The Wenches Horse Around

Cat_243_doverA subject that comes up again and again in historical novels is horses.  In the pre-automotive era, a horse was essential transport.  And, like cars, horses and horsemanship are often used as an aspect of characterization.  Seldom does one see a Regency hero who is a horse klutz (any more than we’d see a contemporary hero driving a Plymouth Valiant, unless eccentricity is desired <G>), and it’s not uncommon for the ladies to also be bruising riders. 

But horses are complicated critters, and for the majority of us who are horse ignorant, opportunities abound to make mistakes when writing about them.  So horses seemed like a good blog topic.  Though I grew up on a farm, I’m fairly clueless about our equine friends, but luckily, we have an expert close at hand: Our very own Whipster, Sherrie Holmes! 

Sherrie is a horse owner and has competed in Endurance and Competitive Trail Ride contests.  She has generously (and often hilariously) shared her experiences on Regency loops that we’re both on, and I’ve saved pages and pages of material she posted about riding, endurance, accidents, and horsy eccentricities.   

She has graciously agreed to educate us on care and use of horses, plus answer some Wenchly questions.  Sherrie, would you like to start by giving us a bit of your history with horses?

Sherrieimage1 SH: Mom said the first word I spoke was “horsy” and the first picture I drew was of a horse.  When I was a toddler, Grandma was babysitting one day and I went missing.  To her horror, she found me in the paddock with my arms and legs wrapped around the front leg of one of Grandpa’s draft horses, sitting on his huge foot.  That gentle giant, who was a working horse and not used to children, was patiently dragging his foot as he walked, being careful not to step on me.  I guess you could say I’ve been horse crazy from an early age. *g*  (That’s Sherrie on horseback to the left.)

But I had to settle for collecting horse knick-knacks and horse books as a kid, because we couldn’t afford a horse.  My dream came true when I bought my first horse at 22, and I’ve now owned horses for 38 years.  (I’ll do the math for you–I’m 60.) Highlights: winning the State Championship 60 mile Competitive Trail Ride, and placing second (missed first place by 1 point!) in the 100 mile CTR, completing the ride in 20 hours with energy to spare.

I’m down to one horse now.  Windigo’s Tempest is 23, but still the life of the party.  Tempestwine He steals laundry from the clothesline, drinks pink Chablis out of a wine glass and Pepsi from the can, fell passionately in love with my old Boxer (they used to French kiss through the fence), loves to wiggle his lips over anything with texture, and if you don’t watch out, he’ll untie your shoelaces or unzip your coat.  He sneaks the dog’s milkbones when nobody’s looking, and twice he’s come into my house during the summer when the slider was open.  You have *no* idea how big a horse is until you have one in your kitchen, flapping a dishtowel! (That’s Tempest drinking the wine. <G>)

TempestbwMJP: Now here are the basic questions of interest to historical writers.  How much ground could a rider reasonably cover in an average day of riding?  What techniques would be used?  (Can’t ride horses at top speed all day!)  What kind of care and feeding would be required?  What if the baddies are coming after him—how far and fast could he go with a decent horse?  (That’s Tempest again on the left.  Handsome fellow, isn’t he?)

SH:  To arrive at the answer, here’s a breakdown of horse speed:

Walk:  3-5 MPH
Trot:  8-10 MPH
Canter/Lope: 10-17 MPH
Gallop:  30 MPH

A decent horse can walk and trot all day, but he can only canter or gallop for short periods–one or two miles.  Also, the gallop is very tiring.  The trot is the horse’s cruise control, his most efficient working gait and the most appropriate gait to use for covering long distances at speed, interspersed with breathers at the walk. 

So, assuming an average rider and average horse over average roads, a conservative estimate for distance is 25 miles in 5-6 hours at a walk. A well conditioned horse ridden by a good rider over relatively even terrain can easily cover 50 miles in 10-11 hours, walking and trotting (but he’ll be one tired hoss). 

Horses1 If the hero is being chased by baddies, he might gallop for a mile to put distance between them, and then drop down to a medium or slow trot, or even a fast walk, to give the horse a breather while staying ahead.  Then he could rev up to a fast trot and maintain that for a long time.  And you could always have the baddie’s horse throw a shoe if you need to slow him down.  Once a horse loses a shoe, he’s out of commission.

MJP: What about those stallions?  Historical romance characters often have them to show how macho they are, but there are reasons why there are so many geldings in the world. <G>  And what about the mere slip of a girl who can control huge stallions by the force of her perky charm and tossing hair?  How likely is that?

SH:  Not very likely!  When I rode endurance and CTR, I *was* a perky slip of a girl.  (Not anymore!)  But I was also a knowledgeable horsewoman and a good rider.  Stallions:  (rolls eyes).  There’s always the exception that proves the rule, and there are certainly nicely mannered stallions out there, but it’s more likely for a stallion to be obnoxious, fractious, dangerous, and quick to use his teeth.  A friend of mine who’s an experienced horse trainer had her ring finger bitten clean off by her normally well-behaved stallion during breeding season.  You never let your guard down around a stallion.  And how fun is it to be riding a stallion in company when there’s a mare in heat nearby? 

Sherrieimage5 Historically, I don’t know how common it was to geld horses, however.  Perhaps (just perhaps) there were more stallions back then, though I can’t imagine why anyone would bother with a stallion for a riding horse when mares and geldings are more tractable and less dangerous. 

MJP:  What about those covers with the heroine riding in front of the hero.  Uncomfortable?  Unlikely?  Not to mention the occasional book that has them having sex on horseback.  (I vaguely recall a book some years back where they not only had sex while galloping, but were being chased by Indians or some such!!!) 

SH:  I’ve always scoffed loudly at the very idea of having sex on horseback, let alone while galloping.  Virtually impossible, I always said, unless you were a contortionist with a fine sense of balance.  But then last year a horsy friend of mine told me that in her younger days she did have sex on horseback.  More than once.  At a gallop.  So while I can no longer say it’s impossible, I still think it stretches credibility.  Regarding heroines riding in front of the hero:  see my answer to Pat’s question about riding double, below.

MJP: Any thoughts on riding sidesaddle?  Though we modern folk tend to put that in the same category as corsets, I understand that it could be a very stable and secure way to ride.

Sidesaddle SH:  The biggest misconception about riding sidesaddle is that people think the rider sits sideways and then twists her torso to face front.  That’s not so.  She sits facing forward, so there’s no twist to the body. As far as stability in the sidesaddle, the rider’s seat wasn’t all that safe and secure until after the invention of the leaping horn, which is the horn that curves down, over the top of the rider’s left leg.  Here’s a picture, to show the position of the legs and the body in a sidesaddle, including the leaping horn.  There’s controversy as to when the leaping horn was invented, but the general consensus is that it was *after* the Regency.

MJP: Now for the Wenchly questions:

JO:  Sherrie, this just came up today in my MIP. I have a coach and two riding
horses, but might be short one rider. Would it be better for the rider to lead
the spare horse, or to link it to the back of the coach? I’m thinking the rider
should lead it.

SH: I agree, Jo.  I’d have the rider lead the spare horse, even though riding a horse and leading another is a pain in the posterior–the led horse often crowds the ridden horse or lags behind, dragging on the rider’s arm.  However, if the horse were used to being tied to a coach, there likely wouldn’t be a problem.  It’s just that horses are absolute magnets for trouble.

Hunting_print JO: Oh, and another. They’re stuck in a place overnight where there’s not much for the horses to eat. Plenty of water, but basically an empty barn with no grass nearby. (Though I can change that.) Would the horses be okay for a few hours work the next day or do I really need to find them food?

SH: They wouldn’t die if they missed a meal, though they might grumble a bit.  Water is important, however–they must have water.

JO:  If there is grass and they want to let them eat in the morning (can’t do it overnight) how long to eat and how long before they can be on the road?

SH:  Grass would be good.  It’s the best horse feed, especially in the spring and summer when it’s loaded with nutrients.  If they have limited time, even 15 minutes of grazing would be adequate.  Half an hour is better.  Ideally, you’d want to give them time to digest (30-60 minutes), but in a pinch they could eat and then get right to work.  But they need water.  The average horse drinks 12 gallons a day.

JO:  Ah, the problems of road books!

PAT:  My big question is about saddles, especially when riding double.  What’s the relative position of the person holding the reins compared to where the tagalong sits?  And that depends on saddle.

Ourhappyhorses SH:  This is where poetic license (or suspending disbelief) comes in.  It’s so romantic to put the heroine in front of the hero, so he can hold her in his strong arms as he guides the horse, but in fact, it’s a bunch of hooey.  The pommel (the hump in front of the saddle) and the horse’s neck would make such an endeavor uncomfortable and precarious.  It’s far more logical for the heroine to sit astride, behind the rider.  However, if they’re riding without a saddle, it’s appropriate and more romantic for the heroine to be in front, one of the hero’s arms encircling her waist, and his other hand holding the reins.

PAT: And any kind of tackle question is usually nutsoid in the writing world. Stop the horses for the night and remove saddle? Remove bridle? (and then chase the critter down again in the morning) 

Regency_event_winner SH: You always remove saddle and bridle for the night, and a good horseman (or his groom) brushes the horse down afterwards, and wipes off the tack (or tackle) and cleans the slobber off the bit.  Most horses went into a paddock or pasture, or a tie-stall or loose box stall.  And yeah, there’d be the occasional horse that would make you chase him all over the pasture, but usually all you had to do was shake a bucket of grain at him and he’d come running.  Sort of like how a romance heroine glances provocatively at the hero, and he comes running. *g*

Chinese_horse_print Thanks for all the great information, Sherrie!  I’m sure some of our other readers are horse people.  What are your pet horsy peeves in novels?  Heck, even if you don’t have a horse yourself, I’m sure you’ve got some opinions.  So what are your romance likes and dislikes in respect to horses?

Mary Jo

255 thoughts on “The Wenches Horse Around”

  1. Nice job–three cheers for the Whipster! I especially liked your coverage of riding double and ALL the nuances. 🙂
    Truth is, even if both riders are comfortable, the horse can’t carry two adults for very long, especially when you consider the heavy clothing, depending on the period.
    Pet peeve: when the hero rides belly to the dirt, scoops up the Victorian heroine, and plants her in front of him while the baddies are in hot pursuit. Good grief, it would take an incredibly strong man to haul a 120 lb. woman up there buck nekkid, let alone one with 25 lbs. of humongous skirts flying about his ears–probably flop over the horse’s eyes and he’d skid to a stop, dumping both hero and heroine unceremoniously on their noggins. Then, the horse, a prey creature, would high-tail it down the road.
    Isn’t that romantic?
    Jacquie

    Reply
  2. Nice job–three cheers for the Whipster! I especially liked your coverage of riding double and ALL the nuances. 🙂
    Truth is, even if both riders are comfortable, the horse can’t carry two adults for very long, especially when you consider the heavy clothing, depending on the period.
    Pet peeve: when the hero rides belly to the dirt, scoops up the Victorian heroine, and plants her in front of him while the baddies are in hot pursuit. Good grief, it would take an incredibly strong man to haul a 120 lb. woman up there buck nekkid, let alone one with 25 lbs. of humongous skirts flying about his ears–probably flop over the horse’s eyes and he’d skid to a stop, dumping both hero and heroine unceremoniously on their noggins. Then, the horse, a prey creature, would high-tail it down the road.
    Isn’t that romantic?
    Jacquie

    Reply
  3. Nice job–three cheers for the Whipster! I especially liked your coverage of riding double and ALL the nuances. 🙂
    Truth is, even if both riders are comfortable, the horse can’t carry two adults for very long, especially when you consider the heavy clothing, depending on the period.
    Pet peeve: when the hero rides belly to the dirt, scoops up the Victorian heroine, and plants her in front of him while the baddies are in hot pursuit. Good grief, it would take an incredibly strong man to haul a 120 lb. woman up there buck nekkid, let alone one with 25 lbs. of humongous skirts flying about his ears–probably flop over the horse’s eyes and he’d skid to a stop, dumping both hero and heroine unceremoniously on their noggins. Then, the horse, a prey creature, would high-tail it down the road.
    Isn’t that romantic?
    Jacquie

    Reply
  4. Nice job–three cheers for the Whipster! I especially liked your coverage of riding double and ALL the nuances. 🙂
    Truth is, even if both riders are comfortable, the horse can’t carry two adults for very long, especially when you consider the heavy clothing, depending on the period.
    Pet peeve: when the hero rides belly to the dirt, scoops up the Victorian heroine, and plants her in front of him while the baddies are in hot pursuit. Good grief, it would take an incredibly strong man to haul a 120 lb. woman up there buck nekkid, let alone one with 25 lbs. of humongous skirts flying about his ears–probably flop over the horse’s eyes and he’d skid to a stop, dumping both hero and heroine unceremoniously on their noggins. Then, the horse, a prey creature, would high-tail it down the road.
    Isn’t that romantic?
    Jacquie

    Reply
  5. Nice job–three cheers for the Whipster! I especially liked your coverage of riding double and ALL the nuances. 🙂
    Truth is, even if both riders are comfortable, the horse can’t carry two adults for very long, especially when you consider the heavy clothing, depending on the period.
    Pet peeve: when the hero rides belly to the dirt, scoops up the Victorian heroine, and plants her in front of him while the baddies are in hot pursuit. Good grief, it would take an incredibly strong man to haul a 120 lb. woman up there buck nekkid, let alone one with 25 lbs. of humongous skirts flying about his ears–probably flop over the horse’s eyes and he’d skid to a stop, dumping both hero and heroine unceremoniously on their noggins. Then, the horse, a prey creature, would high-tail it down the road.
    Isn’t that romantic?
    Jacquie

    Reply
  6. Sherrie, thanks for having horse-sense! I always wonder what happens to the hero’s very own horse/s when he has to change them at the coaching house in pursuit of the heroine. I mean, there weren’t horse trailers back then to get them back where they belonged. Who kept track of such things? I can’t imagine leaving my Explorer behind to get behind the wheel of a strange Jeep, and then that Plymouth Valiant!

    Reply
  7. Sherrie, thanks for having horse-sense! I always wonder what happens to the hero’s very own horse/s when he has to change them at the coaching house in pursuit of the heroine. I mean, there weren’t horse trailers back then to get them back where they belonged. Who kept track of such things? I can’t imagine leaving my Explorer behind to get behind the wheel of a strange Jeep, and then that Plymouth Valiant!

    Reply
  8. Sherrie, thanks for having horse-sense! I always wonder what happens to the hero’s very own horse/s when he has to change them at the coaching house in pursuit of the heroine. I mean, there weren’t horse trailers back then to get them back where they belonged. Who kept track of such things? I can’t imagine leaving my Explorer behind to get behind the wheel of a strange Jeep, and then that Plymouth Valiant!

    Reply
  9. Sherrie, thanks for having horse-sense! I always wonder what happens to the hero’s very own horse/s when he has to change them at the coaching house in pursuit of the heroine. I mean, there weren’t horse trailers back then to get them back where they belonged. Who kept track of such things? I can’t imagine leaving my Explorer behind to get behind the wheel of a strange Jeep, and then that Plymouth Valiant!

    Reply
  10. Sherrie, thanks for having horse-sense! I always wonder what happens to the hero’s very own horse/s when he has to change them at the coaching house in pursuit of the heroine. I mean, there weren’t horse trailers back then to get them back where they belonged. Who kept track of such things? I can’t imagine leaving my Explorer behind to get behind the wheel of a strange Jeep, and then that Plymouth Valiant!

