work. But thanks for saying so many nice things about the book, Pat!
    MJP

    Reply
  8. TO NINA: Don’t worry, we’re new to this blog, too–we only launched last Monday! A lot of writers use the term “muse” as a kind of shorthand for one’s creativity, but it’s not very specific. One friend of mine calls her creative source (a very good one, too) “the Lizard Brain.” 🙂
    As Pat says, my Muse might be Cranky, but is more likely Sluggish. Takes her time showing up and settling down to work. But thanks for saying so many nice things about the book, Pat!
    MJP

    Reply
  9. TO NINA: Don’t worry, we’re new to this blog, too–we only launched last Monday! A lot of writers use the term “muse” as a kind of shorthand for one’s creativity, but it’s not very specific. One friend of mine calls her creative source (a very good one, too) “the Lizard Brain.” 🙂
    As Pat says, my Muse might be Cranky, but is more likely Sluggish. Takes her time showing up and settling down to work. But thanks for saying so many nice things about the book, Pat!
    MJP

    Reply
  10. I look forward to reading the marriage spell. I do have a question as well. Since I started reading historical romances 15/20 years ago, it seems like the number of time periods and settings have really decreased. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I wondered if you guys know why it is so popular that it’s practially taken over historicals as a setting. I understand that it’s a market thing, but I wondered if you could figure out why the appeal is so great that all other settings have mostly disappeared. I really do miss American historicals.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  11. I look forward to reading the marriage spell. I do have a question as well. Since I started reading historical romances 15/20 years ago, it seems like the number of time periods and settings have really decreased. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I wondered if you guys know why it is so popular that it’s practially taken over historicals as a setting. I understand that it’s a market thing, but I wondered if you could figure out why the appeal is so great that all other settings have mostly disappeared. I really do miss American historicals.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  12. I look forward to reading the marriage spell. I do have a question as well. Since I started reading historical romances 15/20 years ago, it seems like the number of time periods and settings have really decreased. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I wondered if you guys know why it is so popular that it’s practially taken over historicals as a setting. I understand that it’s a market thing, but I wondered if you could figure out why the appeal is so great that all other settings have mostly disappeared. I really do miss American historicals.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  13. I have been reading MJP books since the days of your trad regencies. I followed you into the Guardian’s world with some trepidation, but I fell in love with a new cast of characters. I read the excerpt of TMS, and I am already hooked. With apologies for any mangled toes, I cheered loudly that Abby Barton is a healer. I don’t even want to hear the word “vampire.” I also like that the power is in her hands in this early scene, and that the hero begins in vulnerability. Even the bits revealed about Ashby and Ransom intrigue me. Do we see heroes of future books before us?

    Reply
  14. I have been reading MJP books since the days of your trad regencies. I followed you into the Guardian’s world with some trepidation, but I fell in love with a new cast of characters. I read the excerpt of TMS, and I am already hooked. With apologies for any mangled toes, I cheered loudly that Abby Barton is a healer. I don’t even want to hear the word “vampire.” I also like that the power is in her hands in this early scene, and that the hero begins in vulnerability. Even the bits revealed about Ashby and Ransom intrigue me. Do we see heroes of future books before us?

    Reply
  15. I have been reading MJP books since the days of your trad regencies. I followed you into the Guardian’s world with some trepidation, but I fell in love with a new cast of characters. I read the excerpt of TMS, and I am already hooked. With apologies for any mangled toes, I cheered loudly that Abby Barton is a healer. I don’t even want to hear the word “vampire.” I also like that the power is in her hands in this early scene, and that the hero begins in vulnerability. Even the bits revealed about Ashby and Ransom intrigue me. Do we see heroes of future books before us?

