The End

Eilean_donansues_pic_2 Susan Sarah back again….

For the last couple of weeks, I’ve been telling my husband and kids –- I may look like I’m here, but I’m not really here: I’m in Scotland. But they see a shadowy figure, muttering under her breath, walking around in socks that don’t match, in a slouchy sweater that belongs to one of several males in the household (been wearing it for days and he’s not getting it back soon)…she wanders down to the kitchen for a cup of tea and drift upstairs again, ignoring all but the most crucial domestic issues, and she’s never quite sure how many college kids are in the house (still on winter break! acckk!)…they’re up at all hours, and so is she, the wandering, mumbling author-in-residence on a deadline.

Well, it’s not that bad but getting close. I’m in the throes of finishing a manuscript. This book desperately needs to be finished so that I can once more live a normal life. The Deadline Tunnel is looking pretty long on this one before I see light again. There’s a point where it feels like the book will never end and I’ll be wandering, muttering, and wearing this same sweater into infinity. And I so very much want to type “The End”….

To be honest I’ve never actually typed “The End” on any book I’ve ever written. Yet writing the last line of a book is a wonderful feeling.

Reading3 Recently I took a break from my own book to browse through my bookshelves looking for a blog idea for today…and found myself checking out last lines of other novels. And Susan Miranda, who is a good pal (and owes me an idea for the Mondegreens anyway *g*)  suggested that I post them as a game on the blog.

So here are some ending lines of novels. See if you can guess what books they come from!

A few general hints: the quotes are the last lines of books we’ve probably all read, or can easily recognize. They’re from classics of either literature, or classics of their genre, and the authors’ voices are clear enough that even if you haven’t read it, you can probably make a good guess. Since you all are a widely read and very intelligent bunch, you’ll probably whip through these in no time.

Lordleighton_the_maid_with_golden_hair_1_1 It’s a bit like literature class: name these last lines of assigned novels for 5 points. No peeking, the clock is ticking — soon you’ll have to put those pencils down!

But YOU have all day, and no red pencils or grades to dread. Have fun!

================

1.Then shouldering their burdens, they set off, seeking a path that would bring them over the grey hills of the Emyn Muil, and down into the Land of Shadows.

2. But, in spite of these deficiencies, the wishes, the hopes, the confidence, the predictions of the small band of true friends who witnessed the ceremony, were fully answered in the perfect happiness of the union.

3. And the ashes blew toward us like the salt wind from the sea.

4. They said that among the world’s kings, he was the mildest and gentlest of men, most kind to his people, and most eager for praise.

5. As soon as they had strength they arose, joined hands again, and went on.

6. "My Master," he says, "has forewarned me. Daily he announces more distinctly,–‘Surely I come quickly!’ and hourly I more eagerly respond,–‘Amen, even so come, Lord Jesus!’"

7. It was undoubtedly better to be the seventh Duke of Sale than a sweep’s apprentice, but he was much inclined to think that to have been plain Mr. Dash, of Nowhere in Particular, would have been preferable to either of these callings.

8. "After all, tomorrow is another day."

9. Darcy, as well as Elizabeth, really loved them; and they were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the persons who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.
=======

I will post the answers in the comment section around midnight tonight, Wednesday.

Then I’ll choose a random name from among those who have posted a list of answers (you don’t have to get them all right, and try to answer each one) –- and I’ll send the winner an autographed copy of one of my own books.

This will be a novel that I’ve actually finished at some earlier date -– a reminder to myself that I’ve gotten to the last line before, and I can do it again!

This would be a fun game to play again, using themes like Historical Romance Favorites, Classic Historical Fiction, Classic Mysteries — and of course, Books by Word Wenches!

Good luck!

