The Winter Bride: an interview with Anne Gracie

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

TWO Word Wenches releases are due on April 1st!  An abundance of good reading.  I waved my hand first to claim an ARC for Anne's The Winter Bride. This second book of her Chance Sisters Quartet is another delight.  (Abby's story, The Autumn Bride () was first in the series, and chosen by Library Journal as one of the Top Ten Romances of 2013.  AND has just been listed as an RWA RITA finalist!)

TheWinterBride#2Early reviews are great.  Romantic Times' Kathe Robin gave The Winter Bride a 4 1/2 star Top Pick, saying:

"The Chance sisters are living a dream, and readers will be thrilled to be there with them. Gracie has created a wonderful cast of characters, from the sisters themselves to their benefactress and servants. … the lively dialogue and tender emotions compel readers to relish every moment of the developing romance."

Kirkus Reviews:  "Gracie continues her Chance Sisters series with another delightful, emotionally complex romance. Freddy and Damaris are each textured characters, combining well-hidden wounds with a determination to thrive in spite of them, which makes them perfect for each other once they break through to trust and understanding… A romantic winner, with Gracie’s typical witty charm and sweeping emotion."

Publisher's Weekly: "Gracie continues the charming seasonal saga of the four Chance sisters, family by choice rather than blood, with this thoughtful and tender Regency."

MJP:  I love the book, and what particularly impressed me was how Anne took a man who AutumnBride64khad seemed like a complete twit and turned him into an utterly to-die-for hero for all seasons.  Anne, did you have Freddy's transformation in mind ever since you conceived of this series?  Or did he turn into a delicious surprise?

AG: He was the kind of character who simply arrived on the page in the first book.  I did hope he might have hero potential, but I wasn’t sure I could pull it off. I loved how he turned out, and I’m very glad you think he’s a to-die-for.

MJP:  The heroine, Damaris, had an unusual background.  How did that develop?

AG:  Again, she simply arrived in my head as a girl who was born in England, but who grew up as the daughter of a missionary in China. The first 19th century Protestant missionary arrived in China in 1807, so I anticipated him by a few years. Her upbringing was difficult, and lonely, so her new life in England and her “sisters” and Lady Beatrice are a source of great joy to her.

A small side-story here— several months after I’d handed the book in, I met up with an old school friend, who’d been delving into her family history. She’s from a long line of Chinese Australians, and she told me the story of how her 19th century ancestress had left China. Without spoilers, I’ll say it was almost exactly the same as Damaris.

AusWinterBridemedMJP: Your last series, The Devil Riders, was built around male friends.  What are the differences between writing a group of men vs. a group of women?  (If any!)

AG: Mmm, that’s a hard one. I think in general, a male-linked series is more about the men’s world, and about the men themselves. I think, too, the stories tend to have more of an adventure thread in them, whereas a female-linked series has more domesticity. But I’m not sure, because my first series, The Merridew Sisters, was female linked, and yet the stories were all about the heroes, and several of my female-linked stories are also quite adventurous, so really, I don’t know.   I take each story and each couple as they come.

MJP: Who's up next as The Spring Bride?

AG:  It’s going to be Jane, and her hero will have to remain a surprise for now. I originally planned someone else for her, but I changed my mind, so she’s getting a wild card hero.

MJP: Do you have a delicious little excerpt to dangle in front of us????

AG: This is from the start of the book:

When his best friend Max asks him to attend his aunt's literary society, our hero, Freddy, is appalled.

    “Not the literary society. The horror stories those girls read are enough to make a fellow’s hair stand on end.”

    Max frowned. “Horror stories? They don’t read horror stories, only entertaining tales of the kind ladies seem to enjoy, about girls and gossip and families—”

    “Horror stories, every last one of them,” Freddy said firmly. “You asked me to sit in on their literary society last month, when you went up to Manchester, remember? The story they were reading then . . .” He gave an eloquent shudder. “Horror from the very first line: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife." Must he, indeed? What about the poor fellow’s wants, eh? Do they matter? No. Every female in the blasted story was plotting to hook some man for herself or her daughter or niece. If you don’t call that horror, I don’t know what is!”

    Max chuckled.

    “You can laugh, bound as you are for parson’s noose in the morning,” Freddy said bitterly, “but every single man in that story ended up married by the end of the book! Every last one.” He numbered them off on his fingers. “The main fellow, his best friend, the parson, even the soldier fellow ended up married to the silly light-skirt sister—not one single man in that story escaped unwed.” He shuddered again. “Enough to give a man nightmares. So, no literary society for me, thank you.”

MJP: Needless to say, Freddy feels differently by the end of The Winter Bride!  Note SparkyWinterBride3 how the Sparky, the Wenchly mascot and literary critic, bows down in awe to the book.

AG: I had a lot of fun with Freddy and Damaris, and I hope others do too. Thanks so much for interviewing me, Mary Jo and for your kind words about the book.

I have a question for people: what do you think is the difference between male linked series and female linked ones? I’ll give a copy of The Winter Bride to someone who leaves a comment – the winner can choose between the US mass market paperback and the Australian trade-sized version.

265 thoughts on “The Winter Bride: an interview with Anne Gracie”

  1. I think it has to do with the camaraderie that they share, women, don’t have the opportunity to hunt, play cards, shoot or even fence, so they have a camaraderie of shared secrets, sewing, singing or playing an instrument or choosing gowns/shopping…as Anne said, ‘has more domesticity’…am I making any sense?

    Reply
  2. I think it has to do with the camaraderie that they share, women, don’t have the opportunity to hunt, play cards, shoot or even fence, so they have a camaraderie of shared secrets, sewing, singing or playing an instrument or choosing gowns/shopping…as Anne said, ‘has more domesticity’…am I making any sense?

    Reply
  3. I think it has to do with the camaraderie that they share, women, don’t have the opportunity to hunt, play cards, shoot or even fence, so they have a camaraderie of shared secrets, sewing, singing or playing an instrument or choosing gowns/shopping…as Anne said, ‘has more domesticity’…am I making any sense?

    Reply
  4. I think it has to do with the camaraderie that they share, women, don’t have the opportunity to hunt, play cards, shoot or even fence, so they have a camaraderie of shared secrets, sewing, singing or playing an instrument or choosing gowns/shopping…as Anne said, ‘has more domesticity’…am I making any sense?

    Reply
  5. I think it has to do with the camaraderie that they share, women, don’t have the opportunity to hunt, play cards, shoot or even fence, so they have a camaraderie of shared secrets, sewing, singing or playing an instrument or choosing gowns/shopping…as Anne said, ‘has more domesticity’…am I making any sense?

    Reply
  6. I agree with Anne. A male linked series has to do with things that men like to do, and a female inked series has to do with womenly likes.

    Reply
  7. I agree with Anne. A male linked series has to do with things that men like to do, and a female inked series has to do with womenly likes.

    Reply
  8. I agree with Anne. A male linked series has to do with things that men like to do, and a female inked series has to do with womenly likes.

    Reply
  9. I agree with Anne. A male linked series has to do with things that men like to do, and a female inked series has to do with womenly likes.

    Reply
  10. I agree with Anne. A male linked series has to do with things that men like to do, and a female inked series has to do with womenly likes.

    Reply
  11. Jane! I was wondering who was next!
    You know, my favourite thing about this series is that the men *and* women have strong bonds. The first 25% of The Autumn Bride is so memorable to me because of the way the women interacted.
    Some (non-historical) series I’ve read have been male linked and sometimes I get really frustrated with them because all the guys (who are usually Navy SEALs or something) seem to do is sit around talking about their emotions. Er…
    Done well – and there’re a number of good historical series doing it well – I love seeing the bonds between the men. They might hardly talk. They might be old friends and spend the whole time making fun of each other.
    I don’t know what the *difference* is, but I just really love series where the men AND women have friends they can talk to about something other than relationships!

    Reply
  12. Jane! I was wondering who was next!
    You know, my favourite thing about this series is that the men *and* women have strong bonds. The first 25% of The Autumn Bride is so memorable to me because of the way the women interacted.
    Some (non-historical) series I’ve read have been male linked and sometimes I get really frustrated with them because all the guys (who are usually Navy SEALs or something) seem to do is sit around talking about their emotions. Er…
    Done well – and there’re a number of good historical series doing it well – I love seeing the bonds between the men. They might hardly talk. They might be old friends and spend the whole time making fun of each other.
    I don’t know what the *difference* is, but I just really love series where the men AND women have friends they can talk to about something other than relationships!

    Reply
  13. Jane! I was wondering who was next!
    You know, my favourite thing about this series is that the men *and* women have strong bonds. The first 25% of The Autumn Bride is so memorable to me because of the way the women interacted.
    Some (non-historical) series I’ve read have been male linked and sometimes I get really frustrated with them because all the guys (who are usually Navy SEALs or something) seem to do is sit around talking about their emotions. Er…
    Done well – and there’re a number of good historical series doing it well – I love seeing the bonds between the men. They might hardly talk. They might be old friends and spend the whole time making fun of each other.
    I don’t know what the *difference* is, but I just really love series where the men AND women have friends they can talk to about something other than relationships!

    Reply
  14. Jane! I was wondering who was next!
    You know, my favourite thing about this series is that the men *and* women have strong bonds. The first 25% of The Autumn Bride is so memorable to me because of the way the women interacted.
    Some (non-historical) series I’ve read have been male linked and sometimes I get really frustrated with them because all the guys (who are usually Navy SEALs or something) seem to do is sit around talking about their emotions. Er…
    Done well – and there’re a number of good historical series doing it well – I love seeing the bonds between the men. They might hardly talk. They might be old friends and spend the whole time making fun of each other.
    I don’t know what the *difference* is, but I just really love series where the men AND women have friends they can talk to about something other than relationships!