    Reply
  11. Thanks for all the great info 🙂 Very interesting!
    Jacquie – I absolutely would LOVE to see that in a Historical Romance. *Devil grin*

    Reply
  12. Thanks for all the great info 🙂 Very interesting!
    Jacquie – I absolutely would LOVE to see that in a Historical Romance. *Devil grin*

    Reply
  13. Thanks for all the great info 🙂 Very interesting!
    Jacquie – I absolutely would LOVE to see that in a Historical Romance. *Devil grin*

    Reply
  14. Thanks for all the great info 🙂 Very interesting!
    Jacquie – I absolutely would LOVE to see that in a Historical Romance. *Devil grin*

    Reply
  15. Thanks for all the great info 🙂 Very interesting!
    Jacquie – I absolutely would LOVE to see that in a Historical Romance. *Devil grin*

    Reply
  16. Super info. Nice to know I’m not the only one thinking that being able to ride well is enough of an achievement, without making your heroine some sort of prodigy that can ride the evilest stallion in the stables, usually known as Satan or Devil. Take your pick.
    In my experience putting two people on one horse is a recipe for disaster. JI’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world when faced with a new challenge. “No, that’s too heavy. I’m standing here until you change your mind. I might sidle sideways a bit, but I’m not galloping anywhere. Here’s an idea, lets see if I can rub you off against this tree.”

    Reply
  17. Super info. Nice to know I’m not the only one thinking that being able to ride well is enough of an achievement, without making your heroine some sort of prodigy that can ride the evilest stallion in the stables, usually known as Satan or Devil. Take your pick.
    In my experience putting two people on one horse is a recipe for disaster. JI’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world when faced with a new challenge. “No, that’s too heavy. I’m standing here until you change your mind. I might sidle sideways a bit, but I’m not galloping anywhere. Here’s an idea, lets see if I can rub you off against this tree.”

    Reply
  18. Super info. Nice to know I’m not the only one thinking that being able to ride well is enough of an achievement, without making your heroine some sort of prodigy that can ride the evilest stallion in the stables, usually known as Satan or Devil. Take your pick.
    In my experience putting two people on one horse is a recipe for disaster. JI’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world when faced with a new challenge. “No, that’s too heavy. I’m standing here until you change your mind. I might sidle sideways a bit, but I’m not galloping anywhere. Here’s an idea, lets see if I can rub you off against this tree.”

    Reply
  19. Super info. Nice to know I’m not the only one thinking that being able to ride well is enough of an achievement, without making your heroine some sort of prodigy that can ride the evilest stallion in the stables, usually known as Satan or Devil. Take your pick.
    In my experience putting two people on one horse is a recipe for disaster. JI’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world when faced with a new challenge. “No, that’s too heavy. I’m standing here until you change your mind. I might sidle sideways a bit, but I’m not galloping anywhere. Here’s an idea, lets see if I can rub you off against this tree.”

    Reply
  20. Super info. Nice to know I’m not the only one thinking that being able to ride well is enough of an achievement, without making your heroine some sort of prodigy that can ride the evilest stallion in the stables, usually known as Satan or Devil. Take your pick.
    In my experience putting two people on one horse is a recipe for disaster. JI’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world when faced with a new challenge. “No, that’s too heavy. I’m standing here until you change your mind. I might sidle sideways a bit, but I’m not galloping anywhere. Here’s an idea, lets see if I can rub you off against this tree.”

    Reply
  21. Hey, Sherrie. Long time since I sent you my “horse” book–er, saga. Good advice.
    Pet peeves: most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies. It’s not that you can’t–it’s just that you don’t, and it does freak out some horses. And there are a lot of horses that don’t do “double” occupants on their backs.
    Like you, Sherrie, I believe “horse” was my first word as well. This city girl didn’t get her first horse until she was 23, but I went to the racetrack (Thoroughbreds) at 20 and stayed there for over 30 years.

    Reply
  22. Hey, Sherrie. Long time since I sent you my “horse” book–er, saga. Good advice.
    Pet peeves: most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies. It’s not that you can’t–it’s just that you don’t, and it does freak out some horses. And there are a lot of horses that don’t do “double” occupants on their backs.
    Like you, Sherrie, I believe “horse” was my first word as well. This city girl didn’t get her first horse until she was 23, but I went to the racetrack (Thoroughbreds) at 20 and stayed there for over 30 years.

    Reply
  23. Hey, Sherrie. Long time since I sent you my “horse” book–er, saga. Good advice.
    Pet peeves: most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies. It’s not that you can’t–it’s just that you don’t, and it does freak out some horses. And there are a lot of horses that don’t do “double” occupants on their backs.
    Like you, Sherrie, I believe “horse” was my first word as well. This city girl didn’t get her first horse until she was 23, but I went to the racetrack (Thoroughbreds) at 20 and stayed there for over 30 years.

    Reply
  24. Hey, Sherrie. Long time since I sent you my “horse” book–er, saga. Good advice.
    Pet peeves: most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies. It’s not that you can’t–it’s just that you don’t, and it does freak out some horses. And there are a lot of horses that don’t do “double” occupants on their backs.
    Like you, Sherrie, I believe “horse” was my first word as well. This city girl didn’t get her first horse until she was 23, but I went to the racetrack (Thoroughbreds) at 20 and stayed there for over 30 years.

    Reply
  25. Hey, Sherrie. Long time since I sent you my “horse” book–er, saga. Good advice.
    Pet peeves: most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies. It’s not that you can’t–it’s just that you don’t, and it does freak out some horses. And there are a lot of horses that don’t do “double” occupants on their backs.
    Like you, Sherrie, I believe “horse” was my first word as well. This city girl didn’t get her first horse until she was 23, but I went to the racetrack (Thoroughbreds) at 20 and stayed there for over 30 years.

    Reply
  26. “most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies.”
    You know, it never occurred to me to even think about this. LOL! You mount on the left side and you lead on the left side (though my riding coach when I was learning dressage insisted that our horses allow us to mount from either side; it just feels soooooooo wrong).
    As for the gelding/stallion thing, it seems to depend on when you set your books. I’ve heard from some Medieval experts that horses were rarely gelded then, but there are PLENTY of records of sale and such from the Georgian era on showing that geldings ruled the day (way less dangerous than stallions, and less fractious than mares).
    Beautiful horse BTW, Sherrie! I’m the opposite of you: grew up with a horse and haven’t been able to afford once since I went off to college. *sigh* Someday . . .

    Reply
  27. “most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies.”
    You know, it never occurred to me to even think about this. LOL! You mount on the left side and you lead on the left side (though my riding coach when I was learning dressage insisted that our horses allow us to mount from either side; it just feels soooooooo wrong).
    As for the gelding/stallion thing, it seems to depend on when you set your books. I’ve heard from some Medieval experts that horses were rarely gelded then, but there are PLENTY of records of sale and such from the Georgian era on showing that geldings ruled the day (way less dangerous than stallions, and less fractious than mares).
    Beautiful horse BTW, Sherrie! I’m the opposite of you: grew up with a horse and haven’t been able to afford once since I went off to college. *sigh* Someday . . .

    Reply
  28. “most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies.”
    You know, it never occurred to me to even think about this. LOL! You mount on the left side and you lead on the left side (though my riding coach when I was learning dressage insisted that our horses allow us to mount from either side; it just feels soooooooo wrong).
    As for the gelding/stallion thing, it seems to depend on when you set your books. I’ve heard from some Medieval experts that horses were rarely gelded then, but there are PLENTY of records of sale and such from the Georgian era on showing that geldings ruled the day (way less dangerous than stallions, and less fractious than mares).
    Beautiful horse BTW, Sherrie! I’m the opposite of you: grew up with a horse and haven’t been able to afford once since I went off to college. *sigh* Someday . . .

    Reply
  29. “most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies.”
    You know, it never occurred to me to even think about this. LOL! You mount on the left side and you lead on the left side (though my riding coach when I was learning dressage insisted that our horses allow us to mount from either side; it just feels soooooooo wrong).
    As for the gelding/stallion thing, it seems to depend on when you set your books. I’ve heard from some Medieval experts that horses were rarely gelded then, but there are PLENTY of records of sale and such from the Georgian era on showing that geldings ruled the day (way less dangerous than stallions, and less fractious than mares).
    Beautiful horse BTW, Sherrie! I’m the opposite of you: grew up with a horse and haven’t been able to afford once since I went off to college. *sigh* Someday . . .

    Reply
  30. “most real horsemen/women never lead a horse from the right, yet you see that all the time in movies.”
    You know, it never occurred to me to even think about this. LOL! You mount on the left side and you lead on the left side (though my riding coach when I was learning dressage insisted that our horses allow us to mount from either side; it just feels soooooooo wrong).
    As for the gelding/stallion thing, it seems to depend on when you set your books. I’ve heard from some Medieval experts that horses were rarely gelded then, but there are PLENTY of records of sale and such from the Georgian era on showing that geldings ruled the day (way less dangerous than stallions, and less fractious than mares).
    Beautiful horse BTW, Sherrie! I’m the opposite of you: grew up with a horse and haven’t been able to afford once since I went off to college. *sigh* Someday . . .

    Reply
  31. Hi Sherri,
    I liked your comments on riding stallions. When I was riding, many years ago, I did ride some stallions. It took a lot of effort, but for the most part it was fun. Of course our boy, Francis, chose a mare, the Isabela as his mount. Of course she came to a tragic end.

    Reply
  32. Hi Sherri,
    I liked your comments on riding stallions. When I was riding, many years ago, I did ride some stallions. It took a lot of effort, but for the most part it was fun. Of course our boy, Francis, chose a mare, the Isabela as his mount. Of course she came to a tragic end.

    Reply
  33. Hi Sherri,
    I liked your comments on riding stallions. When I was riding, many years ago, I did ride some stallions. It took a lot of effort, but for the most part it was fun. Of course our boy, Francis, chose a mare, the Isabela as his mount. Of course she came to a tragic end.

    Reply
  34. Hi Sherri,
    I liked your comments on riding stallions. When I was riding, many years ago, I did ride some stallions. It took a lot of effort, but for the most part it was fun. Of course our boy, Francis, chose a mare, the Isabela as his mount. Of course she came to a tragic end.

    Reply
  35. Hi Sherri,
    I liked your comments on riding stallions. When I was riding, many years ago, I did ride some stallions. It took a lot of effort, but for the most part it was fun. Of course our boy, Francis, chose a mare, the Isabela as his mount. Of course she came to a tragic end.

    Reply
  36. Bethany, I’m with you. I want to see Jacquie’s scenario in a book! LOL! (And if anybody could write that scene and make it fall-down funny, Jacquie Rogers can!)
    Maggie, I believe there *was* a kind of horse trailer back then, pulled by horses, of course. I don’t know how common they were, but I read a true account once of a man who transported his sale horses to a horse fair in one.
    “I’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world”
    Francois, that’s primarily how the idea for this post came about–most writers don’t own horses, so they must invent what sounds plausible (often getting it wrong), or ask a horse person. I’ve actually had 2 published books dedicated to me after I was a horse consultant. (How do I put *that* on a resume?!!)

    Reply
  37. Bethany, I’m with you. I want to see Jacquie’s scenario in a book! LOL! (And if anybody could write that scene and make it fall-down funny, Jacquie Rogers can!)
    Maggie, I believe there *was* a kind of horse trailer back then, pulled by horses, of course. I don’t know how common they were, but I read a true account once of a man who transported his sale horses to a horse fair in one.
    “I’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world”
    Francois, that’s primarily how the idea for this post came about–most writers don’t own horses, so they must invent what sounds plausible (often getting it wrong), or ask a horse person. I’ve actually had 2 published books dedicated to me after I was a horse consultant. (How do I put *that* on a resume?!!)

    Reply
  38. Bethany, I’m with you. I want to see Jacquie’s scenario in a book! LOL! (And if anybody could write that scene and make it fall-down funny, Jacquie Rogers can!)
    Maggie, I believe there *was* a kind of horse trailer back then, pulled by horses, of course. I don’t know how common they were, but I read a true account once of a man who transported his sale horses to a horse fair in one.
    “I’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world”
    Francois, that’s primarily how the idea for this post came about–most writers don’t own horses, so they must invent what sounds plausible (often getting it wrong), or ask a horse person. I’ve actually had 2 published books dedicated to me after I was a horse consultant. (How do I put *that* on a resume?!!)

    Reply
  39. Bethany, I’m with you. I want to see Jacquie’s scenario in a book! LOL! (And if anybody could write that scene and make it fall-down funny, Jacquie Rogers can!)
    Maggie, I believe there *was* a kind of horse trailer back then, pulled by horses, of course. I don’t know how common they were, but I read a true account once of a man who transported his sale horses to a horse fair in one.
    “I’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world”
    Francois, that’s primarily how the idea for this post came about–most writers don’t own horses, so they must invent what sounds plausible (often getting it wrong), or ask a horse person. I’ve actually had 2 published books dedicated to me after I was a horse consultant. (How do I put *that* on a resume?!!)

    Reply
  40. Bethany, I’m with you. I want to see Jacquie’s scenario in a book! LOL! (And if anybody could write that scene and make it fall-down funny, Jacquie Rogers can!)
    Maggie, I believe there *was* a kind of horse trailer back then, pulled by horses, of course. I don’t know how common they were, but I read a true account once of a man who transported his sale horses to a horse fair in one.
    “I’d like a horses in books to react in the way a fair amount of them do in the real world”
    Francois, that’s primarily how the idea for this post came about–most writers don’t own horses, so they must invent what sounds plausible (often getting it wrong), or ask a horse person. I’ve actually had 2 published books dedicated to me after I was a horse consultant. (How do I put *that* on a resume?!!)

    Reply
  41. Nicole, how nice to “see” you! You’re right about leading horses from the left–the proper way. It just feels so weird to attempt it from the right.
    LOL, Kalen, about your dressage instructor making you mount from the “wrong” side. So did mine! She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!
    Mickey, how nice to see a Dunnett fan here! Glad you got the opportunity to ride a stallion, but yes, they do require constant vigilance. Tempest’s sire, a Thoroughbred, was well-behaved, sociable, and laid back, but you didn’t dare turn your back on him in the stall or he’d take a chunk out of you.
    Hi, Polly! Another face from my past! Thanks for dropping by. Come back often. This is a great site for writers. I’ve saved so many of the Wench posts (and those from the comments section, too) that I had to put them in a binder.

    Reply
  42. Nicole, how nice to “see” you! You’re right about leading horses from the left–the proper way. It just feels so weird to attempt it from the right.
    LOL, Kalen, about your dressage instructor making you mount from the “wrong” side. So did mine! She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!
    Mickey, how nice to see a Dunnett fan here! Glad you got the opportunity to ride a stallion, but yes, they do require constant vigilance. Tempest’s sire, a Thoroughbred, was well-behaved, sociable, and laid back, but you didn’t dare turn your back on him in the stall or he’d take a chunk out of you.
    Hi, Polly! Another face from my past! Thanks for dropping by. Come back often. This is a great site for writers. I’ve saved so many of the Wench posts (and those from the comments section, too) that I had to put them in a binder.

    Reply
  43. Nicole, how nice to “see” you! You’re right about leading horses from the left–the proper way. It just feels so weird to attempt it from the right.
    LOL, Kalen, about your dressage instructor making you mount from the “wrong” side. So did mine! She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!
    Mickey, how nice to see a Dunnett fan here! Glad you got the opportunity to ride a stallion, but yes, they do require constant vigilance. Tempest’s sire, a Thoroughbred, was well-behaved, sociable, and laid back, but you didn’t dare turn your back on him in the stall or he’d take a chunk out of you.
    Hi, Polly! Another face from my past! Thanks for dropping by. Come back often. This is a great site for writers. I’ve saved so many of the Wench posts (and those from the comments section, too) that I had to put them in a binder.

    Reply
  44. Nicole, how nice to “see” you! You’re right about leading horses from the left–the proper way. It just feels so weird to attempt it from the right.
    LOL, Kalen, about your dressage instructor making you mount from the “wrong” side. So did mine! She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!
    Mickey, how nice to see a Dunnett fan here! Glad you got the opportunity to ride a stallion, but yes, they do require constant vigilance. Tempest’s sire, a Thoroughbred, was well-behaved, sociable, and laid back, but you didn’t dare turn your back on him in the stall or he’d take a chunk out of you.
    Hi, Polly! Another face from my past! Thanks for dropping by. Come back often. This is a great site for writers. I’ve saved so many of the Wench posts (and those from the comments section, too) that I had to put them in a binder.