    Reply
  16. I have to confess that my tastes rarely run to the paranormal. I cut and capped my teeth on Anne Rice. Once I grew tired of her I didn’t want to read it elsewhere. You, Ms. Putney, have started to turn around my opinion when I read your wonderful Kiss of Fate. I am delighted to hear of this particular spin on the Regency and can’t wait to get my hands on it!
    I’ve heard you speak on heeding your muse and am so glad that you do! I am just discovering my muse who is proving to be rather illusive at times!
    Best of everything on this release!

    Reply
  17. I have to confess that my tastes rarely run to the paranormal. I cut and capped my teeth on Anne Rice. Once I grew tired of her I didn’t want to read it elsewhere. You, Ms. Putney, have started to turn around my opinion when I read your wonderful Kiss of Fate. I am delighted to hear of this particular spin on the Regency and can’t wait to get my hands on it!
    I’ve heard you speak on heeding your muse and am so glad that you do! I am just discovering my muse who is proving to be rather illusive at times!
    Best of everything on this release!

    Reply
  18. I have to confess that my tastes rarely run to the paranormal. I cut and capped my teeth on Anne Rice. Once I grew tired of her I didn’t want to read it elsewhere. You, Ms. Putney, have started to turn around my opinion when I read your wonderful Kiss of Fate. I am delighted to hear of this particular spin on the Regency and can’t wait to get my hands on it!
    I’ve heard you speak on heeding your muse and am so glad that you do! I am just discovering my muse who is proving to be rather illusive at times!
    Best of everything on this release!

    Reply
  19. The Marriage Spell sounds wonderful! I’m almost salivating… really. My muse wants to kill people off all the time. If she fancies the hero, she tries to force me to kill the heroine! I must sound very crazy (oh well). My dh listens, and acts interested, when I tell him these stories.
    Cathy, off to amazon.com to pre-purchase THE MARRIAGE SPELL, if possible.

    Reply
  20. The Marriage Spell sounds wonderful! I’m almost salivating… really. My muse wants to kill people off all the time. If she fancies the hero, she tries to force me to kill the heroine! I must sound very crazy (oh well). My dh listens, and acts interested, when I tell him these stories.
    Cathy, off to amazon.com to pre-purchase THE MARRIAGE SPELL, if possible.

    Reply
  21. The Marriage Spell sounds wonderful! I’m almost salivating… really. My muse wants to kill people off all the time. If she fancies the hero, she tries to force me to kill the heroine! I must sound very crazy (oh well). My dh listens, and acts interested, when I tell him these stories.
    Cathy, off to amazon.com to pre-purchase THE MARRIAGE SPELL, if possible.

    Reply
  22. TO MICHELLE: Jo Beverley has dubbed the Regency “the setting that ate the genre,” and it’s true–Regency has become overwhelmingly the most popular period.
    Partly that is because it’s a great, interesting, diverse time period, but a lot more is the publishers. With the market cooling, they’ve concentrated on the areas where they could sell the most books, and that has tended to be the Regency. There are still plenty of people who love American settings and Medievals, etc, but there aren’t as many of them, and publishers go where the money is. (This is not a criticism–if they don’t make money, they can’t stay in business.)
    TO WYLENE: Trust me–I will NOT write any vampire stories. The fantasy of the sexy dead guy totally eludes me. 🙂 And one can’t write what doesn’t fit one’s own fantasies.
    As to whether The Marriage Spell is the start of a new series–I honestly don’t know. I certainly made sure to seed the story with some cool guys, but I can’t write fast enough to do justice to two series, so we’ll see what the publisher and I decide at the next contract.
    TO hvb63: I’m glad you decided to give my paranormals a try, and even gladder that you like them. I try to keep the ‘feel’ of a traditional historical, but adding the magic gives freshness, I think.
    As to elusive Muses–will it make you feel better to know that even long-term pro authors can have just as much trouble coaxing the flighty wench to the computer? 🙂
    TO CATHY: LOL! That muse of yours is one jealous babe.
    TO JANGA: Don’t worry about typos–I’m the typo queen. Could never have written a book if I hadn’t acquired a computer, where once you fix something, it stays fixed.