    Reply
  15. Jane! I was wondering who was next!
    You know, my favourite thing about this series is that the men *and* women have strong bonds. The first 25% of The Autumn Bride is so memorable to me because of the way the women interacted.
    Some (non-historical) series I’ve read have been male linked and sometimes I get really frustrated with them because all the guys (who are usually Navy SEALs or something) seem to do is sit around talking about their emotions. Er…
    Done well – and there’re a number of good historical series doing it well – I love seeing the bonds between the men. They might hardly talk. They might be old friends and spend the whole time making fun of each other.
    I don’t know what the *difference* is, but I just really love series where the men AND women have friends they can talk to about something other than relationships!

    Reply
  16. male series seem to be connected to some nefarius villian or some plot which isn’t resolved until the last book. When the series is about females, it usually depicts how each reaches the altar.
    There have been some series based n a group of men where the stories are how advowed bachelors find their true loves and marry but they are fewer than the ones featuring action.
    I am a bit wary of series after one author destroyed the whole previous book by having the heroine of that book be a widow in the second book and on to a second husband though her story wasn’t the main plot.
    I don’t want to read book three and discover that the characters of book one are having marital problems.
    In a way, I prefer a series where the main characters aren’t linked by family or job or club but by something like secrets, a locket, a ring, or society. each book has to be able to stand alone and be enjoyed even if one never reads he other books. However, an HEA is mandatory and not to be canceled by a subsequent book.
    Also, I hate having books about generations or siblings where the next sibling or generation repeats the mistakes of the pevious one.

    Reply
  17. male series seem to be connected to some nefarius villian or some plot which isn’t resolved until the last book. When the series is about females, it usually depicts how each reaches the altar.
    There have been some series based n a group of men where the stories are how advowed bachelors find their true loves and marry but they are fewer than the ones featuring action.
    I am a bit wary of series after one author destroyed the whole previous book by having the heroine of that book be a widow in the second book and on to a second husband though her story wasn’t the main plot.
    I don’t want to read book three and discover that the characters of book one are having marital problems.
    In a way, I prefer a series where the main characters aren’t linked by family or job or club but by something like secrets, a locket, a ring, or society. each book has to be able to stand alone and be enjoyed even if one never reads he other books. However, an HEA is mandatory and not to be canceled by a subsequent book.
    Also, I hate having books about generations or siblings where the next sibling or generation repeats the mistakes of the pevious one.

    Reply
  18. male series seem to be connected to some nefarius villian or some plot which isn’t resolved until the last book. When the series is about females, it usually depicts how each reaches the altar.
    There have been some series based n a group of men where the stories are how advowed bachelors find their true loves and marry but they are fewer than the ones featuring action.
    I am a bit wary of series after one author destroyed the whole previous book by having the heroine of that book be a widow in the second book and on to a second husband though her story wasn’t the main plot.
    I don’t want to read book three and discover that the characters of book one are having marital problems.
    In a way, I prefer a series where the main characters aren’t linked by family or job or club but by something like secrets, a locket, a ring, or society. each book has to be able to stand alone and be enjoyed even if one never reads he other books. However, an HEA is mandatory and not to be canceled by a subsequent book.
    Also, I hate having books about generations or siblings where the next sibling or generation repeats the mistakes of the pevious one.

    Reply
  19. male series seem to be connected to some nefarius villian or some plot which isn’t resolved until the last book. When the series is about females, it usually depicts how each reaches the altar.
    There have been some series based n a group of men where the stories are how advowed bachelors find their true loves and marry but they are fewer than the ones featuring action.
    I am a bit wary of series after one author destroyed the whole previous book by having the heroine of that book be a widow in the second book and on to a second husband though her story wasn’t the main plot.
    I don’t want to read book three and discover that the characters of book one are having marital problems.
    In a way, I prefer a series where the main characters aren’t linked by family or job or club but by something like secrets, a locket, a ring, or society. each book has to be able to stand alone and be enjoyed even if one never reads he other books. However, an HEA is mandatory and not to be canceled by a subsequent book.
    Also, I hate having books about generations or siblings where the next sibling or generation repeats the mistakes of the pevious one.

    Reply
  20. male series seem to be connected to some nefarius villian or some plot which isn’t resolved until the last book. When the series is about females, it usually depicts how each reaches the altar.
    There have been some series based n a group of men where the stories are how advowed bachelors find their true loves and marry but they are fewer than the ones featuring action.
    I am a bit wary of series after one author destroyed the whole previous book by having the heroine of that book be a widow in the second book and on to a second husband though her story wasn’t the main plot.
    I don’t want to read book three and discover that the characters of book one are having marital problems.
    In a way, I prefer a series where the main characters aren’t linked by family or job or club but by something like secrets, a locket, a ring, or society. each book has to be able to stand alone and be enjoyed even if one never reads he other books. However, an HEA is mandatory and not to be canceled by a subsequent book.
    Also, I hate having books about generations or siblings where the next sibling or generation repeats the mistakes of the pevious one.

    Reply
  21. I just finished reading an indie steam punk novel/series that has a romantic element. How the author treats women is so different. She addresses how a woman becomes motherly while engaged in repeated, heroic battles for survival. She even has a scene where the two women are attracted to the same man, become jealous of the other, and work it out so they can be allies against the evil ones.
    That said, I do think most women centered series lack the adventure that male oriented series do. The settings are often so different–estates, spy networks, the London underground, and gaming hells. The women’s world is often balls, the home, musicales, and charities. It did occur to me that there is a brides series a long while back where the women wanted to be a poet, a solider, and some other nontraditional role. Now each of them has a rousing adventure filled with tension and adventure. And there’s another series about lonely lords where they stories are about brotherhood and the small ways love redeems a wounded soul. So now I’ve convinced myself that perhaps it is just maybe there’s less of a difference than appears at first.

    Reply
  22. I just finished reading an indie steam punk novel/series that has a romantic element. How the author treats women is so different. She addresses how a woman becomes motherly while engaged in repeated, heroic battles for survival. She even has a scene where the two women are attracted to the same man, become jealous of the other, and work it out so they can be allies against the evil ones.
    That said, I do think most women centered series lack the adventure that male oriented series do. The settings are often so different–estates, spy networks, the London underground, and gaming hells. The women’s world is often balls, the home, musicales, and charities. It did occur to me that there is a brides series a long while back where the women wanted to be a poet, a solider, and some other nontraditional role. Now each of them has a rousing adventure filled with tension and adventure. And there’s another series about lonely lords where they stories are about brotherhood and the small ways love redeems a wounded soul. So now I’ve convinced myself that perhaps it is just maybe there’s less of a difference than appears at first.

    Reply
  23. I just finished reading an indie steam punk novel/series that has a romantic element. How the author treats women is so different. She addresses how a woman becomes motherly while engaged in repeated, heroic battles for survival. She even has a scene where the two women are attracted to the same man, become jealous of the other, and work it out so they can be allies against the evil ones.
    That said, I do think most women centered series lack the adventure that male oriented series do. The settings are often so different–estates, spy networks, the London underground, and gaming hells. The women’s world is often balls, the home, musicales, and charities. It did occur to me that there is a brides series a long while back where the women wanted to be a poet, a solider, and some other nontraditional role. Now each of them has a rousing adventure filled with tension and adventure. And there’s another series about lonely lords where they stories are about brotherhood and the small ways love redeems a wounded soul. So now I’ve convinced myself that perhaps it is just maybe there’s less of a difference than appears at first.

    Reply
  24. I just finished reading an indie steam punk novel/series that has a romantic element. How the author treats women is so different. She addresses how a woman becomes motherly while engaged in repeated, heroic battles for survival. She even has a scene where the two women are attracted to the same man, become jealous of the other, and work it out so they can be allies against the evil ones.
    That said, I do think most women centered series lack the adventure that male oriented series do. The settings are often so different–estates, spy networks, the London underground, and gaming hells. The women’s world is often balls, the home, musicales, and charities. It did occur to me that there is a brides series a long while back where the women wanted to be a poet, a solider, and some other nontraditional role. Now each of them has a rousing adventure filled with tension and adventure. And there’s another series about lonely lords where they stories are about brotherhood and the small ways love redeems a wounded soul. So now I’ve convinced myself that perhaps it is just maybe there’s less of a difference than appears at first.

    Reply
  25. I just finished reading an indie steam punk novel/series that has a romantic element. How the author treats women is so different. She addresses how a woman becomes motherly while engaged in repeated, heroic battles for survival. She even has a scene where the two women are attracted to the same man, become jealous of the other, and work it out so they can be allies against the evil ones.
    That said, I do think most women centered series lack the adventure that male oriented series do. The settings are often so different–estates, spy networks, the London underground, and gaming hells. The women’s world is often balls, the home, musicales, and charities. It did occur to me that there is a brides series a long while back where the women wanted to be a poet, a solider, and some other nontraditional role. Now each of them has a rousing adventure filled with tension and adventure. And there’s another series about lonely lords where they stories are about brotherhood and the small ways love redeems a wounded soul. So now I’ve convinced myself that perhaps it is just maybe there’s less of a difference than appears at first.

    Reply
  26. Sonya, I agree. I do think there are very different ways that men and women interact, and no, men don’t generally sit around talking about their emotions. I recently reread the first of Nora Roberts’s Chesapeak Bay series and the male interaction then was so markedly male, it was great.