    Reply
  45. Nicole, how nice to “see” you! You’re right about leading horses from the left–the proper way. It just feels so weird to attempt it from the right.
    LOL, Kalen, about your dressage instructor making you mount from the “wrong” side. So did mine! She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!
    Mickey, how nice to see a Dunnett fan here! Glad you got the opportunity to ride a stallion, but yes, they do require constant vigilance. Tempest’s sire, a Thoroughbred, was well-behaved, sociable, and laid back, but you didn’t dare turn your back on him in the stall or he’d take a chunk out of you.
    Hi, Polly! Another face from my past! Thanks for dropping by. Come back often. This is a great site for writers. I’ve saved so many of the Wench posts (and those from the comments section, too) that I had to put them in a binder.

    Reply
  46. Sherrie, your story of the draft horse remined me of my mother. She was a child of homesteaders and loved horses. As a teenager she drove the “school bus”, a team of horses and a wagon. One day when I was a young woman I took my mother and my two year old daughter to the county fair and lost them both. I found my mother in the horse barn and my daughter sitting in a pen with a sow and a litter of pigs. Both of them quite content! It’s never dull in Montana.

    Reply
  47. Sherrie, your story of the draft horse remined me of my mother. She was a child of homesteaders and loved horses. As a teenager she drove the “school bus”, a team of horses and a wagon. One day when I was a young woman I took my mother and my two year old daughter to the county fair and lost them both. I found my mother in the horse barn and my daughter sitting in a pen with a sow and a litter of pigs. Both of them quite content! It’s never dull in Montana.

    Reply
  48. Sherrie, your story of the draft horse remined me of my mother. She was a child of homesteaders and loved horses. As a teenager she drove the “school bus”, a team of horses and a wagon. One day when I was a young woman I took my mother and my two year old daughter to the county fair and lost them both. I found my mother in the horse barn and my daughter sitting in a pen with a sow and a litter of pigs. Both of them quite content! It’s never dull in Montana.

    Reply
  49. Sherrie, your story of the draft horse remined me of my mother. She was a child of homesteaders and loved horses. As a teenager she drove the “school bus”, a team of horses and a wagon. One day when I was a young woman I took my mother and my two year old daughter to the county fair and lost them both. I found my mother in the horse barn and my daughter sitting in a pen with a sow and a litter of pigs. Both of them quite content! It’s never dull in Montana.

    Reply
  50. Sherrie, your story of the draft horse remined me of my mother. She was a child of homesteaders and loved horses. As a teenager she drove the “school bus”, a team of horses and a wagon. One day when I was a young woman I took my mother and my two year old daughter to the county fair and lost them both. I found my mother in the horse barn and my daughter sitting in a pen with a sow and a litter of pigs. Both of them quite content! It’s never dull in Montana.

    Reply
  51. “She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!”
    Mine too! And then there’s the whole “learning how to fall off” lesson. LOL! My favorite thing were the weekly no-bridles-allowed broom polo matches. Tons of fun. It’s pretty amazing what you can get a horse to do with just your legs and your seat.
    I’ve dealt with my share of stallions over the years, and they ran the gambit, temperament-wise. The 18+ hand Irish Thoroughbred I exercised was a mellow doll (I’d have sold my soul to have owned that horse!), but the quarter-horse I was exercising at the same time was a real pain (he too took off someone’s finger; not mine thankfully). He was notorious for striking (rearing up and lashing out with his front hooves). I can’t tell you the number of times I took him by the ear, twisted, and had a heart to heart. The less said about the several Arabs I’ve worked with over they years, the better. The last one I was breaking for a woman was so violent that the stable owner ended up telling her to either geld him or take him somewhere else (gelding mellowed him somewhat, but he was just a nasty beast).

    Reply
  52. “She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!”
    Mine too! And then there’s the whole “learning how to fall off” lesson. LOL! My favorite thing were the weekly no-bridles-allowed broom polo matches. Tons of fun. It’s pretty amazing what you can get a horse to do with just your legs and your seat.
    I’ve dealt with my share of stallions over the years, and they ran the gambit, temperament-wise. The 18+ hand Irish Thoroughbred I exercised was a mellow doll (I’d have sold my soul to have owned that horse!), but the quarter-horse I was exercising at the same time was a real pain (he too took off someone’s finger; not mine thankfully). He was notorious for striking (rearing up and lashing out with his front hooves). I can’t tell you the number of times I took him by the ear, twisted, and had a heart to heart. The less said about the several Arabs I’ve worked with over they years, the better. The last one I was breaking for a woman was so violent that the stable owner ended up telling her to either geld him or take him somewhere else (gelding mellowed him somewhat, but he was just a nasty beast).

    Reply
  53. “She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!”
    Mine too! And then there’s the whole “learning how to fall off” lesson. LOL! My favorite thing were the weekly no-bridles-allowed broom polo matches. Tons of fun. It’s pretty amazing what you can get a horse to do with just your legs and your seat.
    I’ve dealt with my share of stallions over the years, and they ran the gambit, temperament-wise. The 18+ hand Irish Thoroughbred I exercised was a mellow doll (I’d have sold my soul to have owned that horse!), but the quarter-horse I was exercising at the same time was a real pain (he too took off someone’s finger; not mine thankfully). He was notorious for striking (rearing up and lashing out with his front hooves). I can’t tell you the number of times I took him by the ear, twisted, and had a heart to heart. The less said about the several Arabs I’ve worked with over they years, the better. The last one I was breaking for a woman was so violent that the stable owner ended up telling her to either geld him or take him somewhere else (gelding mellowed him somewhat, but he was just a nasty beast).

    Reply
  54. “She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!”
    Mine too! And then there’s the whole “learning how to fall off” lesson. LOL! My favorite thing were the weekly no-bridles-allowed broom polo matches. Tons of fun. It’s pretty amazing what you can get a horse to do with just your legs and your seat.
    I’ve dealt with my share of stallions over the years, and they ran the gambit, temperament-wise. The 18+ hand Irish Thoroughbred I exercised was a mellow doll (I’d have sold my soul to have owned that horse!), but the quarter-horse I was exercising at the same time was a real pain (he too took off someone’s finger; not mine thankfully). He was notorious for striking (rearing up and lashing out with his front hooves). I can’t tell you the number of times I took him by the ear, twisted, and had a heart to heart. The less said about the several Arabs I’ve worked with over they years, the better. The last one I was breaking for a woman was so violent that the stable owner ended up telling her to either geld him or take him somewhere else (gelding mellowed him somewhat, but he was just a nasty beast).

    Reply
  55. “She also made me learn how to dismount safely from a horse that was walking and then when it was trotting. Not easy!”
    Mine too! And then there’s the whole “learning how to fall off” lesson. LOL! My favorite thing were the weekly no-bridles-allowed broom polo matches. Tons of fun. It’s pretty amazing what you can get a horse to do with just your legs and your seat.
    I’ve dealt with my share of stallions over the years, and they ran the gambit, temperament-wise. The 18+ hand Irish Thoroughbred I exercised was a mellow doll (I’d have sold my soul to have owned that horse!), but the quarter-horse I was exercising at the same time was a real pain (he too took off someone’s finger; not mine thankfully). He was notorious for striking (rearing up and lashing out with his front hooves). I can’t tell you the number of times I took him by the ear, twisted, and had a heart to heart. The less said about the several Arabs I’ve worked with over they years, the better. The last one I was breaking for a woman was so violent that the stable owner ended up telling her to either geld him or take him somewhere else (gelding mellowed him somewhat, but he was just a nasty beast).

    Reply
  56. I’m blushing here. I wrote a scene with a heroine perched in front of the hero on a French cavalry saddle when they had to ride double, but I swear I researched it! I think I even asked on the Beau Monde list, among other places. The consensus was that since she had nothing to protect her legs or more delicate parts, given that she was wearing a dress with just a shift and petticoat for underwear, she couldn’t ride astride behind him. But at least they didn’t gallop the poor overloaded beast or try to have sex on his back.
    Anyway, my current equestrian dilemma is whether the protagonist of my historical fantasy MIP should ride a stallion or gelding. Gelding seems more likely, since this is a war horse he’ll be riding on campaign, where I’d think steadiness and reliability would be at a premium. But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood! Decisions, decisions…
    Do any of our equestrians have experience with Barbs? The horse I picked out for my hero (after taking him on an online horse shopping excursion when I was having trouble getting a grip on his POV) is of that breed. I’m wondering now if they’d be as bad tempered as the Arabs Kalen has known…

    Reply
  57. I’m blushing here. I wrote a scene with a heroine perched in front of the hero on a French cavalry saddle when they had to ride double, but I swear I researched it! I think I even asked on the Beau Monde list, among other places. The consensus was that since she had nothing to protect her legs or more delicate parts, given that she was wearing a dress with just a shift and petticoat for underwear, she couldn’t ride astride behind him. But at least they didn’t gallop the poor overloaded beast or try to have sex on his back.
    Anyway, my current equestrian dilemma is whether the protagonist of my historical fantasy MIP should ride a stallion or gelding. Gelding seems more likely, since this is a war horse he’ll be riding on campaign, where I’d think steadiness and reliability would be at a premium. But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood! Decisions, decisions…
    Do any of our equestrians have experience with Barbs? The horse I picked out for my hero (after taking him on an online horse shopping excursion when I was having trouble getting a grip on his POV) is of that breed. I’m wondering now if they’d be as bad tempered as the Arabs Kalen has known…

    Reply
  58. I’m blushing here. I wrote a scene with a heroine perched in front of the hero on a French cavalry saddle when they had to ride double, but I swear I researched it! I think I even asked on the Beau Monde list, among other places. The consensus was that since she had nothing to protect her legs or more delicate parts, given that she was wearing a dress with just a shift and petticoat for underwear, she couldn’t ride astride behind him. But at least they didn’t gallop the poor overloaded beast or try to have sex on his back.
    Anyway, my current equestrian dilemma is whether the protagonist of my historical fantasy MIP should ride a stallion or gelding. Gelding seems more likely, since this is a war horse he’ll be riding on campaign, where I’d think steadiness and reliability would be at a premium. But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood! Decisions, decisions…
    Do any of our equestrians have experience with Barbs? The horse I picked out for my hero (after taking him on an online horse shopping excursion when I was having trouble getting a grip on his POV) is of that breed. I’m wondering now if they’d be as bad tempered as the Arabs Kalen has known…

    Reply
  59. I’m blushing here. I wrote a scene with a heroine perched in front of the hero on a French cavalry saddle when they had to ride double, but I swear I researched it! I think I even asked on the Beau Monde list, among other places. The consensus was that since she had nothing to protect her legs or more delicate parts, given that she was wearing a dress with just a shift and petticoat for underwear, she couldn’t ride astride behind him. But at least they didn’t gallop the poor overloaded beast or try to have sex on his back.
    Anyway, my current equestrian dilemma is whether the protagonist of my historical fantasy MIP should ride a stallion or gelding. Gelding seems more likely, since this is a war horse he’ll be riding on campaign, where I’d think steadiness and reliability would be at a premium. But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood! Decisions, decisions…
    Do any of our equestrians have experience with Barbs? The horse I picked out for my hero (after taking him on an online horse shopping excursion when I was having trouble getting a grip on his POV) is of that breed. I’m wondering now if they’d be as bad tempered as the Arabs Kalen has known…

    Reply
  60. I’m blushing here. I wrote a scene with a heroine perched in front of the hero on a French cavalry saddle when they had to ride double, but I swear I researched it! I think I even asked on the Beau Monde list, among other places. The consensus was that since she had nothing to protect her legs or more delicate parts, given that she was wearing a dress with just a shift and petticoat for underwear, she couldn’t ride astride behind him. But at least they didn’t gallop the poor overloaded beast or try to have sex on his back.
    Anyway, my current equestrian dilemma is whether the protagonist of my historical fantasy MIP should ride a stallion or gelding. Gelding seems more likely, since this is a war horse he’ll be riding on campaign, where I’d think steadiness and reliability would be at a premium. But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood! Decisions, decisions…
    Do any of our equestrians have experience with Barbs? The horse I picked out for my hero (after taking him on an online horse shopping excursion when I was having trouble getting a grip on his POV) is of that breed. I’m wondering now if they’d be as bad tempered as the Arabs Kalen has known…

    Reply
  61. Terrific article by Sherri. Entertaining, packed full of information, and concise. My three favorite things. I’m going to keep her list of rate-of-pace to miles so I don’t have to figure it out every single time I write a book.
    Joan Wolf

    Reply
  62. Terrific article by Sherri. Entertaining, packed full of information, and concise. My three favorite things. I’m going to keep her list of rate-of-pace to miles so I don’t have to figure it out every single time I write a book.
    Joan Wolf

    Reply
  63. Terrific article by Sherri. Entertaining, packed full of information, and concise. My three favorite things. I’m going to keep her list of rate-of-pace to miles so I don’t have to figure it out every single time I write a book.
    Joan Wolf

    Reply
  64. Terrific article by Sherri. Entertaining, packed full of information, and concise. My three favorite things. I’m going to keep her list of rate-of-pace to miles so I don’t have to figure it out every single time I write a book.
    Joan Wolf

    Reply
  65. Terrific article by Sherri. Entertaining, packed full of information, and concise. My three favorite things. I’m going to keep her list of rate-of-pace to miles so I don’t have to figure it out every single time I write a book.
    Joan Wolf

    Reply
  66. On the stallion question: it is still perfectly normal to see horse and donkey stallions as working animals in countries like Egypt – used for draught, riding and (the donkeys) as pack animals. No doubt some are gelded if they are hard to handle, but in general, when you see a male equid there, he’s entire.
    🙂

    Reply
  67. On the stallion question: it is still perfectly normal to see horse and donkey stallions as working animals in countries like Egypt – used for draught, riding and (the donkeys) as pack animals. No doubt some are gelded if they are hard to handle, but in general, when you see a male equid there, he’s entire.
    🙂

    Reply
  68. On the stallion question: it is still perfectly normal to see horse and donkey stallions as working animals in countries like Egypt – used for draught, riding and (the donkeys) as pack animals. No doubt some are gelded if they are hard to handle, but in general, when you see a male equid there, he’s entire.
    🙂

    Reply
  69. On the stallion question: it is still perfectly normal to see horse and donkey stallions as working animals in countries like Egypt – used for draught, riding and (the donkeys) as pack animals. No doubt some are gelded if they are hard to handle, but in general, when you see a male equid there, he’s entire.
    🙂

    Reply
  70. On the stallion question: it is still perfectly normal to see horse and donkey stallions as working animals in countries like Egypt – used for draught, riding and (the donkeys) as pack animals. No doubt some are gelded if they are hard to handle, but in general, when you see a male equid there, he’s entire.
    🙂

    Reply
  71. Not all Arabs have been nasty, but the three Arab stallions I’ve dealt with have all been the worst of the worst (I’ll guarantee you that Arab fanciers will totally disagree with my take on their general temperament, though!). I’ve never had to deal with a Barb Stallion, but the geldings and mares I’ve dealt with definitely shared the flashy temper of the Arabs (big bitters). Not my cuppa. I’m more of a Friesian, Warm Blood, Trakehner kind of girl.

    Reply
  72. Not all Arabs have been nasty, but the three Arab stallions I’ve dealt with have all been the worst of the worst (I’ll guarantee you that Arab fanciers will totally disagree with my take on their general temperament, though!). I’ve never had to deal with a Barb Stallion, but the geldings and mares I’ve dealt with definitely shared the flashy temper of the Arabs (big bitters). Not my cuppa. I’m more of a Friesian, Warm Blood, Trakehner kind of girl.

