Ask A Wench: Most Romantic Scenes

4299108.thbSusan here! The Word Wenches love romance, history, fiction, and of course romantic moments in life and in stories — and we love Valentine’s Day! Bringing all those elements together in honor of February 14th this weekend, we asked each other: 

What’s your most favorite romantic scene in a book or movie?

And here’s what we said:

Mary Jo Putney:

Ladyhawke-ladyhawke-10706550-1024-576For me, the most romantic and memorable movie scene is the finale of Ladyhawke. If you're not familiar with the movie, it's set in a sort of medieval Spanish kingdom. Isabeau (Michelle Pfeiffer) is the incredibly beautiful ward of the Bishop of Aquila, and loves the captain of his guard, Navarre (Rutger Hauer). Wild with jealousy, the bishop curses them: by day, Isabeau is a hawk, by night Navarre is a wolf.  They can see each other only for an instant at sunrise and sunset as they change forms, but they can never touch.

The grand romantic moment is at the end when the curse is broken and the lovers can finally be human together.  Visually the scene is stunning–in a cathedral with sunshine pouring in, and Navarre sweeps Isabeau up in his arms and whirls her around.  It’s incredibly joyous, and really, really romantic!

Cara Elliott/Andrea Pickens:

Pride-and-Prejudice-2005__Pride and Prejudice was the book that first captivated me with the power of an HEA. I remember reading it and just falling utterly in love with the characters, the story 9and of course Austen’s pithy language and observations of hman nature. I know this will be heresy, but despite the taking liberties with Jane’s prose, I find the Keira Knightley -Matthew Macfayden film version has wonderful energy and emotion, as well as lovely cinematography. This scene always makes my heart go all fluttery.

Anne Gracie:

HqdefaultI have a terrible memory for particular scenes from a movie — and even forget that I’ve seen some movies, even though I enjoyed them at the time. But this scene is one I came to as a result of falling in love with a song —Katie Melua’s “When you showed me how to dance.”  I heard the song long before I saw the movie — Miss Potter — and it inspired a scene in one of my books (The Accidental Wedding) when the hero teaches the heroine’s little sister how to dance. 

The full song is here sung by Katie Melua, with images from the movie, but my favourite version is this one, sung to Miss Potter by Ewan McGregor. For me, it’s touching and beautifully romantic. And if you’re not sick of the song yet, you might also enjoy this collage of images of the Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice set to the same song. 

Nicola Cornick:

NorthsouthbbcI am a total sucker for romantic scenes in books and films and will re-read or re-watch my favourites over and over when I am in the mood for a romance fix! It’s really hard for me to narrow the field down to one particular favourite but I think it has to be the scene at the end of North and South by Winifred Holtby, which was adapted for television by the BBC and starred Richard Armitage and Daniela Denby-Ashe. There is so much restrained and simmering passion between the characters of Margaret and John throughout the whole story and it’s a beautiful example of two people who need to learn about each other and overcome their prejudices. When they are finally united on a station platform at the end it is a very tender scene. It’s even better with the dialogue (!) but here is the soundtrack to give you a flavour.

Jo Beverley:

Henry v branaghOkay, this is an odd one, perhaps, but I think it's great. It's from the Kenneth Branagh Henry V, when Henry woos the Princess Katherine. I just watched it and it still works for me, but I first saw it in our local rep cinema in Ottawa with many of the audience bilingual and getting the word play exactly without need of subtitles. I wish they'd trimmed this video clip a few seconds later.

Joanna Bourne:

I like a love scene where something else is going on. Maybe terrible obstacles still to surmount or inevitable goodbyes just around the corner. But most of all, I enjoy some humor. I like a nod to the inevitable awkwardness of the human condition. So I'm going to go for Jamie and Claire in Diana Gabaldon's OutlanderHere's just a little snippet. . . 

Susan King:

Loveactually_colin_Some of my favorites have been mentioned above, but there are so many favorite romantic moments to choose! Like the scene in Love Actually between the writer, Mark, and his Portuguese housemaid, Aurelia. When Mark (Colin Firth) goes into the restaurant to propose to Aurelia (Lucia Moniz), their encounter, with dozens of witnesses, is sweet, shy, sincere and loving–in such touching, funny circumstances—that my heart melts every time. “Beautiful Aurelia, I have come here with a view to asking you to marriage me.”  

