The Whole Tooth and Nothing But the Tooth

Vigiee  1787

In 1787, this painting made a sensation. She's Showing her Teeth

Joanna here. I've posted before with all my thoughts and beliefs and outright speculation that Regency folk of the middling and upper sorts were probably as cleanly and nice smelling as most folks nowadays. That is not an impeccable standard, as anyone who takes public transportation will testify. But it's also not the universal reek-to-heaven some folks think it must be.

So let's wander into the question of oral hygiene, shall we?
(And I promise not to go into anything even vaguely touching upon tooth-ache and tooth-drawers and suchlike horrors because some of you are sitting down with a nice croissant and café au lait and you do not deserve to be harrowed to your marrow.)

What did Regency folk use as toothbrushes?
Well … They used toothbrushes.

Taking into account the sad fact that our Regency folk didn't have plastic and were therefore unable to make their dental implements in screaming magenta and electric green stripes, they still did pretty well. The business end of the toothbrush was of stiff boar bristles or —  like this one over on the right  —  horsehair. The handles were ivory, wood, or bone, carved for a firm yet graceful grip.

Napoleon’s_toothbrush,_c_1795. by science museum london

This belonged to Napoleon. Could be gold, I suppose

 

Toothbrushes were commercially available in the Regency, one of the early companies being founded by William Addis in 1780. He is said to have worked out the manufacturing technique while in prison for rioting. As one does.  

I have to request the favour of you to send me three or four shirts, some cravats, handkerchiefs, night-caps, stockings, &c. out of my drawers, together with comb, soap, toothbrush, with any other trifle that presents itself, which you think I may have occasion for.
          Kirby's Wonderful and Eccentric Museum, Vol 4, R. S. Kirby

The poor were not yet possessors of toothbrushes, but they coped, as they always do.

These ordinary details of life often don't leave much archeological evidence and the folks producing written records at the time weren't interested enough to tell us, but it's likely common folk cleaned their teeth with a bit of cloth and some water and maybe a bit of salt. Or they cut sticks from the branches of a tree or bush or dug up some likely fibrous roots. They'd pound or chew one end of the little stick ragged and brush-like to make quite a fine tooth-cleaning tool. This is still a traditional method worldwide and works just fine.

Given a choice between a fancy boar-bristle toothbrush used for months or years and a nice bit of sassafras twig I'd cut fresh every day or so, I think I'd go for the methods of the poor.

Root box silver paris 1727 to 32 met

Silver root box about 1730, from the Met

Though the root and twig method was also used by the wealthy. Oh yes. Here to the left is a silver box from Paris used for storing your tooth-clean roots of marshmallow, licorice or lucerne (which in this case is not the city but Cytisus proliferus, a "small, spreading evergreen tree".)

How to Make an Excellent Tooth Brush:
Procure two or three dozen of the fresh roots of marshmallows, and dry them carefully in the shade, so that they may not shrivel. They must be chosen about as thick as a cane, and cut to five or six inches long, then with a mallet bruise the ends of them very gently, for about half an inch down, in order to form a brush. Then take two ounces of dragon's blood, four ounces of highly rectified spirit, and half an ounce of fresh conserve of roses, and put them in a glazed pipkin or pan, to dissolve over a gentle fire. When dissolved, put in your prepared mallow-roots, stirring them to make them take the dye equally. Continue this till no moisture Miswak2remains in the vessel, when the roots will be hard, dry, and fit for use. If you take care of them, they will last you a considerable time.
‪          The Complete Servant‬: ‪Being a Practical Guide to the Peculiar Duties and Business of All Descriptions of Servants‬,  Knight and Lacey, 1825

(Dragon's blood, you will be relieved to know, just means 'a red dye'. It could come from any number of sources, though probably not giant saurians.)

Which brings us to toothpaste. Or, as they called in the Regency era, tooth powder, which is was. Powder, I mean. The limitless ingenuity of mankind did not bring forth commercial mushy toothpaste till Victorian times. Our earlier folk had to dip their toothbrush into a jar or box of powder or sprinkle it upon the bristles.

The powder would likely contain some abrasive element like finely ground eggshell, bone, gypsum, oyster shell, chalk, brick dust, ash from burnt bread or burnt snuff. Some Regency tooth powders were called 'coral powders' because they were made with ground coral. The second element would be an astringent and cleansing element like salt, shaved soap, myrrh. Maybe they'd toss in a ground herb like licorice or mint (for that minty-fresh taste). 

TROTTER'S ORIENTAL. DENTIFRICE or ASIATIC TOOTH POWDER, has been for twenty years recommended, a single box is a sufficient quantity to ascertain its efficacy and virtues; being acknowled by the most respectable medical authorises, used by many and commended The Powder cleanses and beautifies the teeth, sweetens the breath, possesses no acid that can currode the enamel, and puts a beautiful polish on the teeth.—From its astringently it strengthens the gums, eradicates the scurvy, (which often proves the destruction of a whole set of teeth) and preserves sound teeth from decay.
It is sold wholesale and retail.
          La Belle Assemblée, Volume 2

And our Regency folk — being inventive — did create their own do-it-yourself toothpaste.

Take of fresh conserve of roses, 2oz the juice of half a sour lemon, a little very rough claret, and 6 ounces of coral tooth powder. Make them into a paste, Which put in small pots; and if it dry by standing, moisten with lemon juice and wine, as before.

Do you make any of your own health and beauty aids?  Your own soap? Maybe some face splash from the herb garden?  Some lucky commenter wins any one of my books she chooses.   

200 thoughts on “The Whole Tooth and Nothing But the Tooth”

  1. I can’t remember where I saw it, but there’s a letter by Jane Austen about her taking her nieces to the dentist to have teeth extracted. Men could drink beforehand, but ladies just had to suffer through it…
    Eh, I like the supermarket! I don’t make my own things, but my Ukrainian grandmother sure did!

    Reply
  2. I can’t remember where I saw it, but there’s a letter by Jane Austen about her taking her nieces to the dentist to have teeth extracted. Men could drink beforehand, but ladies just had to suffer through it…
    Eh, I like the supermarket! I don’t make my own things, but my Ukrainian grandmother sure did!

    Reply
  3. I can’t remember where I saw it, but there’s a letter by Jane Austen about her taking her nieces to the dentist to have teeth extracted. Men could drink beforehand, but ladies just had to suffer through it…
    Eh, I like the supermarket! I don’t make my own things, but my Ukrainian grandmother sure did!

    Reply
  4. I can’t remember where I saw it, but there’s a letter by Jane Austen about her taking her nieces to the dentist to have teeth extracted. Men could drink beforehand, but ladies just had to suffer through it…
    Eh, I like the supermarket! I don’t make my own things, but my Ukrainian grandmother sure did!

    Reply
  5. I can’t remember where I saw it, but there’s a letter by Jane Austen about her taking her nieces to the dentist to have teeth extracted. Men could drink beforehand, but ladies just had to suffer through it…
    Eh, I like the supermarket! I don’t make my own things, but my Ukrainian grandmother sure did!

    Reply
  6. I used to love finding old books and trying to follow the recipes in them for beauty products. I can remember finding camomile flowers and making a brew with them to rinse my hair, because the yellow colour was supposed to enhance blonde colouring. I only did it once because I hated the smell! This was before camomile tea became all the rage, and I found it most amusing when it did. Apparently the plant is called Roman camomile because Roman ladies used the flowers for making hair rinses.
    I see to remember that rosemary was used for darker hair. However, many of the recipes, for example for potpourri, needed things like orris root which I couldn’t get hold of.

