The Stolen Bride

Cptsb Hi, here's Jo with yet another reissue of my early trad regencies.

It's fun having these come out every four months, but four months seems to pass awfully quickly! The great news is that the trade paperback format is working so well that my publisher is moving on to reissue my regency historicals that way, so Dbcovearly next year Forbidden Magic will be out that way, and after that, Dragon's Bride.

Cover Talk

Dragon's Bride had a modern bride on the cover, so my first note to the art department was, "No modern bride, pleaseSbcov!" (You can click on any picture in a Wench blog to see a bigger version.)

I do geSwayzet cover consultation, which is great, but things don't always work out quite right. Perhaps it's something about The Stolen Bride. Way back when, on the Avon paperback, "extremely handsome blond guy" got me Patrick Swayze! 

This time I get a sort of surfer dude. The Avon cover did a better job of Sophie — "Minx with short russet curls" — but in both cases they clearly couldn't believe I meant short hair.

So welcome to Surfer Dude and Neat-as-a-pin Thoughtful Lady.

  Tsblg
Now you might think the loose shirt look is wrong, too, but in fact, no. Randal's a fashionable type, but he's also a rule breaker, and in the country he's much more casual. In addition, this story turns into a wild adventure where he rescues Sophie from extreme danger, so some irregularity of dress is forgivable.

Traditional Regencies in the twenty-first century.

The feedback I'm getting is that the readers accustomed to my more recent books, the historicals, are enjoying the change of pace of the sweet Regencies. At the same time, they wouldn't want to read sweet books all the time. Do you agree with that?

I've been reading through the page proofs of each reissue, revisiting the books after a long time away, and I, too, find a charm in books that involve a courtship circumscribed by the characters being in the midst of society and family and mostly wishing to stay there — ie, not break too many rules.

Ssbare Adventures in Writing.

The Stanforth Secrets was my only who-dunnit. The Stolen Bride is my only novel with two equal love stories. I was still young and malleable then.

I did the mystery at one editor's strong suggestion, and did the dual-romance book because her successor thought Randal and Sophie's story couldn't carry a novel because it had begun in Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed. I'm not sure if that was true or not, but I would have had trouble making the other love story into a novel. Petite ex-governess Beth Hawley and large Corinthian Sir Marium Fletcher have a sweet love story, but it's fairly straightforward. A novella, perhaps?

A writer's life is never as straightforward as it seems!

Ah, I remember I did another dual-romance, in the medieval The Shattered Rose. That was my own idea and I included Raoul and Aline because Galeran and Jehanne's story seemed very dark. A lot of readers felt Raoul and Aline should have had their own book, but again their story was a straightforward love story that couldn't carry a historical romance.

It could, perhaps, have fit a shorter book, one about 60,000 words, which is about the same length as most traditional Regencies way back when. Does the genre need more short historical romances? Not necessarily "sweet" — ie without explicit sex, but with fairly uncomplicated stories.

Not that I can claim that The Stolen Bride is an uncomplicated story!

The storyline.

As you'll remember, in Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed we meet Sophie, Lord Wraybourne's sister, and gorgeous rake Lord Randal Ashby, Wraybourne's friend and neighbour. Sophie has adored Randal for years, and now she's in London for a season, she's set her sights on him. He's fending her off as best he can, but she's not an easily deterred young lady. However, she has no intention of forcing his hand. That comes about during the climactic drama of the novel. Compromised, they engage to marry.

The Stolen Bride opens months later, two weeks before the wedding with family and friends gathering at Stenby Castle, Wraybourne's seat, and Tyne Towers, Randal's father's home. Lady Wraybourne has begged her old governess, Beth Hawley, to come to help with the complexities, especially the odd behaviour of Sophie. Beth soon uncovers that Sophie is worrying that she's trapped her adored Randal, because he's still doing his best to avoid her. She's trying to raise the courage to set him free.

Here's a little snippet seen through Beth's eyes during her first dinner at Stenby.

Sophie was about to respond to this
sibling taunt,but Randal turned her head and laid a finger on her lips.
“Behave yourself,” he said with a smile.

“Behave yourself, behave yourself!” Sophie hissed.“That’s all you ever say to me these days.”

Silence fell and the whole table turned to listen.

Randal looked at her, unperturbed. “Do you know that the hippopotamus bleeds itself?”

“What?” Sophie gaped.

“If
it has overindulged on grass,” said Randal, lounging back in his chair,
“or fish, or whatever a hippopotamus eats, it pierces itself with a
sharp reed. When it has bled enough, it patches itself with mud. Read
it somewhere. May I help you to more carrots, Sophie?”

“You’re mad,” said Sophie, rather flushed. “What has all that to do with anything?”

