The year

Hi, Jo Bev here with a quick blog as I'm traveling.

My next book The Viscount Needs a Wife, and the one I'm working on, are both triggered by the death of Princess Charlotte in November 1817. That leads them straight into winter. I blogged back in December about winter cold, and here we are now on the edge of spring, in England at least. (We won't mention Australia and other southern hemisphere places, which are heading for colder times.)

In most of my books my characters are fond of their country residences. In some books, claiming, holding onto, or restoring the country seat is a main part of the blog. In A Scandalous Countess, for example, the hero is willing to marry Georgia in order to get the money to restore his ruined family estate. It's not an uncommon plot line.

In TVNAW I knew the hero didn't like the country and didn't want a country seat, but I was surprised to find that Kitty felt the same. As a result, I was exposed to the charms of London in the winter and the horrors of the frigid, bleak countryside.

Yes, indeed. Most of the nobility fled to London or possibly some other cosy town once Christmas was done with. In Town, they lived in a small, easily-heated house (and most Mayfair homes were small) and they only needed to travel short distances to visit friends, the theatre, shops, and various other places of business. 

The men could also attend Parliament, which was the original reason for the "Winter Season" but by the Georgian and especially the Regency period, there was so much more to it. All the same, most of the nobility spent most of the year on their country estates. London was noisy, crowded, and very polluted by coal fires. It was also a breeding ground for disease, and not considered a healthy place in which to rear children.

This pattern of living had much to do with Britain avoiding revolution, for despite the Winter Season and the later Spring one, the British nobility were country based. London in the summer was unpleasant, and harvest time was important, so they spent most of their year on their rural estates, taking care of them and in contact with their workers and tenants. In France, by contrast, the nobility had been encouraged to spend all their time at Versailles, so they were out of touch.

The book I'm writing now is also triggered by Charlotte's death, so it's wintery, too, but though the plot hinges on the country estate, Boxstall Priory, the characters do spend most of their time in Town.

Cheers,

Jo 

45 thoughts on “The year”

  1. Parliament quite often started up again in February. The Queen’s birthday was usually celebrated then and many were in town for it.
    In 1804, parliament was in session on January 30th and both houses of parliament went to church for the Martyrdom of King Charles. I don’t have all the days parliament resumed after Christmas but it usually wasn’t until February.
    One book said that the Whigs liked town life while the Tories had more country connections. By the regency there were some who were more politicians without the tradition of generations of landed estates. I find it hard to read the PDF’s of newspapers on my computer–wish I knew how to put them on a tablet and wish I had the tablet I could work. The newspapers report the comings and goings of the fashionable set and there were quite a few parties in February. During Lent it is mostly dinners and routs that are reported. Some people, of course, lived year round in London with brief forays into the countryside for July and August. The country men preferred the country in the autumn because of hunting and shooting. Horseracing seemed to go from April to October.

    Reply
  2. Parliament quite often started up again in February. The Queen’s birthday was usually celebrated then and many were in town for it.
    In 1804, parliament was in session on January 30th and both houses of parliament went to church for the Martyrdom of King Charles. I don’t have all the days parliament resumed after Christmas but it usually wasn’t until February.
    One book said that the Whigs liked town life while the Tories had more country connections. By the regency there were some who were more politicians without the tradition of generations of landed estates. I find it hard to read the PDF’s of newspapers on my computer–wish I knew how to put them on a tablet and wish I had the tablet I could work. The newspapers report the comings and goings of the fashionable set and there were quite a few parties in February. During Lent it is mostly dinners and routs that are reported. Some people, of course, lived year round in London with brief forays into the countryside for July and August. The country men preferred the country in the autumn because of hunting and shooting. Horseracing seemed to go from April to October.

    Reply
  3. Parliament quite often started up again in February. The Queen’s birthday was usually celebrated then and many were in town for it.
    In 1804, parliament was in session on January 30th and both houses of parliament went to church for the Martyrdom of King Charles. I don’t have all the days parliament resumed after Christmas but it usually wasn’t until February.
    One book said that the Whigs liked town life while the Tories had more country connections. By the regency there were some who were more politicians without the tradition of generations of landed estates. I find it hard to read the PDF’s of newspapers on my computer–wish I knew how to put them on a tablet and wish I had the tablet I could work. The newspapers report the comings and goings of the fashionable set and there were quite a few parties in February. During Lent it is mostly dinners and routs that are reported. Some people, of course, lived year round in London with brief forays into the countryside for July and August. The country men preferred the country in the autumn because of hunting and shooting. Horseracing seemed to go from April to October.

    Reply
  4. Parliament quite often started up again in February. The Queen’s birthday was usually celebrated then and many were in town for it.
    In 1804, parliament was in session on January 30th and both houses of parliament went to church for the Martyrdom of King Charles. I don’t have all the days parliament resumed after Christmas but it usually wasn’t until February.
    One book said that the Whigs liked town life while the Tories had more country connections. By the regency there were some who were more politicians without the tradition of generations of landed estates. I find it hard to read the PDF’s of newspapers on my computer–wish I knew how to put them on a tablet and wish I had the tablet I could work. The newspapers report the comings and goings of the fashionable set and there were quite a few parties in February. During Lent it is mostly dinners and routs that are reported. Some people, of course, lived year round in London with brief forays into the countryside for July and August. The country men preferred the country in the autumn because of hunting and shooting. Horseracing seemed to go from April to October.

