The excerpt contest

     Spring_nqal  From Loretta:
      Brace yourself for a long post today–but since it’s got a bit of a book in it, I hope you’ll indulge me.
      To celebrate the forthcoming release of NOT QUITE A LADY–we’re having an excerpt contest.  But first, the usual authorial yammering.
      As I’ve explained previously, my leisure reading time is extremely limited.  Not a lot of time for experimentation, alas.  When I go book shopping, I usually know ahead of time exactly what author or book I’m looking for.  When I’m debating about trying out a new author, I do what a librarian friend, years ago, told me she did:  She opens the book near the middle.  Her thinking was, the beginning has probably been polished more than any other part of the book, to hook the reader.  But to find out if that level is maintained, open to the middle–for many authors, the hardest part of the book to write.
      I opened NOT QUITE A LADY to the middle, and found a scene between the heroine, Lady Charlotte Hayward and the hero, Darius Carsington:
      “You are out of sorts, I see,” he said.  “Perhaps it is the menses.”
      She shot him one of her I-must-kill-you-now looks.
      A promising sign.
      “Many women become weakened during the menses because of the loss of blood,” he said.  “That would account for your lightheadedness.  The imbalance this loss of blood causes to the bodily system no doubt explains the irritability that is so often a symptom as well.”
      She gazed at him for a long moment.  “Have you any idea,” she said, “how aggravating you are?”
      She was definitely recovering her spirits.
      A weight lifted from his.  “I should like to know how I could fail to have an idea of it,” he said, “since everyone in my family tells me, repeatedly.  My grandmother in particular.  She says that of all the aggravating men in the family–and that includes Rupert, she always takes care to remind me–I am the most aggravating.  That, according to her, is my most remarkable achievement.”

     I lucked out on finding an excerpt I could post here.  I might have hit a place that gave too much of the story away-a SPOILER. Or one that needed an introduction, in order to make sense.
     Girls_reading For those of us who peek in the middle or those who peek at the beginning and those–I know you’re out there–who peek at the end, these glimpses can determine whether or not we want to take a book home with us.
      For an author, choosing the right excerpt can be a challenge, especially if the author’s trying to decide, as I am, on excerpts from earlier books, to tempt and tantalize visitors to my website.
      It could be fun as well as challenging.  But I don’t have time to re-read my books, looking for the perfect excerpt!  I’m busy trying to write THE NEXT BOOK.
      So I’m asking your help.
      Pick one of my books–or two or three, if you’ve the time and energy–and choose what you think is the perfect excerpt for me to post on my website.
      If it’s a few lines, like the above, go ahead and quote the whole thing.  If you think a longer excerpt works, that’s fine, but remember that our Comments column is narrow, and people will be scrolling down and scrolling down…  So it’s OK to describe the scene instead of quoting it, or to give us a few lines and a little summary.  And a summary alone is all right, too.  But you will need to name the book and tell me what page to turn to, and recommend where to start and where to stop.
      If I agree that your selection should go up on the BOOKLIST page of my website, you’ll get a free, autographed Loretta Chase book of your choice.  If several people choose the same excerpt, I’ll do the usual and let our blogmistress Sherrie pick the names out of a hat.  You’ve got until 11PM PDT on Tuesday 24 April–the day NOT QUITE A LADY goes on sale–to offer your suggestion(s).  Sherrie will announce the winners on the following weekend.
      And now, for your further consideration, here’s another excerpt from NOT QUITE A LADY:
      Mr. Carsington’s amber eyes slanted toward her father, who had turned away to say something to Lizzie.
      The gaze shifted back to Charlotte.  This time she saw in his unusual eyes the same teasing expression he’d worn when he quizzed her about her hat.
      “But I believe we’ve met before,” he said in a rumbling undertone.  Though he stood a proper distance away, the words felt like a secret breathed in her ear.  Her skin prickled.
      “I think not,” she said, flashing him a warning look.
      He lifted his eyebrows.
      She lifted hers.
      She thought,
Utter one word of what happened and I’ll wrap my hands around your throat and choke you dead.
      She knew no one could read minds.  He must have read something, though, because the quizzical expression disappeared and he blinked.
      She watched his mouth curve slowly into a smile.  “Have we not?”
      Under that lazy smile, something inside her seemed to unfurl, like flower petals opening under the sun.
      But that’s what rake’s smiles did, she reminded herself:  They made women soft and malleable.
      “No,” she said.  She glanced at her parents.  The rector and his wife had claimed their attention.
      “Perhaps you have a twin sister,” said Mr. Carsington.  He made a show of looking about the drawing room.
      “No, I do not,” she said.
      “How strange,” he said.
      “It is not at all strange not to have a twin,” she said.  “It is more common not to have one.”
      “I could have sworn that we met, only a few hours ago, by a pond at Beechwood,” he said, still in the We-Have-a-Secret undertone.  “You were wearing–or rather, not wearing–a wonderfully frivolous hat.”
      He had teased her with the hat as a little boy might do, and for a moment she had wanted to play.
      Experience came to her rescue.  The mischief in his eyes was no more boyish than it was innocent.  What she saw in those changeable amber eyes was a rake’s guile.
      “A lady and a gentleman may not know each other unless they have been properly introduced,” she said coolly.  “If they do not know each other, they cannot have met.  Since we were properly introduced only a moment ago, we cannot have met previously.”
      “What a madly contorted logic that is,” he said.
      “It is a rule of behavior,” she said.  “It needn’t be logical.  There may even be a rule that rules of behavior must be illogical.”
      His eyes lit.  At first she thought what she saw there was amusement, and she cursed herself, because she did not wish to entertain him.  But then his gaze drifted from her face to her neck and downward, lingering upon her bosom before it swept down to the toes of her silk slippers.  It came up again so swiftly that she hadn’t time to get her breathing back to normal.  She could hide that, but not the rest of her reaction.
      Her face was hot.  Everywhere was hot.  Meanwhile her tattletale skin was announcing the fact, she knew, spreading a blush over her neck and the extensive area of shoulders and bosom her gown revealed.
      He was enjoying her agitation.
      Anger crackled inside her.
      Once, only once, she would like to do something, instead of silently enduring a man’s insolent examination.
      But a lady must pretend not to notice when a man disrobed her with his eyes.
      It was not fair.
      When a man took offense at something, he was allowed to react.  He was
expected to react.
      If she were a man, she could push him into a piece of furniture or black his eye.
      But she wasn’t a man and she could not summon another man to do the job for her.  Creating a scene would be disastrous as well as ridiculous.  She was not a child.  She was a woman of seven and twenty, a nobleman’s daughter with eight Seasons behind her.  She was expected to possess complete self control.  She was expected to handle difficult or unpleasant situations with poise and courtesy.
      She must not get even or punish him.
      She must ignore it…and he knew she must, the beast.
      She simmered helplessly for a time.
  &
nbsp;   But Lady Charlotte Hayward was nothing if not resourceful. Even while she was fuming, her mind was working.  She had dealt with scores of men.  She could deal with this one, too.

      ***
     Womanbook And for those who are not in the mood/don’t have the books or the time to hunt for excerpts, here’s the quiz:
      Do you like excerpts or do they annoy you?  Would you rather have the whole thing than be tantalized by tidbits?  Where do you stand on excerpts?

144 thoughts on “The excerpt contest”

  1. He swallowed nausea and pride in one gulp. “Jess the only unforgivable thing you can do is leave me,” he said. …If you leave me, I’ll kill myself.”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” she said. “I should never leave you. Really, Dain, I cannot think where you get such addled ideas.”
    Perfect. A heroine with a brain and magnificent attitude.

    Reply
  2. He swallowed nausea and pride in one gulp. “Jess the only unforgivable thing you can do is leave me,” he said. …If you leave me, I’ll kill myself.”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” she said. “I should never leave you. Really, Dain, I cannot think where you get such addled ideas.”
    Perfect. A heroine with a brain and magnificent attitude.

    Reply
  3. He swallowed nausea and pride in one gulp. “Jess the only unforgivable thing you can do is leave me,” he said. …If you leave me, I’ll kill myself.”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” she said. “I should never leave you. Really, Dain, I cannot think where you get such addled ideas.”
    Perfect. A heroine with a brain and magnificent attitude.

    Reply
  4. He swallowed nausea and pride in one gulp. “Jess the only unforgivable thing you can do is leave me,” he said. …If you leave me, I’ll kill myself.”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” she said. “I should never leave you. Really, Dain, I cannot think where you get such addled ideas.”
    Perfect. A heroine with a brain and magnificent attitude.

    Reply
  5. Loretta – just wanted to say that I got your book in the mail this morning…and for a split second, thought about calling in ‘sick’….
    Now that I’ve read the excerpt, I’m feeling sorry I didn’t. (I’m sure that my conscience could have been temporarily silenced for the couple of hours I’d be reading….but I might burn in hell later on….)
    It’s wonderful to have such a treat to look forward to….(and my dinner date is likely going to wonder why I’m eating so fast and eschewing dessert…)
    MJ

    Reply
  6. Loretta – just wanted to say that I got your book in the mail this morning…and for a split second, thought about calling in ‘sick’….
    Now that I’ve read the excerpt, I’m feeling sorry I didn’t. (I’m sure that my conscience could have been temporarily silenced for the couple of hours I’d be reading….but I might burn in hell later on….)
    It’s wonderful to have such a treat to look forward to….(and my dinner date is likely going to wonder why I’m eating so fast and eschewing dessert…)
    MJ

    Reply
  7. Loretta – just wanted to say that I got your book in the mail this morning…and for a split second, thought about calling in ‘sick’….
    Now that I’ve read the excerpt, I’m feeling sorry I didn’t. (I’m sure that my conscience could have been temporarily silenced for the couple of hours I’d be reading….but I might burn in hell later on….)
    It’s wonderful to have such a treat to look forward to….(and my dinner date is likely going to wonder why I’m eating so fast and eschewing dessert…)
    MJ

    Reply
  8. Loretta – just wanted to say that I got your book in the mail this morning…and for a split second, thought about calling in ‘sick’….
    Now that I’ve read the excerpt, I’m feeling sorry I didn’t. (I’m sure that my conscience could have been temporarily silenced for the couple of hours I’d be reading….but I might burn in hell later on….)
    It’s wonderful to have such a treat to look forward to….(and my dinner date is likely going to wonder why I’m eating so fast and eschewing dessert…)
    MJ

    Reply
  9. What she did next was creep to the corner of the house, grasp the drainpipe, and swing herself up.
    Vere blinked once in disbelief, then ran toward her, heedless of the gravel crunching underfoot.
    Starting at the noise, she slipped and fell, landing with a soft thud upon the grass. Before she could scramble up, he grasped her upper arms and hauled her to her feet.
    “What in blazes do you think you’re doing?” he whispered.
    She wrenched free of his grasp. “What does it look like?” She rubbed her bottom. “Plague take you, I might have broken a leg. What the devil do you mean by creeping up on me? You’re supposed to be in a brothel.”
    “I lied”, he said. “I can’t believe you fell for that old going-to-a-brothel ruse. You didn’t even look out the window to make sure I’d gone away.”
    From “The Last Hellion” p.95.
    I love the dialogue between these two characters throughout the book. They’re unusual people – wonderfully abrasive and perfectly matched.

    Reply
  10. What she did next was creep to the corner of the house, grasp the drainpipe, and swing herself up.
    Vere blinked once in disbelief, then ran toward her, heedless of the gravel crunching underfoot.
    Starting at the noise, she slipped and fell, landing with a soft thud upon the grass. Before she could scramble up, he grasped her upper arms and hauled her to her feet.
    “What in blazes do you think you’re doing?” he whispered.
    She wrenched free of his grasp. “What does it look like?” She rubbed her bottom. “Plague take you, I might have broken a leg. What the devil do you mean by creeping up on me? You’re supposed to be in a brothel.”
    “I lied”, he said. “I can’t believe you fell for that old going-to-a-brothel ruse. You didn’t even look out the window to make sure I’d gone away.”
    From “The Last Hellion” p.95.
    I love the dialogue between these two characters throughout the book. They’re unusual people – wonderfully abrasive and perfectly matched.