    Reply
  23. TO MICHELLE: Jo Beverley has dubbed the Regency “the setting that ate the genre,” and it’s true–Regency has become overwhelmingly the most popular period.
    Partly that is because it’s a great, interesting, diverse time period, but a lot more is the publishers. With the market cooling, they’ve concentrated on the areas where they could sell the most books, and that has tended to be the Regency. There are still plenty of people who love American settings and Medievals, etc, but there aren’t as many of them, and publishers go where the money is. (This is not a criticism–if they don’t make money, they can’t stay in business.)
    TO WYLENE: Trust me–I will NOT write any vampire stories. The fantasy of the sexy dead guy totally eludes me. 🙂 And one can’t write what doesn’t fit one’s own fantasies.
    As to whether The Marriage Spell is the start of a new series–I honestly don’t know. I certainly made sure to seed the story with some cool guys, but I can’t write fast enough to do justice to two series, so we’ll see what the publisher and I decide at the next contract.
    TO hvb63: I’m glad you decided to give my paranormals a try, and even gladder that you like them. I try to keep the ‘feel’ of a traditional historical, but adding the magic gives freshness, I think.
    As to elusive Muses–will it make you feel better to know that even long-term pro authors can have just as much trouble coaxing the flighty wench to the computer? 🙂
    TO CATHY: LOL! That muse of yours is one jealous babe.
    TO JANGA: Don’t worry about typos–I’m the typo queen. Could never have written a book if I hadn’t acquired a computer, where once you fix something, it stays fixed.

    Reply
  24. TO MICHELLE: Jo Beverley has dubbed the Regency “the setting that ate the genre,” and it’s true–Regency has become overwhelmingly the most popular period.
    Partly that is because it’s a great, interesting, diverse time period, but a lot more is the publishers. With the market cooling, they’ve concentrated on the areas where they could sell the most books, and that has tended to be the Regency. There are still plenty of people who love American settings and Medievals, etc, but there aren’t as many of them, and publishers go where the money is. (This is not a criticism–if they don’t make money, they can’t stay in business.)
    TO WYLENE: Trust me–I will NOT write any vampire stories. The fantasy of the sexy dead guy totally eludes me. 🙂 And one can’t write what doesn’t fit one’s own fantasies.
    As to whether The Marriage Spell is the start of a new series–I honestly don’t know. I certainly made sure to seed the story with some cool guys, but I can’t write fast enough to do justice to two series, so we’ll see what the publisher and I decide at the next contract.
    TO hvb63: I’m glad you decided to give my paranormals a try, and even gladder that you like them. I try to keep the ‘feel’ of a traditional historical, but adding the magic gives freshness, I think.
    As to elusive Muses–will it make you feel better to know that even long-term pro authors can have just as much trouble coaxing the flighty wench to the computer? 🙂
    TO CATHY: LOL! That muse of yours is one jealous babe.
    TO JANGA: Don’t worry about typos–I’m the typo queen. Could never have written a book if I hadn’t acquired a computer, where once you fix something, it stays fixed.

    Reply
  25. Socrates referred to his inspiration as his “daemon”–works especially well when your Muse is being fiendish.
    I think I’ll get this one! I’m working on an alternate Regency in which the Etruscans whupped the Romans’ a** and at least parts of THE FAERIE QUEENE are true history. My collaborator has already done Byron’s epic on the Etruscan empire…

    Reply
  26. Socrates referred to his inspiration as his “daemon”–works especially well when your Muse is being fiendish.
    I think I’ll get this one! I’m working on an alternate Regency in which the Etruscans whupped the Romans’ a** and at least parts of THE FAERIE QUEENE are true history. My collaborator has already done Byron’s epic on the Etruscan empire…