    Reply
  5. Parliament quite often started up again in February. The Queen’s birthday was usually celebrated then and many were in town for it.
    In 1804, parliament was in session on January 30th and both houses of parliament went to church for the Martyrdom of King Charles. I don’t have all the days parliament resumed after Christmas but it usually wasn’t until February.
    One book said that the Whigs liked town life while the Tories had more country connections. By the regency there were some who were more politicians without the tradition of generations of landed estates. I find it hard to read the PDF’s of newspapers on my computer–wish I knew how to put them on a tablet and wish I had the tablet I could work. The newspapers report the comings and goings of the fashionable set and there were quite a few parties in February. During Lent it is mostly dinners and routs that are reported. Some people, of course, lived year round in London with brief forays into the countryside for July and August. The country men preferred the country in the autumn because of hunting and shooting. Horseracing seemed to go from April to October.

    Reply
  6. Agricultural based communities have a certain rhythm to their lives closely in sync with nature. Maybe that is why they were the more evolved civilizations. A time for work and also a time to enjoy the fruits of labor. Enjoyed your explanation of the Seasons in England and how that affected their lives as also the political evolution of the society.

    Reply
  7. Agricultural based communities have a certain rhythm to their lives closely in sync with nature. Maybe that is why they were the more evolved civilizations. A time for work and also a time to enjoy the fruits of labor. Enjoyed your explanation of the Seasons in England and how that affected their lives as also the political evolution of the society.

    Reply
  8. Agricultural based communities have a certain rhythm to their lives closely in sync with nature. Maybe that is why they were the more evolved civilizations. A time for work and also a time to enjoy the fruits of labor. Enjoyed your explanation of the Seasons in England and how that affected their lives as also the political evolution of the society.

    Reply
  9. Agricultural based communities have a certain rhythm to their lives closely in sync with nature. Maybe that is why they were the more evolved civilizations. A time for work and also a time to enjoy the fruits of labor. Enjoyed your explanation of the Seasons in England and how that affected their lives as also the political evolution of the society.

    Reply
  10. Agricultural based communities have a certain rhythm to their lives closely in sync with nature. Maybe that is why they were the more evolved civilizations. A time for work and also a time to enjoy the fruits of labor. Enjoyed your explanation of the Seasons in England and how that affected their lives as also the political evolution of the society.

    Reply
  11. My home state of Missouri (U. S.) has always been strongly divided between town (St. Louis and Kansas City areas) and the rural “rest of the state. ( I’m not sure if the next 3 largest cities — St. Joseph, Springfield, and my current home, Columbia — are considered town or country by the rest of the state.)
    All my life I have wondered why they felt so separated. In my mind each “half” of the population is strongly in need of the other half. I grew up in St. Louis — still the largest metropolitan area in the state; but I also knew something about the countryside. I still believe that we all need each other, but the state still seems to be divided.
    By the way, I’m not sure how Columbia is counted because it is somewhat unique; it’s major industries are education (University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College); medicine, and the overflow of government offices from the Capital 35 miles south of us.
    I, personally, am aware of the growing seasons, but an not sure if this is prevalent among townsfolk.

    Reply
  12. My home state of Missouri (U. S.) has always been strongly divided between town (St. Louis and Kansas City areas) and the rural “rest of the state. ( I’m not sure if the next 3 largest cities — St. Joseph, Springfield, and my current home, Columbia — are considered town or country by the rest of the state.)
    All my life I have wondered why they felt so separated. In my mind each “half” of the population is strongly in need of the other half. I grew up in St. Louis — still the largest metropolitan area in the state; but I also knew something about the countryside. I still believe that we all need each other, but the state still seems to be divided.
    By the way, I’m not sure how Columbia is counted because it is somewhat unique; it’s major industries are education (University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College); medicine, and the overflow of government offices from the Capital 35 miles south of us.
    I, personally, am aware of the growing seasons, but an not sure if this is prevalent among townsfolk.

    Reply
  13. My home state of Missouri (U. S.) has always been strongly divided between town (St. Louis and Kansas City areas) and the rural “rest of the state. ( I’m not sure if the next 3 largest cities — St. Joseph, Springfield, and my current home, Columbia — are considered town or country by the rest of the state.)
    All my life I have wondered why they felt so separated. In my mind each “half” of the population is strongly in need of the other half. I grew up in St. Louis — still the largest metropolitan area in the state; but I also knew something about the countryside. I still believe that we all need each other, but the state still seems to be divided.
    By the way, I’m not sure how Columbia is counted because it is somewhat unique; it’s major industries are education (University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College); medicine, and the overflow of government offices from the Capital 35 miles south of us.
    I, personally, am aware of the growing seasons, but an not sure if this is prevalent among townsfolk.