    Reply
  11. What she did next was creep to the corner of the house, grasp the drainpipe, and swing herself up.
    Vere blinked once in disbelief, then ran toward her, heedless of the gravel crunching underfoot.
    Starting at the noise, she slipped and fell, landing with a soft thud upon the grass. Before she could scramble up, he grasped her upper arms and hauled her to her feet.
    “What in blazes do you think you’re doing?” he whispered.
    She wrenched free of his grasp. “What does it look like?” She rubbed her bottom. “Plague take you, I might have broken a leg. What the devil do you mean by creeping up on me? You’re supposed to be in a brothel.”
    “I lied”, he said. “I can’t believe you fell for that old going-to-a-brothel ruse. You didn’t even look out the window to make sure I’d gone away.”
    From “The Last Hellion” p.95.
    I love the dialogue between these two characters throughout the book. They’re unusual people – wonderfully abrasive and perfectly matched.

    Reply
  12. What she did next was creep to the corner of the house, grasp the drainpipe, and swing herself up.
    Vere blinked once in disbelief, then ran toward her, heedless of the gravel crunching underfoot.
    Starting at the noise, she slipped and fell, landing with a soft thud upon the grass. Before she could scramble up, he grasped her upper arms and hauled her to her feet.
    “What in blazes do you think you’re doing?” he whispered.
    She wrenched free of his grasp. “What does it look like?” She rubbed her bottom. “Plague take you, I might have broken a leg. What the devil do you mean by creeping up on me? You’re supposed to be in a brothel.”
    “I lied”, he said. “I can’t believe you fell for that old going-to-a-brothel ruse. You didn’t even look out the window to make sure I’d gone away.”
    From “The Last Hellion” p.95.
    I love the dialogue between these two characters throughout the book. They’re unusual people – wonderfully abrasive and perfectly matched.

    Reply
  13. I don’t get out and about like I used to so I mainly learn about books that I would like to read on the author’s website. I like to see a blurb and an excerpt on the site. This helps me decide whether or not to place an order. Sometimes (unless it’s an auto-buy author) I won’t buy the book unless I have read an excerpt.
    Which is a convoluted way of saying, “Yes! Excerpts are important to me.” LOL

    Reply
  14. I don’t get out and about like I used to so I mainly learn about books that I would like to read on the author’s website. I like to see a blurb and an excerpt on the site. This helps me decide whether or not to place an order. Sometimes (unless it’s an auto-buy author) I won’t buy the book unless I have read an excerpt.
    Which is a convoluted way of saying, “Yes! Excerpts are important to me.” LOL

    Reply
  15. I don’t get out and about like I used to so I mainly learn about books that I would like to read on the author’s website. I like to see a blurb and an excerpt on the site. This helps me decide whether or not to place an order. Sometimes (unless it’s an auto-buy author) I won’t buy the book unless I have read an excerpt.
    Which is a convoluted way of saying, “Yes! Excerpts are important to me.” LOL

    Reply
  16. I don’t get out and about like I used to so I mainly learn about books that I would like to read on the author’s website. I like to see a blurb and an excerpt on the site. This helps me decide whether or not to place an order. Sometimes (unless it’s an auto-buy author) I won’t buy the book unless I have read an excerpt.
    Which is a convoluted way of saying, “Yes! Excerpts are important to me.” LOL

    Reply
  17. Excerpts? I love excerpts! Sad to say, i don’t think I’ve ever read any of your books, but after reading those excerpts, there is definitely one I’m going to, plus I checked out your website, and while I didn’t see any excerpts for other books, i can see that I am going to have to go to the book store today.
    As I said, I love excerpts, there are several authors that I am reading now purely because I stumbled across an excerpt. some live up to the hope instilled, others have lost me when the plots become too similar….When did you say this book was being released?

    Reply
  18. Excerpts? I love excerpts! Sad to say, i don’t think I’ve ever read any of your books, but after reading those excerpts, there is definitely one I’m going to, plus I checked out your website, and while I didn’t see any excerpts for other books, i can see that I am going to have to go to the book store today.
    As I said, I love excerpts, there are several authors that I am reading now purely because I stumbled across an excerpt. some live up to the hope instilled, others have lost me when the plots become too similar….When did you say this book was being released?

    Reply
  19. Excerpts? I love excerpts! Sad to say, i don’t think I’ve ever read any of your books, but after reading those excerpts, there is definitely one I’m going to, plus I checked out your website, and while I didn’t see any excerpts for other books, i can see that I am going to have to go to the book store today.
    As I said, I love excerpts, there are several authors that I am reading now purely because I stumbled across an excerpt. some live up to the hope instilled, others have lost me when the plots become too similar….When did you say this book was being released?

    Reply
  20. Excerpts? I love excerpts! Sad to say, i don’t think I’ve ever read any of your books, but after reading those excerpts, there is definitely one I’m going to, plus I checked out your website, and while I didn’t see any excerpts for other books, i can see that I am going to have to go to the book store today.
    As I said, I love excerpts, there are several authors that I am reading now purely because I stumbled across an excerpt. some live up to the hope instilled, others have lost me when the plots become too similar….When did you say this book was being released?

    Reply
  21. I was going to put an excerpt from Mr Impossible, but there are so many to chose from. And now I’ve started reading it again! I love it when Rupert wakes up at the rug merchant’s (p.82) but also when he tries to explain/excuse why he kissed Daphne (p.118):
    …then there was the passion, ocean-deep and as wild as any sea storm.
    Rupert had a strong suspicion what was her husband had died of.
    He gestured about him. “The…um…romantic scene. The woman of mystery.” With the magnificent rump. And a raw, rare talent for kissing a man deaf, dumb, blind, and deranged. “The mood of the moment. And no one about.”

    “I am no mystery,” she said crossly. “I told you-”
    “Your mind is so intriguing,” he said. “So filled with learning. And all those secrets, too. Complicated. Fascinating.”
    Her expression grew wary. “My mind?” she said. “You kissed me for my MIND?”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” he said. “Do you want to see the pyramids?” He pointed. “They’re that way.”

    Reply
  22. I was going to put an excerpt from Mr Impossible, but there are so many to chose from. And now I’ve started reading it again! I love it when Rupert wakes up at the rug merchant’s (p.82) but also when he tries to explain/excuse why he kissed Daphne (p.118):
    …then there was the passion, ocean-deep and as wild as any sea storm.
    Rupert had a strong suspicion what was her husband had died of.
    He gestured about him. “The…um…romantic scene. The woman of mystery.” With the magnificent rump. And a raw, rare talent for kissing a man deaf, dumb, blind, and deranged. “The mood of the moment. And no one about.”

    “I am no mystery,” she said crossly. “I told you-”
    “Your mind is so intriguing,” he said. “So filled with learning. And all those secrets, too. Complicated. Fascinating.”
    Her expression grew wary. “My mind?” she said. “You kissed me for my MIND?”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” he said. “Do you want to see the pyramids?” He pointed. “They’re that way.”

    Reply
  23. I was going to put an excerpt from Mr Impossible, but there are so many to chose from. And now I’ve started reading it again! I love it when Rupert wakes up at the rug merchant’s (p.82) but also when he tries to explain/excuse why he kissed Daphne (p.118):
    …then there was the passion, ocean-deep and as wild as any sea storm.
    Rupert had a strong suspicion what was her husband had died of.
    He gestured about him. “The…um…romantic scene. The woman of mystery.” With the magnificent rump. And a raw, rare talent for kissing a man deaf, dumb, blind, and deranged. “The mood of the moment. And no one about.”

    “I am no mystery,” she said crossly. “I told you-”
    “Your mind is so intriguing,” he said. “So filled with learning. And all those secrets, too. Complicated. Fascinating.”
    Her expression grew wary. “My mind?” she said. “You kissed me for my MIND?”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” he said. “Do you want to see the pyramids?” He pointed. “They’re that way.”

    Reply
  24. I was going to put an excerpt from Mr Impossible, but there are so many to chose from. And now I’ve started reading it again! I love it when Rupert wakes up at the rug merchant’s (p.82) but also when he tries to explain/excuse why he kissed Daphne (p.118):
    …then there was the passion, ocean-deep and as wild as any sea storm.
    Rupert had a strong suspicion what was her husband had died of.
    He gestured about him. “The…um…romantic scene. The woman of mystery.” With the magnificent rump. And a raw, rare talent for kissing a man deaf, dumb, blind, and deranged. “The mood of the moment. And no one about.”

    “I am no mystery,” she said crossly. “I told you-”
    “Your mind is so intriguing,” he said. “So filled with learning. And all those secrets, too. Complicated. Fascinating.”
    Her expression grew wary. “My mind?” she said. “You kissed me for my MIND?”
    “Don’t be ridiculous,” he said. “Do you want to see the pyramids?” He pointed. “They’re that way.”

    Reply
  25. I do the middle of the book thing as well – and I don’t really buy online unless it’s an author I read already, so excerpts would absolutely tip the balance for me.

    Reply
  26. I do the middle of the book thing as well – and I don’t really buy online unless it’s an author I read already, so excerpts would absolutely tip the balance for me.

    Reply
  27. I do the middle of the book thing as well – and I don’t really buy online unless it’s an author I read already, so excerpts would absolutely tip the balance for me.

    Reply
  28. I do the middle of the book thing as well – and I don’t really buy online unless it’s an author I read already, so excerpts would absolutely tip the balance for me.

    Reply
  29. I love excerpts, they let me know if I’m going to like the author’s voice, which is VITAL. I always check out the “look inside” option on Amazon when I’m shopping online if I’m looking at book by an unknown author.

    Reply
  30. I love excerpts, they let me know if I’m going to like the author’s voice, which is VITAL. I always check out the “look inside” option on Amazon when I’m shopping online if I’m looking at book by an unknown author.

    Reply
  31. I love excerpts, they let me know if I’m going to like the author’s voice, which is VITAL. I always check out the “look inside” option on Amazon when I’m shopping online if I’m looking at book by an unknown author.

    Reply
  32. I love excerpts, they let me know if I’m going to like the author’s voice, which is VITAL. I always check out the “look inside” option on Amazon when I’m shopping online if I’m looking at book by an unknown author.

    Reply
  33. Well, for me I don’t always read excerpts from authors that I autobuy. . . but I do read them for authors that are new/new to me type of thing. In the first instance it’s because the back cover blurb’s fine with me. In the second instance I just like having that extra info. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  34. Well, for me I don’t always read excerpts from authors that I autobuy. . . but I do read them for authors that are new/new to me type of thing. In the first instance it’s because the back cover blurb’s fine with me. In the second instance I just like having that extra info. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  35. Well, for me I don’t always read excerpts from authors that I autobuy. . . but I do read them for authors that are new/new to me type of thing. In the first instance it’s because the back cover blurb’s fine with me. In the second instance I just like having that extra info. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  36. Well, for me I don’t always read excerpts from authors that I autobuy. . . but I do read them for authors that are new/new to me type of thing. In the first instance it’s because the back cover blurb’s fine with me. In the second instance I just like having that extra info. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  37. I love excerpts. They give you a idea of what the book is about. That’s what I usually go by before I buy a book. By the way I love your books. I don’t need to read an excerpt to tell me your books are good.

    Reply
  38. I love excerpts. They give you a idea of what the book is about. That’s what I usually go by before I buy a book. By the way I love your books. I don’t need to read an excerpt to tell me your books are good.