    Reply
  7. I used to love finding old books and trying to follow the recipes in them for beauty products. I can remember finding camomile flowers and making a brew with them to rinse my hair, because the yellow colour was supposed to enhance blonde colouring. I only did it once because I hated the smell! This was before camomile tea became all the rage, and I found it most amusing when it did. Apparently the plant is called Roman camomile because Roman ladies used the flowers for making hair rinses.
    I see to remember that rosemary was used for darker hair. However, many of the recipes, for example for potpourri, needed things like orris root which I couldn’t get hold of.

    Reply
  8. I used to love finding old books and trying to follow the recipes in them for beauty products. I can remember finding camomile flowers and making a brew with them to rinse my hair, because the yellow colour was supposed to enhance blonde colouring. I only did it once because I hated the smell! This was before camomile tea became all the rage, and I found it most amusing when it did. Apparently the plant is called Roman camomile because Roman ladies used the flowers for making hair rinses.
    I see to remember that rosemary was used for darker hair. However, many of the recipes, for example for potpourri, needed things like orris root which I couldn’t get hold of.

    Reply
  9. I used to love finding old books and trying to follow the recipes in them for beauty products. I can remember finding camomile flowers and making a brew with them to rinse my hair, because the yellow colour was supposed to enhance blonde colouring. I only did it once because I hated the smell! This was before camomile tea became all the rage, and I found it most amusing when it did. Apparently the plant is called Roman camomile because Roman ladies used the flowers for making hair rinses.
    I see to remember that rosemary was used for darker hair. However, many of the recipes, for example for potpourri, needed things like orris root which I couldn’t get hold of.

    Reply
  10. I used to love finding old books and trying to follow the recipes in them for beauty products. I can remember finding camomile flowers and making a brew with them to rinse my hair, because the yellow colour was supposed to enhance blonde colouring. I only did it once because I hated the smell! This was before camomile tea became all the rage, and I found it most amusing when it did. Apparently the plant is called Roman camomile because Roman ladies used the flowers for making hair rinses.
    I see to remember that rosemary was used for darker hair. However, many of the recipes, for example for potpourri, needed things like orris root which I couldn’t get hold of.

    Reply
  11. When I was a girl, one of my friends used baking soda rather than toothpaste. At slumber parties, she would bring some in a plastic sandwich bag and dip her toothbrush into it. I suspect it worked well enough, like the tooth powders of earlier eras. I haven’t tried to make my own beauty products, because my only domestic skill is shopping.
    During her trip around the world, Nellie Bly observed that the peeled twigs used by the Somalis were far superior to the damaging toothbrushes used by westerners.

    Reply
  12. When I was a girl, one of my friends used baking soda rather than toothpaste. At slumber parties, she would bring some in a plastic sandwich bag and dip her toothbrush into it. I suspect it worked well enough, like the tooth powders of earlier eras. I haven’t tried to make my own beauty products, because my only domestic skill is shopping.
    During her trip around the world, Nellie Bly observed that the peeled twigs used by the Somalis were far superior to the damaging toothbrushes used by westerners.

    Reply
  13. When I was a girl, one of my friends used baking soda rather than toothpaste. At slumber parties, she would bring some in a plastic sandwich bag and dip her toothbrush into it. I suspect it worked well enough, like the tooth powders of earlier eras. I haven’t tried to make my own beauty products, because my only domestic skill is shopping.
    During her trip around the world, Nellie Bly observed that the peeled twigs used by the Somalis were far superior to the damaging toothbrushes used by westerners.

    Reply
  14. When I was a girl, one of my friends used baking soda rather than toothpaste. At slumber parties, she would bring some in a plastic sandwich bag and dip her toothbrush into it. I suspect it worked well enough, like the tooth powders of earlier eras. I haven’t tried to make my own beauty products, because my only domestic skill is shopping.
    During her trip around the world, Nellie Bly observed that the peeled twigs used by the Somalis were far superior to the damaging toothbrushes used by westerners.

    Reply
  15. When I was a girl, one of my friends used baking soda rather than toothpaste. At slumber parties, she would bring some in a plastic sandwich bag and dip her toothbrush into it. I suspect it worked well enough, like the tooth powders of earlier eras. I haven’t tried to make my own beauty products, because my only domestic skill is shopping.
    During her trip around the world, Nellie Bly observed that the peeled twigs used by the Somalis were far superior to the damaging toothbrushes used by westerners.

    Reply
  16. And all through the Middle East and East Africa you can still buy bundles of those twigs and little sticks in the market place. They seem to do a perfectly fine job.
    Sassafras is quite a lovely taste and smell. Maybe I should lay in a supply of that kind of root for cleaning the teeth.

    Reply
  17. And all through the Middle East and East Africa you can still buy bundles of those twigs and little sticks in the market place. They seem to do a perfectly fine job.
    Sassafras is quite a lovely taste and smell. Maybe I should lay in a supply of that kind of root for cleaning the teeth.

    Reply
  18. And all through the Middle East and East Africa you can still buy bundles of those twigs and little sticks in the market place. They seem to do a perfectly fine job.
    Sassafras is quite a lovely taste and smell. Maybe I should lay in a supply of that kind of root for cleaning the teeth.

    Reply
  19. And all through the Middle East and East Africa you can still buy bundles of those twigs and little sticks in the market place. They seem to do a perfectly fine job.
    Sassafras is quite a lovely taste and smell. Maybe I should lay in a supply of that kind of root for cleaning the teeth.

    Reply
  20. And all through the Middle East and East Africa you can still buy bundles of those twigs and little sticks in the market place. They seem to do a perfectly fine job.
    Sassafras is quite a lovely taste and smell. Maybe I should lay in a supply of that kind of root for cleaning the teeth.

    Reply
  21. You can still get tooth powder at Whole Foods. It’s not the same ingredients, but it’s not bad!
    Lemon juice is a natural bleach for the hair and lightens it if the hair is exposed to sunshine. It’s what the girls put in their hair in my high school in California when their mothers wouldn’t let them use hair dye to go blonde.

    Reply
  22. You can still get tooth powder at Whole Foods. It’s not the same ingredients, but it’s not bad!
    Lemon juice is a natural bleach for the hair and lightens it if the hair is exposed to sunshine. It’s what the girls put in their hair in my high school in California when their mothers wouldn’t let them use hair dye to go blonde.

    Reply
  23. You can still get tooth powder at Whole Foods. It’s not the same ingredients, but it’s not bad!
    Lemon juice is a natural bleach for the hair and lightens it if the hair is exposed to sunshine. It’s what the girls put in their hair in my high school in California when their mothers wouldn’t let them use hair dye to go blonde.

    Reply
  24. You can still get tooth powder at Whole Foods. It’s not the same ingredients, but it’s not bad!
    Lemon juice is a natural bleach for the hair and lightens it if the hair is exposed to sunshine. It’s what the girls put in their hair in my high school in California when their mothers wouldn’t let them use hair dye to go blonde.