And we Wenches also recommend — for all the doggies we love — this sweetly romantic movie moment between The Lady and the Tramp — and the plate of spaghetti.  Nicola also suggests this special Valentine’s favourite for all those lovely dogs out there!

36993181.thbYour turn! What are your favorite romantic scenes, and why?  

Happy Valentine's Day from the Wenches! 

70 thoughts on “Ask A Wench: Most Romantic Scenes”

  1. The North and South scene gets my vote! I discovered the miniseries one year near Christmas. I remember I was decorating our tree, but I kept taking breaks to go back and watch the train station scene. (Yes, I know that’s pathetic!)
    Maybe it’s the sarcastic Australian in me, but outright declarations of love make me uncomfortable. Mr Thornton’s look of love on his face – that’s all I need!

    Reply
  2. The North and South scene gets my vote! I discovered the miniseries one year near Christmas. I remember I was decorating our tree, but I kept taking breaks to go back and watch the train station scene. (Yes, I know that’s pathetic!)
    Maybe it’s the sarcastic Australian in me, but outright declarations of love make me uncomfortable. Mr Thornton’s look of love on his face – that’s all I need!

    Reply
  3. The North and South scene gets my vote! I discovered the miniseries one year near Christmas. I remember I was decorating our tree, but I kept taking breaks to go back and watch the train station scene. (Yes, I know that’s pathetic!)
    Maybe it’s the sarcastic Australian in me, but outright declarations of love make me uncomfortable. Mr Thornton’s look of love on his face – that’s all I need!

    Reply
  4. The North and South scene gets my vote! I discovered the miniseries one year near Christmas. I remember I was decorating our tree, but I kept taking breaks to go back and watch the train station scene. (Yes, I know that’s pathetic!)
    Maybe it’s the sarcastic Australian in me, but outright declarations of love make me uncomfortable. Mr Thornton’s look of love on his face – that’s all I need!

    Reply
  5. The North and South scene gets my vote! I discovered the miniseries one year near Christmas. I remember I was decorating our tree, but I kept taking breaks to go back and watch the train station scene. (Yes, I know that’s pathetic!)
    Maybe it’s the sarcastic Australian in me, but outright declarations of love make me uncomfortable. Mr Thornton’s look of love on his face – that’s all I need!

    Reply
  6. For me it’s not a particular scene, but the romantic feel of the whole movie. Very few movies can give me the same feeling of satisfaction as a book, but Ladyhawke sounds wonderful. I loved the romantic feel of “Say Anything”, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “An Officer and a Gentleman” has a terrific final scene, where the hero literally comes in and sweeps the heroine off her feet. I also love “Moonstruck” although it’s mostly a comedy.

    Reply
  7. For me it’s not a particular scene, but the romantic feel of the whole movie. Very few movies can give me the same feeling of satisfaction as a book, but Ladyhawke sounds wonderful. I loved the romantic feel of “Say Anything”, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “An Officer and a Gentleman” has a terrific final scene, where the hero literally comes in and sweeps the heroine off her feet. I also love “Moonstruck” although it’s mostly a comedy.

    Reply
  8. For me it’s not a particular scene, but the romantic feel of the whole movie. Very few movies can give me the same feeling of satisfaction as a book, but Ladyhawke sounds wonderful. I loved the romantic feel of “Say Anything”, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “An Officer and a Gentleman” has a terrific final scene, where the hero literally comes in and sweeps the heroine off her feet. I also love “Moonstruck” although it’s mostly a comedy.

    Reply
  9. For me it’s not a particular scene, but the romantic feel of the whole movie. Very few movies can give me the same feeling of satisfaction as a book, but Ladyhawke sounds wonderful. I loved the romantic feel of “Say Anything”, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “An Officer and a Gentleman” has a terrific final scene, where the hero literally comes in and sweeps the heroine off her feet. I also love “Moonstruck” although it’s mostly a comedy.

    Reply
  10. For me it’s not a particular scene, but the romantic feel of the whole movie. Very few movies can give me the same feeling of satisfaction as a book, but Ladyhawke sounds wonderful. I loved the romantic feel of “Say Anything”, “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “An Officer and a Gentleman” has a terrific final scene, where the hero literally comes in and sweeps the heroine off her feet. I also love “Moonstruck” although it’s mostly a comedy.