    Reply
  73. Not all Arabs have been nasty, but the three Arab stallions I’ve dealt with have all been the worst of the worst (I’ll guarantee you that Arab fanciers will totally disagree with my take on their general temperament, though!). I’ve never had to deal with a Barb Stallion, but the geldings and mares I’ve dealt with definitely shared the flashy temper of the Arabs (big bitters). Not my cuppa. I’m more of a Friesian, Warm Blood, Trakehner kind of girl.

    Reply
  74. Not all Arabs have been nasty, but the three Arab stallions I’ve dealt with have all been the worst of the worst (I’ll guarantee you that Arab fanciers will totally disagree with my take on their general temperament, though!). I’ve never had to deal with a Barb Stallion, but the geldings and mares I’ve dealt with definitely shared the flashy temper of the Arabs (big bitters). Not my cuppa. I’m more of a Friesian, Warm Blood, Trakehner kind of girl.

    Reply
  75. Not all Arabs have been nasty, but the three Arab stallions I’ve dealt with have all been the worst of the worst (I’ll guarantee you that Arab fanciers will totally disagree with my take on their general temperament, though!). I’ve never had to deal with a Barb Stallion, but the geldings and mares I’ve dealt with definitely shared the flashy temper of the Arabs (big bitters). Not my cuppa. I’m more of a Friesian, Warm Blood, Trakehner kind of girl.

    Reply
  76. Hugs to all fellow horsey lovers!
    My first word was horsey, but it came out “sissy.” In Junior High and high school,I learned to ride as a working student in hunter/jumper barns, then at age 23, bought a mare I competed at three-day eventing and did that for the next ten years. Now, the budget allows my daughter riding lessons, and I get to pet a velvety nose! Just being around a horse for a bit restores my sanity. But I’m determined to ride dressage freestyle before I trot off this mortal coil.
    Even as an experienced horseperson, I find I have to be very careful in my writing. Horse care was very different in previous times, carriages and harness are a brave new world to me, and historically, attitudes towards horses have changed.(For the better.)
    Thanks for the great post and gorgeous pics!

    Reply
  77. Hugs to all fellow horsey lovers!
    My first word was horsey, but it came out “sissy.” In Junior High and high school,I learned to ride as a working student in hunter/jumper barns, then at age 23, bought a mare I competed at three-day eventing and did that for the next ten years. Now, the budget allows my daughter riding lessons, and I get to pet a velvety nose! Just being around a horse for a bit restores my sanity. But I’m determined to ride dressage freestyle before I trot off this mortal coil.
    Even as an experienced horseperson, I find I have to be very careful in my writing. Horse care was very different in previous times, carriages and harness are a brave new world to me, and historically, attitudes towards horses have changed.(For the better.)
    Thanks for the great post and gorgeous pics!

    Reply
  78. Hugs to all fellow horsey lovers!
    My first word was horsey, but it came out “sissy.” In Junior High and high school,I learned to ride as a working student in hunter/jumper barns, then at age 23, bought a mare I competed at three-day eventing and did that for the next ten years. Now, the budget allows my daughter riding lessons, and I get to pet a velvety nose! Just being around a horse for a bit restores my sanity. But I’m determined to ride dressage freestyle before I trot off this mortal coil.
    Even as an experienced horseperson, I find I have to be very careful in my writing. Horse care was very different in previous times, carriages and harness are a brave new world to me, and historically, attitudes towards horses have changed.(For the better.)
    Thanks for the great post and gorgeous pics!

    Reply
  79. Hugs to all fellow horsey lovers!
    My first word was horsey, but it came out “sissy.” In Junior High and high school,I learned to ride as a working student in hunter/jumper barns, then at age 23, bought a mare I competed at three-day eventing and did that for the next ten years. Now, the budget allows my daughter riding lessons, and I get to pet a velvety nose! Just being around a horse for a bit restores my sanity. But I’m determined to ride dressage freestyle before I trot off this mortal coil.
    Even as an experienced horseperson, I find I have to be very careful in my writing. Horse care was very different in previous times, carriages and harness are a brave new world to me, and historically, attitudes towards horses have changed.(For the better.)
    Thanks for the great post and gorgeous pics!

    Reply
  80. Hugs to all fellow horsey lovers!
    My first word was horsey, but it came out “sissy.” In Junior High and high school,I learned to ride as a working student in hunter/jumper barns, then at age 23, bought a mare I competed at three-day eventing and did that for the next ten years. Now, the budget allows my daughter riding lessons, and I get to pet a velvety nose! Just being around a horse for a bit restores my sanity. But I’m determined to ride dressage freestyle before I trot off this mortal coil.
    Even as an experienced horseperson, I find I have to be very careful in my writing. Horse care was very different in previous times, carriages and harness are a brave new world to me, and historically, attitudes towards horses have changed.(For the better.)
    Thanks for the great post and gorgeous pics!

    Reply
  81. Kalen, the nicest stallions I’ve known were 2 Arabians and a Paso Fino. Go figure! One guy gave his grandchildren riding lessons on his Arab stallion. But those are exceptions to the rule.
    Susan, having never worn a corset, I don’t know how difficult it would be to sit astride a horse, but it doesn’t seem like it would be any different than sitting on a chair with your knees spread wide–which you could do in a corset. However, since Regency skirts were often tubular, that could certainly present a problem when riding astride!
    “But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood!”
    I think that’s precisely why so many writers mount their hero on a stallion. To me, that’s become as cliched as the tender heroine mounted sideways before the hero. But hey, most readers aren’t horse people, so it probably makes no difference to them, anyway, as long as it’s a good story!
    Hi, Joan! I have about a million of your books in my Regency library! I’ve gobbled up all the old Signets and other trad Regencies I could find in UBS, and have over 700 now. Your books take up a good section of the W’s! *g* So glad the rate-of-pace info will be helpful. I think if more writers had that simple chart, it would be easier to calculate times and distances.

    Reply
  82. Kalen, the nicest stallions I’ve known were 2 Arabians and a Paso Fino. Go figure! One guy gave his grandchildren riding lessons on his Arab stallion. But those are exceptions to the rule.
    Susan, having never worn a corset, I don’t know how difficult it would be to sit astride a horse, but it doesn’t seem like it would be any different than sitting on a chair with your knees spread wide–which you could do in a corset. However, since Regency skirts were often tubular, that could certainly present a problem when riding astride!
    “But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood!”
    I think that’s precisely why so many writers mount their hero on a stallion. To me, that’s become as cliched as the tender heroine mounted sideways before the hero. But hey, most readers aren’t horse people, so it probably makes no difference to them, anyway, as long as it’s a good story!
    Hi, Joan! I have about a million of your books in my Regency library! I’ve gobbled up all the old Signets and other trad Regencies I could find in UBS, and have over 700 now. Your books take up a good section of the W’s! *g* So glad the rate-of-pace info will be helpful. I think if more writers had that simple chart, it would be easier to calculate times and distances.

    Reply
  83. Kalen, the nicest stallions I’ve known were 2 Arabians and a Paso Fino. Go figure! One guy gave his grandchildren riding lessons on his Arab stallion. But those are exceptions to the rule.
    Susan, having never worn a corset, I don’t know how difficult it would be to sit astride a horse, but it doesn’t seem like it would be any different than sitting on a chair with your knees spread wide–which you could do in a corset. However, since Regency skirts were often tubular, that could certainly present a problem when riding astride!
    “But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood!”
    I think that’s precisely why so many writers mount their hero on a stallion. To me, that’s become as cliched as the tender heroine mounted sideways before the hero. But hey, most readers aren’t horse people, so it probably makes no difference to them, anyway, as long as it’s a good story!
    Hi, Joan! I have about a million of your books in my Regency library! I’ve gobbled up all the old Signets and other trad Regencies I could find in UBS, and have over 700 now. Your books take up a good section of the W’s! *g* So glad the rate-of-pace info will be helpful. I think if more writers had that simple chart, it would be easier to calculate times and distances.

    Reply
  84. Kalen, the nicest stallions I’ve known were 2 Arabians and a Paso Fino. Go figure! One guy gave his grandchildren riding lessons on his Arab stallion. But those are exceptions to the rule.
    Susan, having never worn a corset, I don’t know how difficult it would be to sit astride a horse, but it doesn’t seem like it would be any different than sitting on a chair with your knees spread wide–which you could do in a corset. However, since Regency skirts were often tubular, that could certainly present a problem when riding astride!
    “But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood!”
    I think that’s precisely why so many writers mount their hero on a stallion. To me, that’s become as cliched as the tender heroine mounted sideways before the hero. But hey, most readers aren’t horse people, so it probably makes no difference to them, anyway, as long as it’s a good story!
    Hi, Joan! I have about a million of your books in my Regency library! I’ve gobbled up all the old Signets and other trad Regencies I could find in UBS, and have over 700 now. Your books take up a good section of the W’s! *g* So glad the rate-of-pace info will be helpful. I think if more writers had that simple chart, it would be easier to calculate times and distances.

    Reply
  85. Kalen, the nicest stallions I’ve known were 2 Arabians and a Paso Fino. Go figure! One guy gave his grandchildren riding lessons on his Arab stallion. But those are exceptions to the rule.
    Susan, having never worn a corset, I don’t know how difficult it would be to sit astride a horse, but it doesn’t seem like it would be any different than sitting on a chair with your knees spread wide–which you could do in a corset. However, since Regency skirts were often tubular, that could certainly present a problem when riding astride!
    “But I’m afraid putting a hero on a gelding would be taken by many readers as a sort of subliminal slight on his manhood!”
    I think that’s precisely why so many writers mount their hero on a stallion. To me, that’s become as cliched as the tender heroine mounted sideways before the hero. But hey, most readers aren’t horse people, so it probably makes no difference to them, anyway, as long as it’s a good story!
    Hi, Joan! I have about a million of your books in my Regency library! I’ve gobbled up all the old Signets and other trad Regencies I could find in UBS, and have over 700 now. Your books take up a good section of the W’s! *g* So glad the rate-of-pace info will be helpful. I think if more writers had that simple chart, it would be easier to calculate times and distances.

    Reply
  86. Hi, Judith. I’d love to put Tempest in a book, but nobody would believe half the stuff he does! He’s a real character.
    AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries? Judging by the pictures I’ve seen, most are scrawny and overburdened.
    Jane, when I used to show, I had a lot of friends who did 3-day eventing. Now there’s a sport that’ll put hair on your chest!
    Kalen, I adore Friesians. Have you seen the movie “Ladyhawke”? That gorgeous black stallion Rutger Hauer rides (movie name: Goliath) is a Friesian.

    Reply
  87. Hi, Judith. I’d love to put Tempest in a book, but nobody would believe half the stuff he does! He’s a real character.
    AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries? Judging by the pictures I’ve seen, most are scrawny and overburdened.
    Jane, when I used to show, I had a lot of friends who did 3-day eventing. Now there’s a sport that’ll put hair on your chest!
    Kalen, I adore Friesians. Have you seen the movie “Ladyhawke”? That gorgeous black stallion Rutger Hauer rides (movie name: Goliath) is a Friesian.

    Reply
  88. Hi, Judith. I’d love to put Tempest in a book, but nobody would believe half the stuff he does! He’s a real character.
    AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries? Judging by the pictures I’ve seen, most are scrawny and overburdened.
    Jane, when I used to show, I had a lot of friends who did 3-day eventing. Now there’s a sport that’ll put hair on your chest!
    Kalen, I adore Friesians. Have you seen the movie “Ladyhawke”? That gorgeous black stallion Rutger Hauer rides (movie name: Goliath) is a Friesian.

    Reply
  89. Hi, Judith. I’d love to put Tempest in a book, but nobody would believe half the stuff he does! He’s a real character.
    AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries? Judging by the pictures I’ve seen, most are scrawny and overburdened.
    Jane, when I used to show, I had a lot of friends who did 3-day eventing. Now there’s a sport that’ll put hair on your chest!
    Kalen, I adore Friesians. Have you seen the movie “Ladyhawke”? That gorgeous black stallion Rutger Hauer rides (movie name: Goliath) is a Friesian.

    Reply
  90. Hi, Judith. I’d love to put Tempest in a book, but nobody would believe half the stuff he does! He’s a real character.
    AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries? Judging by the pictures I’ve seen, most are scrawny and overburdened.
    Jane, when I used to show, I had a lot of friends who did 3-day eventing. Now there’s a sport that’ll put hair on your chest!
    Kalen, I adore Friesians. Have you seen the movie “Ladyhawke”? That gorgeous black stallion Rutger Hauer rides (movie name: Goliath) is a Friesian.

    Reply
  91. Great info, Sherrie, bless you for sharing! I’m wondering how many of us get our mental images of romantic horse rides from movies and TV, thus leading to the preponderance of romantic doubles riding and hauling screaming women from the ground in gallant rescues. I’m thinking it’s unfair we have to be logical and correct when they get away with drama!

    Reply
  92. Great info, Sherrie, bless you for sharing! I’m wondering how many of us get our mental images of romantic horse rides from movies and TV, thus leading to the preponderance of romantic doubles riding and hauling screaming women from the ground in gallant rescues. I’m thinking it’s unfair we have to be logical and correct when they get away with drama!

    Reply
  93. Great info, Sherrie, bless you for sharing! I’m wondering how many of us get our mental images of romantic horse rides from movies and TV, thus leading to the preponderance of romantic doubles riding and hauling screaming women from the ground in gallant rescues. I’m thinking it’s unfair we have to be logical and correct when they get away with drama!

    Reply
  94. Great info, Sherrie, bless you for sharing! I’m wondering how many of us get our mental images of romantic horse rides from movies and TV, thus leading to the preponderance of romantic doubles riding and hauling screaming women from the ground in gallant rescues. I’m thinking it’s unfair we have to be logical and correct when they get away with drama!

    Reply
  95. Great info, Sherrie, bless you for sharing! I’m wondering how many of us get our mental images of romantic horse rides from movies and TV, thus leading to the preponderance of romantic doubles riding and hauling screaming women from the ground in gallant rescues. I’m thinking it’s unfair we have to be logical and correct when they get away with drama!

    Reply
  96. I can comment a bit more on the stallions vs geldings. Two words, no anesthetic!
    Gelding your stallion was a crapshoot with a significant mortality rate. If you had a total jerk for a stallion, you were likely to kill him anyway out of frustration, so dropping him in the stable yard, hog tieing both front and back feet, depositing a groom on both sets of feet and another on the horse’s neck and then going to work with a sharp knife was not a procedure designed to incline the owner to geld a horse and would have been used only as a last resort! I had this discussion with an older vet that still remembered working the large ranches in the American West, where the horses were gelded just like the cattle. He much preferes the use of anesthetic, for both saving his skin and the horse.
    Also, remember that the horse as a working animal typically worked daily. If he didn’t have an amenable temprament, he was food. Our horses today rarely work the amount that was typical of a horse in the past and are not conditioned to do that much work. So a horse 150 years ago, would have been either exercised by his groom, if he belonged to a rich person, or his owner rode him everywhere he had to go, all day long. He would have stood quietly when tied, being used to being tied for hours whenever and wherever the master stopped. 25 miles a day would have been pretty easy to cover, day after day. Multiday endurance rides are becoming popular and there are many horses doing all 5 days with daily 50 mile ride times of 8 or 9 hours. Horses that were used as daily transporation in the past should be able to equal these rides/times.
    Glad to see the writers trying to get it right!