    Reply
  39. I love excerpts. They give you a idea of what the book is about. That’s what I usually go by before I buy a book. By the way I love your books. I don’t need to read an excerpt to tell me your books are good.

    Reply
  40. I love excerpts. They give you a idea of what the book is about. That’s what I usually go by before I buy a book. By the way I love your books. I don’t need to read an excerpt to tell me your books are good.

    Reply
  41. I like to read excerpts before I buy. Not too small of an excerpt but enough to give you an insight on the book. Like the secon excerpt you gave for Not Quite a Lady. But it wouldn’t have to that long either. After reading to (that lazy smile, something inside her seem to unfurl) would have been enough for me to buy. I can’t wait to read this book. Great excerpt by the way and I love your books.

    Reply
  42. I like to read excerpts before I buy. Not too small of an excerpt but enough to give you an insight on the book. Like the secon excerpt you gave for Not Quite a Lady. But it wouldn’t have to that long either. After reading to (that lazy smile, something inside her seem to unfurl) would have been enough for me to buy. I can’t wait to read this book. Great excerpt by the way and I love your books.

    Reply
  43. I like to read excerpts before I buy. Not too small of an excerpt but enough to give you an insight on the book. Like the secon excerpt you gave for Not Quite a Lady. But it wouldn’t have to that long either. After reading to (that lazy smile, something inside her seem to unfurl) would have been enough for me to buy. I can’t wait to read this book. Great excerpt by the way and I love your books.

    Reply
  44. I like to read excerpts before I buy. Not too small of an excerpt but enough to give you an insight on the book. Like the secon excerpt you gave for Not Quite a Lady. But it wouldn’t have to that long either. After reading to (that lazy smile, something inside her seem to unfurl) would have been enough for me to buy. I can’t wait to read this book. Great excerpt by the way and I love your books.

    Reply
  45. Loretta, I think you can safely open any page of one of your books and write down the contents and the humor and characters would leap out at unsuspecting readers.
    I generally don’t go to author websites looking for excerpts unless I’m also curious about the author, but I do love the ones on Amazon. I gather author names and titles for weeks before I’m ready to order books, and then I check them out on Amazon to see if I still want to read them. I’m getting rather snotty about books that don’t have an Amazon excerpt and think twice about making the order unless the author is known to me. Publishers, take heed!

    Reply
  46. Loretta, I think you can safely open any page of one of your books and write down the contents and the humor and characters would leap out at unsuspecting readers.
    I generally don’t go to author websites looking for excerpts unless I’m also curious about the author, but I do love the ones on Amazon. I gather author names and titles for weeks before I’m ready to order books, and then I check them out on Amazon to see if I still want to read them. I’m getting rather snotty about books that don’t have an Amazon excerpt and think twice about making the order unless the author is known to me. Publishers, take heed!

    Reply
  47. Loretta, I think you can safely open any page of one of your books and write down the contents and the humor and characters would leap out at unsuspecting readers.
    I generally don’t go to author websites looking for excerpts unless I’m also curious about the author, but I do love the ones on Amazon. I gather author names and titles for weeks before I’m ready to order books, and then I check them out on Amazon to see if I still want to read them. I’m getting rather snotty about books that don’t have an Amazon excerpt and think twice about making the order unless the author is known to me. Publishers, take heed!

    Reply
  48. Loretta, I think you can safely open any page of one of your books and write down the contents and the humor and characters would leap out at unsuspecting readers.
    I generally don’t go to author websites looking for excerpts unless I’m also curious about the author, but I do love the ones on Amazon. I gather author names and titles for weeks before I’m ready to order books, and then I check them out on Amazon to see if I still want to read them. I’m getting rather snotty about books that don’t have an Amazon excerpt and think twice about making the order unless the author is known to me. Publishers, take heed!

    Reply
  49. Excerpts definitely seem to be popular–so I’m glad I asked for help. Gillian and Francois, thank you for getting the ball rolling with some selections I’m defnitely proud of. MJ, how did you get the book so fast? And please don’t gulp your dinner. *g* Piper, I’m so glad you liked the excerpt. Not Quite a Lady is supposed to go on sale on Tuesday 24 April–but MJ seems to have a secret high-speed source.

    Reply
  50. Excerpts definitely seem to be popular–so I’m glad I asked for help. Gillian and Francois, thank you for getting the ball rolling with some selections I’m defnitely proud of. MJ, how did you get the book so fast? And please don’t gulp your dinner. *g* Piper, I’m so glad you liked the excerpt. Not Quite a Lady is supposed to go on sale on Tuesday 24 April–but MJ seems to have a secret high-speed source.

    Reply
  51. Excerpts definitely seem to be popular–so I’m glad I asked for help. Gillian and Francois, thank you for getting the ball rolling with some selections I’m defnitely proud of. MJ, how did you get the book so fast? And please don’t gulp your dinner. *g* Piper, I’m so glad you liked the excerpt. Not Quite a Lady is supposed to go on sale on Tuesday 24 April–but MJ seems to have a secret high-speed source.

    Reply
  52. Excerpts definitely seem to be popular–so I’m glad I asked for help. Gillian and Francois, thank you for getting the ball rolling with some selections I’m defnitely proud of. MJ, how did you get the book so fast? And please don’t gulp your dinner. *g* Piper, I’m so glad you liked the excerpt. Not Quite a Lady is supposed to go on sale on Tuesday 24 April–but MJ seems to have a secret high-speed source.

    Reply
  53. Opening CAPTIVES OF THE NIGHT at random, here is an excerpt from pp. 222-223:
    She stormed into the room, tearing her bonnet off and hurling it aside. Ismal followed and gently closed the door behind him.
    “I’m good at a lot of things,” she raged on. “At falling in love with the Devil’s spawn, certainly. I have a genius for it, don’t you think? And for leaping out of the pan, straight into the flames. From Papa to Francis to you.”
    He leaned back against the door, a sledgehammer driving at his heart with slow, fierce blows. “In love?” he repeated, his mouth dry. “With me, Leila?”
    “No, with the Bishop of Durham.” She fumbled at her cloak fastenings. “For all I know, you’ll be him next. And do as brilliant a job as you did disguised as a constable.” She ripped off the coat. “What else have you been, I wonder? How long have you been a French count? How long have you been French?”
    He stiffened.
    She swept to the dressing table, flung herself onto the chair and began pulling pins from her hair. “Alexis Delavenne, Comte d’Esmond, is it? Where did they find your title, I wonder? One of the unfortunate families decimated during the Terror? Were you the infant Delavenne–sent away and hidden–until it was safe to return and claim your birthright? Is that the story you and your colleagues fabricated?”
    He stood unmoving, outwardly calm: a normal, civilized man patiently absorbing the outpourings of an overwrought woman. Yet the barbarian inside him believed the Devil must be whispering these secrets in her ear. it was surely the Devil who made Ismal choke on the smooth denials and evasions ready to spill from his tongue. It must be the Devil who held him helpless, transfixed on one treacherous word: love.
    It was that word which tangled his brain and tongue, which opened the rift in his proud, well-guarded heart, leaving a place that ached, needing tending. Needy, he could only ask, like a foolish, besotted boy, “Do you love me, Leila?”

    Reply
  54. Opening CAPTIVES OF THE NIGHT at random, here is an excerpt from pp. 222-223:
    She stormed into the room, tearing her bonnet off and hurling it aside. Ismal followed and gently closed the door behind him.
    “I’m good at a lot of things,” she raged on. “At falling in love with the Devil’s spawn, certainly. I have a genius for it, don’t you think? And for leaping out of the pan, straight into the flames. From Papa to Francis to you.”
    He leaned back against the door, a sledgehammer driving at his heart with slow, fierce blows. “In love?” he repeated, his mouth dry. “With me, Leila?”
    “No, with the Bishop of Durham.” She fumbled at her cloak fastenings. “For all I know, you’ll be him next. And do as brilliant a job as you did disguised as a constable.” She ripped off the coat. “What else have you been, I wonder? How long have you been a French count? How long have you been French?”
    He stiffened.
    She swept to the dressing table, flung herself onto the chair and began pulling pins from her hair. “Alexis Delavenne, Comte d’Esmond, is it? Where did they find your title, I wonder? One of the unfortunate families decimated during the Terror? Were you the infant Delavenne–sent away and hidden–until it was safe to return and claim your birthright? Is that the story you and your colleagues fabricated?”
    He stood unmoving, outwardly calm: a normal, civilized man patiently absorbing the outpourings of an overwrought woman. Yet the barbarian inside him believed the Devil must be whispering these secrets in her ear. it was surely the Devil who made Ismal choke on the smooth denials and evasions ready to spill from his tongue. It must be the Devil who held him helpless, transfixed on one treacherous word: love.
    It was that word which tangled his brain and tongue, which opened the rift in his proud, well-guarded heart, leaving a place that ached, needing tending. Needy, he could only ask, like a foolish, besotted boy, “Do you love me, Leila?”

    Reply
  55. Opening CAPTIVES OF THE NIGHT at random, here is an excerpt from pp. 222-223:
    She stormed into the room, tearing her bonnet off and hurling it aside. Ismal followed and gently closed the door behind him.
    “I’m good at a lot of things,” she raged on. “At falling in love with the Devil’s spawn, certainly. I have a genius for it, don’t you think? And for leaping out of the pan, straight into the flames. From Papa to Francis to you.”
    He leaned back against the door, a sledgehammer driving at his heart with slow, fierce blows. “In love?” he repeated, his mouth dry. “With me, Leila?”
    “No, with the Bishop of Durham.” She fumbled at her cloak fastenings. “For all I know, you’ll be him next. And do as brilliant a job as you did disguised as a constable.” She ripped off the coat. “What else have you been, I wonder? How long have you been a French count? How long have you been French?”
    He stiffened.
    She swept to the dressing table, flung herself onto the chair and began pulling pins from her hair. “Alexis Delavenne, Comte d’Esmond, is it? Where did they find your title, I wonder? One of the unfortunate families decimated during the Terror? Were you the infant Delavenne–sent away and hidden–until it was safe to return and claim your birthright? Is that the story you and your colleagues fabricated?”
    He stood unmoving, outwardly calm: a normal, civilized man patiently absorbing the outpourings of an overwrought woman. Yet the barbarian inside him believed the Devil must be whispering these secrets in her ear. it was surely the Devil who made Ismal choke on the smooth denials and evasions ready to spill from his tongue. It must be the Devil who held him helpless, transfixed on one treacherous word: love.
    It was that word which tangled his brain and tongue, which opened the rift in his proud, well-guarded heart, leaving a place that ached, needing tending. Needy, he could only ask, like a foolish, besotted boy, “Do you love me, Leila?”

    Reply
  56. Opening CAPTIVES OF THE NIGHT at random, here is an excerpt from pp. 222-223:
    She stormed into the room, tearing her bonnet off and hurling it aside. Ismal followed and gently closed the door behind him.
    “I’m good at a lot of things,” she raged on. “At falling in love with the Devil’s spawn, certainly. I have a genius for it, don’t you think? And for leaping out of the pan, straight into the flames. From Papa to Francis to you.”
    He leaned back against the door, a sledgehammer driving at his heart with slow, fierce blows. “In love?” he repeated, his mouth dry. “With me, Leila?”
    “No, with the Bishop of Durham.” She fumbled at her cloak fastenings. “For all I know, you’ll be him next. And do as brilliant a job as you did disguised as a constable.” She ripped off the coat. “What else have you been, I wonder? How long have you been a French count? How long have you been French?”
    He stiffened.
    She swept to the dressing table, flung herself onto the chair and began pulling pins from her hair. “Alexis Delavenne, Comte d’Esmond, is it? Where did they find your title, I wonder? One of the unfortunate families decimated during the Terror? Were you the infant Delavenne–sent away and hidden–until it was safe to return and claim your birthright? Is that the story you and your colleagues fabricated?”
    He stood unmoving, outwardly calm: a normal, civilized man patiently absorbing the outpourings of an overwrought woman. Yet the barbarian inside him believed the Devil must be whispering these secrets in her ear. it was surely the Devil who made Ismal choke on the smooth denials and evasions ready to spill from his tongue. It must be the Devil who held him helpless, transfixed on one treacherous word: love.
    It was that word which tangled his brain and tongue, which opened the rift in his proud, well-guarded heart, leaving a place that ached, needing tending. Needy, he could only ask, like a foolish, besotted boy, “Do you love me, Leila?”