    Reply
  11. I love that Katie Melua song, Anne. It’s on my best-loved songs playlist.
    My favorite romantic movie scene is the New Year’s Eve scene from When Harry Met Sally. I think it is just a perfect scene on many levels–deeply romantic and totally true to the two characters. I could probably do a top 100 of scenes from books. Certainly Wentworth’s letter in Jane Austen’s Persuasion would be near the top. Another would be a scene from a Shakespeare class in Betsy and Joe, a YA novel by Maud Hart Lovelace, probably the book that began my addiction to HEAs.
    “In Miss Bangeter’s Shakespeare class they sat side by side at the back of the room. Miss Bangeter, with her dark magnetic eyes and sonorous voice, had almost transformed that roomful of desks and blackboards into the Forest of Arden. Trees with love songs hung and carved upon them seemed to rise between the desks. The sun slanted down through leafy aisles upon gallants and fair ladies, shepherds, shepherdesses, clowns, and courtiers. The Forest of Arden always made Betsy think of the Big Hill.
    She underlined a sentence and passed it across to Joe. ‘Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.’
    ‘That’s what I’d like to do,’ she whispered.
    ‘That’s what we’ll do next spring,’ Joe whispered back, while even Miss Bangeter looked pleased.”

    Reply
  12. I love that Katie Melua song, Anne. It’s on my best-loved songs playlist.
    My favorite romantic movie scene is the New Year’s Eve scene from When Harry Met Sally. I think it is just a perfect scene on many levels–deeply romantic and totally true to the two characters. I could probably do a top 100 of scenes from books. Certainly Wentworth’s letter in Jane Austen’s Persuasion would be near the top. Another would be a scene from a Shakespeare class in Betsy and Joe, a YA novel by Maud Hart Lovelace, probably the book that began my addiction to HEAs.
    “In Miss Bangeter’s Shakespeare class they sat side by side at the back of the room. Miss Bangeter, with her dark magnetic eyes and sonorous voice, had almost transformed that roomful of desks and blackboards into the Forest of Arden. Trees with love songs hung and carved upon them seemed to rise between the desks. The sun slanted down through leafy aisles upon gallants and fair ladies, shepherds, shepherdesses, clowns, and courtiers. The Forest of Arden always made Betsy think of the Big Hill.
    She underlined a sentence and passed it across to Joe. ‘Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.’
    ‘That’s what I’d like to do,’ she whispered.
    ‘That’s what we’ll do next spring,’ Joe whispered back, while even Miss Bangeter looked pleased.”

    Reply
  13. I love that Katie Melua song, Anne. It’s on my best-loved songs playlist.
    My favorite romantic movie scene is the New Year’s Eve scene from When Harry Met Sally. I think it is just a perfect scene on many levels–deeply romantic and totally true to the two characters. I could probably do a top 100 of scenes from books. Certainly Wentworth’s letter in Jane Austen’s Persuasion would be near the top. Another would be a scene from a Shakespeare class in Betsy and Joe, a YA novel by Maud Hart Lovelace, probably the book that began my addiction to HEAs.
    “In Miss Bangeter’s Shakespeare class they sat side by side at the back of the room. Miss Bangeter, with her dark magnetic eyes and sonorous voice, had almost transformed that roomful of desks and blackboards into the Forest of Arden. Trees with love songs hung and carved upon them seemed to rise between the desks. The sun slanted down through leafy aisles upon gallants and fair ladies, shepherds, shepherdesses, clowns, and courtiers. The Forest of Arden always made Betsy think of the Big Hill.
    She underlined a sentence and passed it across to Joe. ‘Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.’
    ‘That’s what I’d like to do,’ she whispered.
    ‘That’s what we’ll do next spring,’ Joe whispered back, while even Miss Bangeter looked pleased.”

