The White Wedding Dress

Anne here, blogging about a fabulous exhibition I recently attended: The White Wedding Dress. The exhibition was in Bendigo, a regional city about two hours drive from Melbourne, my home city, but the main part of the exhibit had come from the world renowned Victoria & Albert Museum in London, (also known as the V&A.)

QVstatue1 But first, a little about the city of Bendigo, because it was, in fact, a very appropriate setting for this wonderful exhibition. Bendigo is a city built on gold. In 1851 gold was discovered there and the gold rush was on. At first it was a city of tents, but as alluvial gold gave way to commercial gold mining on a huge scale, the cily boomed and today its prosperous Victorian era roots are still very much in evidence in the many solid 19th century buildings and statues that remain. This statue of Queen Victoria stands in the heart of the city. But more of her later…

Bendigopark

And now back to the exhibition. Most of the wedding dresses were on loan from the V&A museum in London, and ranged from the late 18th century up to the present day, but there was also a local Australian display. 

Bendigoexhibition
It's a commonly held notion that the white wedding dress is a relatively modern convention, introduced by Queen Victoria in 1840 when she married Prince Albert. She certainly made it very fashionable but she was by no means the first. In 1559, even though white was considered the color of mourning for French Queens,  Mary, Queen of Scots, wore a white wedding gown when she married the Dauphin of France because, she said, it was her favorite color. (I'm not convinced there wasn't a political statement there, but we won't go into that.)

1434wedding Throughout history, brides have dressed for their wedding in the best dress they can afford. Today, most brides expect to wear their wedding dress only once — it's a sign of how much wealthier most people are today. 

In the past, girls of wealthy families could choose whatever fabric and style they wanted,  but the majority of women needed to be practical, and most expected to wear their wedding dress at many other occasion after their wedding. (Left: Jan van Eyck, “The Marriage of Giovanni Arnolfini and Giovanna Cenami,” 1434. Note this bride in green is not pregnant — the design of the dress is to emphasize her fertility. )  Bridal1813

Thus an elaborate white wedding dress would be a quite impractical choice. Most fabrics were not easily laundered in those days — not the way we wash clothes today. Dyes would run and fabrics would shrink and stains were not easily removed. Some fabrics would be entirely ruined if washed, and white or light colors would need to be washed more than others, as the hems would drag along the ground.

Nevertheless some who liked white and could afford it, chose white wedding dresses. For some it was a status symbol, and even before Queen Victoria's wedding, fashion magazines were featuring bridal fashions in white. The one above on the right is from 1813.

Charlottesweddingdress Up until Queen Victoria's time, most English Royal Brides wore silver. Princess Charlotte, the daughter of the Prince Regent, wore silver net and lace over white silk. But compare the actual dress on the left with the official drawing pictured below. Quite different looking, aren't they? PrincessCharlotte

Victoria chose a white gown because she had some beautiful lace she wanted to wear and it didn't display to advantage with silver, so she decided on a white dress. Victoria was a hugely popular young queen — after a series of unsatisfactory and unpopular monarchs, here was this young queen, mistress of an ever-expanding colonial and empire, in love with her Prince, and poised on the brink of an exciting new, modern technolofical age. Naturally people wanted to identify with her and emulate her.

But it wasn't royal fashion-setting alone that brought the white wedding dress into general prominence, it was technology — two areas in particular. The first was the new art of photography — photographs of the royal wedding portrait were widely published in newspapers and magazines, and more people saw them than had seen any previous royal wedding portraits.  Victoria*Albert1854

The second area was the increased availability of affordable fabric because of the industrial revolution. By far the largest cost of clothing was the cost of the fabric. Labor to sew the garments was very cheap by comparison — seamstresses worked long hours under difficult conditions for very little pay. 

For one fashionable wedding in 1812, the bride paid £735 for "a robe of real Brussels point lace" worked in a simple sprig pattern and worn over a white satin underdress. To compare, in 1811 The Duke of Devonshire paid his butler £80 per year and a junior housemaid was paid up to £16. RegencyWeddinggowns

The exhibition didn't stop in the 19th century. It moved on through the decades right up to today. I loved looking at the changes in fashion. I think the Edwardian period is a very romantic period for fashion. 
Edwardian  

And of course there were old newsreel reports of famous brides of various eras. Gkbride_websize

You can see more photos of some of the wonderful dresses on exhibit here, and some excellent close-ups.

There was a wonderful spirit at the art gallery. It's been a hugely popular exhibition and people have travelled from all over Australian to visit it — Bendigo is the only place in the country where it's being shown. There were a few men with their wives, but mostly the audience was women — friends, grandmothers, mothers, daughters, sisters, bridesmaids — all talking weddings and wedding dresses, reminiscing, laughing, exclaiming over the exhibits, examining the fine workmanship and the ostentatious displays of some, and exchanging stories. 

1929wedding

There were also some fabulous photos and movie footage that captures some moments in time so brilliantly. One of my favorites was a photo from 1940 of an English bride leaving her bombed-out home

There was living history being talked all around us. Little girls stood and heard stories of their mothers', aunts' and grandmas' weddings. Some of the wartime stories were particularly poignant.