    Reply
  27. Sonya, I agree. I do think there are very different ways that men and women interact, and no, men don’t generally sit around talking about their emotions. I recently reread the first of Nora Roberts’s Chesapeak Bay series and the male interaction then was so markedly male, it was great.

    Reply
  28. Sonya, I agree. I do think there are very different ways that men and women interact, and no, men don’t generally sit around talking about their emotions. I recently reread the first of Nora Roberts’s Chesapeak Bay series and the male interaction then was so markedly male, it was great.

    Reply
  29. Sonya, I agree. I do think there are very different ways that men and women interact, and no, men don’t generally sit around talking about their emotions. I recently reread the first of Nora Roberts’s Chesapeak Bay series and the male interaction then was so markedly male, it was great.

    Reply
  30. Sonya, I agree. I do think there are very different ways that men and women interact, and no, men don’t generally sit around talking about their emotions. I recently reread the first of Nora Roberts’s Chesapeak Bay series and the male interaction then was so markedly male, it was great.

    Reply
  31. Sarah, that’s wonderful — I’m so pleased. I probably shouldn’t say this here, but Harlequin are putting out one of my early harlequin historicals out as an ebook in 2 weeks. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  32. Sarah, that’s wonderful — I’m so pleased. I probably shouldn’t say this here, but Harlequin are putting out one of my early harlequin historicals out as an ebook in 2 weeks. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  33. Sarah, that’s wonderful — I’m so pleased. I probably shouldn’t say this here, but Harlequin are putting out one of my early harlequin historicals out as an ebook in 2 weeks. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  34. Sarah, that’s wonderful — I’m so pleased. I probably shouldn’t say this here, but Harlequin are putting out one of my early harlequin historicals out as an ebook in 2 weeks. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  35. Sarah, that’s wonderful — I’m so pleased. I probably shouldn’t say this here, but Harlequin are putting out one of my early harlequin historicals out as an ebook in 2 weeks. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  36. Thanks for those insights, Nancy. For me, every book in a series, no matter whether it’s a male or female-centred one, needs to be able to be read as a stand-alone. I certainly try to make all mine like that.

    Reply
  37. Thanks for those insights, Nancy. For me, every book in a series, no matter whether it’s a male or female-centred one, needs to be able to be read as a stand-alone. I certainly try to make all mine like that.

    Reply
  38. Thanks for those insights, Nancy. For me, every book in a series, no matter whether it’s a male or female-centred one, needs to be able to be read as a stand-alone. I certainly try to make all mine like that.

    Reply
  39. Thanks for those insights, Nancy. For me, every book in a series, no matter whether it’s a male or female-centred one, needs to be able to be read as a stand-alone. I certainly try to make all mine like that.

    Reply
  40. Thanks for those insights, Nancy. For me, every book in a series, no matter whether it’s a male or female-centred one, needs to be able to be read as a stand-alone. I certainly try to make all mine like that.

    Reply
  41. Shannon, I think we had similar thought processes. When Mary Jo first asked me the question I thought, oh it’s pretty straightforward, but then the more I thought about various series, the less clear-cut it became. Which is why I opened it up for discussion here.

    Reply
  42. Shannon, I think we had similar thought processes. When Mary Jo first asked me the question I thought, oh it’s pretty straightforward, but then the more I thought about various series, the less clear-cut it became. Which is why I opened it up for discussion here.

    Reply
  43. Shannon, I think we had similar thought processes. When Mary Jo first asked me the question I thought, oh it’s pretty straightforward, but then the more I thought about various series, the less clear-cut it became. Which is why I opened it up for discussion here.

    Reply
  44. Shannon, I think we had similar thought processes. When Mary Jo first asked me the question I thought, oh it’s pretty straightforward, but then the more I thought about various series, the less clear-cut it became. Which is why I opened it up for discussion here.

    Reply
  45. Shannon, I think we had similar thought processes. When Mary Jo first asked me the question I thought, oh it’s pretty straightforward, but then the more I thought about various series, the less clear-cut it became. Which is why I opened it up for discussion here.

    Reply
  46. Men and women do think differently. So, the women’s view of the world and what’s important is a lot different from the man’s point of view and what he thinks is important. Men usually don’t have relationships with other men. They just share time together. Whereas women do have relationships with women. But in the end everyone just wants to feel needed too.

    Reply
  47. Men and women do think differently. So, the women’s view of the world and what’s important is a lot different from the man’s point of view and what he thinks is important. Men usually don’t have relationships with other men. They just share time together. Whereas women do have relationships with women. But in the end everyone just wants to feel needed too.

    Reply
  48. Men and women do think differently. So, the women’s view of the world and what’s important is a lot different from the man’s point of view and what he thinks is important. Men usually don’t have relationships with other men. They just share time together. Whereas women do have relationships with women. But in the end everyone just wants to feel needed too.

    Reply
  49. Men and women do think differently. So, the women’s view of the world and what’s important is a lot different from the man’s point of view and what he thinks is important. Men usually don’t have relationships with other men. They just share time together. Whereas women do have relationships with women. But in the end everyone just wants to feel needed too.

    Reply
  50. Men and women do think differently. So, the women’s view of the world and what’s important is a lot different from the man’s point of view and what he thinks is important. Men usually don’t have relationships with other men. They just share time together. Whereas women do have relationships with women. But in the end everyone just wants to feel needed too.

    Reply
  51. What fun! Anne will always have a bit of adventure in her books, no matter if it’s men or women. Other writers, the men will always be stereotypical male and the women will always be stereotypical female. They’ve found a formula that works for them. It depends on the writer.

    Reply
  52. What fun! Anne will always have a bit of adventure in her books, no matter if it’s men or women. Other writers, the men will always be stereotypical male and the women will always be stereotypical female. They’ve found a formula that works for them. It depends on the writer.

    Reply
  53. What fun! Anne will always have a bit of adventure in her books, no matter if it’s men or women. Other writers, the men will always be stereotypical male and the women will always be stereotypical female. They’ve found a formula that works for them. It depends on the writer.

    Reply
  54. What fun! Anne will always have a bit of adventure in her books, no matter if it’s men or women. Other writers, the men will always be stereotypical male and the women will always be stereotypical female. They’ve found a formula that works for them. It depends on the writer.

    Reply
  55. What fun! Anne will always have a bit of adventure in her books, no matter if it’s men or women. Other writers, the men will always be stereotypical male and the women will always be stereotypical female. They’ve found a formula that works for them. It depends on the writer.

    Reply
  56. That is a very interesting question. I’ve been thinking about all the different series I’ve read – both contemporary and historical.
    In the best series there isn’t that much of a difference. Both the female/male leads become involved in “something” that is an adventure/out of the ordinary for them. There is a “struggle” of some sort.
    If you think of the Cynster series by Stephanie Laurens, the theme is family and love but there are small series in the big series. As well each book has an adventure of some sort in it.
    Lisa Kelypas Hathaway series is somewhat more “domestic” but there are adventures in each one. Each adventure is different because the 4 sisters are different. And then there is Leo….
    Then there are the series like Mary Jo writes, (Fallen Angels and The Lost Lords). There is a tie between the male characters but each book has a different setting and set of challenges for each couple.
    Books with a male lead do tend to have a more action subtext because you are following a male life but only if that male was into sporting pursuits. Females more often a girly domestic subtext but not always. What it boils down to is it all depends on the male/female characters of each book.
    Okay…I give up thinking about this. I’ve probably said the same thing multiple ways now.

    Reply
  57. That is a very interesting question. I’ve been thinking about all the different series I’ve read – both contemporary and historical.
    In the best series there isn’t that much of a difference. Both the female/male leads become involved in “something” that is an adventure/out of the ordinary for them. There is a “struggle” of some sort.
    If you think of the Cynster series by Stephanie Laurens, the theme is family and love but there are small series in the big series. As well each book has an adventure of some sort in it.
    Lisa Kelypas Hathaway series is somewhat more “domestic” but there are adventures in each one. Each adventure is different because the 4 sisters are different. And then there is Leo….
    Then there are the series like Mary Jo writes, (Fallen Angels and The Lost Lords). There is a tie between the male characters but each book has a different setting and set of challenges for each couple.
    Books with a male lead do tend to have a more action subtext because you are following a male life but only if that male was into sporting pursuits. Females more often a girly domestic subtext but not always. What it boils down to is it all depends on the male/female characters of each book.
    Okay…I give up thinking about this. I’ve probably said the same thing multiple ways now.

    Reply
  58. That is a very interesting question. I’ve been thinking about all the different series I’ve read – both contemporary and historical.
    In the best series there isn’t that much of a difference. Both the female/male leads become involved in “something” that is an adventure/out of the ordinary for them. There is a “struggle” of some sort.
    If you think of the Cynster series by Stephanie Laurens, the theme is family and love but there are small series in the big series. As well each book has an adventure of some sort in it.
    Lisa Kelypas Hathaway series is somewhat more “domestic” but there are adventures in each one. Each adventure is different because the 4 sisters are different. And then there is Leo….
    Then there are the series like Mary Jo writes, (Fallen Angels and The Lost Lords). There is a tie between the male characters but each book has a different setting and set of challenges for each couple.
    Books with a male lead do tend to have a more action subtext because you are following a male life but only if that male was into sporting pursuits. Females more often a girly domestic subtext but not always. What it boils down to is it all depends on the male/female characters of each book.
    Okay…I give up thinking about this. I’ve probably said the same thing multiple ways now.