    Reply
  14. I love that Katie Melua song, Anne. It’s on my best-loved songs playlist.
    My favorite romantic movie scene is the New Year’s Eve scene from When Harry Met Sally. I think it is just a perfect scene on many levels–deeply romantic and totally true to the two characters. I could probably do a top 100 of scenes from books. Certainly Wentworth’s letter in Jane Austen’s Persuasion would be near the top. Another would be a scene from a Shakespeare class in Betsy and Joe, a YA novel by Maud Hart Lovelace, probably the book that began my addiction to HEAs.
    “In Miss Bangeter’s Shakespeare class they sat side by side at the back of the room. Miss Bangeter, with her dark magnetic eyes and sonorous voice, had almost transformed that roomful of desks and blackboards into the Forest of Arden. Trees with love songs hung and carved upon them seemed to rise between the desks. The sun slanted down through leafy aisles upon gallants and fair ladies, shepherds, shepherdesses, clowns, and courtiers. The Forest of Arden always made Betsy think of the Big Hill.
    She underlined a sentence and passed it across to Joe. ‘Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.’
    ‘That’s what I’d like to do,’ she whispered.
    ‘That’s what we’ll do next spring,’ Joe whispered back, while even Miss Bangeter looked pleased.”

    Reply
  15. I love that Katie Melua song, Anne. It’s on my best-loved songs playlist.
    My favorite romantic movie scene is the New Year’s Eve scene from When Harry Met Sally. I think it is just a perfect scene on many levels–deeply romantic and totally true to the two characters. I could probably do a top 100 of scenes from books. Certainly Wentworth’s letter in Jane Austen’s Persuasion would be near the top. Another would be a scene from a Shakespeare class in Betsy and Joe, a YA novel by Maud Hart Lovelace, probably the book that began my addiction to HEAs.
    “In Miss Bangeter’s Shakespeare class they sat side by side at the back of the room. Miss Bangeter, with her dark magnetic eyes and sonorous voice, had almost transformed that roomful of desks and blackboards into the Forest of Arden. Trees with love songs hung and carved upon them seemed to rise between the desks. The sun slanted down through leafy aisles upon gallants and fair ladies, shepherds, shepherdesses, clowns, and courtiers. The Forest of Arden always made Betsy think of the Big Hill.
    She underlined a sentence and passed it across to Joe. ‘Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.’
    ‘That’s what I’d like to do,’ she whispered.
    ‘That’s what we’ll do next spring,’ Joe whispered back, while even Miss Bangeter looked pleased.”

    Reply
  16. I almost forgot the most romantic movie of all, South Pacific! When Rossano Brazzi sings “Some Enchanted Evening” and “This Nearly Was Mine”(swoons).

    Reply
  17. I almost forgot the most romantic movie of all, South Pacific! When Rossano Brazzi sings “Some Enchanted Evening” and “This Nearly Was Mine”(swoons).

    Reply
  18. I almost forgot the most romantic movie of all, South Pacific! When Rossano Brazzi sings “Some Enchanted Evening” and “This Nearly Was Mine”(swoons).

    Reply
  19. I almost forgot the most romantic movie of all, South Pacific! When Rossano Brazzi sings “Some Enchanted Evening” and “This Nearly Was Mine”(swoons).

    Reply
  20. I almost forgot the most romantic movie of all, South Pacific! When Rossano Brazzi sings “Some Enchanted Evening” and “This Nearly Was Mine”(swoons).

    Reply
  21. I see there are more romantic movies I need to hunt down! I enjoyed Miss Potter, but I’ve never seen North and South. That worldless scene of them coming together was lovely. Now I want the words!
    I like that version of Pride and Prejudice, too. I need to watch it again.

    Reply
  22. I see there are more romantic movies I need to hunt down! I enjoyed Miss Potter, but I’ve never seen North and South. That worldless scene of them coming together was lovely. Now I want the words!
    I like that version of Pride and Prejudice, too. I need to watch it again.

    Reply
  23. I see there are more romantic movies I need to hunt down! I enjoyed Miss Potter, but I’ve never seen North and South. That worldless scene of them coming together was lovely. Now I want the words!
    I like that version of Pride and Prejudice, too. I need to watch it again.

    Reply
  24. I see there are more romantic movies I need to hunt down! I enjoyed Miss Potter, but I’ve never seen North and South. That worldless scene of them coming together was lovely. Now I want the words!
    I like that version of Pride and Prejudice, too. I need to watch it again.

    Reply
  25. I see there are more romantic movies I need to hunt down! I enjoyed Miss Potter, but I’ve never seen North and South. That worldless scene of them coming together was lovely. Now I want the words!
    I like that version of Pride and Prejudice, too. I need to watch it again.