    Reply
  25. You can still get tooth powder at Whole Foods. It’s not the same ingredients, but it’s not bad!
    Lemon juice is a natural bleach for the hair and lightens it if the hair is exposed to sunshine. It’s what the girls put in their hair in my high school in California when their mothers wouldn’t let them use hair dye to go blonde.

    Reply
  26. I see tooth powder in some small, old-fashioned drugstores in the South. Baking soda and salt, I think.
    I’ve always wondered if lemon juice actually did do anything to hair color … and yet it’s traditional.

    Reply
  27. I see tooth powder in some small, old-fashioned drugstores in the South. Baking soda and salt, I think.
    I’ve always wondered if lemon juice actually did do anything to hair color … and yet it’s traditional.

    Reply
  28. I see tooth powder in some small, old-fashioned drugstores in the South. Baking soda and salt, I think.
    I’ve always wondered if lemon juice actually did do anything to hair color … and yet it’s traditional.

    Reply
  29. I see tooth powder in some small, old-fashioned drugstores in the South. Baking soda and salt, I think.
    I’ve always wondered if lemon juice actually did do anything to hair color … and yet it’s traditional.

    Reply
  30. I see tooth powder in some small, old-fashioned drugstores in the South. Baking soda and salt, I think.
    I’ve always wondered if lemon juice actually did do anything to hair color … and yet it’s traditional.

    Reply
  31. I love this post madly. Thank you for helping me to eliminate the “Ew, his/her breath has *got* to smell funky.” mutterings that my brain likes to interject into my nice reading flow on a semi-regular basis. Mutterings, be gone! They’ve got a stick and some eggshell! Everything’s fine, people, everything’s fine.

    Reply
  32. I love this post madly. Thank you for helping me to eliminate the “Ew, his/her breath has *got* to smell funky.” mutterings that my brain likes to interject into my nice reading flow on a semi-regular basis. Mutterings, be gone! They’ve got a stick and some eggshell! Everything’s fine, people, everything’s fine.

    Reply
  33. I love this post madly. Thank you for helping me to eliminate the “Ew, his/her breath has *got* to smell funky.” mutterings that my brain likes to interject into my nice reading flow on a semi-regular basis. Mutterings, be gone! They’ve got a stick and some eggshell! Everything’s fine, people, everything’s fine.

    Reply
  34. I love this post madly. Thank you for helping me to eliminate the “Ew, his/her breath has *got* to smell funky.” mutterings that my brain likes to interject into my nice reading flow on a semi-regular basis. Mutterings, be gone! They’ve got a stick and some eggshell! Everything’s fine, people, everything’s fine.

    Reply
  35. I love this post madly. Thank you for helping me to eliminate the “Ew, his/her breath has *got* to smell funky.” mutterings that my brain likes to interject into my nice reading flow on a semi-regular basis. Mutterings, be gone! They’ve got a stick and some eggshell! Everything’s fine, people, everything’s fine.

    Reply
  36. I remember tooth powder in a sort of maroon can. Calgon? Something like that. And a friend of mine uses a mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for tooth whitening. She says that’s all the expensive strips are. I’m not sure I want to swallow hydrogen peroxide though.

    Reply
  37. I remember tooth powder in a sort of maroon can. Calgon? Something like that. And a friend of mine uses a mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for tooth whitening. She says that’s all the expensive strips are. I’m not sure I want to swallow hydrogen peroxide though.

    Reply
  38. I remember tooth powder in a sort of maroon can. Calgon? Something like that. And a friend of mine uses a mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for tooth whitening. She says that’s all the expensive strips are. I’m not sure I want to swallow hydrogen peroxide though.

    Reply
  39. I remember tooth powder in a sort of maroon can. Calgon? Something like that. And a friend of mine uses a mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for tooth whitening. She says that’s all the expensive strips are. I’m not sure I want to swallow hydrogen peroxide though.

    Reply
  40. I remember tooth powder in a sort of maroon can. Calgon? Something like that. And a friend of mine uses a mixture of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for tooth whitening. She says that’s all the expensive strips are. I’m not sure I want to swallow hydrogen peroxide though.

    Reply
  41. When I was little, my dad preferred tooth powder to tooth paste, so that’s what we had. One had to be careful not to breath in when that powder-filled brush went into the mouth! Ask me how I know. 🙂
    Interesting post. Thanks.

    Reply
  42. When I was little, my dad preferred tooth powder to tooth paste, so that’s what we had. One had to be careful not to breath in when that powder-filled brush went into the mouth! Ask me how I know. 🙂
    Interesting post. Thanks.

    Reply
  43. When I was little, my dad preferred tooth powder to tooth paste, so that’s what we had. One had to be careful not to breath in when that powder-filled brush went into the mouth! Ask me how I know. 🙂
    Interesting post. Thanks.

    Reply
  44. When I was little, my dad preferred tooth powder to tooth paste, so that’s what we had. One had to be careful not to breath in when that powder-filled brush went into the mouth! Ask me how I know. 🙂
    Interesting post. Thanks.

    Reply
  45. When I was little, my dad preferred tooth powder to tooth paste, so that’s what we had. One had to be careful not to breath in when that powder-filled brush went into the mouth! Ask me how I know. 🙂
    Interesting post. Thanks.

    Reply
  46. You have given me information and thereby enriched my world.
    I am going to have to go locate some of this and use it so I can put myself in my heroine’s half-boots.

    Reply
  47. You have given me information and thereby enriched my world.
    I am going to have to go locate some of this and use it so I can put myself in my heroine’s half-boots.

    Reply
  48. You have given me information and thereby enriched my world.
    I am going to have to go locate some of this and use it so I can put myself in my heroine’s half-boots.

    Reply
  49. You have given me information and thereby enriched my world.
    I am going to have to go locate some of this and use it so I can put myself in my heroine’s half-boots.

    Reply
  50. You have given me information and thereby enriched my world.
    I am going to have to go locate some of this and use it so I can put myself in my heroine’s half-boots.

    Reply
  51. I am always wary of the idea of hydrogen peroxide myself. It sounds so very chemical.
    I am not amazed to discover the expensive tooth strips are the same old home remedy in new packaging. No, not surprised at all.

    Reply
  52. I am always wary of the idea of hydrogen peroxide myself. It sounds so very chemical.
    I am not amazed to discover the expensive tooth strips are the same old home remedy in new packaging. No, not surprised at all.

    Reply
  53. I am always wary of the idea of hydrogen peroxide myself. It sounds so very chemical.
    I am not amazed to discover the expensive tooth strips are the same old home remedy in new packaging. No, not surprised at all.

    Reply
  54. I am always wary of the idea of hydrogen peroxide myself. It sounds so very chemical.
    I am not amazed to discover the expensive tooth strips are the same old home remedy in new packaging. No, not surprised at all.

    Reply
  55. I am always wary of the idea of hydrogen peroxide myself. It sounds so very chemical.
    I am not amazed to discover the expensive tooth strips are the same old home remedy in new packaging. No, not surprised at all.

    Reply
  56. Contemporary references deplore bad breath, so I imagine it was uncommon enough to be unacceptable.
    Your Regency person probably chewed mint or cloves for sweet breath.
    Then there were ‘comfits’. These were little strong-flavored treats that delivered a wild taste kick — kinda like tic tacs. You had yer anise, yer caraway, yer fennel seeds and so on. The central flavor morsel was dipped again and again in a thin sugar coating and let dry. Fancy little candies.
    There were also pastilles which were ground herbs or spices and sweetening pressed together.
    Anyhow, there were obviously just lots of emergency measures to deal with too much garlic in the bouillabaisse.