    Reply
  27. Socrates referred to his inspiration as his “daemon”–works especially well when your Muse is being fiendish.
    I think I’ll get this one! I’m working on an alternate Regency in which the Etruscans whupped the Romans’ a** and at least parts of THE FAERIE QUEENE are true history. My collaborator has already done Byron’s epic on the Etruscan empire…

    Reply
  28. Thank you MJ for answering my “muse” question. I feel better now – almost.
    In line with Cathy — my muse has a very dark side, too. But killing isn’t enough for my muse. “She” likes to think up ways to make death preferable, inflict the pain, and then refuses to draw the knife. Sort of like MJ’s China Bride. Terrorize the reader into accepting the knife and then making them thank you when you discover it was to dull too do the job. And then you pull out another, even bigger knife that the reader didn’t know you had.
    MJ: You know I love China Bride. It’s the first book I’ve read in a long, long, long time that crushed my steely heart and took me by surprise. Am salivating for Marriage Spell.
    Question to our illustrious Word Wenches: No matter how dark or bright or cranky one’s muse, what do you do when “he/she/it” doesn’t want to “come out and play”? Or perhaps more specific to my plight — what do you do when “she’s” afraid to come out and play?
    Nina

    Reply
  29. Thank you MJ for answering my “muse” question. I feel better now – almost.
    In line with Cathy — my muse has a very dark side, too. But killing isn’t enough for my muse. “She” likes to think up ways to make death preferable, inflict the pain, and then refuses to draw the knife. Sort of like MJ’s China Bride. Terrorize the reader into accepting the knife and then making them thank you when you discover it was to dull too do the job. And then you pull out another, even bigger knife that the reader didn’t know you had.
    MJ: You know I love China Bride. It’s the first book I’ve read in a long, long, long time that crushed my steely heart and took me by surprise. Am salivating for Marriage Spell.
    Question to our illustrious Word Wenches: No matter how dark or bright or cranky one’s muse, what do you do when “he/she/it” doesn’t want to “come out and play”? Or perhaps more specific to my plight — what do you do when “she’s” afraid to come out and play?
    Nina

    Reply
  30. Thank you MJ for answering my “muse” question. I feel better now – almost.
    In line with Cathy — my muse has a very dark side, too. But killing isn’t enough for my muse. “She” likes to think up ways to make death preferable, inflict the pain, and then refuses to draw the knife. Sort of like MJ’s China Bride. Terrorize the reader into accepting the knife and then making them thank you when you discover it was to dull too do the job. And then you pull out another, even bigger knife that the reader didn’t know you had.
    MJ: You know I love China Bride. It’s the first book I’ve read in a long, long, long time that crushed my steely heart and took me by surprise. Am salivating for Marriage Spell.
    Question to our illustrious Word Wenches: No matter how dark or bright or cranky one’s muse, what do you do when “he/she/it” doesn’t want to “come out and play”? Or perhaps more specific to my plight — what do you do when “she’s” afraid to come out and play?
    Nina