    Reply
  26. My favourite is at the end of You’ve Got Mail, when Meg Ryan’s character is waiting in the park to finally meet the man she’s been having a digital romance with. Tom Hank’s character’s dog comes racing around the corner, Meg Ryan turns and there he is…. As they embrace, she’s crying and it’s just so romantic and beautiful and I cry every single time… I just love it!

    Reply
  27. My favourite is at the end of You’ve Got Mail, when Meg Ryan’s character is waiting in the park to finally meet the man she’s been having a digital romance with. Tom Hank’s character’s dog comes racing around the corner, Meg Ryan turns and there he is…. As they embrace, she’s crying and it’s just so romantic and beautiful and I cry every single time… I just love it!

    Reply
  28. My favourite is at the end of You’ve Got Mail, when Meg Ryan’s character is waiting in the park to finally meet the man she’s been having a digital romance with. Tom Hank’s character’s dog comes racing around the corner, Meg Ryan turns and there he is…. As they embrace, she’s crying and it’s just so romantic and beautiful and I cry every single time… I just love it!

    Reply
  29. My favourite is at the end of You’ve Got Mail, when Meg Ryan’s character is waiting in the park to finally meet the man she’s been having a digital romance with. Tom Hank’s character’s dog comes racing around the corner, Meg Ryan turns and there he is…. As they embrace, she’s crying and it’s just so romantic and beautiful and I cry every single time… I just love it!

    Reply
  30. My favourite is at the end of You’ve Got Mail, when Meg Ryan’s character is waiting in the park to finally meet the man she’s been having a digital romance with. Tom Hank’s character’s dog comes racing around the corner, Meg Ryan turns and there he is…. As they embrace, she’s crying and it’s just so romantic and beautiful and I cry every single time… I just love it!

    Reply
  31. There’s a scene in Steve Martin’s LA story…
    Throughout the the film, there’s a running gag about the ennui experienced by a weatherman (Harris) who works in a city that is perpetually bathed in sunshine.
    At one point, there is some dialog between Harris and Sara:
    Sara: And if I were to go?
    Harris: All I know is, on the day your plane was to leave, if I had the power, I would turn the winds around, I would roll in the fog, I would bring in storms, I would change the polarity of the earth so compasses couldn’t work, so your plane couldn’t take off.
    And then when Sara leaves, towards the end of the film, Harris sits in the dark, changing the barometric pressure through force of will. As Sara’s plane heads towards the runway, LA is suddenly engulfed in fog, and crazy cyclonic weather, and the plane’s compasses go bananas, and Sara’s plane can’t take off! And then Sara KNOWS. She hot foots it to a taxi… A
    And Harris runs out of his house…
    And they meet, in the pouring rain…
    And there’s a song 🙂
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rWyNFiKq2A

    Reply
  32. There’s a scene in Steve Martin’s LA story…
    Throughout the the film, there’s a running gag about the ennui experienced by a weatherman (Harris) who works in a city that is perpetually bathed in sunshine.
    At one point, there is some dialog between Harris and Sara:
    Sara: And if I were to go?
    Harris: All I know is, on the day your plane was to leave, if I had the power, I would turn the winds around, I would roll in the fog, I would bring in storms, I would change the polarity of the earth so compasses couldn’t work, so your plane couldn’t take off.
    And then when Sara leaves, towards the end of the film, Harris sits in the dark, changing the barometric pressure through force of will. As Sara’s plane heads towards the runway, LA is suddenly engulfed in fog, and crazy cyclonic weather, and the plane’s compasses go bananas, and Sara’s plane can’t take off! And then Sara KNOWS. She hot foots it to a taxi… A
    And Harris runs out of his house…
    And they meet, in the pouring rain…
    And there’s a song 🙂
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rWyNFiKq2A

    Reply
  33. There’s a scene in Steve Martin’s LA story…
    Throughout the the film, there’s a running gag about the ennui experienced by a weatherman (Harris) who works in a city that is perpetually bathed in sunshine.
    At one point, there is some dialog between Harris and Sara:
    Sara: And if I were to go?
    Harris: All I know is, on the day your plane was to leave, if I had the power, I would turn the winds around, I would roll in the fog, I would bring in storms, I would change the polarity of the earth so compasses couldn’t work, so your plane couldn’t take off.
    And then when Sara leaves, towards the end of the film, Harris sits in the dark, changing the barometric pressure through force of will. As Sara’s plane heads towards the runway, LA is suddenly engulfed in fog, and crazy cyclonic weather, and the plane’s compasses go bananas, and Sara’s plane can’t take off! And then Sara KNOWS. She hot foots it to a taxi… A
    And Harris runs out of his house…
    And they meet, in the pouring rain…
    And there’s a song 🙂
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rWyNFiKq2A