    Reply
  57. Contemporary references deplore bad breath, so I imagine it was uncommon enough to be unacceptable.
    Your Regency person probably chewed mint or cloves for sweet breath.
    Then there were ‘comfits’. These were little strong-flavored treats that delivered a wild taste kick — kinda like tic tacs. You had yer anise, yer caraway, yer fennel seeds and so on. The central flavor morsel was dipped again and again in a thin sugar coating and let dry. Fancy little candies.
    There were also pastilles which were ground herbs or spices and sweetening pressed together.
    Anyhow, there were obviously just lots of emergency measures to deal with too much garlic in the bouillabaisse.

    Reply
  58. Contemporary references deplore bad breath, so I imagine it was uncommon enough to be unacceptable.
    Your Regency person probably chewed mint or cloves for sweet breath.
    Then there were ‘comfits’. These were little strong-flavored treats that delivered a wild taste kick — kinda like tic tacs. You had yer anise, yer caraway, yer fennel seeds and so on. The central flavor morsel was dipped again and again in a thin sugar coating and let dry. Fancy little candies.
    There were also pastilles which were ground herbs or spices and sweetening pressed together.
    Anyhow, there were obviously just lots of emergency measures to deal with too much garlic in the bouillabaisse.

    Reply
  59. Contemporary references deplore bad breath, so I imagine it was uncommon enough to be unacceptable.
    Your Regency person probably chewed mint or cloves for sweet breath.
    Then there were ‘comfits’. These were little strong-flavored treats that delivered a wild taste kick — kinda like tic tacs. You had yer anise, yer caraway, yer fennel seeds and so on. The central flavor morsel was dipped again and again in a thin sugar coating and let dry. Fancy little candies.
    There were also pastilles which were ground herbs or spices and sweetening pressed together.
    Anyhow, there were obviously just lots of emergency measures to deal with too much garlic in the bouillabaisse.

    Reply
  60. Contemporary references deplore bad breath, so I imagine it was uncommon enough to be unacceptable.
    Your Regency person probably chewed mint or cloves for sweet breath.
    Then there were ‘comfits’. These were little strong-flavored treats that delivered a wild taste kick — kinda like tic tacs. You had yer anise, yer caraway, yer fennel seeds and so on. The central flavor morsel was dipped again and again in a thin sugar coating and let dry. Fancy little candies.
    There were also pastilles which were ground herbs or spices and sweetening pressed together.
    Anyhow, there were obviously just lots of emergency measures to deal with too much garlic in the bouillabaisse.

    Reply
  61. Captain Fremantle sent requests home for tooth brushes and tooth powder.
    Jane Austen has Robert Ferrars buying a fancy tooth pick.
    Some probably did have bad breath and some probably did have rotten teeth but they didn’t consume as much sugar as we do nor as many “sticky” foods.
    I imagine there were many, especially men, who never brushed their teeth.
    As a child I had to brush my teeth with soap for some years. Then we had salt and baking soda

    Reply
  62. Captain Fremantle sent requests home for tooth brushes and tooth powder.
    Jane Austen has Robert Ferrars buying a fancy tooth pick.
    Some probably did have bad breath and some probably did have rotten teeth but they didn’t consume as much sugar as we do nor as many “sticky” foods.
    I imagine there were many, especially men, who never brushed their teeth.
    As a child I had to brush my teeth with soap for some years. Then we had salt and baking soda

    Reply
  63. Captain Fremantle sent requests home for tooth brushes and tooth powder.
    Jane Austen has Robert Ferrars buying a fancy tooth pick.
    Some probably did have bad breath and some probably did have rotten teeth but they didn’t consume as much sugar as we do nor as many “sticky” foods.
    I imagine there were many, especially men, who never brushed their teeth.
    As a child I had to brush my teeth with soap for some years. Then we had salt and baking soda

    Reply
  64. Captain Fremantle sent requests home for tooth brushes and tooth powder.
    Jane Austen has Robert Ferrars buying a fancy tooth pick.
    Some probably did have bad breath and some probably did have rotten teeth but they didn’t consume as much sugar as we do nor as many “sticky” foods.
    I imagine there were many, especially men, who never brushed their teeth.
    As a child I had to brush my teeth with soap for some years. Then we had salt and baking soda

    Reply
  65. Captain Fremantle sent requests home for tooth brushes and tooth powder.
    Jane Austen has Robert Ferrars buying a fancy tooth pick.
    Some probably did have bad breath and some probably did have rotten teeth but they didn’t consume as much sugar as we do nor as many “sticky” foods.
    I imagine there were many, especially men, who never brushed their teeth.
    As a child I had to brush my teeth with soap for some years. Then we had salt and baking soda

    Reply
  66. I’ve heard archeologists (on TV) talk about how ancient peoples didn’t have many cavities because they didn’t have much sugar in their diet. Says something about our modern eating habits.
    I think in the Regency period sugar was still quite expensive and most folks probably ate very little of it. I’m going to hope all my favorite heroes and heroines escaped tooth decay that way.

    Reply
  67. I’ve heard archeologists (on TV) talk about how ancient peoples didn’t have many cavities because they didn’t have much sugar in their diet. Says something about our modern eating habits.
    I think in the Regency period sugar was still quite expensive and most folks probably ate very little of it. I’m going to hope all my favorite heroes and heroines escaped tooth decay that way.

    Reply
  68. I’ve heard archeologists (on TV) talk about how ancient peoples didn’t have many cavities because they didn’t have much sugar in their diet. Says something about our modern eating habits.
    I think in the Regency period sugar was still quite expensive and most folks probably ate very little of it. I’m going to hope all my favorite heroes and heroines escaped tooth decay that way.

    Reply
  69. I’ve heard archeologists (on TV) talk about how ancient peoples didn’t have many cavities because they didn’t have much sugar in their diet. Says something about our modern eating habits.
    I think in the Regency period sugar was still quite expensive and most folks probably ate very little of it. I’m going to hope all my favorite heroes and heroines escaped tooth decay that way.

    Reply
  70. I’ve heard archeologists (on TV) talk about how ancient peoples didn’t have many cavities because they didn’t have much sugar in their diet. Says something about our modern eating habits.
    I think in the Regency period sugar was still quite expensive and most folks probably ate very little of it. I’m going to hope all my favorite heroes and heroines escaped tooth decay that way.

    Reply
  71. No….I haven’t gotten into the make my own beauty products. But I only buy handmade soap from craft vendors to use in the shower.
    Cleaning products, now I do make a bunch of my own. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning agent and baking soda are my favorite components. Oh and lemon juice…

    Reply
  72. No….I haven’t gotten into the make my own beauty products. But I only buy handmade soap from craft vendors to use in the shower.
    Cleaning products, now I do make a bunch of my own. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning agent and baking soda are my favorite components. Oh and lemon juice…

    Reply
  73. No….I haven’t gotten into the make my own beauty products. But I only buy handmade soap from craft vendors to use in the shower.
    Cleaning products, now I do make a bunch of my own. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning agent and baking soda are my favorite components. Oh and lemon juice…

    Reply
  74. No….I haven’t gotten into the make my own beauty products. But I only buy handmade soap from craft vendors to use in the shower.
    Cleaning products, now I do make a bunch of my own. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning agent and baking soda are my favorite components. Oh and lemon juice…

    Reply
  75. No….I haven’t gotten into the make my own beauty products. But I only buy handmade soap from craft vendors to use in the shower.
    Cleaning products, now I do make a bunch of my own. Vinegar, hydrogen peroxide as a cleaning agent and baking soda are my favorite components. Oh and lemon juice…

    Reply
  76. I had forgotten about using hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth. We used it in the 60s at boarding school. Tasted yuk!
    I have a couple of silver tooth picks dating from Victorian times. The tooth pick slide up and down inside a narrow casing. I have never been sure if they were used by men, or women, or both, and whether they were used at the table or elsewhere. My dad, who got them from his mother etc. didn’t know when asked.