    Reply
  31. Nina —
    In response to your question about muses not wanting to come out and play:
    This does happen to everyone, more often than any of us would wish. However, at least with my particular muse, I give her a quick reminder that she’s paying the mortgage, and unless she wants to go live somewhere else, she better get back to Inspiring RIGHT NOW.
    It usually works. That, and an offering of chocolate, tend to do the trick.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  32. Nina —
    In response to your question about muses not wanting to come out and play:
    This does happen to everyone, more often than any of us would wish. However, at least with my particular muse, I give her a quick reminder that she’s paying the mortgage, and unless she wants to go live somewhere else, she better get back to Inspiring RIGHT NOW.
    It usually works. That, and an offering of chocolate, tend to do the trick.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  33. Nina —
    In response to your question about muses not wanting to come out and play:
    This does happen to everyone, more often than any of us would wish. However, at least with my particular muse, I give her a quick reminder that she’s paying the mortgage, and unless she wants to go live somewhere else, she better get back to Inspiring RIGHT NOW.
    It usually works. That, and an offering of chocolate, tend to do the trick.
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  34. Susan/Miranda —
    LOL! Thank you for your words and encouragement. In truth, I’m looking forward to the day when I can tell my muse that she’s paying the mortgage and needs to get off her butt. Right now, she works for “nothing.” I will however, try the chocolate lure.
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  35. Susan/Miranda —
    LOL! Thank you for your words and encouragement. In truth, I’m looking forward to the day when I can tell my muse that she’s paying the mortgage and needs to get off her butt. Right now, she works for “nothing.” I will however, try the chocolate lure.
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  36. Susan/Miranda —
    LOL! Thank you for your words and encouragement. In truth, I’m looking forward to the day when I can tell my muse that she’s paying the mortgage and needs to get off her butt. Right now, she works for “nothing.” I will however, try the chocolate lure.
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  37. Mary Jo,
    I love your comment about “seeding” the story with other interesting men. Great visual!
    You are the author that persuaded me that romance novels were worth reading. Thunder and Roses was the first romance I read and I couldn’t believe what a great story it was. I had been a fantasy and sci fi reader for the most part, but your book absolutely made me a romance convert.
    I cannot wait for the Marriage Spell; it sounds absolutely fantastic – Regency twisted to the left. I love the idea of maintaining a world that we know while introducing a spicier element. I’ll be at Borders the day it’s available!

    Reply
  38. Mary Jo,
    I love your comment about “seeding” the story with other interesting men. Great visual!
    You are the author that persuaded me that romance novels were worth reading. Thunder and Roses was the first romance I read and I couldn’t believe what a great story it was. I had been a fantasy and sci fi reader for the most part, but your book absolutely made me a romance convert.
    I cannot wait for the Marriage Spell; it sounds absolutely fantastic – Regency twisted to the left. I love the idea of maintaining a world that we know while introducing a spicier element. I’ll be at Borders the day it’s available!

    Reply
  39. Mary Jo,
    I love your comment about “seeding” the story with other interesting men. Great visual!
    You are the author that persuaded me that romance novels were worth reading. Thunder and Roses was the first romance I read and I couldn’t believe what a great story it was. I had been a fantasy and sci fi reader for the most part, but your book absolutely made me a romance convert.
    I cannot wait for the Marriage Spell; it sounds absolutely fantastic – Regency twisted to the left. I love the idea of maintaining a world that we know while introducing a spicier element. I’ll be at Borders the day it’s available!

    Reply
  40. Selina:
    I’m an MJP fan too. Started with Kiss of Fate in Jan. It was my first romance novel. Previously, I categorically denied the need for the genre, but now I’m hooked.
    You mentioned that you are a Sci-Fi and fantasy reader. Would love to know what you’ve been reading. I left that world just post ST:TNG books and haven’t been back since. I found YA Vampire books and burned through those. And yea, I know some very sexy dead guys.
    I was in Borders the other day, engrossed in my monthly ritual of reading the first 10 pages of every new release fiction book. Found nothing that would keep my interest. Would love to hear your SciFi and Fantacy picks.
    Nina

    Reply
  41. Selina:
    I’m an MJP fan too. Started with Kiss of Fate in Jan. It was my first romance novel. Previously, I categorically denied the need for the genre, but now I’m hooked.
    You mentioned that you are a Sci-Fi and fantasy reader. Would love to know what you’ve been reading. I left that world just post ST:TNG books and haven’t been back since. I found YA Vampire books and burned through those. And yea, I know some very sexy dead guys.
    I was in Borders the other day, engrossed in my monthly ritual of reading the first 10 pages of every new release fiction book. Found nothing that would keep my interest. Would love to hear your SciFi and Fantacy picks.
    Nina