    Reply
  34. There’s a scene in Steve Martin’s LA story…
    Throughout the the film, there’s a running gag about the ennui experienced by a weatherman (Harris) who works in a city that is perpetually bathed in sunshine.
    At one point, there is some dialog between Harris and Sara:
    Sara: And if I were to go?
    Harris: All I know is, on the day your plane was to leave, if I had the power, I would turn the winds around, I would roll in the fog, I would bring in storms, I would change the polarity of the earth so compasses couldn’t work, so your plane couldn’t take off.
    And then when Sara leaves, towards the end of the film, Harris sits in the dark, changing the barometric pressure through force of will. As Sara’s plane heads towards the runway, LA is suddenly engulfed in fog, and crazy cyclonic weather, and the plane’s compasses go bananas, and Sara’s plane can’t take off! And then Sara KNOWS. She hot foots it to a taxi… A
    And Harris runs out of his house…
    And they meet, in the pouring rain…
    And there’s a song 🙂
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rWyNFiKq2A

    Reply
  35. There’s a scene in Steve Martin’s LA story…
    Throughout the the film, there’s a running gag about the ennui experienced by a weatherman (Harris) who works in a city that is perpetually bathed in sunshine.
    At one point, there is some dialog between Harris and Sara:
    Sara: And if I were to go?
    Harris: All I know is, on the day your plane was to leave, if I had the power, I would turn the winds around, I would roll in the fog, I would bring in storms, I would change the polarity of the earth so compasses couldn’t work, so your plane couldn’t take off.
    And then when Sara leaves, towards the end of the film, Harris sits in the dark, changing the barometric pressure through force of will. As Sara’s plane heads towards the runway, LA is suddenly engulfed in fog, and crazy cyclonic weather, and the plane’s compasses go bananas, and Sara’s plane can’t take off! And then Sara KNOWS. She hot foots it to a taxi… A
    And Harris runs out of his house…
    And they meet, in the pouring rain…
    And there’s a song 🙂
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rWyNFiKq2A

    Reply
  36. I love the scene in Truly Madly Deeply, where a heartbroken Nina is playing part of a Bach duet endlessly,when suddenly the cello part kicks in, & there he is… Jamie, her beloved, back to help her through her bereavement. Love it ! And it’s Alan Rickman being romantic, so .. result !

    Reply
  37. I love the scene in Truly Madly Deeply, where a heartbroken Nina is playing part of a Bach duet endlessly,when suddenly the cello part kicks in, & there he is… Jamie, her beloved, back to help her through her bereavement. Love it ! And it’s Alan Rickman being romantic, so .. result !

    Reply
  38. I love the scene in Truly Madly Deeply, where a heartbroken Nina is playing part of a Bach duet endlessly,when suddenly the cello part kicks in, & there he is… Jamie, her beloved, back to help her through her bereavement. Love it ! And it’s Alan Rickman being romantic, so .. result !

    Reply
  39. I love the scene in Truly Madly Deeply, where a heartbroken Nina is playing part of a Bach duet endlessly,when suddenly the cello part kicks in, & there he is… Jamie, her beloved, back to help her through her bereavement. Love it ! And it’s Alan Rickman being romantic, so .. result !

    Reply
  40. I love the scene in Truly Madly Deeply, where a heartbroken Nina is playing part of a Bach duet endlessly,when suddenly the cello part kicks in, & there he is… Jamie, her beloved, back to help her through her bereavement. Love it ! And it’s Alan Rickman being romantic, so .. result !

    Reply
  41. Since Doctor Who returned to TV, I’ve become a huge fan, in part because there is so much romantic feeling to it. The best scene to me is the one in which the Tenth Doctor visits Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, and burns up a sun for the energy to do the hologram, just to see her once again and almost say he loves her. Gets me every time.
    Or the one in Forest of the Dead where the Doctor has just seen River Song for the first time, but for her it’s the last time, ever, because she’s cuffed him to a pipe and he can’t save her from sacrificing her life. (Sort of.)
    In the movies, I don’t think anyone’s ever beaten Notorious with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and all sorts of smoldering feelings leading to scenes like the kiss outside the wine cellar and Devlin carrying Alicia down the stairs as her husband Alex realizes his Nazi masters now think of him as a liability. Won’t be long until Alicia is free to marry her man.
    The more recent movie I play most often is Sense and Sensibility — one of the few times I think a novel’s adapter has actually improved over the original. I could listen to Alan Rickman speak all day.