    Reply
  77. I had forgotten about using hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth. We used it in the 60s at boarding school. Tasted yuk!
    I have a couple of silver tooth picks dating from Victorian times. The tooth pick slide up and down inside a narrow casing. I have never been sure if they were used by men, or women, or both, and whether they were used at the table or elsewhere. My dad, who got them from his mother etc. didn’t know when asked.

    Reply
  78. I had forgotten about using hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth. We used it in the 60s at boarding school. Tasted yuk!
    I have a couple of silver tooth picks dating from Victorian times. The tooth pick slide up and down inside a narrow casing. I have never been sure if they were used by men, or women, or both, and whether they were used at the table or elsewhere. My dad, who got them from his mother etc. didn’t know when asked.

    Reply
  79. I had forgotten about using hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth. We used it in the 60s at boarding school. Tasted yuk!
    I have a couple of silver tooth picks dating from Victorian times. The tooth pick slide up and down inside a narrow casing. I have never been sure if they were used by men, or women, or both, and whether they were used at the table or elsewhere. My dad, who got them from his mother etc. didn’t know when asked.

    Reply
  80. I had forgotten about using hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth. We used it in the 60s at boarding school. Tasted yuk!
    I have a couple of silver tooth picks dating from Victorian times. The tooth pick slide up and down inside a narrow casing. I have never been sure if they were used by men, or women, or both, and whether they were used at the table or elsewhere. My dad, who got them from his mother etc. didn’t know when asked.

    Reply
  81. You spit it out, Lil — never swallow it. I know people who’ve used hydrogen peroxide on their teeth. Seems to work. I’ve used baking powder and salt when toothpaste is in short supply.
    Great blog, Joanna.
    I remember my high school science teacher saying people also used to use ash to scrub their teeth. He told a hilarious story about someone who accidentally cleaned their teeth with grandma’s ashes.

    Reply
  82. You spit it out, Lil — never swallow it. I know people who’ve used hydrogen peroxide on their teeth. Seems to work. I’ve used baking powder and salt when toothpaste is in short supply.
    Great blog, Joanna.
    I remember my high school science teacher saying people also used to use ash to scrub their teeth. He told a hilarious story about someone who accidentally cleaned their teeth with grandma’s ashes.

    Reply
  83. You spit it out, Lil — never swallow it. I know people who’ve used hydrogen peroxide on their teeth. Seems to work. I’ve used baking powder and salt when toothpaste is in short supply.
    Great blog, Joanna.
    I remember my high school science teacher saying people also used to use ash to scrub their teeth. He told a hilarious story about someone who accidentally cleaned their teeth with grandma’s ashes.

    Reply
  84. You spit it out, Lil — never swallow it. I know people who’ve used hydrogen peroxide on their teeth. Seems to work. I’ve used baking powder and salt when toothpaste is in short supply.
    Great blog, Joanna.
    I remember my high school science teacher saying people also used to use ash to scrub their teeth. He told a hilarious story about someone who accidentally cleaned their teeth with grandma’s ashes.

    Reply
  85. You spit it out, Lil — never swallow it. I know people who’ve used hydrogen peroxide on their teeth. Seems to work. I’ve used baking powder and salt when toothpaste is in short supply.
    Great blog, Joanna.
    I remember my high school science teacher saying people also used to use ash to scrub their teeth. He told a hilarious story about someone who accidentally cleaned their teeth with grandma’s ashes.

    Reply
  86. I make my own body butter 🙂
    This was fascinating! I never knew they used those roots and how they made them

    Reply
  87. I make my own body butter 🙂
    This was fascinating! I never knew they used those roots and how they made them

    Reply
  88. I make my own body butter 🙂
    This was fascinating! I never knew they used those roots and how they made them

    Reply
  89. I make my own body butter 🙂
    This was fascinating! I never knew they used those roots and how they made them

    Reply
  90. I make my own body butter 🙂
    This was fascinating! I never knew they used those roots and how they made them

    Reply
  91. I always wondered and could get my answers here. 😄
    So interesting! I remember us using tooth powder, it came back maybe in the 80’s or so and too when we ran out of toothpaste, my mom had us use baking soda. With six children and in proverty, we used whatever she told us to.
    I had a favorite question at Author chats, asking ‘If you could bring one (“or two, etc) items from the present to regency, what would you bring. I often thought to myself it would be toilet paper. I have no idea what they used back then. But that was my main answer.
    What book would you suggest to check out, that would answer a lot of these sort of questions and society in regency ear? A site too?
    Awesome post. Thanks again. Cathie
    Cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  92. I always wondered and could get my answers here. 😄
    So interesting! I remember us using tooth powder, it came back maybe in the 80’s or so and too when we ran out of toothpaste, my mom had us use baking soda. With six children and in proverty, we used whatever she told us to.
    I had a favorite question at Author chats, asking ‘If you could bring one (“or two, etc) items from the present to regency, what would you bring. I often thought to myself it would be toilet paper. I have no idea what they used back then. But that was my main answer.
    What book would you suggest to check out, that would answer a lot of these sort of questions and society in regency ear? A site too?
    Awesome post. Thanks again. Cathie
    Cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  93. I always wondered and could get my answers here. 😄
    So interesting! I remember us using tooth powder, it came back maybe in the 80’s or so and too when we ran out of toothpaste, my mom had us use baking soda. With six children and in proverty, we used whatever she told us to.
    I had a favorite question at Author chats, asking ‘If you could bring one (“or two, etc) items from the present to regency, what would you bring. I often thought to myself it would be toilet paper. I have no idea what they used back then. But that was my main answer.
    What book would you suggest to check out, that would answer a lot of these sort of questions and society in regency ear? A site too?
    Awesome post. Thanks again. Cathie
    Cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  94. I always wondered and could get my answers here. 😄
    So interesting! I remember us using tooth powder, it came back maybe in the 80’s or so and too when we ran out of toothpaste, my mom had us use baking soda. With six children and in proverty, we used whatever she told us to.
    I had a favorite question at Author chats, asking ‘If you could bring one (“or two, etc) items from the present to regency, what would you bring. I often thought to myself it would be toilet paper. I have no idea what they used back then. But that was my main answer.
    What book would you suggest to check out, that would answer a lot of these sort of questions and society in regency ear? A site too?
    Awesome post. Thanks again. Cathie
    Cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  95. I always wondered and could get my answers here. 😄
    So interesting! I remember us using tooth powder, it came back maybe in the 80’s or so and too when we ran out of toothpaste, my mom had us use baking soda. With six children and in proverty, we used whatever she told us to.
    I had a favorite question at Author chats, asking ‘If you could bring one (“or two, etc) items from the present to regency, what would you bring. I often thought to myself it would be toilet paper. I have no idea what they used back then. But that was my main answer.
    What book would you suggest to check out, that would answer a lot of these sort of questions and society in regency ear? A site too?
    Awesome post. Thanks again. Cathie
    Cathiecaffey@ gmail.com

    Reply
  96. My aunt used baking soda for tooth powder until she died (at nearly ninety) with almost all of her teeth intact. (I credit good genes for the most part, but good genes require good dental habits also.)