~Susan Sarah

112 thoughts on “The End”

  1. I don’t care if this blog was my suggestion, Susan/Sarah — all I’m going to do this morning is try to figure these out!!
    Good luck in the deadline tunnel, AND feeding all those boys underfoot. *g*

    Reply
  2. I don’t care if this blog was my suggestion, Susan/Sarah — all I’m going to do this morning is try to figure these out!!
    Good luck in the deadline tunnel, AND feeding all those boys underfoot. *g*

    Reply
  3. I don’t care if this blog was my suggestion, Susan/Sarah — all I’m going to do this morning is try to figure these out!!
    Good luck in the deadline tunnel, AND feeding all those boys underfoot. *g*

    Reply
  4. I don’t care if this blog was my suggestion, Susan/Sarah — all I’m going to do this morning is try to figure these out!!
    Good luck in the deadline tunnel, AND feeding all those boys underfoot. *g*

    Reply
  5. 1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Ubervilles – A Pure Woman
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Fortunes of Nigel ??
    8. Gone With The Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  6. 1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Ubervilles – A Pure Woman
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Fortunes of Nigel ??
    8. Gone With The Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  7. 1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Ubervilles – A Pure Woman
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Fortunes of Nigel ??
    8. Gone With The Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  8. 1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Ubervilles – A Pure Woman
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Fortunes of Nigel ??
    8. Gone With The Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  9. Hi Susan/Sarah!
    3 inches of snow and the city is completely at a standstill for the second day in a row. So I’m working from home (uh. . .wenching from home).
    1. Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
    2. Emma, Austen
    3. Rebecca, duMaurier
    4. Beowolf
    5. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy
    6. Jane Eyre, Bronte
    7. The Foundling, Heyer
    8. Gone with the Wind, Mitchell
    9. Pride and Prejudice, Austen
    I was struck by how #s 1 and #5 reminded me of this one:
    “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    I loved this, Susan/Sarah!

    Reply
  10. Hi Susan/Sarah!
    3 inches of snow and the city is completely at a standstill for the second day in a row. So I’m working from home (uh. . .wenching from home).
    1. Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
    2. Emma, Austen
    3. Rebecca, duMaurier
    4. Beowolf
    5. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy
    6. Jane Eyre, Bronte
    7. The Foundling, Heyer
    8. Gone with the Wind, Mitchell
    9. Pride and Prejudice, Austen
    I was struck by how #s 1 and #5 reminded me of this one:
    “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    I loved this, Susan/Sarah!

    Reply
  11. Hi Susan/Sarah!
    3 inches of snow and the city is completely at a standstill for the second day in a row. So I’m working from home (uh. . .wenching from home).
    1. Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
    2. Emma, Austen
    3. Rebecca, duMaurier
    4. Beowolf
    5. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy
    6. Jane Eyre, Bronte
    7. The Foundling, Heyer
    8. Gone with the Wind, Mitchell
    9. Pride and Prejudice, Austen
    I was struck by how #s 1 and #5 reminded me of this one:
    “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    I loved this, Susan/Sarah!

    Reply
  12. Hi Susan/Sarah!
    3 inches of snow and the city is completely at a standstill for the second day in a row. So I’m working from home (uh. . .wenching from home).
    1. Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
    2. Emma, Austen
    3. Rebecca, duMaurier
    4. Beowolf
    5. Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Hardy
    6. Jane Eyre, Bronte
    7. The Foundling, Heyer
    8. Gone with the Wind, Mitchell
    9. Pride and Prejudice, Austen
    I was struck by how #s 1 and #5 reminded me of this one:
    “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    I loved this, Susan/Sarah!

    Reply
  13. You guys are doing great!
    This is fun — so far not a complete 100% though! 😉
    I’m not telling the answers yet…. some are obvious… and you all can build on each other.
    Keep trying!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  14. You guys are doing great!
    This is fun — so far not a complete 100% though! 😉
    I’m not telling the answers yet…. some are obvious… and you all can build on each other.
    Keep trying!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  15. You guys are doing great!
    This is fun — so far not a complete 100% though! 😉
    I’m not telling the answers yet…. some are obvious… and you all can build on each other.
    Keep trying!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  16. You guys are doing great!
    This is fun — so far not a complete 100% though! 😉
    I’m not telling the answers yet…. some are obvious… and you all can build on each other.
    Keep trying!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  17. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    Ooooh that’s lovely. Melinda gives us another one to puzzle out!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  18. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    Ooooh that’s lovely. Melinda gives us another one to puzzle out!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  19. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    Ooooh that’s lovely. Melinda gives us another one to puzzle out!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  20. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    Ooooh that’s lovely. Melinda gives us another one to puzzle out!
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  21. 1. Fellowship of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  22. 1. Fellowship of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  23. 1. Fellowship of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  24. 1. Fellowship of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice

    Reply
  25. 1 The Fellowship of the Ring
    2 Emma
    3 Rebecca
    4 Beowulf
    5 Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6 Jane Eyre
    7 The Foundling
    8 Gone With the Wind
    9 Pride and Prejudice
    and that one up there that I don’t think has an answer to is Paradise Lost. 🙂
    And I just looked at the answers, and I really didn’t copy from anyone, promise! 🙂 I tried it before looking so I wouldn’t keep them in mind subconsciously. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  26. 1 The Fellowship of the Ring
    2 Emma
    3 Rebecca
    4 Beowulf
    5 Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6 Jane Eyre
    7 The Foundling
    8 Gone With the Wind
    9 Pride and Prejudice
    and that one up there that I don’t think has an answer to is Paradise Lost. 🙂
    And I just looked at the answers, and I really didn’t copy from anyone, promise! 🙂 I tried it before looking so I wouldn’t keep them in mind subconsciously. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  27. 1 The Fellowship of the Ring
    2 Emma
    3 Rebecca
    4 Beowulf
    5 Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6 Jane Eyre
    7 The Foundling
    8 Gone With the Wind
    9 Pride and Prejudice
    and that one up there that I don’t think has an answer to is Paradise Lost. 🙂
    And I just looked at the answers, and I really didn’t copy from anyone, promise! 🙂 I tried it before looking so I wouldn’t keep them in mind subconsciously. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  28. 1 The Fellowship of the Ring
    2 Emma
    3 Rebecca
    4 Beowulf
    5 Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6 Jane Eyre
    7 The Foundling
    8 Gone With the Wind
    9 Pride and Prejudice
    and that one up there that I don’t think has an answer to is Paradise Lost. 🙂
    And I just looked at the answers, and I really didn’t copy from anyone, promise! 🙂 I tried it before looking so I wouldn’t keep them in mind subconsciously. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  29. 1. The Fellowship of the Ring
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice
    Okay – I admit it. I cheated by copying 1-7. Sigh… but I want to win a book 🙂

    Reply
  30. 1. The Fellowship of the Ring
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice
    Okay – I admit it. I cheated by copying 1-7. Sigh… but I want to win a book 🙂

    Reply
  31. 1. The Fellowship of the Ring
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice
    Okay – I admit it. I cheated by copying 1-7. Sigh… but I want to win a book 🙂

    Reply
  32. 1. The Fellowship of the Ring
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone With the Wind
    9. Pride and Prejudice
    Okay – I admit it. I cheated by copying 1-7. Sigh… but I want to win a book 🙂

    Reply
  33. This was a fun distraction. Thanks.
    #1 Lord of the Rings – Tolkein
    # 2 Emma – Jane Austen
    #3 Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
    #4 Beowulf – by a bunch of saga guys, later translated by some chap, though not Michael Alexander who translated my dusty old Penguin copy, which has a slightly different last line in which he’s gracious, rather than kind to his people, and “the most keen for praise”, which gives a different view, doesn’t it?
    #5 Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thos Hardy
    #6 No idea
    #7 Not The Foundling — but certainly a line by the Divine Georgette, and a Mystery to me. Both my copies of the Foundling have the last line as “Adolphus, my little one, I salute you!” Spoken to Gilly, Duke of Sale by Gideon Ware.
    Do you suppose it is an English vs American edition? Most intriguing.
    #8 Gone with the Wind – Margt Mitchell
    #9 Pride & Prejudice – Jane Austen

    Reply
  34. This was a fun distraction. Thanks.
    #1 Lord of the Rings – Tolkein
    # 2 Emma – Jane Austen
    #3 Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
    #4 Beowulf – by a bunch of saga guys, later translated by some chap, though not Michael Alexander who translated my dusty old Penguin copy, which has a slightly different last line in which he’s gracious, rather than kind to his people, and “the most keen for praise”, which gives a different view, doesn’t it?
    #5 Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thos Hardy
    #6 No idea
    #7 Not The Foundling — but certainly a line by the Divine Georgette, and a Mystery to me. Both my copies of the Foundling have the last line as “Adolphus, my little one, I salute you!” Spoken to Gilly, Duke of Sale by Gideon Ware.
    Do you suppose it is an English vs American edition? Most intriguing.
    #8 Gone with the Wind – Margt Mitchell
    #9 Pride & Prejudice – Jane Austen