    Reply
  57. “I think we had better pretend it never happened,” she broke in desparately.
    “That would be dishonest,” he said.
    The space was small, and growing smaller and warmer by the second. She was desperately aware of the large hand on the door. She remembered how easily he’d captured her, how gently yet firmly he’d grasped her head and held her while he claimed her mouth and made it his. She remembered his powerful hand on her backside, pressing her so close, and the pressure of his arousal against her belly. She was awash now in the mingled scents of Male: boot polish and shaving soap, pomade and, most intoxicating of all, the combination that was so absolutely and devastatingly him.
    “It was an aberration, a momentary madness,” she said.
    “It was madly exciting,” he said, his voice so low that she felt rather than heard it, on her neck, behind her ear, and deep, deep within, where the devil lurked and mad her ache for wild and wicked things.
    She said, her voice taut and a little too high, “But above all, it was wrong, Mr. Carsington.”
    She didn’t see him move, but it felt as though he stood nearer, too near.
    “Really,” he said. “What was wrong with it? Which part? Should I have done this?” He laid the palm of his other hand upon the door, boxing her in. “And this?”
    Mr. Impossible, p 134-135

    Reply
  58. “I think we had better pretend it never happened,” she broke in desparately.
    “That would be dishonest,” he said.
    The space was small, and growing smaller and warmer by the second. She was desperately aware of the large hand on the door. She remembered how easily he’d captured her, how gently yet firmly he’d grasped her head and held her while he claimed her mouth and made it his. She remembered his powerful hand on her backside, pressing her so close, and the pressure of his arousal against her belly. She was awash now in the mingled scents of Male: boot polish and shaving soap, pomade and, most intoxicating of all, the combination that was so absolutely and devastatingly him.
    “It was an aberration, a momentary madness,” she said.
    “It was madly exciting,” he said, his voice so low that she felt rather than heard it, on her neck, behind her ear, and deep, deep within, where the devil lurked and mad her ache for wild and wicked things.
    She said, her voice taut and a little too high, “But above all, it was wrong, Mr. Carsington.”
    She didn’t see him move, but it felt as though he stood nearer, too near.
    “Really,” he said. “What was wrong with it? Which part? Should I have done this?” He laid the palm of his other hand upon the door, boxing her in. “And this?”
    Mr. Impossible, p 134-135

    Reply
  59. “I think we had better pretend it never happened,” she broke in desparately.
    “That would be dishonest,” he said.
    The space was small, and growing smaller and warmer by the second. She was desperately aware of the large hand on the door. She remembered how easily he’d captured her, how gently yet firmly he’d grasped her head and held her while he claimed her mouth and made it his. She remembered his powerful hand on her backside, pressing her so close, and the pressure of his arousal against her belly. She was awash now in the mingled scents of Male: boot polish and shaving soap, pomade and, most intoxicating of all, the combination that was so absolutely and devastatingly him.
    “It was an aberration, a momentary madness,” she said.
    “It was madly exciting,” he said, his voice so low that she felt rather than heard it, on her neck, behind her ear, and deep, deep within, where the devil lurked and mad her ache for wild and wicked things.
    She said, her voice taut and a little too high, “But above all, it was wrong, Mr. Carsington.”
    She didn’t see him move, but it felt as though he stood nearer, too near.
    “Really,” he said. “What was wrong with it? Which part? Should I have done this?” He laid the palm of his other hand upon the door, boxing her in. “And this?”
    Mr. Impossible, p 134-135

    Reply
  60. “I think we had better pretend it never happened,” she broke in desparately.
    “That would be dishonest,” he said.
    The space was small, and growing smaller and warmer by the second. She was desperately aware of the large hand on the door. She remembered how easily he’d captured her, how gently yet firmly he’d grasped her head and held her while he claimed her mouth and made it his. She remembered his powerful hand on her backside, pressing her so close, and the pressure of his arousal against her belly. She was awash now in the mingled scents of Male: boot polish and shaving soap, pomade and, most intoxicating of all, the combination that was so absolutely and devastatingly him.
    “It was an aberration, a momentary madness,” she said.
    “It was madly exciting,” he said, his voice so low that she felt rather than heard it, on her neck, behind her ear, and deep, deep within, where the devil lurked and mad her ache for wild and wicked things.
    She said, her voice taut and a little too high, “But above all, it was wrong, Mr. Carsington.”
    She didn’t see him move, but it felt as though he stood nearer, too near.
    “Really,” he said. “What was wrong with it? Which part? Should I have done this?” He laid the palm of his other hand upon the door, boxing her in. “And this?”
    Mr. Impossible, p 134-135

    Reply
  61. “Given a choice, I’d rather be thought loathesome,” he said. “I can think of few worse fates than being deemed boring. An incorrectly starched neckcloth, perhaps. Hessians worn with breeches. Waistcoat buttons left undone with a plain shirt.” He shuddered theatrically.
    –Miss Wonderful, p. 148/149
    There he was: tall, dark, far too handsome for anybody’s good, and only half-dressed, as usual. Lose white Turkish trousers tucked into gleaming boots. An Arab-style shirt, called a kamees, with very full sleeves. Over this he wore a wine-coloured English waistcoat, unbuttoned. He hadn’t bothered with a neckcloth. The shirt had no buttons, merely a slit in the front. This left his neck and collarbone as well as a deep V of his powerful chest completely exposed. The Egyptian sun had turned his neck several degrees darker than the outer edge of the V. She wanted to draw her tongue along that paler edge of skin. She wanted to bury her face in his neck.
    She wanted to bang her head against the wall.
    –Mr. Impossible, p.144
    The third man offered to stuff a part of Rathbourne’s anatomy down his throat.
    “I daresay I should waste my breath reminding you that a lady is present,” Rathbourne said.
    “Oh, fine lady she is, too,” said Drunk Number Two, abandoning his friend on the bench. “I know what kind of ladies come out at this time of night, don’t I?”
    He walked unsteadily to the curricle, contorting his face into what Bathsheba supposed was meant to be a wink. “Why don’t you leave old carbuncle face there and his catch-fart to amuse each other lie they like best? Wy don’t you come down to me instead, my pretty blackbird.” He grasped her seat handle with one hand and grabbed his crotch with the other. “I’ve got something bigger and stronger for you to perch on.”
    “Not tonight,” said Bathsheba. “I have a headache.”
    –Lord Perfect, p. 114

    Reply
  62. “Given a choice, I’d rather be thought loathesome,” he said. “I can think of few worse fates than being deemed boring. An incorrectly starched neckcloth, perhaps. Hessians worn with breeches. Waistcoat buttons left undone with a plain shirt.” He shuddered theatrically.
    –Miss Wonderful, p. 148/149
    There he was: tall, dark, far too handsome for anybody’s good, and only half-dressed, as usual. Lose white Turkish trousers tucked into gleaming boots. An Arab-style shirt, called a kamees, with very full sleeves. Over this he wore a wine-coloured English waistcoat, unbuttoned. He hadn’t bothered with a neckcloth. The shirt had no buttons, merely a slit in the front. This left his neck and collarbone as well as a deep V of his powerful chest completely exposed. The Egyptian sun had turned his neck several degrees darker than the outer edge of the V. She wanted to draw her tongue along that paler edge of skin. She wanted to bury her face in his neck.
    She wanted to bang her head against the wall.
    –Mr. Impossible, p.144
    The third man offered to stuff a part of Rathbourne’s anatomy down his throat.
    “I daresay I should waste my breath reminding you that a lady is present,” Rathbourne said.
    “Oh, fine lady she is, too,” said Drunk Number Two, abandoning his friend on the bench. “I know what kind of ladies come out at this time of night, don’t I?”
    He walked unsteadily to the curricle, contorting his face into what Bathsheba supposed was meant to be a wink. “Why don’t you leave old carbuncle face there and his catch-fart to amuse each other lie they like best? Wy don’t you come down to me instead, my pretty blackbird.” He grasped her seat handle with one hand and grabbed his crotch with the other. “I’ve got something bigger and stronger for you to perch on.”
    “Not tonight,” said Bathsheba. “I have a headache.”
    –Lord Perfect, p. 114

    Reply
  63. “Given a choice, I’d rather be thought loathesome,” he said. “I can think of few worse fates than being deemed boring. An incorrectly starched neckcloth, perhaps. Hessians worn with breeches. Waistcoat buttons left undone with a plain shirt.” He shuddered theatrically.
    –Miss Wonderful, p. 148/149
    There he was: tall, dark, far too handsome for anybody’s good, and only half-dressed, as usual. Lose white Turkish trousers tucked into gleaming boots. An Arab-style shirt, called a kamees, with very full sleeves. Over this he wore a wine-coloured English waistcoat, unbuttoned. He hadn’t bothered with a neckcloth. The shirt had no buttons, merely a slit in the front. This left his neck and collarbone as well as a deep V of his powerful chest completely exposed. The Egyptian sun had turned his neck several degrees darker than the outer edge of the V. She wanted to draw her tongue along that paler edge of skin. She wanted to bury her face in his neck.
    She wanted to bang her head against the wall.
    –Mr. Impossible, p.144
    The third man offered to stuff a part of Rathbourne’s anatomy down his throat.
    “I daresay I should waste my breath reminding you that a lady is present,” Rathbourne said.
    “Oh, fine lady she is, too,” said Drunk Number Two, abandoning his friend on the bench. “I know what kind of ladies come out at this time of night, don’t I?”
    He walked unsteadily to the curricle, contorting his face into what Bathsheba supposed was meant to be a wink. “Why don’t you leave old carbuncle face there and his catch-fart to amuse each other lie they like best? Wy don’t you come down to me instead, my pretty blackbird.” He grasped her seat handle with one hand and grabbed his crotch with the other. “I’ve got something bigger and stronger for you to perch on.”
    “Not tonight,” said Bathsheba. “I have a headache.”
    –Lord Perfect, p. 114

    Reply
  64. “Given a choice, I’d rather be thought loathesome,” he said. “I can think of few worse fates than being deemed boring. An incorrectly starched neckcloth, perhaps. Hessians worn with breeches. Waistcoat buttons left undone with a plain shirt.” He shuddered theatrically.
    –Miss Wonderful, p. 148/149
    There he was: tall, dark, far too handsome for anybody’s good, and only half-dressed, as usual. Lose white Turkish trousers tucked into gleaming boots. An Arab-style shirt, called a kamees, with very full sleeves. Over this he wore a wine-coloured English waistcoat, unbuttoned. He hadn’t bothered with a neckcloth. The shirt had no buttons, merely a slit in the front. This left his neck and collarbone as well as a deep V of his powerful chest completely exposed. The Egyptian sun had turned his neck several degrees darker than the outer edge of the V. She wanted to draw her tongue along that paler edge of skin. She wanted to bury her face in his neck.
    She wanted to bang her head against the wall.
    –Mr. Impossible, p.144
    The third man offered to stuff a part of Rathbourne’s anatomy down his throat.
    “I daresay I should waste my breath reminding you that a lady is present,” Rathbourne said.
    “Oh, fine lady she is, too,” said Drunk Number Two, abandoning his friend on the bench. “I know what kind of ladies come out at this time of night, don’t I?”
    He walked unsteadily to the curricle, contorting his face into what Bathsheba supposed was meant to be a wink. “Why don’t you leave old carbuncle face there and his catch-fart to amuse each other lie they like best? Wy don’t you come down to me instead, my pretty blackbird.” He grasped her seat handle with one hand and grabbed his crotch with the other. “I’ve got something bigger and stronger for you to perch on.”
    “Not tonight,” said Bathsheba. “I have a headache.”
    –Lord Perfect, p. 114

    Reply
  65. He went promptly because, though he’d spoken as truthfully as he could – more truthfully than he’d done in years – he could not overcome the habits of a lifetime. He had missed nothing – the way her eyes softened while he spoke, the way her posture eased and her body shifted ever so slightly, inclining toward him – and every instinct had urged him to take advantage. He would have fallen to his knees and begged, conscienceless beast that he was. Because he hadn’t lied. He didn’t know how to stop wanting her. And so nothing – honor, wisdom, caution, even pride – could keep him from trying.