Rose&billy1 One girl was absolutely horrified when she heard of a WW2 bride who'd made her dress out of curtains, because she didn't have enough rationing coupons to buy dress material. She couldn't understand that everything was rationed. 
Wedding1943
Another woman told a WW2 story of how her grandma used all her mother's coupons to purchase underwear for her older sister, because her naughty sister had been doing without underwear, spending all her coupons on outer wear! Grandma wasn't going to let her go to her wedding with no underwear, even if it did mean that little sister missed out on new clothes. Marvelous stories — I could have happily sat and listened all day.

So, let's talk. If you're married, tell us about your wedding & your dress. Or any special wedding story. Who's your favorite famous bride? And what historical era is your favorite for fashion?

105 thoughts on “The White Wedding Dress”

  1. Hello Anne,
    lovely pictures! I also love the Edwardian period, especially the hats, but I have to wonder – how could ladies have worn these hats to church or to a theatre? They’re so extravagant, they must have been in the way.

    Reply
  2. Hello Anne,
    lovely pictures! I also love the Edwardian period, especially the hats, but I have to wonder – how could ladies have worn these hats to church or to a theatre? They’re so extravagant, they must have been in the way.

    Reply
  3. Hello Anne,
    lovely pictures! I also love the Edwardian period, especially the hats, but I have to wonder – how could ladies have worn these hats to church or to a theatre? They’re so extravagant, they must have been in the way.

    Reply
  4. Hello Anne,
    lovely pictures! I also love the Edwardian period, especially the hats, but I have to wonder – how could ladies have worn these hats to church or to a theatre? They’re so extravagant, they must have been in the way.

    Reply
  5. Hello Anne,
    lovely pictures! I also love the Edwardian period, especially the hats, but I have to wonder – how could ladies have worn these hats to church or to a theatre? They’re so extravagant, they must have been in the way.

    Reply
  6. The apron on Princess Charlotte’s gown is a later addition (I’ve never been able to find out who did it or why, just that it’s not original; perhaps there’s damage to the front underneath?). If you mentally strip it away, it looks very much like the drawing.

    Reply
  7. The apron on Princess Charlotte’s gown is a later addition (I’ve never been able to find out who did it or why, just that it’s not original; perhaps there’s damage to the front underneath?). If you mentally strip it away, it looks very much like the drawing.

    Reply
  8. The apron on Princess Charlotte’s gown is a later addition (I’ve never been able to find out who did it or why, just that it’s not original; perhaps there’s damage to the front underneath?). If you mentally strip it away, it looks very much like the drawing.

    Reply
  9. The apron on Princess Charlotte’s gown is a later addition (I’ve never been able to find out who did it or why, just that it’s not original; perhaps there’s damage to the front underneath?). If you mentally strip it away, it looks very much like the drawing.

    Reply
  10. The apron on Princess Charlotte’s gown is a later addition (I’ve never been able to find out who did it or why, just that it’s not original; perhaps there’s damage to the front underneath?). If you mentally strip it away, it looks very much like the drawing.

    Reply
  11. Jennie, the hats are amazing, aren’t they, but i don;t think they’d be so hard to manage in church. In a theatre, they could remove them. My worry would be how they’d handle in anything above a gentle breeze. 😉
    Isobel, thanks, I didn’t know that. Why would someone add on that apron bit? Seems bizarre. But it explains the difference.
    Did you click on the link to the pictures of the exhibition? I didn’t get an answer to my email asking for permission to use the photos in the blog, but they;’re well worth looking at.

    Reply
  12. Jennie, the hats are amazing, aren’t they, but i don;t think they’d be so hard to manage in church. In a theatre, they could remove them. My worry would be how they’d handle in anything above a gentle breeze. 😉
    Isobel, thanks, I didn’t know that. Why would someone add on that apron bit? Seems bizarre. But it explains the difference.
    Did you click on the link to the pictures of the exhibition? I didn’t get an answer to my email asking for permission to use the photos in the blog, but they;’re well worth looking at.

    Reply
  13. Jennie, the hats are amazing, aren’t they, but i don;t think they’d be so hard to manage in church. In a theatre, they could remove them. My worry would be how they’d handle in anything above a gentle breeze. 😉
    Isobel, thanks, I didn’t know that. Why would someone add on that apron bit? Seems bizarre. But it explains the difference.
    Did you click on the link to the pictures of the exhibition? I didn’t get an answer to my email asking for permission to use the photos in the blog, but they;’re well worth looking at.

    Reply
  14. Jennie, the hats are amazing, aren’t they, but i don;t think they’d be so hard to manage in church. In a theatre, they could remove them. My worry would be how they’d handle in anything above a gentle breeze. 😉
    Isobel, thanks, I didn’t know that. Why would someone add on that apron bit? Seems bizarre. But it explains the difference.
    Did you click on the link to the pictures of the exhibition? I didn’t get an answer to my email asking for permission to use the photos in the blog, but they;’re well worth looking at.

    Reply
  15. Jennie, the hats are amazing, aren’t they, but i don;t think they’d be so hard to manage in church. In a theatre, they could remove them. My worry would be how they’d handle in anything above a gentle breeze. 😉
    Isobel, thanks, I didn’t know that. Why would someone add on that apron bit? Seems bizarre. But it explains the difference.
    Did you click on the link to the pictures of the exhibition? I didn’t get an answer to my email asking for permission to use the photos in the blog, but they;’re well worth looking at.