    Reply
  59. That is a very interesting question. I’ve been thinking about all the different series I’ve read – both contemporary and historical.
    In the best series there isn’t that much of a difference. Both the female/male leads become involved in “something” that is an adventure/out of the ordinary for them. There is a “struggle” of some sort.
    If you think of the Cynster series by Stephanie Laurens, the theme is family and love but there are small series in the big series. As well each book has an adventure of some sort in it.
    Lisa Kelypas Hathaway series is somewhat more “domestic” but there are adventures in each one. Each adventure is different because the 4 sisters are different. And then there is Leo….
    Then there are the series like Mary Jo writes, (Fallen Angels and The Lost Lords). There is a tie between the male characters but each book has a different setting and set of challenges for each couple.
    Books with a male lead do tend to have a more action subtext because you are following a male life but only if that male was into sporting pursuits. Females more often a girly domestic subtext but not always. What it boils down to is it all depends on the male/female characters of each book.
    Okay…I give up thinking about this. I’ve probably said the same thing multiple ways now.

    Reply
  60. That is a very interesting question. I’ve been thinking about all the different series I’ve read – both contemporary and historical.
    In the best series there isn’t that much of a difference. Both the female/male leads become involved in “something” that is an adventure/out of the ordinary for them. There is a “struggle” of some sort.
    If you think of the Cynster series by Stephanie Laurens, the theme is family and love but there are small series in the big series. As well each book has an adventure of some sort in it.
    Lisa Kelypas Hathaway series is somewhat more “domestic” but there are adventures in each one. Each adventure is different because the 4 sisters are different. And then there is Leo….
    Then there are the series like Mary Jo writes, (Fallen Angels and The Lost Lords). There is a tie between the male characters but each book has a different setting and set of challenges for each couple.
    Books with a male lead do tend to have a more action subtext because you are following a male life but only if that male was into sporting pursuits. Females more often a girly domestic subtext but not always. What it boils down to is it all depends on the male/female characters of each book.
    Okay…I give up thinking about this. I’ve probably said the same thing multiple ways now.

    Reply
  61. They are both satisfying, it’s just that the male & female group dynamics are usually very different in that they connect in different ways. Males share their interests (usually sport, gaming or financial)and avoiding marriage, where females usually are pursuing marriage connect thru mutual support. Tho I do find it fun if those norms get shaken up a bit.

    Reply
  62. They are both satisfying, it’s just that the male & female group dynamics are usually very different in that they connect in different ways. Males share their interests (usually sport, gaming or financial)and avoiding marriage, where females usually are pursuing marriage connect thru mutual support. Tho I do find it fun if those norms get shaken up a bit.

    Reply
  63. They are both satisfying, it’s just that the male & female group dynamics are usually very different in that they connect in different ways. Males share their interests (usually sport, gaming or financial)and avoiding marriage, where females usually are pursuing marriage connect thru mutual support. Tho I do find it fun if those norms get shaken up a bit.

    Reply
  64. They are both satisfying, it’s just that the male & female group dynamics are usually very different in that they connect in different ways. Males share their interests (usually sport, gaming or financial)and avoiding marriage, where females usually are pursuing marriage connect thru mutual support. Tho I do find it fun if those norms get shaken up a bit.

    Reply
  65. They are both satisfying, it’s just that the male & female group dynamics are usually very different in that they connect in different ways. Males share their interests (usually sport, gaming or financial)and avoiding marriage, where females usually are pursuing marriage connect thru mutual support. Tho I do find it fun if those norms get shaken up a bit.

    Reply
  66. I think the obvious answer is that men tend to bond around “action” as in war or sports. They are creatures of doing. Whereas females tend to bond around emotion and relationships. These traits are general and what we typically ascribe to each sex though, and well-rounded, vibrant characters will transcend stereotypes to become living, breathing beings.
    I have to say that I LOVE the send-up of Pride and Prejudice! What a great opening to draw the reader in. Now I can’t wait to read this series. Also, good name for the series – was that you or an editor or publisher?

    Reply
  67. I think the obvious answer is that men tend to bond around “action” as in war or sports. They are creatures of doing. Whereas females tend to bond around emotion and relationships. These traits are general and what we typically ascribe to each sex though, and well-rounded, vibrant characters will transcend stereotypes to become living, breathing beings.
    I have to say that I LOVE the send-up of Pride and Prejudice! What a great opening to draw the reader in. Now I can’t wait to read this series. Also, good name for the series – was that you or an editor or publisher?

    Reply
  68. I think the obvious answer is that men tend to bond around “action” as in war or sports. They are creatures of doing. Whereas females tend to bond around emotion and relationships. These traits are general and what we typically ascribe to each sex though, and well-rounded, vibrant characters will transcend stereotypes to become living, breathing beings.
    I have to say that I LOVE the send-up of Pride and Prejudice! What a great opening to draw the reader in. Now I can’t wait to read this series. Also, good name for the series – was that you or an editor or publisher?

    Reply
  69. I think the obvious answer is that men tend to bond around “action” as in war or sports. They are creatures of doing. Whereas females tend to bond around emotion and relationships. These traits are general and what we typically ascribe to each sex though, and well-rounded, vibrant characters will transcend stereotypes to become living, breathing beings.
    I have to say that I LOVE the send-up of Pride and Prejudice! What a great opening to draw the reader in. Now I can’t wait to read this series. Also, good name for the series – was that you or an editor or publisher?

    Reply
  70. I think the obvious answer is that men tend to bond around “action” as in war or sports. They are creatures of doing. Whereas females tend to bond around emotion and relationships. These traits are general and what we typically ascribe to each sex though, and well-rounded, vibrant characters will transcend stereotypes to become living, breathing beings.
    I have to say that I LOVE the send-up of Pride and Prejudice! What a great opening to draw the reader in. Now I can’t wait to read this series. Also, good name for the series – was that you or an editor or publisher?

    Reply
  71. The Autumn Bride was one of my favorite books of 2013, and I think The Winter Bride is even better. I love Freddy! He reminded me a bit of another favorite Freddy–the surprising hero of Heyer’s Cotillion. And I’m so delighted that Gallant Waif, still my #1 favorite Anne Gracie book, will be available on my Kindle soon.
    Research on real life differences in male and female friendships suggests men do things together–golf, play poker, attend sporting events and women talk about their lives, sharing details, secrets, and feelings. I think fiction reflects the same behavior. Of course, there are exceptions in life and in fiction. But in most of the female adventures I can recall, the adventures are shared with a male rather than with a female friend.

    Reply
  72. The Autumn Bride was one of my favorite books of 2013, and I think The Winter Bride is even better. I love Freddy! He reminded me a bit of another favorite Freddy–the surprising hero of Heyer’s Cotillion. And I’m so delighted that Gallant Waif, still my #1 favorite Anne Gracie book, will be available on my Kindle soon.
    Research on real life differences in male and female friendships suggests men do things together–golf, play poker, attend sporting events and women talk about their lives, sharing details, secrets, and feelings. I think fiction reflects the same behavior. Of course, there are exceptions in life and in fiction. But in most of the female adventures I can recall, the adventures are shared with a male rather than with a female friend.

    Reply
  73. The Autumn Bride was one of my favorite books of 2013, and I think The Winter Bride is even better. I love Freddy! He reminded me a bit of another favorite Freddy–the surprising hero of Heyer’s Cotillion. And I’m so delighted that Gallant Waif, still my #1 favorite Anne Gracie book, will be available on my Kindle soon.
    Research on real life differences in male and female friendships suggests men do things together–golf, play poker, attend sporting events and women talk about their lives, sharing details, secrets, and feelings. I think fiction reflects the same behavior. Of course, there are exceptions in life and in fiction. But in most of the female adventures I can recall, the adventures are shared with a male rather than with a female friend.

    Reply
  74. The Autumn Bride was one of my favorite books of 2013, and I think The Winter Bride is even better. I love Freddy! He reminded me a bit of another favorite Freddy–the surprising hero of Heyer’s Cotillion. And I’m so delighted that Gallant Waif, still my #1 favorite Anne Gracie book, will be available on my Kindle soon.
    Research on real life differences in male and female friendships suggests men do things together–golf, play poker, attend sporting events and women talk about their lives, sharing details, secrets, and feelings. I think fiction reflects the same behavior. Of course, there are exceptions in life and in fiction. But in most of the female adventures I can recall, the adventures are shared with a male rather than with a female friend.

    Reply
  75. The Autumn Bride was one of my favorite books of 2013, and I think The Winter Bride is even better. I love Freddy! He reminded me a bit of another favorite Freddy–the surprising hero of Heyer’s Cotillion. And I’m so delighted that Gallant Waif, still my #1 favorite Anne Gracie book, will be available on my Kindle soon.
    Research on real life differences in male and female friendships suggests men do things together–golf, play poker, attend sporting events and women talk about their lives, sharing details, secrets, and feelings. I think fiction reflects the same behavior. Of course, there are exceptions in life and in fiction. But in most of the female adventures I can recall, the adventures are shared with a male rather than with a female friend.

    Reply
  76. Male linked series can be brothers and best friends, whereas female linked ones can be anything from situational relationships (like all work for an agency) to friends?

    Reply
  77. Male linked series can be brothers and best friends, whereas female linked ones can be anything from situational relationships (like all work for an agency) to friends?

    Reply
  78. Male linked series can be brothers and best friends, whereas female linked ones can be anything from situational relationships (like all work for an agency) to friends?

    Reply
  79. Male linked series can be brothers and best friends, whereas female linked ones can be anything from situational relationships (like all work for an agency) to friends?

    Reply
  80. Male linked series can be brothers and best friends, whereas female linked ones can be anything from situational relationships (like all work for an agency) to friends?

    Reply
  81. Jackie, that’s interesting — I think men do tend to “do stuff together” and that’s the core activity of their friendships. I do think that a lot of men have relationships with other men and that they value them hugely, even if they don’t talk about it much.