    Reply
  66. He went promptly because, though he’d spoken as truthfully as he could – more truthfully than he’d done in years – he could not overcome the habits of a lifetime. He had missed nothing – the way her eyes softened while he spoke, the way her posture eased and her body shifted ever so slightly, inclining toward him – and every instinct had urged him to take advantage. He would have fallen to his knees and begged, conscienceless beast that he was. Because he hadn’t lied. He didn’t know how to stop wanting her. And so nothing – honor, wisdom, caution, even pride – could keep him from trying.

    Reply
  67. He went promptly because, though he’d spoken as truthfully as he could – more truthfully than he’d done in years – he could not overcome the habits of a lifetime. He had missed nothing – the way her eyes softened while he spoke, the way her posture eased and her body shifted ever so slightly, inclining toward him – and every instinct had urged him to take advantage. He would have fallen to his knees and begged, conscienceless beast that he was. Because he hadn’t lied. He didn’t know how to stop wanting her. And so nothing – honor, wisdom, caution, even pride – could keep him from trying.

    Reply
  68. He went promptly because, though he’d spoken as truthfully as he could – more truthfully than he’d done in years – he could not overcome the habits of a lifetime. He had missed nothing – the way her eyes softened while he spoke, the way her posture eased and her body shifted ever so slightly, inclining toward him – and every instinct had urged him to take advantage. He would have fallen to his knees and begged, conscienceless beast that he was. Because he hadn’t lied. He didn’t know how to stop wanting her. And so nothing – honor, wisdom, caution, even pride – could keep him from trying.

    Reply
  69. Love Mr. Impossible! This contest was a wonderful excuse to reread yet again. The whole book is so wonderfully quotable. I tried to restrain myself to things not too revealing.
    ===
    “Garnet,” Rupert said as she picked up her hat and veil.
    She turned and looked at him, her expression wary. “I beg your pardon?”
    “Garnet. If someone asked me what color your hair was, I’d say, ‘Garnet.'”
    She clamped the hat onto her head. “Did you hear a single word I said?”
    My mind wandered,” he said. “You’re on the tallish side for a woman, I think?” Something over five and a half feet, he estimated.
    “I do not see the relevance of my height or hair color,” she said.
    “That’s because you’re not a man,” he said.
    Very much not. The dress seemed designed to play down her assets rather than enhance them. She couldn’t disguise her walk, though. She walked like a queen or a goddess, chin high, back straight. But the arrogant sawy of her hips bespoke a Cleopatra kind of queen, an Aphrodite kind of goddess. The walk was an invitation. The attire was a Keep Off sign. The combination was fascinating.
    “To a man, you see,” he continued, “these facts are immensely important.”
    “Oh yes, of course,” she said. “A woman’s looks are all important. Her mental capabilities don’t signify in the least.”
    “That would depend,” he said, “on what she was thinking.”
    ***
    Daphne was thinking it was very hard to think with Mr. Carsington in the vicinity.

    Reply
  70. Love Mr. Impossible! This contest was a wonderful excuse to reread yet again. The whole book is so wonderfully quotable. I tried to restrain myself to things not too revealing.
    ===
    “Garnet,” Rupert said as she picked up her hat and veil.
    She turned and looked at him, her expression wary. “I beg your pardon?”
    “Garnet. If someone asked me what color your hair was, I’d say, ‘Garnet.'”
    She clamped the hat onto her head. “Did you hear a single word I said?”
    My mind wandered,” he said. “You’re on the tallish side for a woman, I think?” Something over five and a half feet, he estimated.
    “I do not see the relevance of my height or hair color,” she said.
    “That’s because you’re not a man,” he said.
    Very much not. The dress seemed designed to play down her assets rather than enhance them. She couldn’t disguise her walk, though. She walked like a queen or a goddess, chin high, back straight. But the arrogant sawy of her hips bespoke a Cleopatra kind of queen, an Aphrodite kind of goddess. The walk was an invitation. The attire was a Keep Off sign. The combination was fascinating.
    “To a man, you see,” he continued, “these facts are immensely important.”
    “Oh yes, of course,” she said. “A woman’s looks are all important. Her mental capabilities don’t signify in the least.”
    “That would depend,” he said, “on what she was thinking.”
    ***
    Daphne was thinking it was very hard to think with Mr. Carsington in the vicinity.

    Reply
  71. Love Mr. Impossible! This contest was a wonderful excuse to reread yet again. The whole book is so wonderfully quotable. I tried to restrain myself to things not too revealing.
    ===
    “Garnet,” Rupert said as she picked up her hat and veil.
    She turned and looked at him, her expression wary. “I beg your pardon?”
    “Garnet. If someone asked me what color your hair was, I’d say, ‘Garnet.'”
    She clamped the hat onto her head. “Did you hear a single word I said?”
    My mind wandered,” he said. “You’re on the tallish side for a woman, I think?” Something over five and a half feet, he estimated.
    “I do not see the relevance of my height or hair color,” she said.
    “That’s because you’re not a man,” he said.
    Very much not. The dress seemed designed to play down her assets rather than enhance them. She couldn’t disguise her walk, though. She walked like a queen or a goddess, chin high, back straight. But the arrogant sawy of her hips bespoke a Cleopatra kind of queen, an Aphrodite kind of goddess. The walk was an invitation. The attire was a Keep Off sign. The combination was fascinating.
    “To a man, you see,” he continued, “these facts are immensely important.”
    “Oh yes, of course,” she said. “A woman’s looks are all important. Her mental capabilities don’t signify in the least.”
    “That would depend,” he said, “on what she was thinking.”
    ***
    Daphne was thinking it was very hard to think with Mr. Carsington in the vicinity.

    Reply
  72. Love Mr. Impossible! This contest was a wonderful excuse to reread yet again. The whole book is so wonderfully quotable. I tried to restrain myself to things not too revealing.
    ===
    “Garnet,” Rupert said as she picked up her hat and veil.
    She turned and looked at him, her expression wary. “I beg your pardon?”
    “Garnet. If someone asked me what color your hair was, I’d say, ‘Garnet.'”
    She clamped the hat onto her head. “Did you hear a single word I said?”
    My mind wandered,” he said. “You’re on the tallish side for a woman, I think?” Something over five and a half feet, he estimated.
    “I do not see the relevance of my height or hair color,” she said.
    “That’s because you’re not a man,” he said.
    Very much not. The dress seemed designed to play down her assets rather than enhance them. She couldn’t disguise her walk, though. She walked like a queen or a goddess, chin high, back straight. But the arrogant sawy of her hips bespoke a Cleopatra kind of queen, an Aphrodite kind of goddess. The walk was an invitation. The attire was a Keep Off sign. The combination was fascinating.
    “To a man, you see,” he continued, “these facts are immensely important.”
    “Oh yes, of course,” she said. “A woman’s looks are all important. Her mental capabilities don’t signify in the least.”
    “That would depend,” he said, “on what she was thinking.”
    ***
    Daphne was thinking it was very hard to think with Mr. Carsington in the vicinity.

    Reply
  73. More Mr. Impossible:
    ===
    (F)ists on his hips, the long, muscled legs straddling a gap between masses of broken stone blocks, the man who’d brought Daphne to Giza without a murmur of objection stood looking up at Chephren’s pyramid.
    By swift degrees, Mr. Carsington had discarded his gloves, hat, neckcloth, and coat. Now barely dressed and glowing in the sun’s glare, he seemed a bronze colossus.
    Daphne was only dimly aware of the pyramid, one of the world’s wonders. All she could see was the man, and far too much of him: the shirt taut across the broad shoulders, the thin fabric almost transparent in the harsh light, revealing the contours of muscular arms and back.
    It was some comfort to know she wasn’t the only one whose gaze he drew. Her servants cast him frequent, wary glances. The men who loitered about the pyramids to help visitors ascend to the top or penetrate its interior also watched him from a respectful distance.
    And she might as well have been his shadow. The guides hardly noticed her or seemed to care who or what she was.
    They all felt it: the magnetism of that tall figure, the danger crackling in the air about him. All understood that an unpredictable, uncontrollable force had come among them.
    Daphne had felt it even before she could see him, when he’d been only a shadowy figure in the dungeon’s gloom.

    Reply
  74. More Mr. Impossible:
    ===
    (F)ists on his hips, the long, muscled legs straddling a gap between masses of broken stone blocks, the man who’d brought Daphne to Giza without a murmur of objection stood looking up at Chephren’s pyramid.
    By swift degrees, Mr. Carsington had discarded his gloves, hat, neckcloth, and coat. Now barely dressed and glowing in the sun’s glare, he seemed a bronze colossus.
    Daphne was only dimly aware of the pyramid, one of the world’s wonders. All she could see was the man, and far too much of him: the shirt taut across the broad shoulders, the thin fabric almost transparent in the harsh light, revealing the contours of muscular arms and back.
    It was some comfort to know she wasn’t the only one whose gaze he drew. Her servants cast him frequent, wary glances. The men who loitered about the pyramids to help visitors ascend to the top or penetrate its interior also watched him from a respectful distance.
    And she might as well have been his shadow. The guides hardly noticed her or seemed to care who or what she was.
    They all felt it: the magnetism of that tall figure, the danger crackling in the air about him. All understood that an unpredictable, uncontrollable force had come among them.
    Daphne had felt it even before she could see him, when he’d been only a shadowy figure in the dungeon’s gloom.

    Reply
  75. More Mr. Impossible:
    ===
    (F)ists on his hips, the long, muscled legs straddling a gap between masses of broken stone blocks, the man who’d brought Daphne to Giza without a murmur of objection stood looking up at Chephren’s pyramid.
    By swift degrees, Mr. Carsington had discarded his gloves, hat, neckcloth, and coat. Now barely dressed and glowing in the sun’s glare, he seemed a bronze colossus.
    Daphne was only dimly aware of the pyramid, one of the world’s wonders. All she could see was the man, and far too much of him: the shirt taut across the broad shoulders, the thin fabric almost transparent in the harsh light, revealing the contours of muscular arms and back.
    It was some comfort to know she wasn’t the only one whose gaze he drew. Her servants cast him frequent, wary glances. The men who loitered about the pyramids to help visitors ascend to the top or penetrate its interior also watched him from a respectful distance.
    And she might as well have been his shadow. The guides hardly noticed her or seemed to care who or what she was.
    They all felt it: the magnetism of that tall figure, the danger crackling in the air about him. All understood that an unpredictable, uncontrollable force had come among them.
    Daphne had felt it even before she could see him, when he’d been only a shadowy figure in the dungeon’s gloom.