    Reply
  35. This was a fun distraction. Thanks.
    #1 Lord of the Rings – Tolkein
    # 2 Emma – Jane Austen
    #3 Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
    #4 Beowulf – by a bunch of saga guys, later translated by some chap, though not Michael Alexander who translated my dusty old Penguin copy, which has a slightly different last line in which he’s gracious, rather than kind to his people, and “the most keen for praise”, which gives a different view, doesn’t it?
    #5 Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thos Hardy
    #6 No idea
    #7 Not The Foundling — but certainly a line by the Divine Georgette, and a Mystery to me. Both my copies of the Foundling have the last line as “Adolphus, my little one, I salute you!” Spoken to Gilly, Duke of Sale by Gideon Ware.
    Do you suppose it is an English vs American edition? Most intriguing.
    #8 Gone with the Wind – Margt Mitchell
    #9 Pride & Prejudice – Jane Austen

    Reply
  36. This was a fun distraction. Thanks.
    #1 Lord of the Rings – Tolkein
    # 2 Emma – Jane Austen
    #3 Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier
    #4 Beowulf – by a bunch of saga guys, later translated by some chap, though not Michael Alexander who translated my dusty old Penguin copy, which has a slightly different last line in which he’s gracious, rather than kind to his people, and “the most keen for praise”, which gives a different view, doesn’t it?
    #5 Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Thos Hardy
    #6 No idea
    #7 Not The Foundling — but certainly a line by the Divine Georgette, and a Mystery to me. Both my copies of the Foundling have the last line as “Adolphus, my little one, I salute you!” Spoken to Gilly, Duke of Sale by Gideon Ware.
    Do you suppose it is an English vs American edition? Most intriguing.
    #8 Gone with the Wind – Margt Mitchell
    #9 Pride & Prejudice – Jane Austen

    Reply
  37. This was a fun exercise, and has made me think more about “the end.” When I write, I often do the last scene well before I actually am any where near it. Lots of books just sort of trickle out, without the glow of the above lines. Thanks!

    Reply
  38. This was a fun exercise, and has made me think more about “the end.” When I write, I often do the last scene well before I actually am any where near it. Lots of books just sort of trickle out, without the glow of the above lines. Thanks!

    Reply
  39. This was a fun exercise, and has made me think more about “the end.” When I write, I often do the last scene well before I actually am any where near it. Lots of books just sort of trickle out, without the glow of the above lines. Thanks!

    Reply
  40. This was a fun exercise, and has made me think more about “the end.” When I write, I often do the last scene well before I actually am any where near it. Lots of books just sort of trickle out, without the glow of the above lines. Thanks!

    Reply
  41. Oh what a fun game! Pity I come to it brain dead. (and no smart remarks from other wenches about when am I not!) I figured Tolkien and probably have the last four, although I couldn’t begin to tell you which Heyer title. I just recognize the voice. Names escape me. very strange that.

    Reply
  42. Oh what a fun game! Pity I come to it brain dead. (and no smart remarks from other wenches about when am I not!) I figured Tolkien and probably have the last four, although I couldn’t begin to tell you which Heyer title. I just recognize the voice. Names escape me. very strange that.

    Reply
  43. Oh what a fun game! Pity I come to it brain dead. (and no smart remarks from other wenches about when am I not!) I figured Tolkien and probably have the last four, although I couldn’t begin to tell you which Heyer title. I just recognize the voice. Names escape me. very strange that.

    Reply
  44. Oh what a fun game! Pity I come to it brain dead. (and no smart remarks from other wenches about when am I not!) I figured Tolkien and probably have the last four, although I couldn’t begin to tell you which Heyer title. I just recognize the voice. Names escape me. very strange that.

    Reply
  45. My brain is deader than Pat’s. Mostly I said, “Huh?” I got #1 and the last two, guessed Heyer for #7 and Austen for #2. Didn’t recognize Beowulf and when I looked it up, my translation, too, was different: “they said that of all kings on earth he was the kindest, the most gentle, the most just to his people, the most eager for fame.” Not that I would have had a clue anyway, unless you’d quoted the Old English. And even then I might have remained clueless.