    Reply
  82. Jackie, that’s interesting — I think men do tend to “do stuff together” and that’s the core activity of their friendships. I do think that a lot of men have relationships with other men and that they value them hugely, even if they don’t talk about it much.

    Reply
  83. Jackie, that’s interesting — I think men do tend to “do stuff together” and that’s the core activity of their friendships. I do think that a lot of men have relationships with other men and that they value them hugely, even if they don’t talk about it much.

    Reply
  84. Jackie, that’s interesting — I think men do tend to “do stuff together” and that’s the core activity of their friendships. I do think that a lot of men have relationships with other men and that they value them hugely, even if they don’t talk about it much.

    Reply
  85. Jackie, that’s interesting — I think men do tend to “do stuff together” and that’s the core activity of their friendships. I do think that a lot of men have relationships with other men and that they value them hugely, even if they don’t talk about it much.

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Lauren — what a lovely thing to say. I do like a little bit of adventure. I suspect my reading taste was formed in childhood, with all those adventurous books by Enid Blyton and others. 🙂

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Lauren — what a lovely thing to say. I do like a little bit of adventure. I suspect my reading taste was formed in childhood, with all those adventurous books by Enid Blyton and others. 🙂

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Lauren — what a lovely thing to say. I do like a little bit of adventure. I suspect my reading taste was formed in childhood, with all those adventurous books by Enid Blyton and others. 🙂

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Lauren — what a lovely thing to say. I do like a little bit of adventure. I suspect my reading taste was formed in childhood, with all those adventurous books by Enid Blyton and others. 🙂

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Lauren — what a lovely thing to say. I do like a little bit of adventure. I suspect my reading taste was formed in childhood, with all those adventurous books by Enid Blyton and others. 🙂

    Reply
  91. Vicki, I chuckled, reading your comment, because yes, the more you look at the various series, the less clear-cut the difference is. So glad to have shared the confusion around. 🙂

    Reply
  92. Vicki, I chuckled, reading your comment, because yes, the more you look at the various series, the less clear-cut the difference is. So glad to have shared the confusion around. 🙂

    Reply
  93. Vicki, I chuckled, reading your comment, because yes, the more you look at the various series, the less clear-cut the difference is. So glad to have shared the confusion around. 🙂

    Reply
  94. Vicki, I chuckled, reading your comment, because yes, the more you look at the various series, the less clear-cut the difference is. So glad to have shared the confusion around. 🙂

    Reply
  95. Vicki, I chuckled, reading your comment, because yes, the more you look at the various series, the less clear-cut the difference is. So glad to have shared the confusion around. 🙂

    Reply
  96. Donna, if you mean who thought up the Chance sisters as the name for the series, that was me. The seasonal titles was the publisher’s choice.
    I’m so glad you liked Freddy on Pride and Prejudice. I hope you enjoy the series.

    Reply
  97. Donna, if you mean who thought up the Chance sisters as the name for the series, that was me. The seasonal titles was the publisher’s choice.
    I’m so glad you liked Freddy on Pride and Prejudice. I hope you enjoy the series.

    Reply
  98. Donna, if you mean who thought up the Chance sisters as the name for the series, that was me. The seasonal titles was the publisher’s choice.
    I’m so glad you liked Freddy on Pride and Prejudice. I hope you enjoy the series.

    Reply
  99. Donna, if you mean who thought up the Chance sisters as the name for the series, that was me. The seasonal titles was the publisher’s choice.
    I’m so glad you liked Freddy on Pride and Prejudice. I hope you enjoy the series.

    Reply
  100. Donna, if you mean who thought up the Chance sisters as the name for the series, that was me. The seasonal titles was the publisher’s choice.
    I’m so glad you liked Freddy on Pride and Prejudice. I hope you enjoy the series.

    Reply
  101. Oh, thanks so much for those very kind comments, Janga — I’m thrilled you love my Freddy. And yes, when he first walked onto the page in Autumn Bride, muttering dire things about muffins, he reminded me a bit of Heyer’s Freddy Standen a bit too, hence his name.
    BTW I’m not sure if Gallant Waif is going to be available — I hope so, but for some reason the first book of mine Harlequin has issued as an e-book is An Honourable Thief.
    I think it’d be wonderful fun to write a female adventure story, but since I write romance, I’ll always want to put a male in there to share the adventure.

    Reply
  102. Oh, thanks so much for those very kind comments, Janga — I’m thrilled you love my Freddy. And yes, when he first walked onto the page in Autumn Bride, muttering dire things about muffins, he reminded me a bit of Heyer’s Freddy Standen a bit too, hence his name.
    BTW I’m not sure if Gallant Waif is going to be available — I hope so, but for some reason the first book of mine Harlequin has issued as an e-book is An Honourable Thief.
    I think it’d be wonderful fun to write a female adventure story, but since I write romance, I’ll always want to put a male in there to share the adventure.

    Reply
  103. Oh, thanks so much for those very kind comments, Janga — I’m thrilled you love my Freddy. And yes, when he first walked onto the page in Autumn Bride, muttering dire things about muffins, he reminded me a bit of Heyer’s Freddy Standen a bit too, hence his name.
    BTW I’m not sure if Gallant Waif is going to be available — I hope so, but for some reason the first book of mine Harlequin has issued as an e-book is An Honourable Thief.
    I think it’d be wonderful fun to write a female adventure story, but since I write romance, I’ll always want to put a male in there to share the adventure.

    Reply
  104. Oh, thanks so much for those very kind comments, Janga — I’m thrilled you love my Freddy. And yes, when he first walked onto the page in Autumn Bride, muttering dire things about muffins, he reminded me a bit of Heyer’s Freddy Standen a bit too, hence his name.
    BTW I’m not sure if Gallant Waif is going to be available — I hope so, but for some reason the first book of mine Harlequin has issued as an e-book is An Honourable Thief.
    I think it’d be wonderful fun to write a female adventure story, but since I write romance, I’ll always want to put a male in there to share the adventure.

    Reply
  105. Oh, thanks so much for those very kind comments, Janga — I’m thrilled you love my Freddy. And yes, when he first walked onto the page in Autumn Bride, muttering dire things about muffins, he reminded me a bit of Heyer’s Freddy Standen a bit too, hence his name.
    BTW I’m not sure if Gallant Waif is going to be available — I hope so, but for some reason the first book of mine Harlequin has issued as an e-book is An Honourable Thief.
    I think it’d be wonderful fun to write a female adventure story, but since I write romance, I’ll always want to put a male in there to share the adventure.

    Reply
  106. Vicki–
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    Reply
  107. Vicki–
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    Reply
  108. Vicki–
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    Reply
  109. Vicki–
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    Reply
  110. Vicki–
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    Reply
  111. HUGE CONGRATS on the RITA nomination! I LOVED The Autumn Bride and cannot wait to read The Winter Bride!
    For me the difference between male linked series and female linked series is a matter of insight and subtleties. Men and women ARE different, but not nearly so much as we think. The things that connect women are different from the things that connect men and the ways those things are portrayed are different as well.
    Both types of series, if well-written (which yours most definitely are) give us an window into the human condition at its deepest level – our fears, our hopes, our dreams, our secrets, our foibles – everything that makes us human. And anything that helps men and women understand each other a bit more is always a good thing!

    Reply
  112. HUGE CONGRATS on the RITA nomination! I LOVED The Autumn Bride and cannot wait to read The Winter Bride!
    For me the difference between male linked series and female linked series is a matter of insight and subtleties. Men and women ARE different, but not nearly so much as we think. The things that connect women are different from the things that connect men and the ways those things are portrayed are different as well.
    Both types of series, if well-written (which yours most definitely are) give us an window into the human condition at its deepest level – our fears, our hopes, our dreams, our secrets, our foibles – everything that makes us human. And anything that helps men and women understand each other a bit more is always a good thing!

    Reply
  113. HUGE CONGRATS on the RITA nomination! I LOVED The Autumn Bride and cannot wait to read The Winter Bride!
    For me the difference between male linked series and female linked series is a matter of insight and subtleties. Men and women ARE different, but not nearly so much as we think. The things that connect women are different from the things that connect men and the ways those things are portrayed are different as well.
    Both types of series, if well-written (which yours most definitely are) give us an window into the human condition at its deepest level – our fears, our hopes, our dreams, our secrets, our foibles – everything that makes us human. And anything that helps men and women understand each other a bit more is always a good thing!

    Reply
  114. HUGE CONGRATS on the RITA nomination! I LOVED The Autumn Bride and cannot wait to read The Winter Bride!
    For me the difference between male linked series and female linked series is a matter of insight and subtleties. Men and women ARE different, but not nearly so much as we think. The things that connect women are different from the things that connect men and the ways those things are portrayed are different as well.
    Both types of series, if well-written (which yours most definitely are) give us an window into the human condition at its deepest level – our fears, our hopes, our dreams, our secrets, our foibles – everything that makes us human. And anything that helps men and women understand each other a bit more is always a good thing!

    Reply
  115. HUGE CONGRATS on the RITA nomination! I LOVED The Autumn Bride and cannot wait to read The Winter Bride!
    For me the difference between male linked series and female linked series is a matter of insight and subtleties. Men and women ARE different, but not nearly so much as we think. The things that connect women are different from the things that connect men and the ways those things are portrayed are different as well.
    Both types of series, if well-written (which yours most definitely are) give us an window into the human condition at its deepest level – our fears, our hopes, our dreams, our secrets, our foibles – everything that makes us human. And anything that helps men and women understand each other a bit more is always a good thing!