    Reply
  76. More Mr. Impossible:
    ===
    (F)ists on his hips, the long, muscled legs straddling a gap between masses of broken stone blocks, the man who’d brought Daphne to Giza without a murmur of objection stood looking up at Chephren’s pyramid.
    By swift degrees, Mr. Carsington had discarded his gloves, hat, neckcloth, and coat. Now barely dressed and glowing in the sun’s glare, he seemed a bronze colossus.
    Daphne was only dimly aware of the pyramid, one of the world’s wonders. All she could see was the man, and far too much of him: the shirt taut across the broad shoulders, the thin fabric almost transparent in the harsh light, revealing the contours of muscular arms and back.
    It was some comfort to know she wasn’t the only one whose gaze he drew. Her servants cast him frequent, wary glances. The men who loitered about the pyramids to help visitors ascend to the top or penetrate its interior also watched him from a respectful distance.
    And she might as well have been his shadow. The guides hardly noticed her or seemed to care who or what she was.
    They all felt it: the magnetism of that tall figure, the danger crackling in the air about him. All understood that an unpredictable, uncontrollable force had come among them.
    Daphne had felt it even before she could see him, when he’d been only a shadowy figure in the dungeon’s gloom.

    Reply
  77. Mr. Impossible gets his name:
    ===
    She bowed her head and leaned toward the man who wasn’t her brother or even her brother’s trusted friend, until her turban touched his chest.
    He grasped her shoulders. “No fainting,” he said. “No weeping, either.”
    Her head shot up. “I was not weeping,” she said.
    “Oh,” he said. “Were you finding me irresistible? Sorry.” He tried to draw her back.
    Daphne pulled his hands from her soulders and retreated as far as she could in the small space. “You are impossible,” she said.
    “If you were not fainting or weeping or making an advance, what were you doing, then?” he said.
    “Succumbing to despair,” she said. It was true enough, if not the whole truth. “But it was momentary. I am fully recovered. Shall we proceed, and ought I do so with my knife drawn?”
    “You’d better keep it where it is for the moment, ” he said. “Otherwise you might stab me to death accidentally.”
    “If I stab you to death,” she said, “it will not be accidental.”

    Reply
  78. Mr. Impossible gets his name:
    ===
    She bowed her head and leaned toward the man who wasn’t her brother or even her brother’s trusted friend, until her turban touched his chest.
    He grasped her shoulders. “No fainting,” he said. “No weeping, either.”
    Her head shot up. “I was not weeping,” she said.
    “Oh,” he said. “Were you finding me irresistible? Sorry.” He tried to draw her back.
    Daphne pulled his hands from her soulders and retreated as far as she could in the small space. “You are impossible,” she said.
    “If you were not fainting or weeping or making an advance, what were you doing, then?” he said.
    “Succumbing to despair,” she said. It was true enough, if not the whole truth. “But it was momentary. I am fully recovered. Shall we proceed, and ought I do so with my knife drawn?”
    “You’d better keep it where it is for the moment, ” he said. “Otherwise you might stab me to death accidentally.”
    “If I stab you to death,” she said, “it will not be accidental.”

    Reply
  79. Mr. Impossible gets his name:
    ===
    She bowed her head and leaned toward the man who wasn’t her brother or even her brother’s trusted friend, until her turban touched his chest.
    He grasped her shoulders. “No fainting,” he said. “No weeping, either.”
    Her head shot up. “I was not weeping,” she said.
    “Oh,” he said. “Were you finding me irresistible? Sorry.” He tried to draw her back.
    Daphne pulled his hands from her soulders and retreated as far as she could in the small space. “You are impossible,” she said.
    “If you were not fainting or weeping or making an advance, what were you doing, then?” he said.
    “Succumbing to despair,” she said. It was true enough, if not the whole truth. “But it was momentary. I am fully recovered. Shall we proceed, and ought I do so with my knife drawn?”
    “You’d better keep it where it is for the moment, ” he said. “Otherwise you might stab me to death accidentally.”
    “If I stab you to death,” she said, “it will not be accidental.”

    Reply
  80. Mr. Impossible gets his name:
    ===
    She bowed her head and leaned toward the man who wasn’t her brother or even her brother’s trusted friend, until her turban touched his chest.
    He grasped her shoulders. “No fainting,” he said. “No weeping, either.”
    Her head shot up. “I was not weeping,” she said.
    “Oh,” he said. “Were you finding me irresistible? Sorry.” He tried to draw her back.
    Daphne pulled his hands from her soulders and retreated as far as she could in the small space. “You are impossible,” she said.
    “If you were not fainting or weeping or making an advance, what were you doing, then?” he said.
    “Succumbing to despair,” she said. It was true enough, if not the whole truth. “But it was momentary. I am fully recovered. Shall we proceed, and ought I do so with my knife drawn?”
    “You’d better keep it where it is for the moment, ” he said. “Otherwise you might stab me to death accidentally.”
    “If I stab you to death,” she said, “it will not be accidental.”

    Reply
  81. This is driving me insane! I want to go out and buy every one of the above books, but my budget has taken a hike for parts unknown, so I’ll have to wait until payday. Oh, wait, I’m my own boss! I’d better give myself a raise. *g*
    I hope people post more excerpts. I’m enjoying them immensely, and have laughed out loud at several of them.

    Reply
  82. This is driving me insane! I want to go out and buy every one of the above books, but my budget has taken a hike for parts unknown, so I’ll have to wait until payday. Oh, wait, I’m my own boss! I’d better give myself a raise. *g*
    I hope people post more excerpts. I’m enjoying them immensely, and have laughed out loud at several of them.

    Reply
  83. This is driving me insane! I want to go out and buy every one of the above books, but my budget has taken a hike for parts unknown, so I’ll have to wait until payday. Oh, wait, I’m my own boss! I’d better give myself a raise. *g*
    I hope people post more excerpts. I’m enjoying them immensely, and have laughed out loud at several of them.

    Reply
  84. This is driving me insane! I want to go out and buy every one of the above books, but my budget has taken a hike for parts unknown, so I’ll have to wait until payday. Oh, wait, I’m my own boss! I’d better give myself a raise. *g*
    I hope people post more excerpts. I’m enjoying them immensely, and have laughed out loud at several of them.

    Reply
  85. Excerpts are great and NEVER long enough. I have NQAL fresh from the bookstore this afternoon and it is all I can do to continue typing and not change into my PJs and read it immediately. I’m in the middle of two other books but I’m going to ditch them.

    Reply
  86. Excerpts are great and NEVER long enough. I have NQAL fresh from the bookstore this afternoon and it is all I can do to continue typing and not change into my PJs and read it immediately. I’m in the middle of two other books but I’m going to ditch them.

    Reply
  87. Excerpts are great and NEVER long enough. I have NQAL fresh from the bookstore this afternoon and it is all I can do to continue typing and not change into my PJs and read it immediately. I’m in the middle of two other books but I’m going to ditch them.

    Reply
  88. Excerpts are great and NEVER long enough. I have NQAL fresh from the bookstore this afternoon and it is all I can do to continue typing and not change into my PJs and read it immediately. I’m in the middle of two other books but I’m going to ditch them.

    Reply
  89. Thank you for the excerpt from The Last Hellion. I was inspired to stop waiting for it to turn up at my usual sources and track it down on abebooks.com. It’s on the way to me now.
    Excerpts rule! More excerpts!!

    Reply
  90. Thank you for the excerpt from The Last Hellion. I was inspired to stop waiting for it to turn up at my usual sources and track it down on abebooks.com. It’s on the way to me now.
    Excerpts rule! More excerpts!!

    Reply
  91. Thank you for the excerpt from The Last Hellion. I was inspired to stop waiting for it to turn up at my usual sources and track it down on abebooks.com. It’s on the way to me now.
    Excerpts rule! More excerpts!!

    Reply
  92. Thank you for the excerpt from The Last Hellion. I was inspired to stop waiting for it to turn up at my usual sources and track it down on abebooks.com. It’s on the way to me now.
    Excerpts rule! More excerpts!!

    Reply
  93. Oh Nancy, The Last Hellion is one of my favourites! It is superb all the way through. Well worth waiting for.
    After checking the blurb quickly, I like to read excerpts, but I don’t usually trust the ones given out by publishers (because of course they have a book to sell) and go for the middle-of-the-book-at-random technique to see if I can stand the writing style. It’s amazing how style can get in the way of what would have been a great story. Sometimes I wish someone else would come along and just write the whole thing again, better!

    Reply
  94. Oh Nancy, The Last Hellion is one of my favourites! It is superb all the way through. Well worth waiting for.
    After checking the blurb quickly, I like to read excerpts, but I don’t usually trust the ones given out by publishers (because of course they have a book to sell) and go for the middle-of-the-book-at-random technique to see if I can stand the writing style. It’s amazing how style can get in the way of what would have been a great story. Sometimes I wish someone else would come along and just write the whole thing again, better!

    Reply
  95. Oh Nancy, The Last Hellion is one of my favourites! It is superb all the way through. Well worth waiting for.
    After checking the blurb quickly, I like to read excerpts, but I don’t usually trust the ones given out by publishers (because of course they have a book to sell) and go for the middle-of-the-book-at-random technique to see if I can stand the writing style. It’s amazing how style can get in the way of what would have been a great story. Sometimes I wish someone else would come along and just write the whole thing again, better!

    Reply
  96. Oh Nancy, The Last Hellion is one of my favourites! It is superb all the way through. Well worth waiting for.
    After checking the blurb quickly, I like to read excerpts, but I don’t usually trust the ones given out by publishers (because of course they have a book to sell) and go for the middle-of-the-book-at-random technique to see if I can stand the writing style. It’s amazing how style can get in the way of what would have been a great story. Sometimes I wish someone else would come along and just write the whole thing again, better!

    Reply
  97. From The Lion’s Daughter starting on page 128:
    His entire body pounded with outrage. His chest was tight with it, and it beat in his ears, making the tranquil landscape about him throb as well, like a great, hammering sea. He looked at her.
    In the sullen afternoon light, her hair glinted deep copper sparks. Yet it was a rat’s nest of tangles and bits of straw and several knotty tendrils stuck damply to her face. She’d dug out her worst, oldest garments, or, more likely, traded some beggar for these.
    It finishes on page 129 with:
    He was afraid to touch her. His rage would weaken and he didin’t want to feel what lay within it. He turned away and stared blindly into the distance.

    Reply
  98. From The Lion’s Daughter starting on page 128:
    His entire body pounded with outrage. His chest was tight with it, and it beat in his ears, making the tranquil landscape about him throb as well, like a great, hammering sea. He looked at her.
    In the sullen afternoon light, her hair glinted deep copper sparks. Yet it was a rat’s nest of tangles and bits of straw and several knotty tendrils stuck damply to her face. She’d dug out her worst, oldest garments, or, more likely, traded some beggar for these.
    It finishes on page 129 with:
    He was afraid to touch her. His rage would weaken and he didin’t want to feel what lay within it. He turned away and stared blindly into the distance.

    Reply
  99. From The Lion’s Daughter starting on page 128:
    His entire body pounded with outrage. His chest was tight with it, and it beat in his ears, making the tranquil landscape about him throb as well, like a great, hammering sea. He looked at her.
    In the sullen afternoon light, her hair glinted deep copper sparks. Yet it was a rat’s nest of tangles and bits of straw and several knotty tendrils stuck damply to her face. She’d dug out her worst, oldest garments, or, more likely, traded some beggar for these.
    It finishes on page 129 with:
    He was afraid to touch her. His rage would weaken and he didin’t want to feel what lay within it. He turned away and stared blindly into the distance.

    Reply
  100. From The Lion’s Daughter starting on page 128:
    His entire body pounded with outrage. His chest was tight with it, and it beat in his ears, making the tranquil landscape about him throb as well, like a great, hammering sea. He looked at her.
    In the sullen afternoon light, her hair glinted deep copper sparks. Yet it was a rat’s nest of tangles and bits of straw and several knotty tendrils stuck damply to her face. She’d dug out her worst, oldest garments, or, more likely, traded some beggar for these.
    It finishes on page 129 with:
    He was afraid to touch her. His rage would weaken and he didin’t want to feel what lay within it. He turned away and stared blindly into the distance.