    Reply
  97. My aunt used baking soda for tooth powder until she died (at nearly ninety) with almost all of her teeth intact. (I credit good genes for the most part, but good genes require good dental habits also.)

    Reply
  98. My aunt used baking soda for tooth powder until she died (at nearly ninety) with almost all of her teeth intact. (I credit good genes for the most part, but good genes require good dental habits also.)

    Reply
  99. My aunt used baking soda for tooth powder until she died (at nearly ninety) with almost all of her teeth intact. (I credit good genes for the most part, but good genes require good dental habits also.)

    Reply
  100. My aunt used baking soda for tooth powder until she died (at nearly ninety) with almost all of her teeth intact. (I credit good genes for the most part, but good genes require good dental habits also.)

    Reply
  101. Ooooh. Picking a book is a hard one.
    You might see if your library can get hold of ‘Home Comfort: A History of Domestic Arrangements’ by Christina Hardyment. It’s pretty readable.
    Some of the grand storytellers who paint the details of their age so delightfully were late Victorian or Edwardian, rather than Regency. I’d put Margaret Powell’s ‘Below Stairs’ and Flora Thompson’s ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ in that group.

    Reply
  102. Ooooh. Picking a book is a hard one.
    You might see if your library can get hold of ‘Home Comfort: A History of Domestic Arrangements’ by Christina Hardyment. It’s pretty readable.
    Some of the grand storytellers who paint the details of their age so delightfully were late Victorian or Edwardian, rather than Regency. I’d put Margaret Powell’s ‘Below Stairs’ and Flora Thompson’s ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ in that group.

    Reply
  103. Ooooh. Picking a book is a hard one.
    You might see if your library can get hold of ‘Home Comfort: A History of Domestic Arrangements’ by Christina Hardyment. It’s pretty readable.
    Some of the grand storytellers who paint the details of their age so delightfully were late Victorian or Edwardian, rather than Regency. I’d put Margaret Powell’s ‘Below Stairs’ and Flora Thompson’s ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ in that group.

    Reply
  104. Ooooh. Picking a book is a hard one.
    You might see if your library can get hold of ‘Home Comfort: A History of Domestic Arrangements’ by Christina Hardyment. It’s pretty readable.
    Some of the grand storytellers who paint the details of their age so delightfully were late Victorian or Edwardian, rather than Regency. I’d put Margaret Powell’s ‘Below Stairs’ and Flora Thompson’s ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ in that group.

    Reply
  105. Ooooh. Picking a book is a hard one.
    You might see if your library can get hold of ‘Home Comfort: A History of Domestic Arrangements’ by Christina Hardyment. It’s pretty readable.
    Some of the grand storytellers who paint the details of their age so delightfully were late Victorian or Edwardian, rather than Regency. I’d put Margaret Powell’s ‘Below Stairs’ and Flora Thompson’s ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ in that group.

    Reply
  106. Sounds cool. I have to wonder what it’s made of and whether there’s a tradition behind that.
    I recently discovered Shea Butter to mend the skin of my hands — so sensitive — and had occasion to wonder who Shea is. Turns out it’s the name of an African tree. Apparently not just traditionally used to protect skin. Anciently used for that.

    Reply
  107. Sounds cool. I have to wonder what it’s made of and whether there’s a tradition behind that.
    I recently discovered Shea Butter to mend the skin of my hands — so sensitive — and had occasion to wonder who Shea is. Turns out it’s the name of an African tree. Apparently not just traditionally used to protect skin. Anciently used for that.

    Reply
  108. Sounds cool. I have to wonder what it’s made of and whether there’s a tradition behind that.
    I recently discovered Shea Butter to mend the skin of my hands — so sensitive — and had occasion to wonder who Shea is. Turns out it’s the name of an African tree. Apparently not just traditionally used to protect skin. Anciently used for that.

    Reply
  109. Sounds cool. I have to wonder what it’s made of and whether there’s a tradition behind that.
    I recently discovered Shea Butter to mend the skin of my hands — so sensitive — and had occasion to wonder who Shea is. Turns out it’s the name of an African tree. Apparently not just traditionally used to protect skin. Anciently used for that.

    Reply
  110. Sounds cool. I have to wonder what it’s made of and whether there’s a tradition behind that.
    I recently discovered Shea Butter to mend the skin of my hands — so sensitive — and had occasion to wonder who Shea is. Turns out it’s the name of an African tree. Apparently not just traditionally used to protect skin. Anciently used for that.

    Reply
  111. Hi Jenny —
    I don’t think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g*
    I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar.
    But private use … I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.

    Reply
  112. Hi Jenny —
    I don’t think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g*
    I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar.
    But private use … I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.

    Reply
  113. Hi Jenny —
    I don’t think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g*
    I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar.
    But private use … I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.

    Reply
  114. Hi Jenny —
    I don’t think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g*
    I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar.
    But private use … I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.

    Reply
  115. Hi Jenny —
    I don’t think it can ever have been exactly genteel to pick your teeth in company. *g*
    I have one of my characters (Doyle) carry an ivory tooth in a little case and use it when he wants to look particularly vulgar.
    But private use … I will venture to say it was probably pretty universal. Just not so much mentioned.

    Reply
  116. I’m with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here.
    I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It’s lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.

    Reply
  117. I’m with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here.
    I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It’s lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.

    Reply
  118. I’m with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here.
    I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It’s lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.

    Reply
  119. I’m with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here.
    I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It’s lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.

    Reply
  120. I’m with you on the cleaning products. The final quick wipe of the wood floor is dilute vinegar. I like the way it cuts through all the pollens we have up here.
    I, too, try to buy artisan soap. It’s lovely stuff and I want to encourage the crafts. Etsy has a fine selection.

    Reply
  121. Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I’ve had ginger ale recommended but it doesn’t seem to work as well for me somehow.

    Reply
  122. Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I’ve had ginger ale recommended but it doesn’t seem to work as well for me somehow.

    Reply
  123. Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I’ve had ginger ale recommended but it doesn’t seem to work as well for me somehow.

    Reply
  124. Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I’ve had ginger ale recommended but it doesn’t seem to work as well for me somehow.

    Reply
  125. Candied ginger is just the sovereign remedy against nausea. (Tastes good too.) I’ve had ginger ale recommended but it doesn’t seem to work as well for me somehow.

    Reply
  126. My mom and dad met over a can of tooth powder. Mom had just gone grocery shopping and a can of Lyons’ tooth powder was visible at the top of her grocery bag as she sat on the bus. My dad was walking by looking for a seat and noticed it. His last name was Lyons. He started a conversation with her over the tooth powder and managed a seat next to her. When she got off, he did. He followed her home. They were married 60 years. I was once told by a dentist that the best toothpaste there is is a paste of baking soda and peroxide. It sounded horrible, but I tried it. Not bad at all.