    Reply
  42. Selina:
    I’m an MJP fan too. Started with Kiss of Fate in Jan. It was my first romance novel. Previously, I categorically denied the need for the genre, but now I’m hooked.
    You mentioned that you are a Sci-Fi and fantasy reader. Would love to know what you’ve been reading. I left that world just post ST:TNG books and haven’t been back since. I found YA Vampire books and burned through those. And yea, I know some very sexy dead guys.
    I was in Borders the other day, engrossed in my monthly ritual of reading the first 10 pages of every new release fiction book. Found nothing that would keep my interest. Would love to hear your SciFi and Fantacy picks.
    Nina

    Reply
  43. Nina, you can have MY SF/fantasy picks: THE BLACK JEWELS TRILOGY by Anne Bishop; the Liaden Universe books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller; Diane Duane’s YA Young Wizards series and STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES; Jayne Castle’s paranormal romances (she’s Jayne Ann Krentz, and has some great paranormals under that name: GIFT OF GOLD/GIFT OF FIRE, DREAMS, and SHIELD’S LADY). Also Tanya Huff’s books.
    I don’t care much for vampires: I think they suck.
    But werewolves are intriguing.

    Reply
  44. Nina, you can have MY SF/fantasy picks: THE BLACK JEWELS TRILOGY by Anne Bishop; the Liaden Universe books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller; Diane Duane’s YA Young Wizards series and STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES; Jayne Castle’s paranormal romances (she’s Jayne Ann Krentz, and has some great paranormals under that name: GIFT OF GOLD/GIFT OF FIRE, DREAMS, and SHIELD’S LADY). Also Tanya Huff’s books.
    I don’t care much for vampires: I think they suck.
    But werewolves are intriguing.

    Reply
  45. Nina, you can have MY SF/fantasy picks: THE BLACK JEWELS TRILOGY by Anne Bishop; the Liaden Universe books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller; Diane Duane’s YA Young Wizards series and STEALING THE ELF-KING’S ROSES; Jayne Castle’s paranormal romances (she’s Jayne Ann Krentz, and has some great paranormals under that name: GIFT OF GOLD/GIFT OF FIRE, DREAMS, and SHIELD’S LADY). Also Tanya Huff’s books.
    I don’t care much for vampires: I think they suck.
    But werewolves are intriguing.

    Reply
  46. Nina – I haven’t read a smuch of the genre recently as I used to, but I can give you some of my “tried and true” picks.
    Mercedes Lackey – Valdemar series. I started reading her with Arrows of the Queen and her world building and story telling has grown immeasurably since then. I’m 50/50 on what I read of hers now, but I do enjoy the Valdemar books.
    Luna books – The imprint is worth checking out since it features strong heroines. The books, again, have been 50/50 for me, but I find it very refreshing to have fantasy books centered around a female protagonist.
    Anne MacCaffery – Of course, the dragon series, but my favorite is actually Killashandra which is part of the Crystal singers series.
    Weis and Hickamn – Dragonlance series. I recommend the two original trilogies which are the Chronicles and Twins series. After that, even the ones they wrote together tend to slip.
    Tamora Pierce – Song of the Lioness – These are YA books about a young girl becoming a knight in a realm where it is traditionally only boys who do so. Great books for young teens with a trong positive role model.
    Shirley Jackson – ok, she is really a paranormal writer, but she is truly psychologically freaky; a 1950’s Poe. The Haunting of Hill House is just a terrific read.
    Hope some of these are new for you!