    Reply
  97. I can comment a bit more on the stallions vs geldings. Two words, no anesthetic!
    Gelding your stallion was a crapshoot with a significant mortality rate. If you had a total jerk for a stallion, you were likely to kill him anyway out of frustration, so dropping him in the stable yard, hog tieing both front and back feet, depositing a groom on both sets of feet and another on the horse’s neck and then going to work with a sharp knife was not a procedure designed to incline the owner to geld a horse and would have been used only as a last resort! I had this discussion with an older vet that still remembered working the large ranches in the American West, where the horses were gelded just like the cattle. He much preferes the use of anesthetic, for both saving his skin and the horse.
    Also, remember that the horse as a working animal typically worked daily. If he didn’t have an amenable temprament, he was food. Our horses today rarely work the amount that was typical of a horse in the past and are not conditioned to do that much work. So a horse 150 years ago, would have been either exercised by his groom, if he belonged to a rich person, or his owner rode him everywhere he had to go, all day long. He would have stood quietly when tied, being used to being tied for hours whenever and wherever the master stopped. 25 miles a day would have been pretty easy to cover, day after day. Multiday endurance rides are becoming popular and there are many horses doing all 5 days with daily 50 mile ride times of 8 or 9 hours. Horses that were used as daily transporation in the past should be able to equal these rides/times.
    Glad to see the writers trying to get it right!

    Reply
  98. I can comment a bit more on the stallions vs geldings. Two words, no anesthetic!
    Gelding your stallion was a crapshoot with a significant mortality rate. If you had a total jerk for a stallion, you were likely to kill him anyway out of frustration, so dropping him in the stable yard, hog tieing both front and back feet, depositing a groom on both sets of feet and another on the horse’s neck and then going to work with a sharp knife was not a procedure designed to incline the owner to geld a horse and would have been used only as a last resort! I had this discussion with an older vet that still remembered working the large ranches in the American West, where the horses were gelded just like the cattle. He much preferes the use of anesthetic, for both saving his skin and the horse.
    Also, remember that the horse as a working animal typically worked daily. If he didn’t have an amenable temprament, he was food. Our horses today rarely work the amount that was typical of a horse in the past and are not conditioned to do that much work. So a horse 150 years ago, would have been either exercised by his groom, if he belonged to a rich person, or his owner rode him everywhere he had to go, all day long. He would have stood quietly when tied, being used to being tied for hours whenever and wherever the master stopped. 25 miles a day would have been pretty easy to cover, day after day. Multiday endurance rides are becoming popular and there are many horses doing all 5 days with daily 50 mile ride times of 8 or 9 hours. Horses that were used as daily transporation in the past should be able to equal these rides/times.
    Glad to see the writers trying to get it right!

    Reply
  99. I can comment a bit more on the stallions vs geldings. Two words, no anesthetic!
    Gelding your stallion was a crapshoot with a significant mortality rate. If you had a total jerk for a stallion, you were likely to kill him anyway out of frustration, so dropping him in the stable yard, hog tieing both front and back feet, depositing a groom on both sets of feet and another on the horse’s neck and then going to work with a sharp knife was not a procedure designed to incline the owner to geld a horse and would have been used only as a last resort! I had this discussion with an older vet that still remembered working the large ranches in the American West, where the horses were gelded just like the cattle. He much preferes the use of anesthetic, for both saving his skin and the horse.
    Also, remember that the horse as a working animal typically worked daily. If he didn’t have an amenable temprament, he was food. Our horses today rarely work the amount that was typical of a horse in the past and are not conditioned to do that much work. So a horse 150 years ago, would have been either exercised by his groom, if he belonged to a rich person, or his owner rode him everywhere he had to go, all day long. He would have stood quietly when tied, being used to being tied for hours whenever and wherever the master stopped. 25 miles a day would have been pretty easy to cover, day after day. Multiday endurance rides are becoming popular and there are many horses doing all 5 days with daily 50 mile ride times of 8 or 9 hours. Horses that were used as daily transporation in the past should be able to equal these rides/times.
    Glad to see the writers trying to get it right!

    Reply
  100. I can comment a bit more on the stallions vs geldings. Two words, no anesthetic!
    Gelding your stallion was a crapshoot with a significant mortality rate. If you had a total jerk for a stallion, you were likely to kill him anyway out of frustration, so dropping him in the stable yard, hog tieing both front and back feet, depositing a groom on both sets of feet and another on the horse’s neck and then going to work with a sharp knife was not a procedure designed to incline the owner to geld a horse and would have been used only as a last resort! I had this discussion with an older vet that still remembered working the large ranches in the American West, where the horses were gelded just like the cattle. He much preferes the use of anesthetic, for both saving his skin and the horse.
    Also, remember that the horse as a working animal typically worked daily. If he didn’t have an amenable temprament, he was food. Our horses today rarely work the amount that was typical of a horse in the past and are not conditioned to do that much work. So a horse 150 years ago, would have been either exercised by his groom, if he belonged to a rich person, or his owner rode him everywhere he had to go, all day long. He would have stood quietly when tied, being used to being tied for hours whenever and wherever the master stopped. 25 miles a day would have been pretty easy to cover, day after day. Multiday endurance rides are becoming popular and there are many horses doing all 5 days with daily 50 mile ride times of 8 or 9 hours. Horses that were used as daily transporation in the past should be able to equal these rides/times.
    Glad to see the writers trying to get it right!

    Reply
  101. Hi Sherrie,
    How I enjoyed this glimpse into your life as a rider/horse owner! Although I read all the “Misty” books as a kid, I am still kinda scared of horses close up–they’re awfully large. . .and as for Sex in the Saddle (what a great name for a romance novel!), that’s probably about tops on my list of Things I Will Never Try. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  102. Hi Sherrie,
    How I enjoyed this glimpse into your life as a rider/horse owner! Although I read all the “Misty” books as a kid, I am still kinda scared of horses close up–they’re awfully large. . .and as for Sex in the Saddle (what a great name for a romance novel!), that’s probably about tops on my list of Things I Will Never Try. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  103. Hi Sherrie,
    How I enjoyed this glimpse into your life as a rider/horse owner! Although I read all the “Misty” books as a kid, I am still kinda scared of horses close up–they’re awfully large. . .and as for Sex in the Saddle (what a great name for a romance novel!), that’s probably about tops on my list of Things I Will Never Try. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  104. Hi Sherrie,
    How I enjoyed this glimpse into your life as a rider/horse owner! Although I read all the “Misty” books as a kid, I am still kinda scared of horses close up–they’re awfully large. . .and as for Sex in the Saddle (what a great name for a romance novel!), that’s probably about tops on my list of Things I Will Never Try. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  105. Hi Sherrie,
    How I enjoyed this glimpse into your life as a rider/horse owner! Although I read all the “Misty” books as a kid, I am still kinda scared of horses close up–they’re awfully large. . .and as for Sex in the Saddle (what a great name for a romance novel!), that’s probably about tops on my list of Things I Will Never Try. . .
    Melinda

    Reply
  106. Wench Jo here. Great piece, Sherrie! Thanks for answering my questions.
    LOL, Francois. I’m not a horse person really, and I’d often thought the horse would have the same reaction.
    Joan Wolf! Wonderful to see you here. Love your Road to Avalon and Alfred books.(Great writer, everyone. Take note.)
    Re warhorses. They were often stallions, because the knights wanted that violent temperament, under control of course. They rode palfreys, however, which were mares or gelding. (I believe they had gelding back then, but I’ve never checked. Must.) They also rode mules. In the Song of Roland they go on about the wondrous gift of mules. Somehow, that’s not going down for the heroic mount of choice in romances any time soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  107. Wench Jo here. Great piece, Sherrie! Thanks for answering my questions.
    LOL, Francois. I’m not a horse person really, and I’d often thought the horse would have the same reaction.
    Joan Wolf! Wonderful to see you here. Love your Road to Avalon and Alfred books.(Great writer, everyone. Take note.)
    Re warhorses. They were often stallions, because the knights wanted that violent temperament, under control of course. They rode palfreys, however, which were mares or gelding. (I believe they had gelding back then, but I’ve never checked. Must.) They also rode mules. In the Song of Roland they go on about the wondrous gift of mules. Somehow, that’s not going down for the heroic mount of choice in romances any time soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  108. Wench Jo here. Great piece, Sherrie! Thanks for answering my questions.
    LOL, Francois. I’m not a horse person really, and I’d often thought the horse would have the same reaction.
    Joan Wolf! Wonderful to see you here. Love your Road to Avalon and Alfred books.(Great writer, everyone. Take note.)
    Re warhorses. They were often stallions, because the knights wanted that violent temperament, under control of course. They rode palfreys, however, which were mares or gelding. (I believe they had gelding back then, but I’ve never checked. Must.) They also rode mules. In the Song of Roland they go on about the wondrous gift of mules. Somehow, that’s not going down for the heroic mount of choice in romances any time soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  109. Wench Jo here. Great piece, Sherrie! Thanks for answering my questions.
    LOL, Francois. I’m not a horse person really, and I’d often thought the horse would have the same reaction.
    Joan Wolf! Wonderful to see you here. Love your Road to Avalon and Alfred books.(Great writer, everyone. Take note.)
    Re warhorses. They were often stallions, because the knights wanted that violent temperament, under control of course. They rode palfreys, however, which were mares or gelding. (I believe they had gelding back then, but I’ve never checked. Must.) They also rode mules. In the Song of Roland they go on about the wondrous gift of mules. Somehow, that’s not going down for the heroic mount of choice in romances any time soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  110. Wench Jo here. Great piece, Sherrie! Thanks for answering my questions.
    LOL, Francois. I’m not a horse person really, and I’d often thought the horse would have the same reaction.
    Joan Wolf! Wonderful to see you here. Love your Road to Avalon and Alfred books.(Great writer, everyone. Take note.)
    Re warhorses. They were often stallions, because the knights wanted that violent temperament, under control of course. They rode palfreys, however, which were mares or gelding. (I believe they had gelding back then, but I’ve never checked. Must.) They also rode mules. In the Song of Roland they go on about the wondrous gift of mules. Somehow, that’s not going down for the heroic mount of choice in romances any time soon.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  111. Jo, do you know if the desire for stallions as warhorses still held true in the 18th and 19th centuries? And would the answer change depending upon whether the officer riding the horse was, say, a cavalry captain who’d be directly participating in mounted charges vs. an infantry officer or the general commanding the division?

    Reply
  112. Jo, do you know if the desire for stallions as warhorses still held true in the 18th and 19th centuries? And would the answer change depending upon whether the officer riding the horse was, say, a cavalry captain who’d be directly participating in mounted charges vs. an infantry officer or the general commanding the division?

    Reply
  113. Jo, do you know if the desire for stallions as warhorses still held true in the 18th and 19th centuries? And would the answer change depending upon whether the officer riding the horse was, say, a cavalry captain who’d be directly participating in mounted charges vs. an infantry officer or the general commanding the division?

    Reply
  114. Jo, do you know if the desire for stallions as warhorses still held true in the 18th and 19th centuries? And would the answer change depending upon whether the officer riding the horse was, say, a cavalry captain who’d be directly participating in mounted charges vs. an infantry officer or the general commanding the division?

    Reply
  115. Jo, do you know if the desire for stallions as warhorses still held true in the 18th and 19th centuries? And would the answer change depending upon whether the officer riding the horse was, say, a cavalry captain who’d be directly participating in mounted charges vs. an infantry officer or the general commanding the division?

    Reply
  116. OK, Jacquie, I’m blushing — I had the bad guy fling a stationary heroine over the front of his saddle. She didn’t like it a whole bunch.
    There’s a Rowlandson print of a couple having sex while in one of those “carriages for two” (it’s late, else I know I’d remember the name, gig?) It didn’t look particularly comfortable … but I can actually see how sex on a horse would work… I must put that in a book … Hmm….
    BTW, Sherrie — thanks for the info and — one of these days I’m gonna have to meet Tempest!

    Reply
  117. OK, Jacquie, I’m blushing — I had the bad guy fling a stationary heroine over the front of his saddle. She didn’t like it a whole bunch.
    There’s a Rowlandson print of a couple having sex while in one of those “carriages for two” (it’s late, else I know I’d remember the name, gig?) It didn’t look particularly comfortable … but I can actually see how sex on a horse would work… I must put that in a book … Hmm….
    BTW, Sherrie — thanks for the info and — one of these days I’m gonna have to meet Tempest!

    Reply
  118. OK, Jacquie, I’m blushing — I had the bad guy fling a stationary heroine over the front of his saddle. She didn’t like it a whole bunch.
    There’s a Rowlandson print of a couple having sex while in one of those “carriages for two” (it’s late, else I know I’d remember the name, gig?) It didn’t look particularly comfortable … but I can actually see how sex on a horse would work… I must put that in a book … Hmm….
    BTW, Sherrie — thanks for the info and — one of these days I’m gonna have to meet Tempest!

    Reply
  119. OK, Jacquie, I’m blushing — I had the bad guy fling a stationary heroine over the front of his saddle. She didn’t like it a whole bunch.
    There’s a Rowlandson print of a couple having sex while in one of those “carriages for two” (it’s late, else I know I’d remember the name, gig?) It didn’t look particularly comfortable … but I can actually see how sex on a horse would work… I must put that in a book … Hmm….
    BTW, Sherrie — thanks for the info and — one of these days I’m gonna have to meet Tempest!

    Reply
  120. OK, Jacquie, I’m blushing — I had the bad guy fling a stationary heroine over the front of his saddle. She didn’t like it a whole bunch.
    There’s a Rowlandson print of a couple having sex while in one of those “carriages for two” (it’s late, else I know I’d remember the name, gig?) It didn’t look particularly comfortable … but I can actually see how sex on a horse would work… I must put that in a book … Hmm….
    BTW, Sherrie — thanks for the info and — one of these days I’m gonna have to meet Tempest!

    Reply
  121. Sherrie said: ‘AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries?’
    Yes, it is true that they work very hard indeed. Twenty years ago, it was common to see draught-horses even in tourist towns like Luxor that were in heartbreakingly poor condition, but thanks to the efforts of one charity in particular, this is, thank heavens, no longer so common. One still sees some donkeys in the villages that are malnourished and ill-treated (ill-fitting, dirty harness, and the resultant sores, is one of the worst problems), as well as overworked, but the average Egyptian horse/donkey owner values his animal and treats it fairly. But the hours they work and the loads they pull or carry would be considered excessive in our societies. However, they are probably similar to those that were normal in Western cities before the advent of the motor vehicle.
    When I speak of ‘draught-horses’ in this context, I refer to their *job* rather than their type – they are lightly-built Arab-type animals, seldom taller than 15.2hh.

    Reply
  122. Sherrie said: ‘AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries?’
    Yes, it is true that they work very hard indeed. Twenty years ago, it was common to see draught-horses even in tourist towns like Luxor that were in heartbreakingly poor condition, but thanks to the efforts of one charity in particular, this is, thank heavens, no longer so common. One still sees some donkeys in the villages that are malnourished and ill-treated (ill-fitting, dirty harness, and the resultant sores, is one of the worst problems), as well as overworked, but the average Egyptian horse/donkey owner values his animal and treats it fairly. But the hours they work and the loads they pull or carry would be considered excessive in our societies. However, they are probably similar to those that were normal in Western cities before the advent of the motor vehicle.
    When I speak of ‘draught-horses’ in this context, I refer to their *job* rather than their type – they are lightly-built Arab-type animals, seldom taller than 15.2hh.

    Reply
  123. Sherrie said: ‘AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries?’
    Yes, it is true that they work very hard indeed. Twenty years ago, it was common to see draught-horses even in tourist towns like Luxor that were in heartbreakingly poor condition, but thanks to the efforts of one charity in particular, this is, thank heavens, no longer so common. One still sees some donkeys in the villages that are malnourished and ill-treated (ill-fitting, dirty harness, and the resultant sores, is one of the worst problems), as well as overworked, but the average Egyptian horse/donkey owner values his animal and treats it fairly. But the hours they work and the loads they pull or carry would be considered excessive in our societies. However, they are probably similar to those that were normal in Western cities before the advent of the motor vehicle.
    When I speak of ‘draught-horses’ in this context, I refer to their *job* rather than their type – they are lightly-built Arab-type animals, seldom taller than 15.2hh.