    Reply
  16. Well, I was married 57 years ago and wore a ballerina length gown. The skirt was pleated all around, and it had long sleeves and a Queen Anne neckline. It was made of some kind of light, airy, lacy fabric. But that is not what I wanted to talk about. Have you heard of Brides Against Breast Cancer? (http://bridesagainstbreastcancer.org) This organization accepts gowns from individuals and manufacturers and makes them available to new brides at a reasonable price, generally between $99 to $799. Some of the couture and exclusive designer gowns valued around $20,000 will sell for 25% to 75% savings. They are preparing to accept vintage gowns, for us who have stored them for decades, I guess. For more information, please go to their web site.
    Thank you for this opportunity to put this information out there.
    Diane

    Reply
  17. Well, I was married 57 years ago and wore a ballerina length gown. The skirt was pleated all around, and it had long sleeves and a Queen Anne neckline. It was made of some kind of light, airy, lacy fabric. But that is not what I wanted to talk about. Have you heard of Brides Against Breast Cancer? (http://bridesagainstbreastcancer.org) This organization accepts gowns from individuals and manufacturers and makes them available to new brides at a reasonable price, generally between $99 to $799. Some of the couture and exclusive designer gowns valued around $20,000 will sell for 25% to 75% savings. They are preparing to accept vintage gowns, for us who have stored them for decades, I guess. For more information, please go to their web site.
    Thank you for this opportunity to put this information out there.
    Diane

    Reply
  18. Well, I was married 57 years ago and wore a ballerina length gown. The skirt was pleated all around, and it had long sleeves and a Queen Anne neckline. It was made of some kind of light, airy, lacy fabric. But that is not what I wanted to talk about. Have you heard of Brides Against Breast Cancer? (http://bridesagainstbreastcancer.org) This organization accepts gowns from individuals and manufacturers and makes them available to new brides at a reasonable price, generally between $99 to $799. Some of the couture and exclusive designer gowns valued around $20,000 will sell for 25% to 75% savings. They are preparing to accept vintage gowns, for us who have stored them for decades, I guess. For more information, please go to their web site.
    Thank you for this opportunity to put this information out there.
    Diane

    Reply
  19. Well, I was married 57 years ago and wore a ballerina length gown. The skirt was pleated all around, and it had long sleeves and a Queen Anne neckline. It was made of some kind of light, airy, lacy fabric. But that is not what I wanted to talk about. Have you heard of Brides Against Breast Cancer? (http://bridesagainstbreastcancer.org) This organization accepts gowns from individuals and manufacturers and makes them available to new brides at a reasonable price, generally between $99 to $799. Some of the couture and exclusive designer gowns valued around $20,000 will sell for 25% to 75% savings. They are preparing to accept vintage gowns, for us who have stored them for decades, I guess. For more information, please go to their web site.
    Thank you for this opportunity to put this information out there.
    Diane

    Reply
  20. Well, I was married 57 years ago and wore a ballerina length gown. The skirt was pleated all around, and it had long sleeves and a Queen Anne neckline. It was made of some kind of light, airy, lacy fabric. But that is not what I wanted to talk about. Have you heard of Brides Against Breast Cancer? (http://bridesagainstbreastcancer.org) This organization accepts gowns from individuals and manufacturers and makes them available to new brides at a reasonable price, generally between $99 to $799. Some of the couture and exclusive designer gowns valued around $20,000 will sell for 25% to 75% savings. They are preparing to accept vintage gowns, for us who have stored them for decades, I guess. For more information, please go to their web site.
    Thank you for this opportunity to put this information out there.
    Diane

    Reply
  21. Lovely post, Anne. I wish I might have attended the exhibit with you. It sounds as if the stories of the other visitors were as fascinating and lovely as the gowns. I popped over to take a look at the photos. WOW! The Duchess of Argyle’s gown is stupendous!

    Reply
  22. Lovely post, Anne. I wish I might have attended the exhibit with you. It sounds as if the stories of the other visitors were as fascinating and lovely as the gowns. I popped over to take a look at the photos. WOW! The Duchess of Argyle’s gown is stupendous!

    Reply
  23. Lovely post, Anne. I wish I might have attended the exhibit with you. It sounds as if the stories of the other visitors were as fascinating and lovely as the gowns. I popped over to take a look at the photos. WOW! The Duchess of Argyle’s gown is stupendous!

    Reply
  24. Lovely post, Anne. I wish I might have attended the exhibit with you. It sounds as if the stories of the other visitors were as fascinating and lovely as the gowns. I popped over to take a look at the photos. WOW! The Duchess of Argyle’s gown is stupendous!

    Reply
  25. Lovely post, Anne. I wish I might have attended the exhibit with you. It sounds as if the stories of the other visitors were as fascinating and lovely as the gowns. I popped over to take a look at the photos. WOW! The Duchess of Argyle’s gown is stupendous!

    Reply
  26. What a marvelous exhibit! It seems the Cambridge’s wedding this past spring has incited wedding fever for museums. Your mentioning that the exhibit was filled with women piqued my interest!
    Based on paintings and portraits of past centuries, it seems that men also used the wedding to display their rank and fortune, and I know that in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, it was customary for the groom to pay for everything, including the bridesmaids bouquets. And even though 19th and 20th century American customs were rather similar to today’s, how did we get to the point where the men just show up in their tuxedos and say their vows?