    Reply
  116. I believe women in groups tend to focus more on their own interaction, sharing thoughts,ideas, and feelings as events unfold in their lives. A similar group of men would face joint events in terms of how to overcome obstacles and support each other with actions more so than with words. I suppose the two could be labeled as subjective versus objective attitudes, yes?
    I’ve read The Autumn Bride where I was already interested in Damaris. So glad her turn is next!

    Reply
  117. I believe women in groups tend to focus more on their own interaction, sharing thoughts,ideas, and feelings as events unfold in their lives. A similar group of men would face joint events in terms of how to overcome obstacles and support each other with actions more so than with words. I suppose the two could be labeled as subjective versus objective attitudes, yes?
    I’ve read The Autumn Bride where I was already interested in Damaris. So glad her turn is next!

    Reply
  118. I believe women in groups tend to focus more on their own interaction, sharing thoughts,ideas, and feelings as events unfold in their lives. A similar group of men would face joint events in terms of how to overcome obstacles and support each other with actions more so than with words. I suppose the two could be labeled as subjective versus objective attitudes, yes?
    I’ve read The Autumn Bride where I was already interested in Damaris. So glad her turn is next!

    Reply
  119. I believe women in groups tend to focus more on their own interaction, sharing thoughts,ideas, and feelings as events unfold in their lives. A similar group of men would face joint events in terms of how to overcome obstacles and support each other with actions more so than with words. I suppose the two could be labeled as subjective versus objective attitudes, yes?
    I’ve read The Autumn Bride where I was already interested in Damaris. So glad her turn is next!

    Reply
  120. I believe women in groups tend to focus more on their own interaction, sharing thoughts,ideas, and feelings as events unfold in their lives. A similar group of men would face joint events in terms of how to overcome obstacles and support each other with actions more so than with words. I suppose the two could be labeled as subjective versus objective attitudes, yes?
    I’ve read The Autumn Bride where I was already interested in Damaris. So glad her turn is next!

    Reply
  121. Thanks, Dee — I think that’s a very good outline of how men and women interact differently. Having just spent the last week on a writing retreat with eight other women, I can’t help but wonder how it might be different with all men. I hope you enjoy Damaris and Freddy.

    Reply
  122. Thanks, Dee — I think that’s a very good outline of how men and women interact differently. Having just spent the last week on a writing retreat with eight other women, I can’t help but wonder how it might be different with all men. I hope you enjoy Damaris and Freddy.

    Reply
  123. Thanks, Dee — I think that’s a very good outline of how men and women interact differently. Having just spent the last week on a writing retreat with eight other women, I can’t help but wonder how it might be different with all men. I hope you enjoy Damaris and Freddy.

    Reply
  124. Thanks, Dee — I think that’s a very good outline of how men and women interact differently. Having just spent the last week on a writing retreat with eight other women, I can’t help but wonder how it might be different with all men. I hope you enjoy Damaris and Freddy.

    Reply
  125. Thanks, Dee — I think that’s a very good outline of how men and women interact differently. Having just spent the last week on a writing retreat with eight other women, I can’t help but wonder how it might be different with all men. I hope you enjoy Damaris and Freddy.

    Reply
  126. I don’t know. The Perfect series started with a huge adventure but with the sisters, not the men in the stories though I suppose the men’s walks to the alter were their own adventures 😉 And your Devil Riders started with a runaway wife with a dead husband (and the puppy…tch tch 😉 )so when I read your stories, I think the mix is much more even when you write. Not that I care much. You could pass me your grocery list and I’d snatch it up to read in a heartbeat…

    Reply
  127. I don’t know. The Perfect series started with a huge adventure but with the sisters, not the men in the stories though I suppose the men’s walks to the alter were their own adventures 😉 And your Devil Riders started with a runaway wife with a dead husband (and the puppy…tch tch 😉 )so when I read your stories, I think the mix is much more even when you write. Not that I care much. You could pass me your grocery list and I’d snatch it up to read in a heartbeat…

    Reply
  128. I don’t know. The Perfect series started with a huge adventure but with the sisters, not the men in the stories though I suppose the men’s walks to the alter were their own adventures 😉 And your Devil Riders started with a runaway wife with a dead husband (and the puppy…tch tch 😉 )so when I read your stories, I think the mix is much more even when you write. Not that I care much. You could pass me your grocery list and I’d snatch it up to read in a heartbeat…

    Reply
  129. I don’t know. The Perfect series started with a huge adventure but with the sisters, not the men in the stories though I suppose the men’s walks to the alter were their own adventures 😉 And your Devil Riders started with a runaway wife with a dead husband (and the puppy…tch tch 😉 )so when I read your stories, I think the mix is much more even when you write. Not that I care much. You could pass me your grocery list and I’d snatch it up to read in a heartbeat…

    Reply
  130. I don’t know. The Perfect series started with a huge adventure but with the sisters, not the men in the stories though I suppose the men’s walks to the alter were their own adventures 😉 And your Devil Riders started with a runaway wife with a dead husband (and the puppy…tch tch 😉 )so when I read your stories, I think the mix is much more even when you write. Not that I care much. You could pass me your grocery list and I’d snatch it up to read in a heartbeat…

    Reply
  131. I guess the main difference is how men and women bond and maintain friendships because of the different activities available to them — especially in historical novels. While women might be sent off to school, their education was focused differently than that of men. Men could bond at school, at war, etc. Women mostly bonded over domestic matters. (lucky them -.- )

    Reply
  132. I guess the main difference is how men and women bond and maintain friendships because of the different activities available to them — especially in historical novels. While women might be sent off to school, their education was focused differently than that of men. Men could bond at school, at war, etc. Women mostly bonded over domestic matters. (lucky them -.- )

    Reply
  133. I guess the main difference is how men and women bond and maintain friendships because of the different activities available to them — especially in historical novels. While women might be sent off to school, their education was focused differently than that of men. Men could bond at school, at war, etc. Women mostly bonded over domestic matters. (lucky them -.- )

    Reply
  134. I guess the main difference is how men and women bond and maintain friendships because of the different activities available to them — especially in historical novels. While women might be sent off to school, their education was focused differently than that of men. Men could bond at school, at war, etc. Women mostly bonded over domestic matters. (lucky them -.- )

    Reply
  135. I guess the main difference is how men and women bond and maintain friendships because of the different activities available to them — especially in historical novels. While women might be sent off to school, their education was focused differently than that of men. Men could bond at school, at war, etc. Women mostly bonded over domestic matters. (lucky them -.- )

    Reply
  136. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both.

    Reply
  137. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both.

    Reply
  138. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both.

    Reply
  139. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both.

    Reply
  140. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both.

    Reply
  141. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both
    Sorry. I first posted this in the wrong thread.

    Reply
  142. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both
    Sorry. I first posted this in the wrong thread.

    Reply
  143. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both
    Sorry. I first posted this in the wrong thread.

    Reply
  144. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both
    Sorry. I first posted this in the wrong thread.

    Reply
  145. Anne, according to Amazon, both An Honorable Thief and Gallant Waif will be released for Kindle on April 15. I pre-ordered both
    Sorry. I first posted this in the wrong thread.

    Reply
  146. I think the differences are similar to the difference between men and women – the male linked series are usually more about men’s goals and adventures and the women linked series usually follow women’s search for happiness and fullfillment.

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  147. I think the differences are similar to the difference between men and women – the male linked series are usually more about men’s goals and adventures and the women linked series usually follow women’s search for happiness and fullfillment.

    Reply
  148. I think the differences are similar to the difference between men and women – the male linked series are usually more about men’s goals and adventures and the women linked series usually follow women’s search for happiness and fullfillment.

    Reply
  149. I think the differences are similar to the difference between men and women – the male linked series are usually more about men’s goals and adventures and the women linked series usually follow women’s search for happiness and fullfillment.

    Reply
  150. I think the differences are similar to the difference between men and women – the male linked series are usually more about men’s goals and adventures and the women linked series usually follow women’s search for happiness and fullfillment.

    Reply
  151. Thanks for the lovely compliment, Theo — though I have to say my grocery list is tres dull. But as for adventure, I think I do mix it up a bit more so the difference isn’t quite so clear-cut. It was a good question Mary Jo asked (and I passed on) — and has given me much food for thought.

    Reply
  152. Thanks for the lovely compliment, Theo — though I have to say my grocery list is tres dull. But as for adventure, I think I do mix it up a bit more so the difference isn’t quite so clear-cut. It was a good question Mary Jo asked (and I passed on) — and has given me much food for thought.

    Reply
  153. Thanks for the lovely compliment, Theo — though I have to say my grocery list is tres dull. But as for adventure, I think I do mix it up a bit more so the difference isn’t quite so clear-cut. It was a good question Mary Jo asked (and I passed on) — and has given me much food for thought.

    Reply
  154. Thanks for the lovely compliment, Theo — though I have to say my grocery list is tres dull. But as for adventure, I think I do mix it up a bit more so the difference isn’t quite so clear-cut. It was a good question Mary Jo asked (and I passed on) — and has given me much food for thought.

    Reply
  155. Thanks for the lovely compliment, Theo — though I have to say my grocery list is tres dull. But as for adventure, I think I do mix it up a bit more so the difference isn’t quite so clear-cut. It was a good question Mary Jo asked (and I passed on) — and has given me much food for thought.

    Reply
  156. Glenda, that’s true — most of my male character friends bonded either in school or the army or both, while the girls were related – or pretended to be. Though Gideon in The Perfect Rake was best friends with his cousin.

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  157. Glenda, that’s true — most of my male character friends bonded either in school or the army or both, while the girls were related – or pretended to be. Though Gideon in The Perfect Rake was best friends with his cousin.