    Reply
  127. My mom and dad met over a can of tooth powder. Mom had just gone grocery shopping and a can of Lyons’ tooth powder was visible at the top of her grocery bag as she sat on the bus. My dad was walking by looking for a seat and noticed it. His last name was Lyons. He started a conversation with her over the tooth powder and managed a seat next to her. When she got off, he did. He followed her home. They were married 60 years. I was once told by a dentist that the best toothpaste there is is a paste of baking soda and peroxide. It sounded horrible, but I tried it. Not bad at all.

    Reply
  128. My mom and dad met over a can of tooth powder. Mom had just gone grocery shopping and a can of Lyons’ tooth powder was visible at the top of her grocery bag as she sat on the bus. My dad was walking by looking for a seat and noticed it. His last name was Lyons. He started a conversation with her over the tooth powder and managed a seat next to her. When she got off, he did. He followed her home. They were married 60 years. I was once told by a dentist that the best toothpaste there is is a paste of baking soda and peroxide. It sounded horrible, but I tried it. Not bad at all.

    Reply
  129. My mom and dad met over a can of tooth powder. Mom had just gone grocery shopping and a can of Lyons’ tooth powder was visible at the top of her grocery bag as she sat on the bus. My dad was walking by looking for a seat and noticed it. His last name was Lyons. He started a conversation with her over the tooth powder and managed a seat next to her. When she got off, he did. He followed her home. They were married 60 years. I was once told by a dentist that the best toothpaste there is is a paste of baking soda and peroxide. It sounded horrible, but I tried it. Not bad at all.

    Reply
  130. My mom and dad met over a can of tooth powder. Mom had just gone grocery shopping and a can of Lyons’ tooth powder was visible at the top of her grocery bag as she sat on the bus. My dad was walking by looking for a seat and noticed it. His last name was Lyons. He started a conversation with her over the tooth powder and managed a seat next to her. When she got off, he did. He followed her home. They were married 60 years. I was once told by a dentist that the best toothpaste there is is a paste of baking soda and peroxide. It sounded horrible, but I tried it. Not bad at all.

    Reply
  131. I think the traditional reason for the ‘acid?’ rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate.
    If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or — this has always struck me as so odd — beer.
    And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.

    Reply
  132. I think the traditional reason for the ‘acid?’ rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate.
    If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or — this has always struck me as so odd — beer.
    And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.

    Reply
  133. I think the traditional reason for the ‘acid?’ rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate.
    If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or — this has always struck me as so odd — beer.
    And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.

    Reply
  134. I think the traditional reason for the ‘acid?’ rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate.
    If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or — this has always struck me as so odd — beer.
    And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.

    Reply
  135. I think the traditional reason for the ‘acid?’ rinse was to get the last of the soap out of the hair back in the days when folks did you soap rather than detergents and lauryl stearate.
    If so, vinegar would work, or lemon, or — this has always struck me as so odd — beer.
    And if one must smell of any of those three, let it be lemon.

    Reply
  136. That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man.
    I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn’t that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.

    Reply
  137. That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man.
    I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn’t that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.

    Reply
  138. That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man.
    I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn’t that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.

    Reply
  139. That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man.
    I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn’t that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.

    Reply
  140. That is such a fine, touching story. (But I suspect your dad might have found something else to strike up his conversation. He sounds like a determined man.
    I have always wondered why we use toothpaste that tastes sweet. I mean, doesn’t that leave sugar on the teeth to do its dread work of decay? So maybe your dentist had something there.

    Reply
  141. I’m enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs.
    I’m quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.

    Reply
  142. I’m enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs.
    I’m quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.

    Reply
  143. I’m enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs.
    I’m quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.

    Reply
  144. I’m enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs.
    I’m quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.

    Reply
  145. I’m enjoying the thought of ye olde period toothpick twigs.
    I’m quite certain there were favored species. I can see a medieval goodwife laying in a store for the winter.

    Reply
  146. Oh frabjuous day! An author friend linked to this page on facebook. I popped over with gritted teeth and twas brillig! Several of my favourite authors all in one place! Such a relief! I read historicals when I can, but it’s a case of knowing too much for my own good. As a history, and historic fashion geek, I have been known to throw books (not yours) across the room with extreme prejudice when the noble-well-educated-yet-FIERCE Viking price unzips (!!!) the corset (!!!) of the extremely-well-educated-lovely-Fierce Celtic Warrior Princess while easing the elastic (!!!!) or her panties (?) down. Yeah. So reading your clueful prose is a relief. The ladies wear linens and carry hankies. The gents wear proper linens (well, most of the time, it IS romance 😉 )
    Thank you. I’m currently hunting Jo Beverley’s Rogues books like a terrier after a rat. Sadly, I’m in Canada and shipping from the US is horrific. I have 8 awaiting me in Buffalo 🙂
    Cheers Ladies!

    Reply
  147. Oh frabjuous day! An author friend linked to this page on facebook. I popped over with gritted teeth and twas brillig! Several of my favourite authors all in one place! Such a relief! I read historicals when I can, but it’s a case of knowing too much for my own good. As a history, and historic fashion geek, I have been known to throw books (not yours) across the room with extreme prejudice when the noble-well-educated-yet-FIERCE Viking price unzips (!!!) the corset (!!!) of the extremely-well-educated-lovely-Fierce Celtic Warrior Princess while easing the elastic (!!!!) or her panties (?) down. Yeah. So reading your clueful prose is a relief. The ladies wear linens and carry hankies. The gents wear proper linens (well, most of the time, it IS romance 😉 )
    Thank you. I’m currently hunting Jo Beverley’s Rogues books like a terrier after a rat. Sadly, I’m in Canada and shipping from the US is horrific. I have 8 awaiting me in Buffalo 🙂
    Cheers Ladies!

    Reply
  148. Oh frabjuous day! An author friend linked to this page on facebook. I popped over with gritted teeth and twas brillig! Several of my favourite authors all in one place! Such a relief! I read historicals when I can, but it’s a case of knowing too much for my own good. As a history, and historic fashion geek, I have been known to throw books (not yours) across the room with extreme prejudice when the noble-well-educated-yet-FIERCE Viking price unzips (!!!) the corset (!!!) of the extremely-well-educated-lovely-Fierce Celtic Warrior Princess while easing the elastic (!!!!) or her panties (?) down. Yeah. So reading your clueful prose is a relief. The ladies wear linens and carry hankies. The gents wear proper linens (well, most of the time, it IS romance 😉 )
    Thank you. I’m currently hunting Jo Beverley’s Rogues books like a terrier after a rat. Sadly, I’m in Canada and shipping from the US is horrific. I have 8 awaiting me in Buffalo 🙂
    Cheers Ladies!

    Reply
  149. Oh frabjuous day! An author friend linked to this page on facebook. I popped over with gritted teeth and twas brillig! Several of my favourite authors all in one place! Such a relief! I read historicals when I can, but it’s a case of knowing too much for my own good. As a history, and historic fashion geek, I have been known to throw books (not yours) across the room with extreme prejudice when the noble-well-educated-yet-FIERCE Viking price unzips (!!!) the corset (!!!) of the extremely-well-educated-lovely-Fierce Celtic Warrior Princess while easing the elastic (!!!!) or her panties (?) down. Yeah. So reading your clueful prose is a relief. The ladies wear linens and carry hankies. The gents wear proper linens (well, most of the time, it IS romance 😉 )
    Thank you. I’m currently hunting Jo Beverley’s Rogues books like a terrier after a rat. Sadly, I’m in Canada and shipping from the US is horrific. I have 8 awaiting me in Buffalo 🙂
    Cheers Ladies!