    Reply
  27. What a marvelous exhibit! It seems the Cambridge’s wedding this past spring has incited wedding fever for museums. Your mentioning that the exhibit was filled with women piqued my interest!
    Based on paintings and portraits of past centuries, it seems that men also used the wedding to display their rank and fortune, and I know that in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, it was customary for the groom to pay for everything, including the bridesmaids bouquets. And even though 19th and 20th century American customs were rather similar to today’s, how did we get to the point where the men just show up in their tuxedos and say their vows?

    Reply
  28. What a marvelous exhibit! It seems the Cambridge’s wedding this past spring has incited wedding fever for museums. Your mentioning that the exhibit was filled with women piqued my interest!
    Based on paintings and portraits of past centuries, it seems that men also used the wedding to display their rank and fortune, and I know that in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, it was customary for the groom to pay for everything, including the bridesmaids bouquets. And even though 19th and 20th century American customs were rather similar to today’s, how did we get to the point where the men just show up in their tuxedos and say their vows?

    Reply
  29. What a marvelous exhibit! It seems the Cambridge’s wedding this past spring has incited wedding fever for museums. Your mentioning that the exhibit was filled with women piqued my interest!
    Based on paintings and portraits of past centuries, it seems that men also used the wedding to display their rank and fortune, and I know that in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, it was customary for the groom to pay for everything, including the bridesmaids bouquets. And even though 19th and 20th century American customs were rather similar to today’s, how did we get to the point where the men just show up in their tuxedos and say their vows?

    Reply
  30. What a marvelous exhibit! It seems the Cambridge’s wedding this past spring has incited wedding fever for museums. Your mentioning that the exhibit was filled with women piqued my interest!
    Based on paintings and portraits of past centuries, it seems that men also used the wedding to display their rank and fortune, and I know that in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, it was customary for the groom to pay for everything, including the bridesmaids bouquets. And even though 19th and 20th century American customs were rather similar to today’s, how did we get to the point where the men just show up in their tuxedos and say their vows?

    Reply
  31. This is a fascinating post and very much resonated since I shall be getting married in the coming months.
    I always wondered when history turned for the choice of white.
    I feel like I’m doing a really big throwback, since a) a non white choice & b) I intend to have the dress to use for events (such as awards nights etc).
    Beautifully constructed post with the images too Anne. Thank you.

    Reply
  32. This is a fascinating post and very much resonated since I shall be getting married in the coming months.
    I always wondered when history turned for the choice of white.
    I feel like I’m doing a really big throwback, since a) a non white choice & b) I intend to have the dress to use for events (such as awards nights etc).
    Beautifully constructed post with the images too Anne. Thank you.

    Reply
  33. This is a fascinating post and very much resonated since I shall be getting married in the coming months.
    I always wondered when history turned for the choice of white.
    I feel like I’m doing a really big throwback, since a) a non white choice & b) I intend to have the dress to use for events (such as awards nights etc).
    Beautifully constructed post with the images too Anne. Thank you.

    Reply
  34. This is a fascinating post and very much resonated since I shall be getting married in the coming months.
    I always wondered when history turned for the choice of white.
    I feel like I’m doing a really big throwback, since a) a non white choice & b) I intend to have the dress to use for events (such as awards nights etc).
    Beautifully constructed post with the images too Anne. Thank you.

    Reply
  35. This is a fascinating post and very much resonated since I shall be getting married in the coming months.
    I always wondered when history turned for the choice of white.
    I feel like I’m doing a really big throwback, since a) a non white choice & b) I intend to have the dress to use for events (such as awards nights etc).
    Beautifully constructed post with the images too Anne. Thank you.

    Reply
  36. What a fabulous post. I loved the 1940’s bridal photograph…someone had even gone to the trouble of putting a runner down the garden path for her to walk on – how sweet was that ?
    But just as an aside… Dame Barbara Cartland (that’s right – she of the bilious pink outfits & eternal virgins) was partially responsible for setting up a scheme during the second world war,whereby brides to be could borrow wedding dresses, because clothing was rationed during that period & the clothing coupons available the the majority of women just wouldn’t cover the requirements for a traditional wedding gown ( if you could get the fabric in the first place,that is !)

    Reply
  37. What a fabulous post. I loved the 1940’s bridal photograph…someone had even gone to the trouble of putting a runner down the garden path for her to walk on – how sweet was that ?
    But just as an aside… Dame Barbara Cartland (that’s right – she of the bilious pink outfits & eternal virgins) was partially responsible for setting up a scheme during the second world war,whereby brides to be could borrow wedding dresses, because clothing was rationed during that period & the clothing coupons available the the majority of women just wouldn’t cover the requirements for a traditional wedding gown ( if you could get the fabric in the first place,that is !)

    Reply
  38. What a fabulous post. I loved the 1940’s bridal photograph…someone had even gone to the trouble of putting a runner down the garden path for her to walk on – how sweet was that ?
    But just as an aside… Dame Barbara Cartland (that’s right – she of the bilious pink outfits & eternal virgins) was partially responsible for setting up a scheme during the second world war,whereby brides to be could borrow wedding dresses, because clothing was rationed during that period & the clothing coupons available the the majority of women just wouldn’t cover the requirements for a traditional wedding gown ( if you could get the fabric in the first place,that is !)

    Reply
  39. What a fabulous post. I loved the 1940’s bridal photograph…someone had even gone to the trouble of putting a runner down the garden path for her to walk on – how sweet was that ?
    But just as an aside… Dame Barbara Cartland (that’s right – she of the bilious pink outfits & eternal virgins) was partially responsible for setting up a scheme during the second world war,whereby brides to be could borrow wedding dresses, because clothing was rationed during that period & the clothing coupons available the the majority of women just wouldn’t cover the requirements for a traditional wedding gown ( if you could get the fabric in the first place,that is !)