    Reply
  101. Awesome excerpt RevMelinda; Captives of the Night is my favorite Chase novel. I can’t wait to get home and hunt for excerpts. Doesn’t look like I’ll get much studying done tonight!

    Reply
  102. Awesome excerpt RevMelinda; Captives of the Night is my favorite Chase novel. I can’t wait to get home and hunt for excerpts. Doesn’t look like I’ll get much studying done tonight!

    Reply
  103. Awesome excerpt RevMelinda; Captives of the Night is my favorite Chase novel. I can’t wait to get home and hunt for excerpts. Doesn’t look like I’ll get much studying done tonight!

    Reply
  104. Awesome excerpt RevMelinda; Captives of the Night is my favorite Chase novel. I can’t wait to get home and hunt for excerpts. Doesn’t look like I’ll get much studying done tonight!

    Reply
  105. I just pre-order my favourite authors’ books from Chapters (Canada) or Amazon.ca….and they send ’em right away. I do often get books a week or so prior to the official release date, so they must have a program that fulfills the pre-orders as soon as the books hit their warehouse.
    I devoured dinner and followed it with the real treat, The Book.
    (And guess what? They sent me TWO. I’ve already given the other away….)
    And it was wonderful as I’d expected. Loved the ‘eyes’ thing and how accident-prone she was (only around Darius, natch)/how dirty Charlotte seemingly continually became. I’m tired of perfect people – and steadfastly maintain that the most beautiful women remain that way despite good honest dust and ‘glow’. (I’m trying to stay away from spoilers, don’t think I’ve hurt anyone’s good read yet).
    It’s fantastic. Read it soon.
    (And now I’ll re-read all your others, pretending to look for the best excerpts, but really just because it seems a really good idea right now….)
    (-;

    Reply
  106. I just pre-order my favourite authors’ books from Chapters (Canada) or Amazon.ca….and they send ’em right away. I do often get books a week or so prior to the official release date, so they must have a program that fulfills the pre-orders as soon as the books hit their warehouse.
    I devoured dinner and followed it with the real treat, The Book.
    (And guess what? They sent me TWO. I’ve already given the other away….)
    And it was wonderful as I’d expected. Loved the ‘eyes’ thing and how accident-prone she was (only around Darius, natch)/how dirty Charlotte seemingly continually became. I’m tired of perfect people – and steadfastly maintain that the most beautiful women remain that way despite good honest dust and ‘glow’. (I’m trying to stay away from spoilers, don’t think I’ve hurt anyone’s good read yet).
    It’s fantastic. Read it soon.
    (And now I’ll re-read all your others, pretending to look for the best excerpts, but really just because it seems a really good idea right now….)
    (-;

    Reply
  107. I just pre-order my favourite authors’ books from Chapters (Canada) or Amazon.ca….and they send ’em right away. I do often get books a week or so prior to the official release date, so they must have a program that fulfills the pre-orders as soon as the books hit their warehouse.
    I devoured dinner and followed it with the real treat, The Book.
    (And guess what? They sent me TWO. I’ve already given the other away….)
    And it was wonderful as I’d expected. Loved the ‘eyes’ thing and how accident-prone she was (only around Darius, natch)/how dirty Charlotte seemingly continually became. I’m tired of perfect people – and steadfastly maintain that the most beautiful women remain that way despite good honest dust and ‘glow’. (I’m trying to stay away from spoilers, don’t think I’ve hurt anyone’s good read yet).
    It’s fantastic. Read it soon.
    (And now I’ll re-read all your others, pretending to look for the best excerpts, but really just because it seems a really good idea right now….)
    (-;

    Reply
  108. I just pre-order my favourite authors’ books from Chapters (Canada) or Amazon.ca….and they send ’em right away. I do often get books a week or so prior to the official release date, so they must have a program that fulfills the pre-orders as soon as the books hit their warehouse.
    I devoured dinner and followed it with the real treat, The Book.
    (And guess what? They sent me TWO. I’ve already given the other away….)
    And it was wonderful as I’d expected. Loved the ‘eyes’ thing and how accident-prone she was (only around Darius, natch)/how dirty Charlotte seemingly continually became. I’m tired of perfect people – and steadfastly maintain that the most beautiful women remain that way despite good honest dust and ‘glow’. (I’m trying to stay away from spoilers, don’t think I’ve hurt anyone’s good read yet).
    It’s fantastic. Read it soon.
    (And now I’ll re-read all your others, pretending to look for the best excerpts, but really just because it seems a really good idea right now….)
    (-;

    Reply
  109. Oh sorry – as usual responded to one question and forgot the other (my students are used to this – I do always eventually get around to it, and I maintain that the trip can be worthwhile. (-; ).
    I enjoy excerpts even when I know I’m going to buy the book, when I’ve ordered it, or pre-ordered.
    It’s like waiting for Christmas. Way more fun when you see the odd-shaped wrapped parcels under the tree for a week or so beforehand….and you get to shake them gently before you get caught and have to stop (this is for adults, kids keep right on).
    Plus you get that lovely ‘AHA’ when you come across the excerpt you liked (particularly if it was quite funny or dramatic) when you finally get to enjoy the entire story….and see how that wee peek fits into the whole picture…
    So YES. Bring on the excerpts. They just heighten the suspense.

    Reply
  110. Oh sorry – as usual responded to one question and forgot the other (my students are used to this – I do always eventually get around to it, and I maintain that the trip can be worthwhile. (-; ).
    I enjoy excerpts even when I know I’m going to buy the book, when I’ve ordered it, or pre-ordered.
    It’s like waiting for Christmas. Way more fun when you see the odd-shaped wrapped parcels under the tree for a week or so beforehand….and you get to shake them gently before you get caught and have to stop (this is for adults, kids keep right on).
    Plus you get that lovely ‘AHA’ when you come across the excerpt you liked (particularly if it was quite funny or dramatic) when you finally get to enjoy the entire story….and see how that wee peek fits into the whole picture…
    So YES. Bring on the excerpts. They just heighten the suspense.

    Reply
  111. Oh sorry – as usual responded to one question and forgot the other (my students are used to this – I do always eventually get around to it, and I maintain that the trip can be worthwhile. (-; ).
    I enjoy excerpts even when I know I’m going to buy the book, when I’ve ordered it, or pre-ordered.
    It’s like waiting for Christmas. Way more fun when you see the odd-shaped wrapped parcels under the tree for a week or so beforehand….and you get to shake them gently before you get caught and have to stop (this is for adults, kids keep right on).
    Plus you get that lovely ‘AHA’ when you come across the excerpt you liked (particularly if it was quite funny or dramatic) when you finally get to enjoy the entire story….and see how that wee peek fits into the whole picture…
    So YES. Bring on the excerpts. They just heighten the suspense.

    Reply
  112. Oh sorry – as usual responded to one question and forgot the other (my students are used to this – I do always eventually get around to it, and I maintain that the trip can be worthwhile. (-; ).
    I enjoy excerpts even when I know I’m going to buy the book, when I’ve ordered it, or pre-ordered.
    It’s like waiting for Christmas. Way more fun when you see the odd-shaped wrapped parcels under the tree for a week or so beforehand….and you get to shake them gently before you get caught and have to stop (this is for adults, kids keep right on).
    Plus you get that lovely ‘AHA’ when you come across the excerpt you liked (particularly if it was quite funny or dramatic) when you finally get to enjoy the entire story….and see how that wee peek fits into the whole picture…
    So YES. Bring on the excerpts. They just heighten the suspense.

    Reply
  113. I posted this when you guest blogged with the Divas, Loretta. It is the exact moment when I fell irrevocably in love with Dain.
    With the world securely in order, Dain was able to devote the leisurely bath time to editing his mental dictionary. He removed his wife from the general category labeled “Females” and gave her a section of her own. He made a note that she didn’t find him revolting, and proposed several explanations: (a) bad eyesight and faulty hearing, (b)a defect in a portion of her otherwise sound intellect, (c) an inherited Trent eccentricity, or (d) an act of God. Since the Almighty had not done him a single act of kindness in at least twenty-five years, Dain thought it was about bloody time, but he thanked his Heavenly Father all the same, and promised to be as good as he was capable of being.
    Lord of Scoundrels

    Reply
  114. I posted this when you guest blogged with the Divas, Loretta. It is the exact moment when I fell irrevocably in love with Dain.
    With the world securely in order, Dain was able to devote the leisurely bath time to editing his mental dictionary. He removed his wife from the general category labeled “Females” and gave her a section of her own. He made a note that she didn’t find him revolting, and proposed several explanations: (a) bad eyesight and faulty hearing, (b)a defect in a portion of her otherwise sound intellect, (c) an inherited Trent eccentricity, or (d) an act of God. Since the Almighty had not done him a single act of kindness in at least twenty-five years, Dain thought it was about bloody time, but he thanked his Heavenly Father all the same, and promised to be as good as he was capable of being.
    Lord of Scoundrels

    Reply
  115. I posted this when you guest blogged with the Divas, Loretta. It is the exact moment when I fell irrevocably in love with Dain.
    With the world securely in order, Dain was able to devote the leisurely bath time to editing his mental dictionary. He removed his wife from the general category labeled “Females” and gave her a section of her own. He made a note that she didn’t find him revolting, and proposed several explanations: (a) bad eyesight and faulty hearing, (b)a defect in a portion of her otherwise sound intellect, (c) an inherited Trent eccentricity, or (d) an act of God. Since the Almighty had not done him a single act of kindness in at least twenty-five years, Dain thought it was about bloody time, but he thanked his Heavenly Father all the same, and promised to be as good as he was capable of being.
    Lord of Scoundrels

    Reply
  116. I posted this when you guest blogged with the Divas, Loretta. It is the exact moment when I fell irrevocably in love with Dain.
    With the world securely in order, Dain was able to devote the leisurely bath time to editing his mental dictionary. He removed his wife from the general category labeled “Females” and gave her a section of her own. He made a note that she didn’t find him revolting, and proposed several explanations: (a) bad eyesight and faulty hearing, (b)a defect in a portion of her otherwise sound intellect, (c) an inherited Trent eccentricity, or (d) an act of God. Since the Almighty had not done him a single act of kindness in at least twenty-five years, Dain thought it was about bloody time, but he thanked his Heavenly Father all the same, and promised to be as good as he was capable of being.
    Lord of Scoundrels

    Reply
  117. I like excerpts. I think they should be longish, at least a couple of pages, to give you a real taste of the book. The downside is that an excerpt can be very frustrating if the book won’t be published for months, or, even worse, is out of print.
    I went for Miss Wonderful, as no one has picked an excerpt from that yet. I chose Lady Tolbert’s dinner party in chapter 4, from the top of page 63 to the break in page 70. It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot, it shows you how clever Mirabel is, and I love the bits where Alistair redesigns her dress and redoes her hair.
    And I just have to chip in with my favourite part of Mr. Impossible. I think it’s my favourite of your books so far, as it seems to be for many people. I pick the start of chapter 2, up to the break on page 17. I love how insouciant Rupert is about being incarcerated. It’s a brilliant introduction which makes you want to read on.

    Reply
  118. I like excerpts. I think they should be longish, at least a couple of pages, to give you a real taste of the book. The downside is that an excerpt can be very frustrating if the book won’t be published for months, or, even worse, is out of print.
    I went for Miss Wonderful, as no one has picked an excerpt from that yet. I chose Lady Tolbert’s dinner party in chapter 4, from the top of page 63 to the break in page 70. It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot, it shows you how clever Mirabel is, and I love the bits where Alistair redesigns her dress and redoes her hair.
    And I just have to chip in with my favourite part of Mr. Impossible. I think it’s my favourite of your books so far, as it seems to be for many people. I pick the start of chapter 2, up to the break on page 17. I love how insouciant Rupert is about being incarcerated. It’s a brilliant introduction which makes you want to read on.