    Reply
  124. Sherrie said: ‘AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries?’
    Yes, it is true that they work very hard indeed. Twenty years ago, it was common to see draught-horses even in tourist towns like Luxor that were in heartbreakingly poor condition, but thanks to the efforts of one charity in particular, this is, thank heavens, no longer so common. One still sees some donkeys in the villages that are malnourished and ill-treated (ill-fitting, dirty harness, and the resultant sores, is one of the worst problems), as well as overworked, but the average Egyptian horse/donkey owner values his animal and treats it fairly. But the hours they work and the loads they pull or carry would be considered excessive in our societies. However, they are probably similar to those that were normal in Western cities before the advent of the motor vehicle.
    When I speak of ‘draught-horses’ in this context, I refer to their *job* rather than their type – they are lightly-built Arab-type animals, seldom taller than 15.2hh.

    Reply
  125. Sherrie said: ‘AgTigress, I wonder if poor breeding, less-than-optimal nutrition, and hard work contribute to a more docile temperament for stallions in some of the other countries?’
    Yes, it is true that they work very hard indeed. Twenty years ago, it was common to see draught-horses even in tourist towns like Luxor that were in heartbreakingly poor condition, but thanks to the efforts of one charity in particular, this is, thank heavens, no longer so common. One still sees some donkeys in the villages that are malnourished and ill-treated (ill-fitting, dirty harness, and the resultant sores, is one of the worst problems), as well as overworked, but the average Egyptian horse/donkey owner values his animal and treats it fairly. But the hours they work and the loads they pull or carry would be considered excessive in our societies. However, they are probably similar to those that were normal in Western cities before the advent of the motor vehicle.
    When I speak of ‘draught-horses’ in this context, I refer to their *job* rather than their type – they are lightly-built Arab-type animals, seldom taller than 15.2hh.

    Reply
  126. Would you ladies allow me to post a link to a picture-book on horses that I published last year? I think some of you might like it. It is a compilation of museum artefacts and art, from the Stone Age to the 20th century, representing horses.

    Reply
  127. Would you ladies allow me to post a link to a picture-book on horses that I published last year? I think some of you might like it. It is a compilation of museum artefacts and art, from the Stone Age to the 20th century, representing horses.

    Reply
  128. Would you ladies allow me to post a link to a picture-book on horses that I published last year? I think some of you might like it. It is a compilation of museum artefacts and art, from the Stone Age to the 20th century, representing horses.

    Reply
  129. Would you ladies allow me to post a link to a picture-book on horses that I published last year? I think some of you might like it. It is a compilation of museum artefacts and art, from the Stone Age to the 20th century, representing horses.

    Reply
  130. Would you ladies allow me to post a link to a picture-book on horses that I published last year? I think some of you might like it. It is a compilation of museum artefacts and art, from the Stone Age to the 20th century, representing horses.

    Reply
  131. Hi Sherrie!
    Wonderful, wonderful post on horses. The info on the sidesaddle will come in quite handy as my 21st C never-rode-a-horse-in-her-life heroine sits her first horse. I always imagined a twisted torso, a position very hard to maintain in a Regency corset. But now, I know otherwise. Thanks
    Here’s a question (for your and/or the group): How common were piebald (think classic Indian Paint) horses in Regency England?
    Nina

    Reply
  132. Hi Sherrie!
    Wonderful, wonderful post on horses. The info on the sidesaddle will come in quite handy as my 21st C never-rode-a-horse-in-her-life heroine sits her first horse. I always imagined a twisted torso, a position very hard to maintain in a Regency corset. But now, I know otherwise. Thanks
    Here’s a question (for your and/or the group): How common were piebald (think classic Indian Paint) horses in Regency England?
    Nina

    Reply
  133. Hi Sherrie!
    Wonderful, wonderful post on horses. The info on the sidesaddle will come in quite handy as my 21st C never-rode-a-horse-in-her-life heroine sits her first horse. I always imagined a twisted torso, a position very hard to maintain in a Regency corset. But now, I know otherwise. Thanks
    Here’s a question (for your and/or the group): How common were piebald (think classic Indian Paint) horses in Regency England?
    Nina

    Reply
  134. Hi Sherrie!
    Wonderful, wonderful post on horses. The info on the sidesaddle will come in quite handy as my 21st C never-rode-a-horse-in-her-life heroine sits her first horse. I always imagined a twisted torso, a position very hard to maintain in a Regency corset. But now, I know otherwise. Thanks
    Here’s a question (for your and/or the group): How common were piebald (think classic Indian Paint) horses in Regency England?
    Nina

    Reply
  135. Hi Sherrie!
    Wonderful, wonderful post on horses. The info on the sidesaddle will come in quite handy as my 21st C never-rode-a-horse-in-her-life heroine sits her first horse. I always imagined a twisted torso, a position very hard to maintain in a Regency corset. But now, I know otherwise. Thanks
    Here’s a question (for your and/or the group): How common were piebald (think classic Indian Paint) horses in Regency England?
    Nina

    Reply
  136. Sherrie, I lived for a while near the first farm in the US to import Freisans. Their stallion, Laas, was a doll. I loved loved loved those horses. The owner even offered to give me a colt! Sadly I was off to college in 2 months and couldn’t take him. 🙁
    I’d have to poke around a bit to see if I can find info about 19th century cavalry horses . . . let me see if I can find anything.

    Reply
  137. Sherrie, I lived for a while near the first farm in the US to import Freisans. Their stallion, Laas, was a doll. I loved loved loved those horses. The owner even offered to give me a colt! Sadly I was off to college in 2 months and couldn’t take him. 🙁
    I’d have to poke around a bit to see if I can find info about 19th century cavalry horses . . . let me see if I can find anything.

    Reply
  138. Sherrie, I lived for a while near the first farm in the US to import Freisans. Their stallion, Laas, was a doll. I loved loved loved those horses. The owner even offered to give me a colt! Sadly I was off to college in 2 months and couldn’t take him. 🙁
    I’d have to poke around a bit to see if I can find info about 19th century cavalry horses . . . let me see if I can find anything.

    Reply
  139. Sherrie, I lived for a while near the first farm in the US to import Freisans. Their stallion, Laas, was a doll. I loved loved loved those horses. The owner even offered to give me a colt! Sadly I was off to college in 2 months and couldn’t take him. 🙁
    I’d have to poke around a bit to see if I can find info about 19th century cavalry horses . . . let me see if I can find anything.

    Reply
  140. Sherrie, I lived for a while near the first farm in the US to import Freisans. Their stallion, Laas, was a doll. I loved loved loved those horses. The owner even offered to give me a colt! Sadly I was off to college in 2 months and couldn’t take him. 🙁
    I’d have to poke around a bit to see if I can find info about 19th century cavalry horses . . . let me see if I can find anything.

    Reply
  141. Nina, from what I’ve seen piebalds were not at all common for riding or driving horses in England (you do see them among the ponies used by gypsies and Irish tinkers, as well as among some of the heavy draft breeds). Both piebald and skewbald are generally not allowed among many of the breeds being established in the Regency period (like the Irish hunter), but we know they were around in at least small numbers. Johann Georg de Hamilton—a late 17th/early 18th century Austrian painter—depicts several (though they are not in English stables). Has anyone seen a Stubbs painting containing a piebald? I have this vague memory of one, but I’m not sure if I’m just superimposing the piebald coat of Prinny’s dog onto another picture in my head. LOL!

    Reply
  142. Nina, from what I’ve seen piebalds were not at all common for riding or driving horses in England (you do see them among the ponies used by gypsies and Irish tinkers, as well as among some of the heavy draft breeds). Both piebald and skewbald are generally not allowed among many of the breeds being established in the Regency period (like the Irish hunter), but we know they were around in at least small numbers. Johann Georg de Hamilton—a late 17th/early 18th century Austrian painter—depicts several (though they are not in English stables). Has anyone seen a Stubbs painting containing a piebald? I have this vague memory of one, but I’m not sure if I’m just superimposing the piebald coat of Prinny’s dog onto another picture in my head. LOL!

    Reply
  143. Nina, from what I’ve seen piebalds were not at all common for riding or driving horses in England (you do see them among the ponies used by gypsies and Irish tinkers, as well as among some of the heavy draft breeds). Both piebald and skewbald are generally not allowed among many of the breeds being established in the Regency period (like the Irish hunter), but we know they were around in at least small numbers. Johann Georg de Hamilton—a late 17th/early 18th century Austrian painter—depicts several (though they are not in English stables). Has anyone seen a Stubbs painting containing a piebald? I have this vague memory of one, but I’m not sure if I’m just superimposing the piebald coat of Prinny’s dog onto another picture in my head. LOL!

    Reply
  144. Nina, from what I’ve seen piebalds were not at all common for riding or driving horses in England (you do see them among the ponies used by gypsies and Irish tinkers, as well as among some of the heavy draft breeds). Both piebald and skewbald are generally not allowed among many of the breeds being established in the Regency period (like the Irish hunter), but we know they were around in at least small numbers. Johann Georg de Hamilton—a late 17th/early 18th century Austrian painter—depicts several (though they are not in English stables). Has anyone seen a Stubbs painting containing a piebald? I have this vague memory of one, but I’m not sure if I’m just superimposing the piebald coat of Prinny’s dog onto another picture in my head. LOL!

    Reply
  145. Nina, from what I’ve seen piebalds were not at all common for riding or driving horses in England (you do see them among the ponies used by gypsies and Irish tinkers, as well as among some of the heavy draft breeds). Both piebald and skewbald are generally not allowed among many of the breeds being established in the Regency period (like the Irish hunter), but we know they were around in at least small numbers. Johann Georg de Hamilton—a late 17th/early 18th century Austrian painter—depicts several (though they are not in English stables). Has anyone seen a Stubbs painting containing a piebald? I have this vague memory of one, but I’m not sure if I’m just superimposing the piebald coat of Prinny’s dog onto another picture in my head. LOL!

    Reply
  146. Pat, I’m sure TV and movies have contributed to the romantic notion of swooping up the heroine one-handed, at a full gallop, and riding off into the sunset!
    Susan, as far as having no undies, couldn’t the woman tuck the skirt underneath her, as she would when sitting on a chair? She wouldn’t pull up her skirt to sit bare-arsed on a chair, so if she had full skirts, she could sit on the skirts when on horseback.
    Alison, you’re so right about horse use then and now. Back then, they were vital and used daily, often for long hours, and were used to it. This is why I’ve always felt the average Regency horses would be in good physical compared to today’s horses.
    Melinda, I loved those old Misty of Chincoteague books!
    Libby, how nice to see you here! Thanks for stopping by.

    Reply
  147. Pat, I’m sure TV and movies have contributed to the romantic notion of swooping up the heroine one-handed, at a full gallop, and riding off into the sunset!
    Susan, as far as having no undies, couldn’t the woman tuck the skirt underneath her, as she would when sitting on a chair? She wouldn’t pull up her skirt to sit bare-arsed on a chair, so if she had full skirts, she could sit on the skirts when on horseback.
    Alison, you’re so right about horse use then and now. Back then, they were vital and used daily, often for long hours, and were used to it. This is why I’ve always felt the average Regency horses would be in good physical compared to today’s horses.
    Melinda, I loved those old Misty of Chincoteague books!
    Libby, how nice to see you here! Thanks for stopping by.

    Reply
  148. Pat, I’m sure TV and movies have contributed to the romantic notion of swooping up the heroine one-handed, at a full gallop, and riding off into the sunset!
    Susan, as far as having no undies, couldn’t the woman tuck the skirt underneath her, as she would when sitting on a chair? She wouldn’t pull up her skirt to sit bare-arsed on a chair, so if she had full skirts, she could sit on the skirts when on horseback.
    Alison, you’re so right about horse use then and now. Back then, they were vital and used daily, often for long hours, and were used to it. This is why I’ve always felt the average Regency horses would be in good physical compared to today’s horses.
    Melinda, I loved those old Misty of Chincoteague books!
    Libby, how nice to see you here! Thanks for stopping by.

    Reply
  149. Pat, I’m sure TV and movies have contributed to the romantic notion of swooping up the heroine one-handed, at a full gallop, and riding off into the sunset!
    Susan, as far as having no undies, couldn’t the woman tuck the skirt underneath her, as she would when sitting on a chair? She wouldn’t pull up her skirt to sit bare-arsed on a chair, so if she had full skirts, she could sit on the skirts when on horseback.
    Alison, you’re so right about horse use then and now. Back then, they were vital and used daily, often for long hours, and were used to it. This is why I’ve always felt the average Regency horses would be in good physical compared to today’s horses.
    Melinda, I loved those old Misty of Chincoteague books!
    Libby, how nice to see you here! Thanks for stopping by.

    Reply
  150. Pat, I’m sure TV and movies have contributed to the romantic notion of swooping up the heroine one-handed, at a full gallop, and riding off into the sunset!
    Susan, as far as having no undies, couldn’t the woman tuck the skirt underneath her, as she would when sitting on a chair? She wouldn’t pull up her skirt to sit bare-arsed on a chair, so if she had full skirts, she could sit on the skirts when on horseback.
    Alison, you’re so right about horse use then and now. Back then, they were vital and used daily, often for long hours, and were used to it. This is why I’ve always felt the average Regency horses would be in good physical compared to today’s horses.
    Melinda, I loved those old Misty of Chincoteague books!
    Libby, how nice to see you here! Thanks for stopping by.

    Reply
  151. Jo, mules are an excellent choice for a riding animal, and some of them are gorgeous, but as you say, not very glamorous for a hero!
    Celia, let me know when you want to meet Tempest and I’ll set out the oat cakes and pink Chablis (his favorite wine). *g*
    AgTigress, please do post the link to your book. I would love to see it!
    Hi, Kimmy and Anderson! *waving*
    Nina, I don’t know how common piebalds were during the Regency, but I suspect they weren’t that common among riding and driving horses. I don’t recall seeing any contemporary paintings or writings of that era specifically mentioning piebalds.
    Kalen, lucky you to live nextdoor to those Friesians!

    Reply
  152. Jo, mules are an excellent choice for a riding animal, and some of them are gorgeous, but as you say, not very glamorous for a hero!
    Celia, let me know when you want to meet Tempest and I’ll set out the oat cakes and pink Chablis (his favorite wine). *g*
    AgTigress, please do post the link to your book. I would love to see it!
    Hi, Kimmy and Anderson! *waving*
    Nina, I don’t know how common piebalds were during the Regency, but I suspect they weren’t that common among riding and driving horses. I don’t recall seeing any contemporary paintings or writings of that era specifically mentioning piebalds.
    Kalen, lucky you to live nextdoor to those Friesians!

    Reply
  153. Jo, mules are an excellent choice for a riding animal, and some of them are gorgeous, but as you say, not very glamorous for a hero!
    Celia, let me know when you want to meet Tempest and I’ll set out the oat cakes and pink Chablis (his favorite wine). *g*
    AgTigress, please do post the link to your book. I would love to see it!
    Hi, Kimmy and Anderson! *waving*
    Nina, I don’t know how common piebalds were during the Regency, but I suspect they weren’t that common among riding and driving horses. I don’t recall seeing any contemporary paintings or writings of that era specifically mentioning piebalds.
    Kalen, lucky you to live nextdoor to those Friesians!

    Reply
  154. Jo, mules are an excellent choice for a riding animal, and some of them are gorgeous, but as you say, not very glamorous for a hero!
    Celia, let me know when you want to meet Tempest and I’ll set out the oat cakes and pink Chablis (his favorite wine). *g*
    AgTigress, please do post the link to your book. I would love to see it!
    Hi, Kimmy and Anderson! *waving*
    Nina, I don’t know how common piebalds were during the Regency, but I suspect they weren’t that common among riding and driving horses. I don’t recall seeing any contemporary paintings or writings of that era specifically mentioning piebalds.
    Kalen, lucky you to live nextdoor to those Friesians!