    Reply
  40. What a fabulous post. I loved the 1940’s bridal photograph…someone had even gone to the trouble of putting a runner down the garden path for her to walk on – how sweet was that ?
    But just as an aside… Dame Barbara Cartland (that’s right – she of the bilious pink outfits & eternal virgins) was partially responsible for setting up a scheme during the second world war,whereby brides to be could borrow wedding dresses, because clothing was rationed during that period & the clothing coupons available the the majority of women just wouldn’t cover the requirements for a traditional wedding gown ( if you could get the fabric in the first place,that is !)

    Reply
  41. Oh, I saw something about this exhibition and thought about going for the drive to see it, but then completely forgot about it!
    Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
  42. Oh, I saw something about this exhibition and thought about going for the drive to see it, but then completely forgot about it!
    Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
  43. Oh, I saw something about this exhibition and thought about going for the drive to see it, but then completely forgot about it!
    Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
  44. Oh, I saw something about this exhibition and thought about going for the drive to see it, but then completely forgot about it!
    Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
  45. Oh, I saw something about this exhibition and thought about going for the drive to see it, but then completely forgot about it!
    Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
  46. When I was married 34 years ago, I wore a white dress that my mother made. It was a princess line dress and part of the bodice came from my mother’s wedding dress material (that was also a pinafore for me when I was little). My mother embroidered colorful bouquets of flowers using silk embroidery thread in 6 panels around the skirt, and we made a hoop petticoat so it would spread out at the bottom and show off the flowers. The whole thing cost $50, but is way more precious to me than a designer gown.

    Reply
  47. When I was married 34 years ago, I wore a white dress that my mother made. It was a princess line dress and part of the bodice came from my mother’s wedding dress material (that was also a pinafore for me when I was little). My mother embroidered colorful bouquets of flowers using silk embroidery thread in 6 panels around the skirt, and we made a hoop petticoat so it would spread out at the bottom and show off the flowers. The whole thing cost $50, but is way more precious to me than a designer gown.

    Reply
  48. When I was married 34 years ago, I wore a white dress that my mother made. It was a princess line dress and part of the bodice came from my mother’s wedding dress material (that was also a pinafore for me when I was little). My mother embroidered colorful bouquets of flowers using silk embroidery thread in 6 panels around the skirt, and we made a hoop petticoat so it would spread out at the bottom and show off the flowers. The whole thing cost $50, but is way more precious to me than a designer gown.

    Reply
  49. When I was married 34 years ago, I wore a white dress that my mother made. It was a princess line dress and part of the bodice came from my mother’s wedding dress material (that was also a pinafore for me when I was little). My mother embroidered colorful bouquets of flowers using silk embroidery thread in 6 panels around the skirt, and we made a hoop petticoat so it would spread out at the bottom and show off the flowers. The whole thing cost $50, but is way more precious to me than a designer gown.

    Reply
  50. When I was married 34 years ago, I wore a white dress that my mother made. It was a princess line dress and part of the bodice came from my mother’s wedding dress material (that was also a pinafore for me when I was little). My mother embroidered colorful bouquets of flowers using silk embroidery thread in 6 panels around the skirt, and we made a hoop petticoat so it would spread out at the bottom and show off the flowers. The whole thing cost $50, but is way more precious to me than a designer gown.

    Reply
  51. Love all the pics!!! We are married now 41 yrs and I love all of the books you girls write!! I love many era’s, Regency, Elizabeth, the roaring ’20’s, etc.

    Reply
  52. Love all the pics!!! We are married now 41 yrs and I love all of the books you girls write!! I love many era’s, Regency, Elizabeth, the roaring ’20’s, etc.

    Reply
  53. Love all the pics!!! We are married now 41 yrs and I love all of the books you girls write!! I love many era’s, Regency, Elizabeth, the roaring ’20’s, etc.

    Reply
  54. Love all the pics!!! We are married now 41 yrs and I love all of the books you girls write!! I love many era’s, Regency, Elizabeth, the roaring ’20’s, etc.

    Reply
  55. Love all the pics!!! We are married now 41 yrs and I love all of the books you girls write!! I love many era’s, Regency, Elizabeth, the roaring ’20’s, etc.

    Reply
  56. Diane, your dress sounds gorgeous. I can picture it so clearly. And thank you for sharing that site with us — it’s an excellent cause. Romance Writers of Australia do a women’s cancer fundraiser each year at our conferences. I love the idea of women helping women.
    Louisa, there were some great stories. I would have loved for some of them to be recorded. The exhibition touched chords in people that released stories that perhaps hadn’t been told in years. I was only talking about the stories I’d been told — there were, I’m certain — hundreds more.

    Reply
  57. Diane, your dress sounds gorgeous. I can picture it so clearly. And thank you for sharing that site with us — it’s an excellent cause. Romance Writers of Australia do a women’s cancer fundraiser each year at our conferences. I love the idea of women helping women.
    Louisa, there were some great stories. I would have loved for some of them to be recorded. The exhibition touched chords in people that released stories that perhaps hadn’t been told in years. I was only talking about the stories I’d been told — there were, I’m certain — hundreds more.