    Reply
  158. Glenda, that’s true — most of my male character friends bonded either in school or the army or both, while the girls were related – or pretended to be. Though Gideon in The Perfect Rake was best friends with his cousin.

    Reply
  159. Glenda, that’s true — most of my male character friends bonded either in school or the army or both, while the girls were related – or pretended to be. Though Gideon in The Perfect Rake was best friends with his cousin.

    Reply
  160. Glenda, that’s true — most of my male character friends bonded either in school or the army or both, while the girls were related – or pretended to be. Though Gideon in The Perfect Rake was best friends with his cousin.

    Reply
  161. I’m having difficulties thinking of female series where the women are not linked by family. With male series that does happen, of course, but more often there’s a non-family link, such as in Jo Beverley’s Company of Rogues. This isn’t that surprising for historical fiction, when one thinks about it, given that women had much less opportunity to form links based on what they did as opposed to who they were. Going to school is one thing they might both do, and so that does form a link for some female series as well as male ones.

    Reply
  162. I’m having difficulties thinking of female series where the women are not linked by family. With male series that does happen, of course, but more often there’s a non-family link, such as in Jo Beverley’s Company of Rogues. This isn’t that surprising for historical fiction, when one thinks about it, given that women had much less opportunity to form links based on what they did as opposed to who they were. Going to school is one thing they might both do, and so that does form a link for some female series as well as male ones.

    Reply
  163. I’m having difficulties thinking of female series where the women are not linked by family. With male series that does happen, of course, but more often there’s a non-family link, such as in Jo Beverley’s Company of Rogues. This isn’t that surprising for historical fiction, when one thinks about it, given that women had much less opportunity to form links based on what they did as opposed to who they were. Going to school is one thing they might both do, and so that does form a link for some female series as well as male ones.

    Reply
  164. I’m having difficulties thinking of female series where the women are not linked by family. With male series that does happen, of course, but more often there’s a non-family link, such as in Jo Beverley’s Company of Rogues. This isn’t that surprising for historical fiction, when one thinks about it, given that women had much less opportunity to form links based on what they did as opposed to who they were. Going to school is one thing they might both do, and so that does form a link for some female series as well as male ones.

    Reply
  165. I’m having difficulties thinking of female series where the women are not linked by family. With male series that does happen, of course, but more often there’s a non-family link, such as in Jo Beverley’s Company of Rogues. This isn’t that surprising for historical fiction, when one thinks about it, given that women had much less opportunity to form links based on what they did as opposed to who they were. Going to school is one thing they might both do, and so that does form a link for some female series as well as male ones.

    Reply
  166. HJ–
    One thing I like about this series of Anne’s is that only two of the Chance Sisters are connected by blood–the others are sisters of circumstance, which is an usual bond. But a good one!

    Reply
  167. HJ–
    One thing I like about this series of Anne’s is that only two of the Chance Sisters are connected by blood–the others are sisters of circumstance, which is an usual bond. But a good one!

    Reply
  168. HJ–
    One thing I like about this series of Anne’s is that only two of the Chance Sisters are connected by blood–the others are sisters of circumstance, which is an usual bond. But a good one!

    Reply
  169. HJ–
    One thing I like about this series of Anne’s is that only two of the Chance Sisters are connected by blood–the others are sisters of circumstance, which is an usual bond. But a good one!

    Reply
  170. HJ–
    One thing I like about this series of Anne’s is that only two of the Chance Sisters are connected by blood–the others are sisters of circumstance, which is an usual bond. But a good one!

    Reply
  171. MJP said in reply to Vicki…
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    I absolutely agree! I’m reading MJPs the ‘Fallen Angels’ series at the moment and love the way that the old male school chums come together in later life adventures. Some western series are simillar, eg The ‘Whispering Mountain’ series by Jodi Thomas or the ‘Only’ series by Elizabeth Lowell. Adventure mixed with romance can be a very heady mix!
    By contrast the ‘Sweet Magnolias’ series by Sherryl Woods for example involves a group of women in more mundane ‘real life’ situations and didn’t fire my interest to the same degree, though I did enjoy the first book in the series.
    Afraid I haven’t tried an Anne Gracie novel yet. Given my predilection for outdoor adventure mixed with romance, is there a particular novel that would be good for starters?

    Reply
  172. MJP said in reply to Vicki…
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    I absolutely agree! I’m reading MJPs the ‘Fallen Angels’ series at the moment and love the way that the old male school chums come together in later life adventures. Some western series are simillar, eg The ‘Whispering Mountain’ series by Jodi Thomas or the ‘Only’ series by Elizabeth Lowell. Adventure mixed with romance can be a very heady mix!
    By contrast the ‘Sweet Magnolias’ series by Sherryl Woods for example involves a group of women in more mundane ‘real life’ situations and didn’t fire my interest to the same degree, though I did enjoy the first book in the series.
    Afraid I haven’t tried an Anne Gracie novel yet. Given my predilection for outdoor adventure mixed with romance, is there a particular novel that would be good for starters?

    Reply
  173. MJP said in reply to Vicki…
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    I absolutely agree! I’m reading MJPs the ‘Fallen Angels’ series at the moment and love the way that the old male school chums come together in later life adventures. Some western series are simillar, eg The ‘Whispering Mountain’ series by Jodi Thomas or the ‘Only’ series by Elizabeth Lowell. Adventure mixed with romance can be a very heady mix!
    By contrast the ‘Sweet Magnolias’ series by Sherryl Woods for example involves a group of women in more mundane ‘real life’ situations and didn’t fire my interest to the same degree, though I did enjoy the first book in the series.
    Afraid I haven’t tried an Anne Gracie novel yet. Given my predilection for outdoor adventure mixed with romance, is there a particular novel that would be good for starters?

    Reply
  174. MJP said in reply to Vicki…
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    I absolutely agree! I’m reading MJPs the ‘Fallen Angels’ series at the moment and love the way that the old male school chums come together in later life adventures. Some western series are simillar, eg The ‘Whispering Mountain’ series by Jodi Thomas or the ‘Only’ series by Elizabeth Lowell. Adventure mixed with romance can be a very heady mix!
    By contrast the ‘Sweet Magnolias’ series by Sherryl Woods for example involves a group of women in more mundane ‘real life’ situations and didn’t fire my interest to the same degree, though I did enjoy the first book in the series.
    Afraid I haven’t tried an Anne Gracie novel yet. Given my predilection for outdoor adventure mixed with romance, is there a particular novel that would be good for starters?

    Reply
  175. MJP said in reply to Vicki…
    You just made me understand why I’ve always done male centered series rather than female centered: I like action and adventure, and that flows more naturally from a group of guys. As you note, I try to send each couple in a different direction with a different sort of story so things don’t get too repetitive.

    I absolutely agree! I’m reading MJPs the ‘Fallen Angels’ series at the moment and love the way that the old male school chums come together in later life adventures. Some western series are simillar, eg The ‘Whispering Mountain’ series by Jodi Thomas or the ‘Only’ series by Elizabeth Lowell. Adventure mixed with romance can be a very heady mix!
    By contrast the ‘Sweet Magnolias’ series by Sherryl Woods for example involves a group of women in more mundane ‘real life’ situations and didn’t fire my interest to the same degree, though I did enjoy the first book in the series.
    Afraid I haven’t tried an Anne Gracie novel yet. Given my predilection for outdoor adventure mixed with romance, is there a particular novel that would be good for starters?

    Reply
  176. Hj, I think there have been female-linked historical series where the women have been linked to a school, I think as teachers, and another I remember vaguely where they all found work through the same employment agency, so it’s not always family. Though you’re right, family is by far the commonest.

    Reply
  177. Hj, I think there have been female-linked historical series where the women have been linked to a school, I think as teachers, and another I remember vaguely where they all found work through the same employment agency, so it’s not always family. Though you’re right, family is by far the commonest.

    Reply
  178. Hj, I think there have been female-linked historical series where the women have been linked to a school, I think as teachers, and another I remember vaguely where they all found work through the same employment agency, so it’s not always family. Though you’re right, family is by far the commonest.

    Reply
  179. Hj, I think there have been female-linked historical series where the women have been linked to a school, I think as teachers, and another I remember vaguely where they all found work through the same employment agency, so it’s not always family. Though you’re right, family is by far the commonest.

    Reply
  180. Hj, I think there have been female-linked historical series where the women have been linked to a school, I think as teachers, and another I remember vaguely where they all found work through the same employment agency, so it’s not always family. Though you’re right, family is by far the commonest.

    Reply
  181. Quantum, I’ve written a few you might call adventurous – mostly overseas settings/road trip kind of stories. Try Bride By Mistake, or Bride By Mistake.
    But The Autumn Bride also contains some adventurous moments, in this case the heroine being bold and brave, so you could try that.

    Reply
  182. Quantum, I’ve written a few you might call adventurous – mostly overseas settings/road trip kind of stories. Try Bride By Mistake, or Bride By Mistake.
    But The Autumn Bride also contains some adventurous moments, in this case the heroine being bold and brave, so you could try that.

    Reply
  183. Quantum, I’ve written a few you might call adventurous – mostly overseas settings/road trip kind of stories. Try Bride By Mistake, or Bride By Mistake.
    But The Autumn Bride also contains some adventurous moments, in this case the heroine being bold and brave, so you could try that.

    Reply
  184. Quantum, I’ve written a few you might call adventurous – mostly overseas settings/road trip kind of stories. Try Bride By Mistake, or Bride By Mistake.
    But The Autumn Bride also contains some adventurous moments, in this case the heroine being bold and brave, so you could try that.