    Reply
  46. My brain is deader than Pat’s. Mostly I said, “Huh?” I got #1 and the last two, guessed Heyer for #7 and Austen for #2. Didn’t recognize Beowulf and when I looked it up, my translation, too, was different: “they said that of all kings on earth he was the kindest, the most gentle, the most just to his people, the most eager for fame.” Not that I would have had a clue anyway, unless you’d quoted the Old English. And even then I might have remained clueless.

    Reply
  47. My brain is deader than Pat’s. Mostly I said, “Huh?” I got #1 and the last two, guessed Heyer for #7 and Austen for #2. Didn’t recognize Beowulf and when I looked it up, my translation, too, was different: “they said that of all kings on earth he was the kindest, the most gentle, the most just to his people, the most eager for fame.” Not that I would have had a clue anyway, unless you’d quoted the Old English. And even then I might have remained clueless.

    Reply
  48. My brain is deader than Pat’s. Mostly I said, “Huh?” I got #1 and the last two, guessed Heyer for #7 and Austen for #2. Didn’t recognize Beowulf and when I looked it up, my translation, too, was different: “they said that of all kings on earth he was the kindest, the most gentle, the most just to his people, the most eager for fame.” Not that I would have had a clue anyway, unless you’d quoted the Old English. And even then I might have remained clueless.

    Reply
  49. Alright, I feel better now. Thanks Wench Loretta. I got 1, 7 and 9. The rest… can’t say we’ve ever met.
    But this was a very fun game.

    Reply
  50. Alright, I feel better now. Thanks Wench Loretta. I got 1, 7 and 9. The rest… can’t say we’ve ever met.
    But this was a very fun game.

    Reply
  51. Alright, I feel better now. Thanks Wench Loretta. I got 1, 7 and 9. The rest… can’t say we’ve ever met.
    But this was a very fun game.

    Reply
  52. Alright, I feel better now. Thanks Wench Loretta. I got 1, 7 and 9. The rest… can’t say we’ve ever met.
    But this was a very fun game.

    Reply
  53. Hey, this was fun, although I was woeful at it. And it turns out I’ve read all the books too (well, those that have been identified). Clearly I’m getting old. Can we play it again some time?

    Reply
  54. Hey, this was fun, although I was woeful at it. And it turns out I’ve read all the books too (well, those that have been identified). Clearly I’m getting old. Can we play it again some time?

    Reply
  55. Hey, this was fun, although I was woeful at it. And it turns out I’ve read all the books too (well, those that have been identified). Clearly I’m getting old. Can we play it again some time?

    Reply
  56. Hey, this was fun, although I was woeful at it. And it turns out I’ve read all the books too (well, those that have been identified). Clearly I’m getting old. Can we play it again some time?

    Reply
  57. here are mine!!
    1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone with the Wind
    9. Pride & Prejudice
    Love this one – we should do more!

    Reply
  58. here are mine!!
    1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone with the Wind
    9. Pride & Prejudice
    Love this one – we should do more!

    Reply
  59. here are mine!!
    1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone with the Wind
    9. Pride & Prejudice
    Love this one – we should do more!

    Reply
  60. here are mine!!
    1. Lord of the Rings
    2. Emma
    3. Rebecca
    4. Beowulf
    5. Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    6. Jane Eyre
    7. The Foundling
    8. Gone with the Wind
    9. Pride & Prejudice
    Love this one – we should do more!