    Reply
  58. Diane, your dress sounds gorgeous. I can picture it so clearly. And thank you for sharing that site with us — it’s an excellent cause. Romance Writers of Australia do a women’s cancer fundraiser each year at our conferences. I love the idea of women helping women.
    Louisa, there were some great stories. I would have loved for some of them to be recorded. The exhibition touched chords in people that released stories that perhaps hadn’t been told in years. I was only talking about the stories I’d been told — there were, I’m certain — hundreds more.

    Reply
  59. Diane, your dress sounds gorgeous. I can picture it so clearly. And thank you for sharing that site with us — it’s an excellent cause. Romance Writers of Australia do a women’s cancer fundraiser each year at our conferences. I love the idea of women helping women.
    Louisa, there were some great stories. I would have loved for some of them to be recorded. The exhibition touched chords in people that released stories that perhaps hadn’t been told in years. I was only talking about the stories I’d been told — there were, I’m certain — hundreds more.

    Reply
  60. Diane, your dress sounds gorgeous. I can picture it so clearly. And thank you for sharing that site with us — it’s an excellent cause. Romance Writers of Australia do a women’s cancer fundraiser each year at our conferences. I love the idea of women helping women.
    Louisa, there were some great stories. I would have loved for some of them to be recorded. The exhibition touched chords in people that released stories that perhaps hadn’t been told in years. I was only talking about the stories I’d been told — there were, I’m certain — hundreds more.

    Reply
  61. Evangeline, I didn’t know that grooms used to pay back then. Perhaps because the bride brought a dowry? I don’t know. You’ve aroused my curiosity now — I’m going to see if I can dig out the reason.
    Keziah, you would love it. Come down to Melbourne for SheKilda at St Kilda crime fest and whizz up to Bendigo before or after it . 🙂
    J Prince, it’s a beautiful gown, isn’t it? And there were so many more beautiful gowns that weren’t in that photo collection. I was so frustrated that we weren’t allowed to take photos and that the main photos taken are copyright. There were so many lovely gowns that there’s no photo of..

    Reply
  62. Evangeline, I didn’t know that grooms used to pay back then. Perhaps because the bride brought a dowry? I don’t know. You’ve aroused my curiosity now — I’m going to see if I can dig out the reason.
    Keziah, you would love it. Come down to Melbourne for SheKilda at St Kilda crime fest and whizz up to Bendigo before or after it . 🙂
    J Prince, it’s a beautiful gown, isn’t it? And there were so many more beautiful gowns that weren’t in that photo collection. I was so frustrated that we weren’t allowed to take photos and that the main photos taken are copyright. There were so many lovely gowns that there’s no photo of..

    Reply
  63. Evangeline, I didn’t know that grooms used to pay back then. Perhaps because the bride brought a dowry? I don’t know. You’ve aroused my curiosity now — I’m going to see if I can dig out the reason.
    Keziah, you would love it. Come down to Melbourne for SheKilda at St Kilda crime fest and whizz up to Bendigo before or after it . 🙂
    J Prince, it’s a beautiful gown, isn’t it? And there were so many more beautiful gowns that weren’t in that photo collection. I was so frustrated that we weren’t allowed to take photos and that the main photos taken are copyright. There were so many lovely gowns that there’s no photo of..

    Reply
  64. Evangeline, I didn’t know that grooms used to pay back then. Perhaps because the bride brought a dowry? I don’t know. You’ve aroused my curiosity now — I’m going to see if I can dig out the reason.
    Keziah, you would love it. Come down to Melbourne for SheKilda at St Kilda crime fest and whizz up to Bendigo before or after it . 🙂
    J Prince, it’s a beautiful gown, isn’t it? And there were so many more beautiful gowns that weren’t in that photo collection. I was so frustrated that we weren’t allowed to take photos and that the main photos taken are copyright. There were so many lovely gowns that there’s no photo of..

    Reply
  65. Evangeline, I didn’t know that grooms used to pay back then. Perhaps because the bride brought a dowry? I don’t know. You’ve aroused my curiosity now — I’m going to see if I can dig out the reason.
    Keziah, you would love it. Come down to Melbourne for SheKilda at St Kilda crime fest and whizz up to Bendigo before or after it . 🙂
    J Prince, it’s a beautiful gown, isn’t it? And there were so many more beautiful gowns that weren’t in that photo collection. I was so frustrated that we weren’t allowed to take photos and that the main photos taken are copyright. There were so many lovely gowns that there’s no photo of..

    Reply
  66. Nicky, there were some fabulous modern non-white dresses, including a most dramatic Christian LaCroix dress, so you’re in good modern company.
    All the best for your wedding.
    Cate, that 1940s photo of the bride leaving the bombed out house is wonderful isn’t it? As for Dame Barbara Cartland, I’d forgotten that story, but I do know she did good works — it’s a pity she’s mostly remembered for the sillier aspects of her public persona.
    Marg, go, you’ll love it.

    Reply
  67. Nicky, there were some fabulous modern non-white dresses, including a most dramatic Christian LaCroix dress, so you’re in good modern company.
    All the best for your wedding.
    Cate, that 1940s photo of the bride leaving the bombed out house is wonderful isn’t it? As for Dame Barbara Cartland, I’d forgotten that story, but I do know she did good works — it’s a pity she’s mostly remembered for the sillier aspects of her public persona.
    Marg, go, you’ll love it.