    Reply
  155. Jo, mules are an excellent choice for a riding animal, and some of them are gorgeous, but as you say, not very glamorous for a hero!
    Celia, let me know when you want to meet Tempest and I’ll set out the oat cakes and pink Chablis (his favorite wine). *g*
    AgTigress, please do post the link to your book. I would love to see it!
    Hi, Kimmy and Anderson! *waving*
    Nina, I don’t know how common piebalds were during the Regency, but I suspect they weren’t that common among riding and driving horses. I don’t recall seeing any contemporary paintings or writings of that era specifically mentioning piebalds.
    Kalen, lucky you to live nextdoor to those Friesians!

    Reply
  156. There is a piebald (or skewbald – the image is monochrome) in an 1822 lithograph by the French artist Theodore Gericault, who drew a lot of horse subjects during his stay in England in that year; the animal is one of a group of heavy draught-horses being taken to a horse-fair. Two of them are stallions, incidentally – one can’t tell with the other three.
    As others have said, piebalds and skewbalds tended to be associated with Romany horses and/or with especially decorative roles, like circus horses or drum horses in military processions. They would have been considered too ‘frivolous’ in appearance for riding or as carriage horses, I suspect, though I have no written source to prove that.
    On the other hand, there are some nice mid-18th-century figurines in porcelain of spotted, rather than patched, coloured horses being ridden by persons of superior status (though one of these is German rather than English).
    I don’t know of a Stubbs painting with a piebald, and I have three well-illustrated books on Stubbs.
    The objects I have mentioned are illustrated in the book to which I shall post the link in a moment.
    😉

    Reply
  157. There is a piebald (or skewbald – the image is monochrome) in an 1822 lithograph by the French artist Theodore Gericault, who drew a lot of horse subjects during his stay in England in that year; the animal is one of a group of heavy draught-horses being taken to a horse-fair. Two of them are stallions, incidentally – one can’t tell with the other three.
    As others have said, piebalds and skewbalds tended to be associated with Romany horses and/or with especially decorative roles, like circus horses or drum horses in military processions. They would have been considered too ‘frivolous’ in appearance for riding or as carriage horses, I suspect, though I have no written source to prove that.
    On the other hand, there are some nice mid-18th-century figurines in porcelain of spotted, rather than patched, coloured horses being ridden by persons of superior status (though one of these is German rather than English).
    I don’t know of a Stubbs painting with a piebald, and I have three well-illustrated books on Stubbs.
    The objects I have mentioned are illustrated in the book to which I shall post the link in a moment.
    😉

    Reply
  158. There is a piebald (or skewbald – the image is monochrome) in an 1822 lithograph by the French artist Theodore Gericault, who drew a lot of horse subjects during his stay in England in that year; the animal is one of a group of heavy draught-horses being taken to a horse-fair. Two of them are stallions, incidentally – one can’t tell with the other three.
    As others have said, piebalds and skewbalds tended to be associated with Romany horses and/or with especially decorative roles, like circus horses or drum horses in military processions. They would have been considered too ‘frivolous’ in appearance for riding or as carriage horses, I suspect, though I have no written source to prove that.
    On the other hand, there are some nice mid-18th-century figurines in porcelain of spotted, rather than patched, coloured horses being ridden by persons of superior status (though one of these is German rather than English).
    I don’t know of a Stubbs painting with a piebald, and I have three well-illustrated books on Stubbs.
    The objects I have mentioned are illustrated in the book to which I shall post the link in a moment.
    😉

    Reply
  159. There is a piebald (or skewbald – the image is monochrome) in an 1822 lithograph by the French artist Theodore Gericault, who drew a lot of horse subjects during his stay in England in that year; the animal is one of a group of heavy draught-horses being taken to a horse-fair. Two of them are stallions, incidentally – one can’t tell with the other three.
    As others have said, piebalds and skewbalds tended to be associated with Romany horses and/or with especially decorative roles, like circus horses or drum horses in military processions. They would have been considered too ‘frivolous’ in appearance for riding or as carriage horses, I suspect, though I have no written source to prove that.
    On the other hand, there are some nice mid-18th-century figurines in porcelain of spotted, rather than patched, coloured horses being ridden by persons of superior status (though one of these is German rather than English).
    I don’t know of a Stubbs painting with a piebald, and I have three well-illustrated books on Stubbs.
    The objects I have mentioned are illustrated in the book to which I shall post the link in a moment.
    😉

    Reply
  160. There is a piebald (or skewbald – the image is monochrome) in an 1822 lithograph by the French artist Theodore Gericault, who drew a lot of horse subjects during his stay in England in that year; the animal is one of a group of heavy draught-horses being taken to a horse-fair. Two of them are stallions, incidentally – one can’t tell with the other three.
    As others have said, piebalds and skewbalds tended to be associated with Romany horses and/or with especially decorative roles, like circus horses or drum horses in military processions. They would have been considered too ‘frivolous’ in appearance for riding or as carriage horses, I suspect, though I have no written source to prove that.
    On the other hand, there are some nice mid-18th-century figurines in porcelain of spotted, rather than patched, coloured horses being ridden by persons of superior status (though one of these is German rather than English).
    I don’t know of a Stubbs painting with a piebald, and I have three well-illustrated books on Stubbs.
    The objects I have mentioned are illustrated in the book to which I shall post the link in a moment.
    😉

    Reply
  161. AgTigress, I saw this book at the Met and almost bought it (it was too heavy to carry all over NY, so I added it to my “to buy” list). Now I must own it. LOL!
    I’m not sure if piebald horses were considered frivolous, or just unattractive, but they certainly weren’t popular among the upper classes for riding and driving animals (perhaps simply because it was associated with the ponies of Irish tinkers and gypsies?). Spotted (leopard) and dapple horses were seemingly quite popular, though. Sometimes I think it’s simply a matter of cultural taste. Palomino colouring has never been all that desirable in Britain either from what I’ve read over the years (AgTigress, please correct me if I’m mistaken; I know some Hanoverians look “palomino” but I’ve heard some pretty adamant arguments start up about how the colour is NOT the same as palomino, LOL!), but many in the States adore it.

    Reply
  162. AgTigress, I saw this book at the Met and almost bought it (it was too heavy to carry all over NY, so I added it to my “to buy” list). Now I must own it. LOL!
    I’m not sure if piebald horses were considered frivolous, or just unattractive, but they certainly weren’t popular among the upper classes for riding and driving animals (perhaps simply because it was associated with the ponies of Irish tinkers and gypsies?). Spotted (leopard) and dapple horses were seemingly quite popular, though. Sometimes I think it’s simply a matter of cultural taste. Palomino colouring has never been all that desirable in Britain either from what I’ve read over the years (AgTigress, please correct me if I’m mistaken; I know some Hanoverians look “palomino” but I’ve heard some pretty adamant arguments start up about how the colour is NOT the same as palomino, LOL!), but many in the States adore it.

    Reply
  163. AgTigress, I saw this book at the Met and almost bought it (it was too heavy to carry all over NY, so I added it to my “to buy” list). Now I must own it. LOL!
    I’m not sure if piebald horses were considered frivolous, or just unattractive, but they certainly weren’t popular among the upper classes for riding and driving animals (perhaps simply because it was associated with the ponies of Irish tinkers and gypsies?). Spotted (leopard) and dapple horses were seemingly quite popular, though. Sometimes I think it’s simply a matter of cultural taste. Palomino colouring has never been all that desirable in Britain either from what I’ve read over the years (AgTigress, please correct me if I’m mistaken; I know some Hanoverians look “palomino” but I’ve heard some pretty adamant arguments start up about how the colour is NOT the same as palomino, LOL!), but many in the States adore it.

    Reply
  164. AgTigress, I saw this book at the Met and almost bought it (it was too heavy to carry all over NY, so I added it to my “to buy” list). Now I must own it. LOL!
    I’m not sure if piebald horses were considered frivolous, or just unattractive, but they certainly weren’t popular among the upper classes for riding and driving animals (perhaps simply because it was associated with the ponies of Irish tinkers and gypsies?). Spotted (leopard) and dapple horses were seemingly quite popular, though. Sometimes I think it’s simply a matter of cultural taste. Palomino colouring has never been all that desirable in Britain either from what I’ve read over the years (AgTigress, please correct me if I’m mistaken; I know some Hanoverians look “palomino” but I’ve heard some pretty adamant arguments start up about how the colour is NOT the same as palomino, LOL!), but many in the States adore it.

    Reply
  165. AgTigress, I saw this book at the Met and almost bought it (it was too heavy to carry all over NY, so I added it to my “to buy” list). Now I must own it. LOL!
    I’m not sure if piebald horses were considered frivolous, or just unattractive, but they certainly weren’t popular among the upper classes for riding and driving animals (perhaps simply because it was associated with the ponies of Irish tinkers and gypsies?). Spotted (leopard) and dapple horses were seemingly quite popular, though. Sometimes I think it’s simply a matter of cultural taste. Palomino colouring has never been all that desirable in Britain either from what I’ve read over the years (AgTigress, please correct me if I’m mistaken; I know some Hanoverians look “palomino” but I’ve heard some pretty adamant arguments start up about how the colour is NOT the same as palomino, LOL!), but many in the States adore it.

    Reply
  166. Kalen, I think you are right about the class associations of bi-coloured horses, though they have certainly been much admired in many cultures. The cover image of the UK edition of my book features a beautiful 17th-century Mughal (Indian) painting of a boldly-marked skewbald stallion, white and gold, named ‘Amber Head’.
    I don’t think palomino colouring has ever been at all common in British horse breeds: though some of the romantic and melodramatic ‘horse affrighted/attacked by a lion’ series of paintings by Stubbs are vividly golden animals with white manes and tails, they were intended as fantasy images to some degree. There used to be some odd attitudes in Britain even towards chestnuts in the 19th century – the belief that they were ‘hot-tempered’ and unmanageable, like red-haired people, and perhaps a bit vulgarly flashy! Again, I have no reliable source for that statement – it is just an impression. Grey, brown, bay/dark bay and black were always regarded, I think, as the proper, ‘dignified’ colours for riding and carriage horses.
    🙂

    Reply
  167. Kalen, I think you are right about the class associations of bi-coloured horses, though they have certainly been much admired in many cultures. The cover image of the UK edition of my book features a beautiful 17th-century Mughal (Indian) painting of a boldly-marked skewbald stallion, white and gold, named ‘Amber Head’.
    I don’t think palomino colouring has ever been at all common in British horse breeds: though some of the romantic and melodramatic ‘horse affrighted/attacked by a lion’ series of paintings by Stubbs are vividly golden animals with white manes and tails, they were intended as fantasy images to some degree. There used to be some odd attitudes in Britain even towards chestnuts in the 19th century – the belief that they were ‘hot-tempered’ and unmanageable, like red-haired people, and perhaps a bit vulgarly flashy! Again, I have no reliable source for that statement – it is just an impression. Grey, brown, bay/dark bay and black were always regarded, I think, as the proper, ‘dignified’ colours for riding and carriage horses.
    🙂

    Reply
  168. Kalen, I think you are right about the class associations of bi-coloured horses, though they have certainly been much admired in many cultures. The cover image of the UK edition of my book features a beautiful 17th-century Mughal (Indian) painting of a boldly-marked skewbald stallion, white and gold, named ‘Amber Head’.
    I don’t think palomino colouring has ever been at all common in British horse breeds: though some of the romantic and melodramatic ‘horse affrighted/attacked by a lion’ series of paintings by Stubbs are vividly golden animals with white manes and tails, they were intended as fantasy images to some degree. There used to be some odd attitudes in Britain even towards chestnuts in the 19th century – the belief that they were ‘hot-tempered’ and unmanageable, like red-haired people, and perhaps a bit vulgarly flashy! Again, I have no reliable source for that statement – it is just an impression. Grey, brown, bay/dark bay and black were always regarded, I think, as the proper, ‘dignified’ colours for riding and carriage horses.
    🙂

    Reply
  169. Kalen, I think you are right about the class associations of bi-coloured horses, though they have certainly been much admired in many cultures. The cover image of the UK edition of my book features a beautiful 17th-century Mughal (Indian) painting of a boldly-marked skewbald stallion, white and gold, named ‘Amber Head’.
    I don’t think palomino colouring has ever been at all common in British horse breeds: though some of the romantic and melodramatic ‘horse affrighted/attacked by a lion’ series of paintings by Stubbs are vividly golden animals with white manes and tails, they were intended as fantasy images to some degree. There used to be some odd attitudes in Britain even towards chestnuts in the 19th century – the belief that they were ‘hot-tempered’ and unmanageable, like red-haired people, and perhaps a bit vulgarly flashy! Again, I have no reliable source for that statement – it is just an impression. Grey, brown, bay/dark bay and black were always regarded, I think, as the proper, ‘dignified’ colours for riding and carriage horses.
    🙂

    Reply
  170. Kalen, I think you are right about the class associations of bi-coloured horses, though they have certainly been much admired in many cultures. The cover image of the UK edition of my book features a beautiful 17th-century Mughal (Indian) painting of a boldly-marked skewbald stallion, white and gold, named ‘Amber Head’.
    I don’t think palomino colouring has ever been at all common in British horse breeds: though some of the romantic and melodramatic ‘horse affrighted/attacked by a lion’ series of paintings by Stubbs are vividly golden animals with white manes and tails, they were intended as fantasy images to some degree. There used to be some odd attitudes in Britain even towards chestnuts in the 19th century – the belief that they were ‘hot-tempered’ and unmanageable, like red-haired people, and perhaps a bit vulgarly flashy! Again, I have no reliable source for that statement – it is just an impression. Grey, brown, bay/dark bay and black were always regarded, I think, as the proper, ‘dignified’ colours for riding and carriage horses.
    🙂

    Reply
  171. AgTigress, that is one awesome “I-want-it-now” book! It’s going on my Christmas list right this instant! Gorgeous cover, too.
    Kalen, you’re right about palominos (color) and Palominos (registry) being wildly popular in the U.S. I have a friend who had a beautiful golden colored mare (with dapples!) with white socks and a white mane and tail, but she couldn’t be registered as a Palomino because she had a few black hairs in her mane and tail, giving it a silver color. Apparently black in the mane and tail is a no-no.
    Ahhhh, AgTigress, I remember those Stubbs lion-attacking-horse pictures. What is it with that? Eugene Delacroix painted them, too. I have a lovely Delacroix on my wall, but it’s of a horse frightened by lightning: http://tinyurl.com/yvmrn2
    Here’s a Delacroix of a tiger attacking what looks like a spotted horse, Kalen, but I can’t tell if it’s just highlights or real spots: http://tinyurl.com/yrr63a And anyway, since it’s a wild tiger, it wouldn’t be an English horse he’s attacking!

    Reply
  172. AgTigress, that is one awesome “I-want-it-now” book! It’s going on my Christmas list right this instant! Gorgeous cover, too.
    Kalen, you’re right about palominos (color) and Palominos (registry) being wildly popular in the U.S. I have a friend who had a beautiful golden colored mare (with dapples!) with white socks and a white mane and tail, but she couldn’t be registered as a Palomino because she had a few black hairs in her mane and tail, giving it a silver color. Apparently black in the mane and tail is a no-no.
    Ahhhh, AgTigress, I remember those Stubbs lion-attacking-horse pictures. What is it with that? Eugene Delacroix painted them, too. I have a lovely Delacroix on my wall, but it’s of a horse frightened by lightning: http://tinyurl.com/yvmrn2
    Here’s a Delacroix of a tiger attacking what looks like a spotted horse, Kalen, but I can’t tell if it’s just highlights or real spots: http://tinyurl.com/yrr63a And anyway, since it’s a wild tiger, it wouldn’t be an English horse he’s attacking!