    Reply
  61. Here are the answers — though who needs answers, you all did a great job with this!
    1. Tolkein, The Fellowship of the Ring (a great fantasy ending with a Quest and Adventure about to begin)
    2. Austen, Emma (a very lovely Regency ending)
    3. Du Maurier, Rebecca (ends with perfect poetic simplicity)
    4. Beowulf (this ending depends on the translation version, but the phrasing is similar)
    5. Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles (another powerful poetic ending, and Miltonesque, as Melinda pointed out)
    6. Bronte, Jane Eyre (strange but true…though in my heart, this story ends with “Reader, I married him”…)
    7. Heyer, The Foundling
    (OK confession time: I sooooo screw’d up on this one! Flipping through books like mad, I copied this one down out of The Grand Sophy — but it’s not the end of The Grand Sophy — it’s the end of the teaser for The Foundling in the new reissue of TGS. acckkk!! It didn’t sound right to me, but in my deadline-crazed frenzy I just went with it. Mea culpa, my bad, falls under “this is your brain on deadline” — and you all got it anyway!)
    8. Mitchell, Gone With The Wind (who else? a giveaway!)
    9. Austen, Pride and Prejudice (another giveaway, but such a lovely Regency happily-ever-after, who could resist, even with the characters’ names and half the plot in the last sentence)
    This was great fun, thank you all for goofing around with this. We’ll definitely do this again.
    I’ll choose a winner from random (no need to get the answers right, just commenting gets you an entry) and announce that soon….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  62. Here are the answers — though who needs answers, you all did a great job with this!
    1. Tolkein, The Fellowship of the Ring (a great fantasy ending with a Quest and Adventure about to begin)
    2. Austen, Emma (a very lovely Regency ending)
    3. Du Maurier, Rebecca (ends with perfect poetic simplicity)
    4. Beowulf (this ending depends on the translation version, but the phrasing is similar)
    5. Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles (another powerful poetic ending, and Miltonesque, as Melinda pointed out)
    6. Bronte, Jane Eyre (strange but true…though in my heart, this story ends with “Reader, I married him”…)
    7. Heyer, The Foundling
    (OK confession time: I sooooo screw’d up on this one! Flipping through books like mad, I copied this one down out of The Grand Sophy — but it’s not the end of The Grand Sophy — it’s the end of the teaser for The Foundling in the new reissue of TGS. acckkk!! It didn’t sound right to me, but in my deadline-crazed frenzy I just went with it. Mea culpa, my bad, falls under “this is your brain on deadline” — and you all got it anyway!)
    8. Mitchell, Gone With The Wind (who else? a giveaway!)
    9. Austen, Pride and Prejudice (another giveaway, but such a lovely Regency happily-ever-after, who could resist, even with the characters’ names and half the plot in the last sentence)
    This was great fun, thank you all for goofing around with this. We’ll definitely do this again.
    I’ll choose a winner from random (no need to get the answers right, just commenting gets you an entry) and announce that soon….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  63. Here are the answers — though who needs answers, you all did a great job with this!
    1. Tolkein, The Fellowship of the Ring (a great fantasy ending with a Quest and Adventure about to begin)
    2. Austen, Emma (a very lovely Regency ending)
    3. Du Maurier, Rebecca (ends with perfect poetic simplicity)
    4. Beowulf (this ending depends on the translation version, but the phrasing is similar)
    5. Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles (another powerful poetic ending, and Miltonesque, as Melinda pointed out)
    6. Bronte, Jane Eyre (strange but true…though in my heart, this story ends with “Reader, I married him”…)
    7. Heyer, The Foundling
    (OK confession time: I sooooo screw’d up on this one! Flipping through books like mad, I copied this one down out of The Grand Sophy — but it’s not the end of The Grand Sophy — it’s the end of the teaser for The Foundling in the new reissue of TGS. acckkk!! It didn’t sound right to me, but in my deadline-crazed frenzy I just went with it. Mea culpa, my bad, falls under “this is your brain on deadline” — and you all got it anyway!)
    8. Mitchell, Gone With The Wind (who else? a giveaway!)
    9. Austen, Pride and Prejudice (another giveaway, but such a lovely Regency happily-ever-after, who could resist, even with the characters’ names and half the plot in the last sentence)
    This was great fun, thank you all for goofing around with this. We’ll definitely do this again.
    I’ll choose a winner from random (no need to get the answers right, just commenting gets you an entry) and announce that soon….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  64. Here are the answers — though who needs answers, you all did a great job with this!
    1. Tolkein, The Fellowship of the Ring (a great fantasy ending with a Quest and Adventure about to begin)
    2. Austen, Emma (a very lovely Regency ending)
    3. Du Maurier, Rebecca (ends with perfect poetic simplicity)
    4. Beowulf (this ending depends on the translation version, but the phrasing is similar)
    5. Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles (another powerful poetic ending, and Miltonesque, as Melinda pointed out)
    6. Bronte, Jane Eyre (strange but true…though in my heart, this story ends with “Reader, I married him”…)
    7. Heyer, The Foundling
    (OK confession time: I sooooo screw’d up on this one! Flipping through books like mad, I copied this one down out of The Grand Sophy — but it’s not the end of The Grand Sophy — it’s the end of the teaser for The Foundling in the new reissue of TGS. acckkk!! It didn’t sound right to me, but in my deadline-crazed frenzy I just went with it. Mea culpa, my bad, falls under “this is your brain on deadline” — and you all got it anyway!)
    8. Mitchell, Gone With The Wind (who else? a giveaway!)
    9. Austen, Pride and Prejudice (another giveaway, but such a lovely Regency happily-ever-after, who could resist, even with the characters’ names and half the plot in the last sentence)
    This was great fun, thank you all for goofing around with this. We’ll definitely do this again.
    I’ll choose a winner from random (no need to get the answers right, just commenting gets you an entry) and announce that soon….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  65. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    This is Milton, btw — thanks, Melinda!
    Nina, the painting of the woman in gold reading a book is by Frederic, Lord Leighton — let your cursor hover on the image and the attribution should show up.