    Reply
  68. Nicky, there were some fabulous modern non-white dresses, including a most dramatic Christian LaCroix dress, so you’re in good modern company.
    All the best for your wedding.
    Cate, that 1940s photo of the bride leaving the bombed out house is wonderful isn’t it? As for Dame Barbara Cartland, I’d forgotten that story, but I do know she did good works — it’s a pity she’s mostly remembered for the sillier aspects of her public persona.
    Marg, go, you’ll love it.

    Reply
  69. Nicky, there were some fabulous modern non-white dresses, including a most dramatic Christian LaCroix dress, so you’re in good modern company.
    All the best for your wedding.
    Cate, that 1940s photo of the bride leaving the bombed out house is wonderful isn’t it? As for Dame Barbara Cartland, I’d forgotten that story, but I do know she did good works — it’s a pity she’s mostly remembered for the sillier aspects of her public persona.
    Marg, go, you’ll love it.

    Reply
  70. Nicky, there were some fabulous modern non-white dresses, including a most dramatic Christian LaCroix dress, so you’re in good modern company.
    All the best for your wedding.
    Cate, that 1940s photo of the bride leaving the bombed out house is wonderful isn’t it? As for Dame Barbara Cartland, I’d forgotten that story, but I do know she did good works — it’s a pity she’s mostly remembered for the sillier aspects of her public persona.
    Marg, go, you’ll love it.

    Reply
  71. Julie, your wedding gown sounds beautiful, and yes, it’s undoubtedly far more valuable than the cost of the fabric. The personal element and the love that went into creating it is priceless. And as a love of stories, I also love the story of how it was made. Thank you.
    Joanne, thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed the post and the stories.

    Reply
  72. Julie, your wedding gown sounds beautiful, and yes, it’s undoubtedly far more valuable than the cost of the fabric. The personal element and the love that went into creating it is priceless. And as a love of stories, I also love the story of how it was made. Thank you.
    Joanne, thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed the post and the stories.

    Reply
  73. Julie, your wedding gown sounds beautiful, and yes, it’s undoubtedly far more valuable than the cost of the fabric. The personal element and the love that went into creating it is priceless. And as a love of stories, I also love the story of how it was made. Thank you.
    Joanne, thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed the post and the stories.

    Reply
  74. Julie, your wedding gown sounds beautiful, and yes, it’s undoubtedly far more valuable than the cost of the fabric. The personal element and the love that went into creating it is priceless. And as a love of stories, I also love the story of how it was made. Thank you.
    Joanne, thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed the post and the stories.

    Reply
  75. Julie, your wedding gown sounds beautiful, and yes, it’s undoubtedly far more valuable than the cost of the fabric. The personal element and the love that went into creating it is priceless. And as a love of stories, I also love the story of how it was made. Thank you.
    Joanne, thanks for dropping by. Glad you enjoyed the post and the stories.

    Reply
  76. I was married 16 years ago and wore a white lace sheath gown with pearls and crystals all over it and a removable white silk and lace train. It was a gorgeous spring day and I consider it one of the more perfect days so far in my life.
    Thank you for the great post Anne, I would love to have seen the exhibition; it looks as if it was a lot of fun besides all the gorgeous gowns.

    Reply
  77. I was married 16 years ago and wore a white lace sheath gown with pearls and crystals all over it and a removable white silk and lace train. It was a gorgeous spring day and I consider it one of the more perfect days so far in my life.
    Thank you for the great post Anne, I would love to have seen the exhibition; it looks as if it was a lot of fun besides all the gorgeous gowns.

    Reply
  78. I was married 16 years ago and wore a white lace sheath gown with pearls and crystals all over it and a removable white silk and lace train. It was a gorgeous spring day and I consider it one of the more perfect days so far in my life.
    Thank you for the great post Anne, I would love to have seen the exhibition; it looks as if it was a lot of fun besides all the gorgeous gowns.

    Reply
  79. I was married 16 years ago and wore a white lace sheath gown with pearls and crystals all over it and a removable white silk and lace train. It was a gorgeous spring day and I consider it one of the more perfect days so far in my life.
    Thank you for the great post Anne, I would love to have seen the exhibition; it looks as if it was a lot of fun besides all the gorgeous gowns.

    Reply
  80. I was married 16 years ago and wore a white lace sheath gown with pearls and crystals all over it and a removable white silk and lace train. It was a gorgeous spring day and I consider it one of the more perfect days so far in my life.
    Thank you for the great post Anne, I would love to have seen the exhibition; it looks as if it was a lot of fun besides all the gorgeous gowns.

    Reply
  81. I wore my mother’s wedding dress (so did my sister and my niece). My parents married in 1950 and the dress cost $300. My father gifted my mother with 300 silver dollars in a wooden box that his mother had lined with blue velvet. He was 8 years older than my mom and a WWII vet–my moms sibs thought he was to ‘fast’ for her! The dress is heavy ivory satin, fitted bodice, full skirt, catheral train. It is fabulous and lucky–everyone who wore it stayed married. Next week is 24 years for my husband and I. I’m holding it for my daughter.

    Reply
  82. I wore my mother’s wedding dress (so did my sister and my niece). My parents married in 1950 and the dress cost $300. My father gifted my mother with 300 silver dollars in a wooden box that his mother had lined with blue velvet. He was 8 years older than my mom and a WWII vet–my moms sibs thought he was to ‘fast’ for her! The dress is heavy ivory satin, fitted bodice, full skirt, catheral train. It is fabulous and lucky–everyone who wore it stayed married. Next week is 24 years for my husband and I. I’m holding it for my daughter.