    Reply
  173. AgTigress, that is one awesome “I-want-it-now” book! It’s going on my Christmas list right this instant! Gorgeous cover, too.
    Kalen, you’re right about palominos (color) and Palominos (registry) being wildly popular in the U.S. I have a friend who had a beautiful golden colored mare (with dapples!) with white socks and a white mane and tail, but she couldn’t be registered as a Palomino because she had a few black hairs in her mane and tail, giving it a silver color. Apparently black in the mane and tail is a no-no.
    Ahhhh, AgTigress, I remember those Stubbs lion-attacking-horse pictures. What is it with that? Eugene Delacroix painted them, too. I have a lovely Delacroix on my wall, but it’s of a horse frightened by lightning: http://tinyurl.com/yvmrn2
    Here’s a Delacroix of a tiger attacking what looks like a spotted horse, Kalen, but I can’t tell if it’s just highlights or real spots: http://tinyurl.com/yrr63a And anyway, since it’s a wild tiger, it wouldn’t be an English horse he’s attacking!

    Reply
  174. AgTigress, that is one awesome “I-want-it-now” book! It’s going on my Christmas list right this instant! Gorgeous cover, too.
    Kalen, you’re right about palominos (color) and Palominos (registry) being wildly popular in the U.S. I have a friend who had a beautiful golden colored mare (with dapples!) with white socks and a white mane and tail, but she couldn’t be registered as a Palomino because she had a few black hairs in her mane and tail, giving it a silver color. Apparently black in the mane and tail is a no-no.
    Ahhhh, AgTigress, I remember those Stubbs lion-attacking-horse pictures. What is it with that? Eugene Delacroix painted them, too. I have a lovely Delacroix on my wall, but it’s of a horse frightened by lightning: http://tinyurl.com/yvmrn2
    Here’s a Delacroix of a tiger attacking what looks like a spotted horse, Kalen, but I can’t tell if it’s just highlights or real spots: http://tinyurl.com/yrr63a And anyway, since it’s a wild tiger, it wouldn’t be an English horse he’s attacking!

    Reply
  175. AgTigress, that is one awesome “I-want-it-now” book! It’s going on my Christmas list right this instant! Gorgeous cover, too.
    Kalen, you’re right about palominos (color) and Palominos (registry) being wildly popular in the U.S. I have a friend who had a beautiful golden colored mare (with dapples!) with white socks and a white mane and tail, but she couldn’t be registered as a Palomino because she had a few black hairs in her mane and tail, giving it a silver color. Apparently black in the mane and tail is a no-no.
    Ahhhh, AgTigress, I remember those Stubbs lion-attacking-horse pictures. What is it with that? Eugene Delacroix painted them, too. I have a lovely Delacroix on my wall, but it’s of a horse frightened by lightning: http://tinyurl.com/yvmrn2
    Here’s a Delacroix of a tiger attacking what looks like a spotted horse, Kalen, but I can’t tell if it’s just highlights or real spots: http://tinyurl.com/yrr63a And anyway, since it’s a wild tiger, it wouldn’t be an English horse he’s attacking!

    Reply
  176. Sherrie: the 18th-century taste for those melodramatic predator-prey vignettes, such as lions attacking horses, is firmly part of the neo-Classical taste that was fuelled by the ideology of the Enlightenment. Not only were there direct Roman prototypes, but there was a huge interest in the balance and interraction between Nature and Reason, Savagery and Civilisation, and all the complex ways of interpreting those concepts.
    🙂

    Reply
  177. Sherrie: the 18th-century taste for those melodramatic predator-prey vignettes, such as lions attacking horses, is firmly part of the neo-Classical taste that was fuelled by the ideology of the Enlightenment. Not only were there direct Roman prototypes, but there was a huge interest in the balance and interraction between Nature and Reason, Savagery and Civilisation, and all the complex ways of interpreting those concepts.
    🙂

    Reply
  178. Sherrie: the 18th-century taste for those melodramatic predator-prey vignettes, such as lions attacking horses, is firmly part of the neo-Classical taste that was fuelled by the ideology of the Enlightenment. Not only were there direct Roman prototypes, but there was a huge interest in the balance and interraction between Nature and Reason, Savagery and Civilisation, and all the complex ways of interpreting those concepts.
    🙂

    Reply
  179. Sherrie: the 18th-century taste for those melodramatic predator-prey vignettes, such as lions attacking horses, is firmly part of the neo-Classical taste that was fuelled by the ideology of the Enlightenment. Not only were there direct Roman prototypes, but there was a huge interest in the balance and interraction between Nature and Reason, Savagery and Civilisation, and all the complex ways of interpreting those concepts.
    🙂

    Reply
  180. Sherrie: the 18th-century taste for those melodramatic predator-prey vignettes, such as lions attacking horses, is firmly part of the neo-Classical taste that was fuelled by the ideology of the Enlightenment. Not only were there direct Roman prototypes, but there was a huge interest in the balance and interraction between Nature and Reason, Savagery and Civilisation, and all the complex ways of interpreting those concepts.
    🙂

    Reply
  181. ‘”Oh,” said Sherrie, in a very small voice.’
    Oh dear, did I have my pompous lecturing hat on? I’m sorry!
    Retreats, blushing…

    Reply
  182. ‘”Oh,” said Sherrie, in a very small voice.’
    Oh dear, did I have my pompous lecturing hat on? I’m sorry!
    Retreats, blushing…

    Reply
  183. ‘”Oh,” said Sherrie, in a very small voice.’
    Oh dear, did I have my pompous lecturing hat on? I’m sorry!
    Retreats, blushing…

    Reply
  184. ‘”Oh,” said Sherrie, in a very small voice.’
    Oh dear, did I have my pompous lecturing hat on? I’m sorry!
    Retreats, blushing…

    Reply
  185. ‘”Oh,” said Sherrie, in a very small voice.’
    Oh dear, did I have my pompous lecturing hat on? I’m sorry!
    Retreats, blushing…

    Reply
  186. Oh, AgTigress, dearest! No apologies needed! You did NOT have your “pompous lecturing hat on” at all! I was just trying to be funny, and hoped my little *g* at the end would convey that I was only joking.
    Hon, I always enjoy your posts immensely and have printed out some of them for my research files. Most imformative!
    In my other life, I write humor, but I’ve learned that humor is a very individual thing. What I find hysterically funny, someone else just sniffs at, and vice versa. It’s sometimes so hard to convey humor without facial expressions, sappy grins, and winks. Emoticons don’t come close, do they? *ggg* 🙂
    BTW, I celebrated Independence Day with a BBQ at my sister’s and I gave her the Amazon.com printout of your horse book and told her that’s what I wanted for my birthday. I’ll have to wait until December, but I have a strong suspicion that book will be on my coffee table come December. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  187. Oh, AgTigress, dearest! No apologies needed! You did NOT have your “pompous lecturing hat on” at all! I was just trying to be funny, and hoped my little *g* at the end would convey that I was only joking.
    Hon, I always enjoy your posts immensely and have printed out some of them for my research files. Most imformative!
    In my other life, I write humor, but I’ve learned that humor is a very individual thing. What I find hysterically funny, someone else just sniffs at, and vice versa. It’s sometimes so hard to convey humor without facial expressions, sappy grins, and winks. Emoticons don’t come close, do they? *ggg* 🙂
    BTW, I celebrated Independence Day with a BBQ at my sister’s and I gave her the Amazon.com printout of your horse book and told her that’s what I wanted for my birthday. I’ll have to wait until December, but I have a strong suspicion that book will be on my coffee table come December. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  188. Oh, AgTigress, dearest! No apologies needed! You did NOT have your “pompous lecturing hat on” at all! I was just trying to be funny, and hoped my little *g* at the end would convey that I was only joking.
    Hon, I always enjoy your posts immensely and have printed out some of them for my research files. Most imformative!
    In my other life, I write humor, but I’ve learned that humor is a very individual thing. What I find hysterically funny, someone else just sniffs at, and vice versa. It’s sometimes so hard to convey humor without facial expressions, sappy grins, and winks. Emoticons don’t come close, do they? *ggg* 🙂
    BTW, I celebrated Independence Day with a BBQ at my sister’s and I gave her the Amazon.com printout of your horse book and told her that’s what I wanted for my birthday. I’ll have to wait until December, but I have a strong suspicion that book will be on my coffee table come December. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  189. Oh, AgTigress, dearest! No apologies needed! You did NOT have your “pompous lecturing hat on” at all! I was just trying to be funny, and hoped my little *g* at the end would convey that I was only joking.
    Hon, I always enjoy your posts immensely and have printed out some of them for my research files. Most imformative!
    In my other life, I write humor, but I’ve learned that humor is a very individual thing. What I find hysterically funny, someone else just sniffs at, and vice versa. It’s sometimes so hard to convey humor without facial expressions, sappy grins, and winks. Emoticons don’t come close, do they? *ggg* 🙂
    BTW, I celebrated Independence Day with a BBQ at my sister’s and I gave her the Amazon.com printout of your horse book and told her that’s what I wanted for my birthday. I’ll have to wait until December, but I have a strong suspicion that book will be on my coffee table come December. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  190. Oh, AgTigress, dearest! No apologies needed! You did NOT have your “pompous lecturing hat on” at all! I was just trying to be funny, and hoped my little *g* at the end would convey that I was only joking.
    Hon, I always enjoy your posts immensely and have printed out some of them for my research files. Most imformative!
    In my other life, I write humor, but I’ve learned that humor is a very individual thing. What I find hysterically funny, someone else just sniffs at, and vice versa. It’s sometimes so hard to convey humor without facial expressions, sappy grins, and winks. Emoticons don’t come close, do they? *ggg* 🙂
    BTW, I celebrated Independence Day with a BBQ at my sister’s and I gave her the Amazon.com printout of your horse book and told her that’s what I wanted for my birthday. I’ll have to wait until December, but I have a strong suspicion that book will be on my coffee table come December. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  191. Whew, that’s all right then! I do have a lecturing mode, and I don’t always notice when I slip into it. It’s a case of watching out for the other person’s eyes to glaze over, hard to do on a blog.
    I do so know what you mean about humour. Things that will make one person fall about laughing will leave another stony-faced.
    I hope you’ll get the book, and enjoy it, and that you won’t find any mistakes! There are one or two, of course (what book was *ever* printed in a state of utter perfection? I swear, some of those little typos are inserted specially *after* everyone has proof-read the whole thing, to ensure that the author doesn’t get too smug), but the ones I have noted so far, in the hope that there’ll be a paperback edition in which I can correct them, are not too terrible.
    I did have the benefit of advice from friends who are practical horsewomen, so I hope there aren’t any ‘horsemanship’ misunderstandings.
    🙂

    Reply
  192. Whew, that’s all right then! I do have a lecturing mode, and I don’t always notice when I slip into it. It’s a case of watching out for the other person’s eyes to glaze over, hard to do on a blog.
    I do so know what you mean about humour. Things that will make one person fall about laughing will leave another stony-faced.
    I hope you’ll get the book, and enjoy it, and that you won’t find any mistakes! There are one or two, of course (what book was *ever* printed in a state of utter perfection? I swear, some of those little typos are inserted specially *after* everyone has proof-read the whole thing, to ensure that the author doesn’t get too smug), but the ones I have noted so far, in the hope that there’ll be a paperback edition in which I can correct them, are not too terrible.
    I did have the benefit of advice from friends who are practical horsewomen, so I hope there aren’t any ‘horsemanship’ misunderstandings.
    🙂

    Reply
  193. Whew, that’s all right then! I do have a lecturing mode, and I don’t always notice when I slip into it. It’s a case of watching out for the other person’s eyes to glaze over, hard to do on a blog.
    I do so know what you mean about humour. Things that will make one person fall about laughing will leave another stony-faced.
    I hope you’ll get the book, and enjoy it, and that you won’t find any mistakes! There are one or two, of course (what book was *ever* printed in a state of utter perfection? I swear, some of those little typos are inserted specially *after* everyone has proof-read the whole thing, to ensure that the author doesn’t get too smug), but the ones I have noted so far, in the hope that there’ll be a paperback edition in which I can correct them, are not too terrible.
    I did have the benefit of advice from friends who are practical horsewomen, so I hope there aren’t any ‘horsemanship’ misunderstandings.
    🙂

    Reply
  194. Whew, that’s all right then! I do have a lecturing mode, and I don’t always notice when I slip into it. It’s a case of watching out for the other person’s eyes to glaze over, hard to do on a blog.
    I do so know what you mean about humour. Things that will make one person fall about laughing will leave another stony-faced.
    I hope you’ll get the book, and enjoy it, and that you won’t find any mistakes! There are one or two, of course (what book was *ever* printed in a state of utter perfection? I swear, some of those little typos are inserted specially *after* everyone has proof-read the whole thing, to ensure that the author doesn’t get too smug), but the ones I have noted so far, in the hope that there’ll be a paperback edition in which I can correct them, are not too terrible.
    I did have the benefit of advice from friends who are practical horsewomen, so I hope there aren’t any ‘horsemanship’ misunderstandings.
    🙂

    Reply
  195. Whew, that’s all right then! I do have a lecturing mode, and I don’t always notice when I slip into it. It’s a case of watching out for the other person’s eyes to glaze over, hard to do on a blog.
    I do so know what you mean about humour. Things that will make one person fall about laughing will leave another stony-faced.
    I hope you’ll get the book, and enjoy it, and that you won’t find any mistakes! There are one or two, of course (what book was *ever* printed in a state of utter perfection? I swear, some of those little typos are inserted specially *after* everyone has proof-read the whole thing, to ensure that the author doesn’t get too smug), but the ones I have noted so far, in the hope that there’ll be a paperback edition in which I can correct them, are not too terrible.
    I did have the benefit of advice from friends who are practical horsewomen, so I hope there aren’t any ‘horsemanship’ misunderstandings.
    🙂

    Reply
  196. LOL, AgTigress! I know what you mean about the glazed over look. It happens when I fall into editor mode and start rhapsodizing about the importance of commas to a stranger who only asked me for directions to the bathroom. *g*
    And I can almost guarantee your book will be in my hot little hands come December. It’s pretty hard to ignore an 8 1/2 x 11 printout with your book circled and an arrow pointing to it, saying, “Sherrie wants this book for her birthday.” I think my sister will take the hint.
    🙂

    Reply
  197. LOL, AgTigress! I know what you mean about the glazed over look. It happens when I fall into editor mode and start rhapsodizing about the importance of commas to a stranger who only asked me for directions to the bathroom. *g*
    And I can almost guarantee your book will be in my hot little hands come December. It’s pretty hard to ignore an 8 1/2 x 11 printout with your book circled and an arrow pointing to it, saying, “Sherrie wants this book for her birthday.” I think my sister will take the hint.
    🙂

    Reply
  198. LOL, AgTigress! I know what you mean about the glazed over look. It happens when I fall into editor mode and start rhapsodizing about the importance of commas to a stranger who only asked me for directions to the bathroom. *g*
    And I can almost guarantee your book will be in my hot little hands come December. It’s pretty hard to ignore an 8 1/2 x 11 printout with your book circled and an arrow pointing to it, saying, “Sherrie wants this book for her birthday.” I think my sister will take the hint.
    🙂

    Reply
  199. LOL, AgTigress! I know what you mean about the glazed over look. It happens when I fall into editor mode and start rhapsodizing about the importance of commas to a stranger who only asked me for directions to the bathroom. *g*
    And I can almost guarantee your book will be in my hot little hands come December. It’s pretty hard to ignore an 8 1/2 x 11 printout with your book circled and an arrow pointing to it, saying, “Sherrie wants this book for her birthday.” I think my sister will take the hint.
    🙂

    Reply
  200. LOL, AgTigress! I know what you mean about the glazed over look. It happens when I fall into editor mode and start rhapsodizing about the importance of commas to a stranger who only asked me for directions to the bathroom. *g*
    And I can almost guarantee your book will be in my hot little hands come December. It’s pretty hard to ignore an 8 1/2 x 11 printout with your book circled and an arrow pointing to it, saying, “Sherrie wants this book for her birthday.” I think my sister will take the hint.
    🙂

    Reply

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