    Reply
  119. I like excerpts. I think they should be longish, at least a couple of pages, to give you a real taste of the book. The downside is that an excerpt can be very frustrating if the book won’t be published for months, or, even worse, is out of print.
    I went for Miss Wonderful, as no one has picked an excerpt from that yet. I chose Lady Tolbert’s dinner party in chapter 4, from the top of page 63 to the break in page 70. It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot, it shows you how clever Mirabel is, and I love the bits where Alistair redesigns her dress and redoes her hair.
    And I just have to chip in with my favourite part of Mr. Impossible. I think it’s my favourite of your books so far, as it seems to be for many people. I pick the start of chapter 2, up to the break on page 17. I love how insouciant Rupert is about being incarcerated. It’s a brilliant introduction which makes you want to read on.

    Reply
  120. I like excerpts. I think they should be longish, at least a couple of pages, to give you a real taste of the book. The downside is that an excerpt can be very frustrating if the book won’t be published for months, or, even worse, is out of print.
    I went for Miss Wonderful, as no one has picked an excerpt from that yet. I chose Lady Tolbert’s dinner party in chapter 4, from the top of page 63 to the break in page 70. It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot, it shows you how clever Mirabel is, and I love the bits where Alistair redesigns her dress and redoes her hair.
    And I just have to chip in with my favourite part of Mr. Impossible. I think it’s my favourite of your books so far, as it seems to be for many people. I pick the start of chapter 2, up to the break on page 17. I love how insouciant Rupert is about being incarcerated. It’s a brilliant introduction which makes you want to read on.

    Reply
  121. Loretta, I don’t know if you need excerpts from the out-of-prints, but here goes. From The Viscount Vagabond (double issue) page 129 – “It was only a kiss, she told herself, and only the most fleeting contact at that — but somehow the sky had changed, and that was not how it should be, not with him. Good Lord, not with him.
    In novels, heroines got kissed, but by the heroes they would marry, which made it acceptable if not technically proper. This was not the same, and not acceptable for her. And she had liked it, which made no sense.
    Had she not me him in a brothel? Hadn’t he been utterly castaway at the time? Hadn’t she heard Lord Andover’s ironic sympathy for the gentlemen at White’s with whom Lord Rand regularly gambled? Hadn’t she heard as well from several others how Lord Rand had tried to start a brawl on the very steps of that club?
    Besides, he was overbearing and hasty, just like Papa. Why, the viscount even affected the speech of common ruffians, full of oaths and bad grammar. That was hardly the stuff of which heroes were made.”

    Reply
  122. Loretta, I don’t know if you need excerpts from the out-of-prints, but here goes. From The Viscount Vagabond (double issue) page 129 – “It was only a kiss, she told herself, and only the most fleeting contact at that — but somehow the sky had changed, and that was not how it should be, not with him. Good Lord, not with him.
    In novels, heroines got kissed, but by the heroes they would marry, which made it acceptable if not technically proper. This was not the same, and not acceptable for her. And she had liked it, which made no sense.
    Had she not me him in a brothel? Hadn’t he been utterly castaway at the time? Hadn’t she heard Lord Andover’s ironic sympathy for the gentlemen at White’s with whom Lord Rand regularly gambled? Hadn’t she heard as well from several others how Lord Rand had tried to start a brawl on the very steps of that club?
    Besides, he was overbearing and hasty, just like Papa. Why, the viscount even affected the speech of common ruffians, full of oaths and bad grammar. That was hardly the stuff of which heroes were made.”

    Reply
  123. Loretta, I don’t know if you need excerpts from the out-of-prints, but here goes. From The Viscount Vagabond (double issue) page 129 – “It was only a kiss, she told herself, and only the most fleeting contact at that — but somehow the sky had changed, and that was not how it should be, not with him. Good Lord, not with him.
    In novels, heroines got kissed, but by the heroes they would marry, which made it acceptable if not technically proper. This was not the same, and not acceptable for her. And she had liked it, which made no sense.
    Had she not me him in a brothel? Hadn’t he been utterly castaway at the time? Hadn’t she heard Lord Andover’s ironic sympathy for the gentlemen at White’s with whom Lord Rand regularly gambled? Hadn’t she heard as well from several others how Lord Rand had tried to start a brawl on the very steps of that club?
    Besides, he was overbearing and hasty, just like Papa. Why, the viscount even affected the speech of common ruffians, full of oaths and bad grammar. That was hardly the stuff of which heroes were made.”

    Reply
  124. Loretta, I don’t know if you need excerpts from the out-of-prints, but here goes. From The Viscount Vagabond (double issue) page 129 – “It was only a kiss, she told herself, and only the most fleeting contact at that — but somehow the sky had changed, and that was not how it should be, not with him. Good Lord, not with him.
    In novels, heroines got kissed, but by the heroes they would marry, which made it acceptable if not technically proper. This was not the same, and not acceptable for her. And she had liked it, which made no sense.
    Had she not me him in a brothel? Hadn’t he been utterly castaway at the time? Hadn’t she heard Lord Andover’s ironic sympathy for the gentlemen at White’s with whom Lord Rand regularly gambled? Hadn’t she heard as well from several others how Lord Rand had tried to start a brawl on the very steps of that club?
    Besides, he was overbearing and hasty, just like Papa. Why, the viscount even affected the speech of common ruffians, full of oaths and bad grammar. That was hardly the stuff of which heroes were made.”

    Reply
  125. From The Devil’s Delilah (double issue) pages 128 – 129. Beginning, “As he paused to look about him and draw his breath” to “You have depths, sir, I had not imagined.”
    And from “The Mad Earl’s Bride” in Three Weddings and a Kiss, pages 193 – 194. Beginning, “He heard a faint sound, suspiciously like a giggle.” to “I am vastly interested in your corpses, Lady Rawnsley.”

    Reply
  126. From The Devil’s Delilah (double issue) pages 128 – 129. Beginning, “As he paused to look about him and draw his breath” to “You have depths, sir, I had not imagined.”
    And from “The Mad Earl’s Bride” in Three Weddings and a Kiss, pages 193 – 194. Beginning, “He heard a faint sound, suspiciously like a giggle.” to “I am vastly interested in your corpses, Lady Rawnsley.”

    Reply
  127. From The Devil’s Delilah (double issue) pages 128 – 129. Beginning, “As he paused to look about him and draw his breath” to “You have depths, sir, I had not imagined.”
    And from “The Mad Earl’s Bride” in Three Weddings and a Kiss, pages 193 – 194. Beginning, “He heard a faint sound, suspiciously like a giggle.” to “I am vastly interested in your corpses, Lady Rawnsley.”

    Reply
  128. From The Devil’s Delilah (double issue) pages 128 – 129. Beginning, “As he paused to look about him and draw his breath” to “You have depths, sir, I had not imagined.”
    And from “The Mad Earl’s Bride” in Three Weddings and a Kiss, pages 193 – 194. Beginning, “He heard a faint sound, suspiciously like a giggle.” to “I am vastly interested in your corpses, Lady Rawnsley.”

    Reply
  129. Mary K, backlist is fair game, too. That includes out of print books–because some are still available (through me) and some will be revived, sooner or later. The tricky part of this contest, I can see, is choosing among excerpts. Meanwhile, it’s so fascinating–oh, and gratifying, big time–to discover what passages resonate particularly strongly for different readers, and which books are favorites. Several hours remain for the contest, but before then I’d like to thank those who’ve joined in–whether you supplied an excerpt or your opinion of excerpts–and encourage those who are lurking to venture an opinion. This has been so helpful–and so educational. I’ll be back again–but in the meantime, thank you!

    Reply
  130. Mary K, backlist is fair game, too. That includes out of print books–because some are still available (through me) and some will be revived, sooner or later. The tricky part of this contest, I can see, is choosing among excerpts. Meanwhile, it’s so fascinating–oh, and gratifying, big time–to discover what passages resonate particularly strongly for different readers, and which books are favorites. Several hours remain for the contest, but before then I’d like to thank those who’ve joined in–whether you supplied an excerpt or your opinion of excerpts–and encourage those who are lurking to venture an opinion. This has been so helpful–and so educational. I’ll be back again–but in the meantime, thank you!

    Reply
  131. Mary K, backlist is fair game, too. That includes out of print books–because some are still available (through me) and some will be revived, sooner or later. The tricky part of this contest, I can see, is choosing among excerpts. Meanwhile, it’s so fascinating–oh, and gratifying, big time–to discover what passages resonate particularly strongly for different readers, and which books are favorites. Several hours remain for the contest, but before then I’d like to thank those who’ve joined in–whether you supplied an excerpt or your opinion of excerpts–and encourage those who are lurking to venture an opinion. This has been so helpful–and so educational. I’ll be back again–but in the meantime, thank you!

    Reply
  132. Mary K, backlist is fair game, too. That includes out of print books–because some are still available (through me) and some will be revived, sooner or later. The tricky part of this contest, I can see, is choosing among excerpts. Meanwhile, it’s so fascinating–oh, and gratifying, big time–to discover what passages resonate particularly strongly for different readers, and which books are favorites. Several hours remain for the contest, but before then I’d like to thank those who’ve joined in–whether you supplied an excerpt or your opinion of excerpts–and encourage those who are lurking to venture an opinion. This has been so helpful–and so educational. I’ll be back again–but in the meantime, thank you!

    Reply
  133. I’m in class (my students are writing), and I don’t have the book with me to quote, but I remember how captivating I found the opening description of Benedict in Lord Perfect. I am one of those people who read the ending first, but I would have bought LP on the strength of the opening alone.

    Reply
  134. I’m in class (my students are writing), and I don’t have the book with me to quote, but I remember how captivating I found the opening description of Benedict in Lord Perfect. I am one of those people who read the ending first, but I would have bought LP on the strength of the opening alone.

    Reply
  135. I’m in class (my students are writing), and I don’t have the book with me to quote, but I remember how captivating I found the opening description of Benedict in Lord Perfect. I am one of those people who read the ending first, but I would have bought LP on the strength of the opening alone.

    Reply
  136. I’m in class (my students are writing), and I don’t have the book with me to quote, but I remember how captivating I found the opening description of Benedict in Lord Perfect. I am one of those people who read the ending first, but I would have bought LP on the strength of the opening alone.

    Reply
  137. “It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot…”
    Of course I misread this as “carnal”. Miss Wonderful is one of the few books with both!

    Reply
  138. “It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot…”
    Of course I misread this as “carnal”. Miss Wonderful is one of the few books with both!

    Reply
  139. “It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot…”
    Of course I misread this as “carnal”. Miss Wonderful is one of the few books with both!

    Reply
  140. “It gives you a good idea of the canal element of the plot…”
    Of course I misread this as “carnal”. Miss Wonderful is one of the few books with both!

    Reply
  141. I never read excerpts. The blurb on the back of a book, author recognition or a recommendation from a friend who knows what I like is what I use when deciding which books I want to buy.

    Reply
  142. I never read excerpts. The blurb on the back of a book, author recognition or a recommendation from a friend who knows what I like is what I use when deciding which books I want to buy.

    Reply
  143. I never read excerpts. The blurb on the back of a book, author recognition or a recommendation from a friend who knows what I like is what I use when deciding which books I want to buy.

    Reply
  144. I never read excerpts. The blurb on the back of a book, author recognition or a recommendation from a friend who knows what I like is what I use when deciding which books I want to buy.

    Reply

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