    Reply
  47. Nina – I haven’t read a smuch of the genre recently as I used to, but I can give you some of my “tried and true” picks.
    Mercedes Lackey – Valdemar series. I started reading her with Arrows of the Queen and her world building and story telling has grown immeasurably since then. I’m 50/50 on what I read of hers now, but I do enjoy the Valdemar books.
    Luna books – The imprint is worth checking out since it features strong heroines. The books, again, have been 50/50 for me, but I find it very refreshing to have fantasy books centered around a female protagonist.
    Anne MacCaffery – Of course, the dragon series, but my favorite is actually Killashandra which is part of the Crystal singers series.
    Weis and Hickamn – Dragonlance series. I recommend the two original trilogies which are the Chronicles and Twins series. After that, even the ones they wrote together tend to slip.
    Tamora Pierce – Song of the Lioness – These are YA books about a young girl becoming a knight in a realm where it is traditionally only boys who do so. Great books for young teens with a trong positive role model.
    Shirley Jackson – ok, she is really a paranormal writer, but she is truly psychologically freaky; a 1950’s Poe. The Haunting of Hill House is just a terrific read.
    Hope some of these are new for you!

    Reply
  48. Nina – I haven’t read a smuch of the genre recently as I used to, but I can give you some of my “tried and true” picks.
    Mercedes Lackey – Valdemar series. I started reading her with Arrows of the Queen and her world building and story telling has grown immeasurably since then. I’m 50/50 on what I read of hers now, but I do enjoy the Valdemar books.
    Luna books – The imprint is worth checking out since it features strong heroines. The books, again, have been 50/50 for me, but I find it very refreshing to have fantasy books centered around a female protagonist.
    Anne MacCaffery – Of course, the dragon series, but my favorite is actually Killashandra which is part of the Crystal singers series.
    Weis and Hickamn – Dragonlance series. I recommend the two original trilogies which are the Chronicles and Twins series. After that, even the ones they wrote together tend to slip.
    Tamora Pierce – Song of the Lioness – These are YA books about a young girl becoming a knight in a realm where it is traditionally only boys who do so. Great books for young teens with a trong positive role model.
    Shirley Jackson – ok, she is really a paranormal writer, but she is truly psychologically freaky; a 1950’s Poe. The Haunting of Hill House is just a terrific read.
    Hope some of these are new for you!

    Reply
  49. Talpianna: Thank you for your picks. Just ordered Daughter of the Blood from the library. I also went on Anne Bishop’s site and fell in love with her posted excerpt of “The Invisible Ring.” Powerful euphemistic language!
    As for Vampires — yea, they do just as you say. But I find it fascinating how we (as human beings) villanize them. In prep for my book (which doesn’t have any vampires in it) I did a study on the Dracl (The Dragon Knight) and Dracula (Son of the Dragon Knight)– the real men, protectors of the Church, that lived and breathed as you and I do every day. What I found proved to me that a man (or a woman) will do anything in the name of their God.
    As for werewolves, check out Blood and Chocolate by Annette Klause. It is a fantastic, heart throbbing YA read.
    Nina

    Reply
  50. Talpianna: Thank you for your picks. Just ordered Daughter of the Blood from the library. I also went on Anne Bishop’s site and fell in love with her posted excerpt of “The Invisible Ring.” Powerful euphemistic language!
    As for Vampires — yea, they do just as you say. But I find it fascinating how we (as human beings) villanize them. In prep for my book (which doesn’t have any vampires in it) I did a study on the Dracl (The Dragon Knight) and Dracula (Son of the Dragon Knight)– the real men, protectors of the Church, that lived and breathed as you and I do every day. What I found proved to me that a man (or a woman) will do anything in the name of their God.
    As for werewolves, check out Blood and Chocolate by Annette Klause. It is a fantastic, heart throbbing YA read.
    Nina

    Reply
  51. Talpianna: Thank you for your picks. Just ordered Daughter of the Blood from the library. I also went on Anne Bishop’s site and fell in love with her posted excerpt of “The Invisible Ring.” Powerful euphemistic language!
    As for Vampires — yea, they do just as you say. But I find it fascinating how we (as human beings) villanize them. In prep for my book (which doesn’t have any vampires in it) I did a study on the Dracl (The Dragon Knight) and Dracula (Son of the Dragon Knight)– the real men, protectors of the Church, that lived and breathed as you and I do every day. What I found proved to me that a man (or a woman) will do anything in the name of their God.
    As for werewolves, check out Blood and Chocolate by Annette Klause. It is a fantastic, heart throbbing YA read.
    Nina