    Reply
  66. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    This is Milton, btw — thanks, Melinda!
    Nina, the painting of the woman in gold reading a book is by Frederic, Lord Leighton — let your cursor hover on the image and the attribution should show up.

    Reply
  67. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    This is Milton, btw — thanks, Melinda!
    Nina, the painting of the woman in gold reading a book is by Frederic, Lord Leighton — let your cursor hover on the image and the attribution should show up.

    Reply
  68. “The World was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide: They hand in hand with wand’ring steps and slow, Through Eden took their solitary way.”
    This is Milton, btw — thanks, Melinda!
    Nina, the painting of the woman in gold reading a book is by Frederic, Lord Leighton — let your cursor hover on the image and the attribution should show up.

    Reply
  69. My youngest daughter did an internship at the Leighton House Museum in London three summers ago. She’d never heard of him until she worked there, but found herself falling in love with the place as she hauled huge paintings around and perspired through one of London’s hottest summers. I’ll have to tell her he’s not as obscure as she thought!

    Reply
  70. My youngest daughter did an internship at the Leighton House Museum in London three summers ago. She’d never heard of him until she worked there, but found herself falling in love with the place as she hauled huge paintings around and perspired through one of London’s hottest summers. I’ll have to tell her he’s not as obscure as she thought!

    Reply
  71. My youngest daughter did an internship at the Leighton House Museum in London three summers ago. She’d never heard of him until she worked there, but found herself falling in love with the place as she hauled huge paintings around and perspired through one of London’s hottest summers. I’ll have to tell her he’s not as obscure as she thought!

    Reply
  72. My youngest daughter did an internship at the Leighton House Museum in London three summers ago. She’d never heard of him until she worked there, but found herself falling in love with the place as she hauled huge paintings around and perspired through one of London’s hottest summers. I’ll have to tell her he’s not as obscure as she thought!

    Reply
  73. Actually, Maggie, out in Australia Leighton isn’t obscure at all. Our art galleries are full of British Victorian art bought by homesick colonials who had made good out in the sticks. I’ve always really liked Leighton – he does sensual details beautifully like fabrics and skin and hair and room decorations. We had an exhibition in Sydney a few years ago on European painters’ fascination with the Middle East and his paintings of harem and street life for me were the highlights. You could almost step into the scenes, they were so real. I’m hoping to visit his house next time I’m in London.

    Reply
  74. Actually, Maggie, out in Australia Leighton isn’t obscure at all. Our art galleries are full of British Victorian art bought by homesick colonials who had made good out in the sticks. I’ve always really liked Leighton – he does sensual details beautifully like fabrics and skin and hair and room decorations. We had an exhibition in Sydney a few years ago on European painters’ fascination with the Middle East and his paintings of harem and street life for me were the highlights. You could almost step into the scenes, they were so real. I’m hoping to visit his house next time I’m in London.