    Reply
  83. I wore my mother’s wedding dress (so did my sister and my niece). My parents married in 1950 and the dress cost $300. My father gifted my mother with 300 silver dollars in a wooden box that his mother had lined with blue velvet. He was 8 years older than my mom and a WWII vet–my moms sibs thought he was to ‘fast’ for her! The dress is heavy ivory satin, fitted bodice, full skirt, catheral train. It is fabulous and lucky–everyone who wore it stayed married. Next week is 24 years for my husband and I. I’m holding it for my daughter.

    Reply
  84. I wore my mother’s wedding dress (so did my sister and my niece). My parents married in 1950 and the dress cost $300. My father gifted my mother with 300 silver dollars in a wooden box that his mother had lined with blue velvet. He was 8 years older than my mom and a WWII vet–my moms sibs thought he was to ‘fast’ for her! The dress is heavy ivory satin, fitted bodice, full skirt, catheral train. It is fabulous and lucky–everyone who wore it stayed married. Next week is 24 years for my husband and I. I’m holding it for my daughter.

    Reply
  85. I wore my mother’s wedding dress (so did my sister and my niece). My parents married in 1950 and the dress cost $300. My father gifted my mother with 300 silver dollars in a wooden box that his mother had lined with blue velvet. He was 8 years older than my mom and a WWII vet–my moms sibs thought he was to ‘fast’ for her! The dress is heavy ivory satin, fitted bodice, full skirt, catheral train. It is fabulous and lucky–everyone who wore it stayed married. Next week is 24 years for my husband and I. I’m holding it for my daughter.

    Reply
  86. My wedding dress is an ankle length lace overdress over a silk slip, which you can see through the lace. I had a white slip for the wedding, but I also had several other slips made in shades of pink and blue, my favorite colors, so that I can wear the dress other times.

    Reply
  87. My wedding dress is an ankle length lace overdress over a silk slip, which you can see through the lace. I had a white slip for the wedding, but I also had several other slips made in shades of pink and blue, my favorite colors, so that I can wear the dress other times.

    Reply
  88. My wedding dress is an ankle length lace overdress over a silk slip, which you can see through the lace. I had a white slip for the wedding, but I also had several other slips made in shades of pink and blue, my favorite colors, so that I can wear the dress other times.

    Reply
  89. My wedding dress is an ankle length lace overdress over a silk slip, which you can see through the lace. I had a white slip for the wedding, but I also had several other slips made in shades of pink and blue, my favorite colors, so that I can wear the dress other times.

    Reply
  90. My wedding dress is an ankle length lace overdress over a silk slip, which you can see through the lace. I had a white slip for the wedding, but I also had several other slips made in shades of pink and blue, my favorite colors, so that I can wear the dress other times.

    Reply
  91. I am loving these descriptions of the wedding dresses — thank you for sharing. Marie, the white lace sheath with pearls and crystals sounds amazing.
    Patty, I love the silver dollars in a blue velvet lined wooden box — what a treasure. And what a wonderful story about that ivory satin lucky gown – a gorgeous heirloom for your daughter to wear on her big day.
    Linda, what a lovely idea — and how regency of you to have a beautiful lace and different colored slips for other occasions. It sounds beautiful.

    Reply
  92. I am loving these descriptions of the wedding dresses — thank you for sharing. Marie, the white lace sheath with pearls and crystals sounds amazing.
    Patty, I love the silver dollars in a blue velvet lined wooden box — what a treasure. And what a wonderful story about that ivory satin lucky gown – a gorgeous heirloom for your daughter to wear on her big day.
    Linda, what a lovely idea — and how regency of you to have a beautiful lace and different colored slips for other occasions. It sounds beautiful.

    Reply
  93. I am loving these descriptions of the wedding dresses — thank you for sharing. Marie, the white lace sheath with pearls and crystals sounds amazing.
    Patty, I love the silver dollars in a blue velvet lined wooden box — what a treasure. And what a wonderful story about that ivory satin lucky gown – a gorgeous heirloom for your daughter to wear on her big day.
    Linda, what a lovely idea — and how regency of you to have a beautiful lace and different colored slips for other occasions. It sounds beautiful.

    Reply
  94. I am loving these descriptions of the wedding dresses — thank you for sharing. Marie, the white lace sheath with pearls and crystals sounds amazing.
    Patty, I love the silver dollars in a blue velvet lined wooden box — what a treasure. And what a wonderful story about that ivory satin lucky gown – a gorgeous heirloom for your daughter to wear on her big day.
    Linda, what a lovely idea — and how regency of you to have a beautiful lace and different colored slips for other occasions. It sounds beautiful.

    Reply
  95. I am loving these descriptions of the wedding dresses — thank you for sharing. Marie, the white lace sheath with pearls and crystals sounds amazing.
    Patty, I love the silver dollars in a blue velvet lined wooden box — what a treasure. And what a wonderful story about that ivory satin lucky gown – a gorgeous heirloom for your daughter to wear on her big day.
    Linda, what a lovely idea — and how regency of you to have a beautiful lace and different colored slips for other occasions. It sounds beautiful.

    Reply

Leave a Comment