    Reply
  52. Hi Selina: Thank you for your wonderful suggestions. I’m off to check them out. Most of them are new to me.
    I am an avid Tamorra Pierce fan. Loved “Protector of the Small”.
    Nina

    Reply
  53. Hi Selina: Thank you for your wonderful suggestions. I’m off to check them out. Most of them are new to me.
    I am an avid Tamorra Pierce fan. Loved “Protector of the Small”.
    Nina

    Reply
  54. Hi Selina: Thank you for your wonderful suggestions. I’m off to check them out. Most of them are new to me.
    I am an avid Tamorra Pierce fan. Loved “Protector of the Small”.
    Nina

    Reply
  55. I forgot Lackey! I don’t like the Valdemar books as well as the others–the Elemental Masters series, the fairy tale series, the contemporaries (SACRED GROUND and the Diana Tregarde books).
    And her “Five Hundred Kingdoms” books from Luna. Also like C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN from that line.
    Patricia McKillip is good, as is Robin McKinley. And I like several of Patricia Briggs’s books, especially the latest, MOON CALLED (heroine is a coyote-shapeshifter raised by werewolves) and the recently reissued WHEN DEMONS WALK.
    And I particularly love Patricia C. Wrede’s Enchanted Forest Chronicles, and her alternate Regencies: MAIRELON THE MAGICIAN, MAGICIAN’S WARD, and (with Patricia Stevermer) SORCERY & CECELIA and THE GRAND TOUR. Stevermer’s books are good too. And see if you can find THE RAVEN RING by Wrede, an excellent fantasy.
    Contrary to appearances, I don’t confine my reading exclusively to authors named Patricia….

    Reply
  56. I forgot Lackey! I don’t like the Valdemar books as well as the others–the Elemental Masters series, the fairy tale series, the contemporaries (SACRED GROUND and the Diana Tregarde books).
    And her “Five Hundred Kingdoms” books from Luna. Also like C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN from that line.
    Patricia McKillip is good, as is Robin McKinley. And I like several of Patricia Briggs’s books, especially the latest, MOON CALLED (heroine is a coyote-shapeshifter raised by werewolves) and the recently reissued WHEN DEMONS WALK.
    And I particularly love Patricia C. Wrede’s Enchanted Forest Chronicles, and her alternate Regencies: MAIRELON THE MAGICIAN, MAGICIAN’S WARD, and (with Patricia Stevermer) SORCERY & CECELIA and THE GRAND TOUR. Stevermer’s books are good too. And see if you can find THE RAVEN RING by Wrede, an excellent fantasy.
    Contrary to appearances, I don’t confine my reading exclusively to authors named Patricia….

    Reply
  57. I forgot Lackey! I don’t like the Valdemar books as well as the others–the Elemental Masters series, the fairy tale series, the contemporaries (SACRED GROUND and the Diana Tregarde books).
    And her “Five Hundred Kingdoms” books from Luna. Also like C.E. Murphy’s URBAN SHAMAN from that line.
    Patricia McKillip is good, as is Robin McKinley. And I like several of Patricia Briggs’s books, especially the latest, MOON CALLED (heroine is a coyote-shapeshifter raised by werewolves) and the recently reissued WHEN DEMONS WALK.
    And I particularly love Patricia C. Wrede’s Enchanted Forest Chronicles, and her alternate Regencies: MAIRELON THE MAGICIAN, MAGICIAN’S WARD, and (with Patricia Stevermer) SORCERY & CECELIA and THE GRAND TOUR. Stevermer’s books are good too. And see if you can find THE RAVEN RING by Wrede, an excellent fantasy.
    Contrary to appearances, I don’t confine my reading exclusively to authors named Patricia….

    Reply

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