    Reply
  75. Actually, Maggie, out in Australia Leighton isn’t obscure at all. Our art galleries are full of British Victorian art bought by homesick colonials who had made good out in the sticks. I’ve always really liked Leighton – he does sensual details beautifully like fabrics and skin and hair and room decorations. We had an exhibition in Sydney a few years ago on European painters’ fascination with the Middle East and his paintings of harem and street life for me were the highlights. You could almost step into the scenes, they were so real. I’m hoping to visit his house next time I’m in London.

    Reply
  76. Actually, Maggie, out in Australia Leighton isn’t obscure at all. Our art galleries are full of British Victorian art bought by homesick colonials who had made good out in the sticks. I’ve always really liked Leighton – he does sensual details beautifully like fabrics and skin and hair and room decorations. We had an exhibition in Sydney a few years ago on European painters’ fascination with the Middle East and his paintings of harem and street life for me were the highlights. You could almost step into the scenes, they were so real. I’m hoping to visit his house next time I’m in London.

    Reply
  77. Leighton doesn’t seem obscure to me, but in my art history grad days, I studied 19th c. art under a professor who wrote a monograph on Alma-Tadema, so Lord Leighton’s work seems very familiar, and so does his son’s work.
    For some eye-popping gorgeous images, check out Leightons and Alma-Tadema (and lots of others!) at http://www.artrenewal.org/
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  78. Leighton doesn’t seem obscure to me, but in my art history grad days, I studied 19th c. art under a professor who wrote a monograph on Alma-Tadema, so Lord Leighton’s work seems very familiar, and so does his son’s work.
    For some eye-popping gorgeous images, check out Leightons and Alma-Tadema (and lots of others!) at http://www.artrenewal.org/
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  79. Leighton doesn’t seem obscure to me, but in my art history grad days, I studied 19th c. art under a professor who wrote a monograph on Alma-Tadema, so Lord Leighton’s work seems very familiar, and so does his son’s work.
    For some eye-popping gorgeous images, check out Leightons and Alma-Tadema (and lots of others!) at http://www.artrenewal.org/
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  80. Leighton doesn’t seem obscure to me, but in my art history grad days, I studied 19th c. art under a professor who wrote a monograph on Alma-Tadema, so Lord Leighton’s work seems very familiar, and so does his son’s work.
    For some eye-popping gorgeous images, check out Leightons and Alma-Tadema (and lots of others!) at http://www.artrenewal.org/
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  81. Even though Abby had some art history classes (she was an anthropology major with a concentration in museum education), Leighton had never come up. But she became a convert! Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  82. Even though Abby had some art history classes (she was an anthropology major with a concentration in museum education), Leighton had never come up. But she became a convert! Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  83. Even though Abby had some art history classes (she was an anthropology major with a concentration in museum education), Leighton had never come up. But she became a convert! Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  84. Even though Abby had some art history classes (she was an anthropology major with a concentration in museum education), Leighton had never come up. But she became a convert! Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  85. Susan Sarah, thank you so much for that wonderful art link! I have 3 Bouguereau reproductions hanging on my walls. I love him! It was cool seeing so many of his other works. You look at his paintings and the people are so realistic you expect them to walk right off the canvas. You can almost hear them breathe and see them blink their eyes. Wonderful site! (and he’s one of my favorite artists)

    Reply
  86. Susan Sarah, thank you so much for that wonderful art link! I have 3 Bouguereau reproductions hanging on my walls. I love him! It was cool seeing so many of his other works. You look at his paintings and the people are so realistic you expect them to walk right off the canvas. You can almost hear them breathe and see them blink their eyes. Wonderful site! (and he’s one of my favorite artists)

    Reply
  87. Susan Sarah, thank you so much for that wonderful art link! I have 3 Bouguereau reproductions hanging on my walls. I love him! It was cool seeing so many of his other works. You look at his paintings and the people are so realistic you expect them to walk right off the canvas. You can almost hear them breathe and see them blink their eyes. Wonderful site! (and he’s one of my favorite artists)

    Reply
  88. Susan Sarah, thank you so much for that wonderful art link! I have 3 Bouguereau reproductions hanging on my walls. I love him! It was cool seeing so many of his other works. You look at his paintings and the people are so realistic you expect them to walk right off the canvas. You can almost hear them breathe and see them blink their eyes. Wonderful site! (and he’s one of my favorite artists)

    Reply

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