    Reply
  185. Quantum, I’ve written a few you might call adventurous – mostly overseas settings/road trip kind of stories. Try Bride By Mistake, or Bride By Mistake.
    But The Autumn Bride also contains some adventurous moments, in this case the heroine being bold and brave, so you could try that.

    Reply
  186. Male linked series have more adventure and travel. Women linked series usually involve ton pursuits (balls, house parties).
    Congrats on the RITA nomination, Anne! I’m looking forward to reading Damaris and Freddy’s story.
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  187. Male linked series have more adventure and travel. Women linked series usually involve ton pursuits (balls, house parties).
    Congrats on the RITA nomination, Anne! I’m looking forward to reading Damaris and Freddy’s story.
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  188. Male linked series have more adventure and travel. Women linked series usually involve ton pursuits (balls, house parties).
    Congrats on the RITA nomination, Anne! I’m looking forward to reading Damaris and Freddy’s story.
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  189. Male linked series have more adventure and travel. Women linked series usually involve ton pursuits (balls, house parties).
    Congrats on the RITA nomination, Anne! I’m looking forward to reading Damaris and Freddy’s story.
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  190. Male linked series have more adventure and travel. Women linked series usually involve ton pursuits (balls, house parties).
    Congrats on the RITA nomination, Anne! I’m looking forward to reading Damaris and Freddy’s story.
    bmndshuler(at)hotmail(dot)com

    Reply
  191. Thanks so much Marcy. I was told by a former editor that I had a bad habit of not setting my books in London or bath, and that readers preferred the ton/society settings more. But I get a bit bored, and like to vary it around. I enjoy the society events and the glamor, but I also like road trip stories and foreign settings.

    Reply
  192. Thanks so much Marcy. I was told by a former editor that I had a bad habit of not setting my books in London or bath, and that readers preferred the ton/society settings more. But I get a bit bored, and like to vary it around. I enjoy the society events and the glamor, but I also like road trip stories and foreign settings.

    Reply
  193. Thanks so much Marcy. I was told by a former editor that I had a bad habit of not setting my books in London or bath, and that readers preferred the ton/society settings more. But I get a bit bored, and like to vary it around. I enjoy the society events and the glamor, but I also like road trip stories and foreign settings.

    Reply
  194. Thanks so much Marcy. I was told by a former editor that I had a bad habit of not setting my books in London or bath, and that readers preferred the ton/society settings more. But I get a bit bored, and like to vary it around. I enjoy the society events and the glamor, but I also like road trip stories and foreign settings.

    Reply
  195. Thanks so much Marcy. I was told by a former editor that I had a bad habit of not setting my books in London or bath, and that readers preferred the ton/society settings more. But I get a bit bored, and like to vary it around. I enjoy the society events and the glamor, but I also like road trip stories and foreign settings.

    Reply
  196. I’ve never heard of the term male linked/female linked series but i’m guessing it’s that the series is based on male characters from the previous books?
    Love your books Anne! A particular fav is The Gallant Waif which I faithfully sob over every time I reread it.

    Reply
  197. I’ve never heard of the term male linked/female linked series but i’m guessing it’s that the series is based on male characters from the previous books?
    Love your books Anne! A particular fav is The Gallant Waif which I faithfully sob over every time I reread it.

    Reply
  198. I’ve never heard of the term male linked/female linked series but i’m guessing it’s that the series is based on male characters from the previous books?
    Love your books Anne! A particular fav is The Gallant Waif which I faithfully sob over every time I reread it.

    Reply
  199. I’ve never heard of the term male linked/female linked series but i’m guessing it’s that the series is based on male characters from the previous books?
    Love your books Anne! A particular fav is The Gallant Waif which I faithfully sob over every time I reread it.

    Reply
  200. I’ve never heard of the term male linked/female linked series but i’m guessing it’s that the series is based on male characters from the previous books?
    Love your books Anne! A particular fav is The Gallant Waif which I faithfully sob over every time I reread it.

    Reply
  201. Linda, my first series for Berkley, each of which had ‘Perfect’ in the title was a female linked series, linked by the Merridew sisters. The next series, the Devil Riders, was a male-linked series, with the men in each books all friends and comrades. Hope that helps.
    Thanks so much for your very kind words about gallant Waif — it was my first book and is dear to my heart.

    Reply
  202. Linda, my first series for Berkley, each of which had ‘Perfect’ in the title was a female linked series, linked by the Merridew sisters. The next series, the Devil Riders, was a male-linked series, with the men in each books all friends and comrades. Hope that helps.
    Thanks so much for your very kind words about gallant Waif — it was my first book and is dear to my heart.

    Reply
  203. Linda, my first series for Berkley, each of which had ‘Perfect’ in the title was a female linked series, linked by the Merridew sisters. The next series, the Devil Riders, was a male-linked series, with the men in each books all friends and comrades. Hope that helps.
    Thanks so much for your very kind words about gallant Waif — it was my first book and is dear to my heart.

    Reply
  204. Linda, my first series for Berkley, each of which had ‘Perfect’ in the title was a female linked series, linked by the Merridew sisters. The next series, the Devil Riders, was a male-linked series, with the men in each books all friends and comrades. Hope that helps.
    Thanks so much for your very kind words about gallant Waif — it was my first book and is dear to my heart.

    Reply
  205. Linda, my first series for Berkley, each of which had ‘Perfect’ in the title was a female linked series, linked by the Merridew sisters. The next series, the Devil Riders, was a male-linked series, with the men in each books all friends and comrades. Hope that helps.
    Thanks so much for your very kind words about gallant Waif — it was my first book and is dear to my heart.

    Reply
  206. Coming in late here – I think the strongest concept I’ve seen for a male-linked series is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Prince books – where a shared interest brings three utterly distinct men together, men who are otherwise improbable companions.
    Looking forward to the Winter Bride – Freddy looks like a fabulous hero!

    Reply
  207. Coming in late here – I think the strongest concept I’ve seen for a male-linked series is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Prince books – where a shared interest brings three utterly distinct men together, men who are otherwise improbable companions.
    Looking forward to the Winter Bride – Freddy looks like a fabulous hero!

    Reply
  208. Coming in late here – I think the strongest concept I’ve seen for a male-linked series is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Prince books – where a shared interest brings three utterly distinct men together, men who are otherwise improbable companions.
    Looking forward to the Winter Bride – Freddy looks like a fabulous hero!

    Reply
  209. Coming in late here – I think the strongest concept I’ve seen for a male-linked series is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Prince books – where a shared interest brings three utterly distinct men together, men who are otherwise improbable companions.
    Looking forward to the Winter Bride – Freddy looks like a fabulous hero!

    Reply
  210. Coming in late here – I think the strongest concept I’ve seen for a male-linked series is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Prince books – where a shared interest brings three utterly distinct men together, men who are otherwise improbable companions.
    Looking forward to the Winter Bride – Freddy looks like a fabulous hero!

    Reply
  211. Wow, thanks, Janga — I had no idea about Gallant Waif. I wish they’d release Tallie’s Knight — that book had a series of experimental releases, and didn’t do as well as the others, but I get the most mail about Tallie still.

    Reply
  212. Wow, thanks, Janga — I had no idea about Gallant Waif. I wish they’d release Tallie’s Knight — that book had a series of experimental releases, and didn’t do as well as the others, but I get the most mail about Tallie still.

    Reply
  213. Wow, thanks, Janga — I had no idea about Gallant Waif. I wish they’d release Tallie’s Knight — that book had a series of experimental releases, and didn’t do as well as the others, but I get the most mail about Tallie still.

    Reply
  214. Wow, thanks, Janga — I had no idea about Gallant Waif. I wish they’d release Tallie’s Knight — that book had a series of experimental releases, and didn’t do as well as the others, but I get the most mail about Tallie still.

    Reply
  215. Wow, thanks, Janga — I had no idea about Gallant Waif. I wish they’d release Tallie’s Knight — that book had a series of experimental releases, and didn’t do as well as the others, but I get the most mail about Tallie still.

    Reply
  216. Thanks, Louisa, the RITA final was an unexpected thrill. Now I’m dithering about whether to go to Texas for the conference or not.
    Wonderfully insightful comment about the male and female linked series. I think the way men and women connect are different, but deep down the hopes and fears and secret anxieties are what makes people fascinating. Thank you.

    Reply
  217. Thanks, Louisa, the RITA final was an unexpected thrill. Now I’m dithering about whether to go to Texas for the conference or not.
    Wonderfully insightful comment about the male and female linked series. I think the way men and women connect are different, but deep down the hopes and fears and secret anxieties are what makes people fascinating. Thank you.

    Reply
  218. Thanks, Louisa, the RITA final was an unexpected thrill. Now I’m dithering about whether to go to Texas for the conference or not.
    Wonderfully insightful comment about the male and female linked series. I think the way men and women connect are different, but deep down the hopes and fears and secret anxieties are what makes people fascinating. Thank you.

    Reply
  219. Thanks, Louisa, the RITA final was an unexpected thrill. Now I’m dithering about whether to go to Texas for the conference or not.
    Wonderfully insightful comment about the male and female linked series. I think the way men and women connect are different, but deep down the hopes and fears and secret anxieties are what makes people fascinating. Thank you.

    Reply
  220. Thanks, Louisa, the RITA final was an unexpected thrill. Now I’m dithering about whether to go to Texas for the conference or not.
    Wonderfully insightful comment about the male and female linked series. I think the way men and women connect are different, but deep down the hopes and fears and secret anxieties are what makes people fascinating. Thank you.

    Reply

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