    Reply
  14. My home state of Missouri (U. S.) has always been strongly divided between town (St. Louis and Kansas City areas) and the rural “rest of the state. ( I’m not sure if the next 3 largest cities — St. Joseph, Springfield, and my current home, Columbia — are considered town or country by the rest of the state.)
    All my life I have wondered why they felt so separated. In my mind each “half” of the population is strongly in need of the other half. I grew up in St. Louis — still the largest metropolitan area in the state; but I also knew something about the countryside. I still believe that we all need each other, but the state still seems to be divided.
    By the way, I’m not sure how Columbia is counted because it is somewhat unique; it’s major industries are education (University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College); medicine, and the overflow of government offices from the Capital 35 miles south of us.
    I, personally, am aware of the growing seasons, but an not sure if this is prevalent among townsfolk.

    Reply
  15. My home state of Missouri (U. S.) has always been strongly divided between town (St. Louis and Kansas City areas) and the rural “rest of the state. ( I’m not sure if the next 3 largest cities — St. Joseph, Springfield, and my current home, Columbia — are considered town or country by the rest of the state.)
    All my life I have wondered why they felt so separated. In my mind each “half” of the population is strongly in need of the other half. I grew up in St. Louis — still the largest metropolitan area in the state; but I also knew something about the countryside. I still believe that we all need each other, but the state still seems to be divided.
    By the way, I’m not sure how Columbia is counted because it is somewhat unique; it’s major industries are education (University of Missouri, Stephens College, and Columbia College); medicine, and the overflow of government offices from the Capital 35 miles south of us.
    I, personally, am aware of the growing seasons, but an not sure if this is prevalent among townsfolk.

    Reply
  16. Besides the advantages of urban living, London is in the south of England, so its winter climate is milder than many parts of the countryside. Since the end of the Little Ice Age, it is milder still. I visited a year ago, and it seemed very Springlike compared to Wisconsin in February.

    Reply
  17. Besides the advantages of urban living, London is in the south of England, so its winter climate is milder than many parts of the countryside. Since the end of the Little Ice Age, it is milder still. I visited a year ago, and it seemed very Springlike compared to Wisconsin in February.

    Reply
  18. Besides the advantages of urban living, London is in the south of England, so its winter climate is milder than many parts of the countryside. Since the end of the Little Ice Age, it is milder still. I visited a year ago, and it seemed very Springlike compared to Wisconsin in February.

    Reply
  19. Besides the advantages of urban living, London is in the south of England, so its winter climate is milder than many parts of the countryside. Since the end of the Little Ice Age, it is milder still. I visited a year ago, and it seemed very Springlike compared to Wisconsin in February.

    Reply
  20. Besides the advantages of urban living, London is in the south of England, so its winter climate is milder than many parts of the countryside. Since the end of the Little Ice Age, it is milder still. I visited a year ago, and it seemed very Springlike compared to Wisconsin in February.

    Reply
  21. Nancy, you can buy pdf expert from the app store. I have an ipad and save loads of documents to that. It’s editable too, which can be handy. You can also save pdf documents in ibooks and I think also in the kindle app. Use safari as your internet and at fhe top of the page you’ll see a little square with an arrow. Press that and click the Open In tab then select the app you want to read it in. Hope that helps, and by the way it was interesting reading what you’ve written about Britain’s parliament.

    Reply
  22. Nancy, you can buy pdf expert from the app store. I have an ipad and save loads of documents to that. It’s editable too, which can be handy. You can also save pdf documents in ibooks and I think also in the kindle app. Use safari as your internet and at fhe top of the page you’ll see a little square with an arrow. Press that and click the Open In tab then select the app you want to read it in. Hope that helps, and by the way it was interesting reading what you’ve written about Britain’s parliament.

    Reply
  23. Nancy, you can buy pdf expert from the app store. I have an ipad and save loads of documents to that. It’s editable too, which can be handy. You can also save pdf documents in ibooks and I think also in the kindle app. Use safari as your internet and at fhe top of the page you’ll see a little square with an arrow. Press that and click the Open In tab then select the app you want to read it in. Hope that helps, and by the way it was interesting reading what you’ve written about Britain’s parliament.

    Reply
  24. Nancy, you can buy pdf expert from the app store. I have an ipad and save loads of documents to that. It’s editable too, which can be handy. You can also save pdf documents in ibooks and I think also in the kindle app. Use safari as your internet and at fhe top of the page you’ll see a little square with an arrow. Press that and click the Open In tab then select the app you want to read it in. Hope that helps, and by the way it was interesting reading what you’ve written about Britain’s parliament.

    Reply
  25. Nancy, you can buy pdf expert from the app store. I have an ipad and save loads of documents to that. It’s editable too, which can be handy. You can also save pdf documents in ibooks and I think also in the kindle app. Use safari as your internet and at fhe top of the page you’ll see a little square with an arrow. Press that and click the Open In tab then select the app you want to read it in. Hope that helps, and by the way it was interesting reading what you’ve written about Britain’s parliament.

    Reply

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