    Reply
  150. Oh frabjuous day! An author friend linked to this page on facebook. I popped over with gritted teeth and twas brillig! Several of my favourite authors all in one place! Such a relief! I read historicals when I can, but it’s a case of knowing too much for my own good. As a history, and historic fashion geek, I have been known to throw books (not yours) across the room with extreme prejudice when the noble-well-educated-yet-FIERCE Viking price unzips (!!!) the corset (!!!) of the extremely-well-educated-lovely-Fierce Celtic Warrior Princess while easing the elastic (!!!!) or her panties (?) down. Yeah. So reading your clueful prose is a relief. The ladies wear linens and carry hankies. The gents wear proper linens (well, most of the time, it IS romance 😉 )
    Thank you. I’m currently hunting Jo Beverley’s Rogues books like a terrier after a rat. Sadly, I’m in Canada and shipping from the US is horrific. I have 8 awaiting me in Buffalo 🙂
    Cheers Ladies!

    Reply
  151. I have to admit it’s hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate.
    I’m fine with a book that doesn’t give much historical detail. I’m okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That’s very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author’s side in all this.
    Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.

    Reply
  152. I have to admit it’s hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate.
    I’m fine with a book that doesn’t give much historical detail. I’m okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That’s very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author’s side in all this.
    Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.

    Reply
  153. I have to admit it’s hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate.
    I’m fine with a book that doesn’t give much historical detail. I’m okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That’s very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author’s side in all this.
    Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.

    Reply
  154. I have to admit it’s hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate.
    I’m fine with a book that doesn’t give much historical detail. I’m okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That’s very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author’s side in all this.
    Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.

    Reply
  155. I have to admit it’s hard for me to read a Historical Romance that is just plain inaccurate.
    I’m fine with a book that doesn’t give much historical detail. I’m okay with the occasional book that has its characters acting in a very modern way. But when it comes to the equivalent of the hero reaching for a can of beer, I just get kicked out of the story. That’s very *sigh* for me because I WANT the book in my hand to be good. I am on the author’s side in all this.
    Thank goodness there are a lot of good books out there.

    Reply
  156. I have early memories of learning to brush my teeth at my grandmother’s farm in south Arkansas. Her farm was out in the country, small but rich in adventures for kids living in small towns of the early 1950’s. Dad says they used the sturdy Black Gum twigs. He would choose stem close to a joint and chew it into a brush to freshen their teeth after eating when they were away from home. They used tooth powder more commonly than the paste because the powder was cheaper and lasted longer. They had the usual toothbrushes. (He did a good job: he’s 92 and has only lost 2 of his permanent teeth.) On a walk one evening my mom and aunts showed me how they had made their toothbrushes from twigs from the softer wood if the Sweet Gum trees that grew all through the woods. They used baking soda and salt mixtures before the commercial mixes were available, or affordable. I’ve often used the soda-salt mixture when I ran out of Crest!

    Reply
  157. I have early memories of learning to brush my teeth at my grandmother’s farm in south Arkansas. Her farm was out in the country, small but rich in adventures for kids living in small towns of the early 1950’s. Dad says they used the sturdy Black Gum twigs. He would choose stem close to a joint and chew it into a brush to freshen their teeth after eating when they were away from home. They used tooth powder more commonly than the paste because the powder was cheaper and lasted longer. They had the usual toothbrushes. (He did a good job: he’s 92 and has only lost 2 of his permanent teeth.) On a walk one evening my mom and aunts showed me how they had made their toothbrushes from twigs from the softer wood if the Sweet Gum trees that grew all through the woods. They used baking soda and salt mixtures before the commercial mixes were available, or affordable. I’ve often used the soda-salt mixture when I ran out of Crest!

    Reply
  158. I have early memories of learning to brush my teeth at my grandmother’s farm in south Arkansas. Her farm was out in the country, small but rich in adventures for kids living in small towns of the early 1950’s. Dad says they used the sturdy Black Gum twigs. He would choose stem close to a joint and chew it into a brush to freshen their teeth after eating when they were away from home. They used tooth powder more commonly than the paste because the powder was cheaper and lasted longer. They had the usual toothbrushes. (He did a good job: he’s 92 and has only lost 2 of his permanent teeth.) On a walk one evening my mom and aunts showed me how they had made their toothbrushes from twigs from the softer wood if the Sweet Gum trees that grew all through the woods. They used baking soda and salt mixtures before the commercial mixes were available, or affordable. I’ve often used the soda-salt mixture when I ran out of Crest!

    Reply
  159. I have early memories of learning to brush my teeth at my grandmother’s farm in south Arkansas. Her farm was out in the country, small but rich in adventures for kids living in small towns of the early 1950’s. Dad says they used the sturdy Black Gum twigs. He would choose stem close to a joint and chew it into a brush to freshen their teeth after eating when they were away from home. They used tooth powder more commonly than the paste because the powder was cheaper and lasted longer. They had the usual toothbrushes. (He did a good job: he’s 92 and has only lost 2 of his permanent teeth.) On a walk one evening my mom and aunts showed me how they had made their toothbrushes from twigs from the softer wood if the Sweet Gum trees that grew all through the woods. They used baking soda and salt mixtures before the commercial mixes were available, or affordable. I’ve often used the soda-salt mixture when I ran out of Crest!

    Reply
  160. I have early memories of learning to brush my teeth at my grandmother’s farm in south Arkansas. Her farm was out in the country, small but rich in adventures for kids living in small towns of the early 1950’s. Dad says they used the sturdy Black Gum twigs. He would choose stem close to a joint and chew it into a brush to freshen their teeth after eating when they were away from home. They used tooth powder more commonly than the paste because the powder was cheaper and lasted longer. They had the usual toothbrushes. (He did a good job: he’s 92 and has only lost 2 of his permanent teeth.) On a walk one evening my mom and aunts showed me how they had made their toothbrushes from twigs from the softer wood if the Sweet Gum trees that grew all through the woods. They used baking soda and salt mixtures before the commercial mixes were available, or affordable. I’ve often used the soda-salt mixture when I ran out of Crest!

    Reply
  161. Baking powder and salt seems the way to go. I’ll have to try it.
    I now think of my heroine and what sort of tree she’d use to make her twiggy brushes …

    Reply
  162. Baking powder and salt seems the way to go. I’ll have to try it.
    I now think of my heroine and what sort of tree she’d use to make her twiggy brushes …

    Reply
  163. Baking powder and salt seems the way to go. I’ll have to try it.
    I now think of my heroine and what sort of tree she’d use to make her twiggy brushes …

    Reply
  164. Baking powder and salt seems the way to go. I’ll have to try it.
    I now think of my heroine and what sort of tree she’d use to make her twiggy brushes …

    Reply
  165. Baking powder and salt seems the way to go. I’ll have to try it.
    I now think of my heroine and what sort of tree she’d use to make her twiggy brushes …

    Reply

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