    Reply
  42. Since Doctor Who returned to TV, I’ve become a huge fan, in part because there is so much romantic feeling to it. The best scene to me is the one in which the Tenth Doctor visits Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, and burns up a sun for the energy to do the hologram, just to see her once again and almost say he loves her. Gets me every time.
    Or the one in Forest of the Dead where the Doctor has just seen River Song for the first time, but for her it’s the last time, ever, because she’s cuffed him to a pipe and he can’t save her from sacrificing her life. (Sort of.)
    In the movies, I don’t think anyone’s ever beaten Notorious with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and all sorts of smoldering feelings leading to scenes like the kiss outside the wine cellar and Devlin carrying Alicia down the stairs as her husband Alex realizes his Nazi masters now think of him as a liability. Won’t be long until Alicia is free to marry her man.
    The more recent movie I play most often is Sense and Sensibility — one of the few times I think a novel’s adapter has actually improved over the original. I could listen to Alan Rickman speak all day.

    Reply
  43. Since Doctor Who returned to TV, I’ve become a huge fan, in part because there is so much romantic feeling to it. The best scene to me is the one in which the Tenth Doctor visits Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, and burns up a sun for the energy to do the hologram, just to see her once again and almost say he loves her. Gets me every time.
    Or the one in Forest of the Dead where the Doctor has just seen River Song for the first time, but for her it’s the last time, ever, because she’s cuffed him to a pipe and he can’t save her from sacrificing her life. (Sort of.)
    In the movies, I don’t think anyone’s ever beaten Notorious with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and all sorts of smoldering feelings leading to scenes like the kiss outside the wine cellar and Devlin carrying Alicia down the stairs as her husband Alex realizes his Nazi masters now think of him as a liability. Won’t be long until Alicia is free to marry her man.
    The more recent movie I play most often is Sense and Sensibility — one of the few times I think a novel’s adapter has actually improved over the original. I could listen to Alan Rickman speak all day.

    Reply
  44. Since Doctor Who returned to TV, I’ve become a huge fan, in part because there is so much romantic feeling to it. The best scene to me is the one in which the Tenth Doctor visits Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, and burns up a sun for the energy to do the hologram, just to see her once again and almost say he loves her. Gets me every time.
    Or the one in Forest of the Dead where the Doctor has just seen River Song for the first time, but for her it’s the last time, ever, because she’s cuffed him to a pipe and he can’t save her from sacrificing her life. (Sort of.)
    In the movies, I don’t think anyone’s ever beaten Notorious with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and all sorts of smoldering feelings leading to scenes like the kiss outside the wine cellar and Devlin carrying Alicia down the stairs as her husband Alex realizes his Nazi masters now think of him as a liability. Won’t be long until Alicia is free to marry her man.
    The more recent movie I play most often is Sense and Sensibility — one of the few times I think a novel’s adapter has actually improved over the original. I could listen to Alan Rickman speak all day.

    Reply
  45. Since Doctor Who returned to TV, I’ve become a huge fan, in part because there is so much romantic feeling to it. The best scene to me is the one in which the Tenth Doctor visits Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, and burns up a sun for the energy to do the hologram, just to see her once again and almost say he loves her. Gets me every time.
    Or the one in Forest of the Dead where the Doctor has just seen River Song for the first time, but for her it’s the last time, ever, because she’s cuffed him to a pipe and he can’t save her from sacrificing her life. (Sort of.)
    In the movies, I don’t think anyone’s ever beaten Notorious with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and all sorts of smoldering feelings leading to scenes like the kiss outside the wine cellar and Devlin carrying Alicia down the stairs as her husband Alex realizes his Nazi masters now think of him as a liability. Won’t be long until Alicia is free to marry her man.
    The more recent movie I play most often is Sense and Sensibility — one of the few times I think a novel’s adapter has actually improved over the original. I could listen to Alan Rickman speak all day.

    Reply

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