“I said something to you other than ‘behave yourself.” He kissed a finger and
brushed it lightly over her lips.

“Randal, behave yourself,” said the duchess firmly, causing a general laugh as everyone picked up their conversations.

Beth
however viewed the lovers with concern. She understood Jane’s
uneasiness. Something was certainly not right in that quarter.

Then there's the odd woman Jane Wraybourne has housed when she was
found on the road, having lost her memory. She seems to be feeding
Sophie's doubts.

There's a longer, different excerpt here.

Next In Line

And last of these trads is RITA winning Emiy and the Dark Angel. You'll meet the hero, Piers Verderan, in The Stolen Bride, and in the excerpt you can find by clicking on the link above.

Verderan, is one of my true rakes, but like Randal, mostly reformed before their book. For some reason, reforming rakes doesn't thrill me as a story line. Perhaps I think they should get their act together on their own. I think I worry that my poor heroine might end up as a prop for the rest of their lives.

Do you share that concern, or do you like to see them embroiled in the struggle to change their ways?

Anyway, the Dark Angel is reformed rather than tamed. I like that. 🙂

Returning to covers, I really like the cover to EATDA The characters look right as does the setting. The book takes place during hunting season in the Melton Mowbray area.

Now it's your turn, and I'll send a copy of The Stolen Bride to a randomly picked comment on the various subjects raised above. And I wish you a better June than ours is shaping up to be. Here in Whitby, it's gray and chilly. Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Jo

235 thoughts on “The Stolen Bride”

  1. It must be wonderful to see the books out again. I am going to be looking for them. I did not read them before. Now I can

    Reply
  2. It must be wonderful to see the books out again. I am going to be looking for them. I did not read them before. Now I can

    Reply
  3. It must be wonderful to see the books out again. I am going to be looking for them. I did not read them before. Now I can

    Reply
  4. It must be wonderful to see the books out again. I am going to be looking for them. I did not read them before. Now I can

    Reply
  5. It must be wonderful to see the books out again. I am going to be looking for them. I did not read them before. Now I can

    Reply
  6. On the subject of Rakes–I’ve given a lot of thought to what makes a good hero and I don’t think a rake can fit the bill. He has to be reformed first. My favorite romantic heroes are Mr. Darcy, Mr. Knightly, Nicolas Delaney, Race DeVere, and Nat Eaton (Witch of Blackbird Pond). An odd assortment, I know, which is why I have given much thought to what they have in common. And the answer is that they all push the heroine to be the best Elizabeth, Emma, Eleanor, etc. that they can be. An old high school English teacher once told me that the main character has to grow or change in some significant way for a novel to be really good. Romance novels are most often about the woman, so the hero should be the man who helps her grow into herself. A rake can’t really do that. A woman who is wrapped up in rescuing her man from the gutter (literal or figurative) can’t be working on becoming her true self–she’s too focused on him. Like you said, he’s got to get his act together first. Everyone wants to be loved for her true self, and wants to like herself when she is with her lover. A good hero makes the woman recognize that her true self is better even than she thought because he challenges her to rise to all she can become. Rakes are too selfish to play that kind of role in a woman’s life.

    Reply
  7. On the subject of Rakes–I’ve given a lot of thought to what makes a good hero and I don’t think a rake can fit the bill. He has to be reformed first. My favorite romantic heroes are Mr. Darcy, Mr. Knightly, Nicolas Delaney, Race DeVere, and Nat Eaton (Witch of Blackbird Pond). An odd assortment, I know, which is why I have given much thought to what they have in common. And the answer is that they all push the heroine to be the best Elizabeth, Emma, Eleanor, etc. that they can be. An old high school English teacher once told me that the main character has to grow or change in some significant way for a novel to be really good. Romance novels are most often about the woman, so the hero should be the man who helps her grow into herself. A rake can’t really do that. A woman who is wrapped up in rescuing her man from the gutter (literal or figurative) can’t be working on becoming her true self–she’s too focused on him. Like you said, he’s got to get his act together first. Everyone wants to be loved for her true self, and wants to like herself when she is with her lover. A good hero makes the woman recognize that her true self is better even than she thought because he challenges her to rise to all she can become. Rakes are too selfish to play that kind of role in a woman’s life.

    Reply
  8. On the subject of Rakes–I’ve given a lot of thought to what makes a good hero and I don’t think a rake can fit the bill. He has to be reformed first. My favorite romantic heroes are Mr. Darcy, Mr. Knightly, Nicolas Delaney, Race DeVere, and Nat Eaton (Witch of Blackbird Pond). An odd assortment, I know, which is why I have given much thought to what they have in common. And the answer is that they all push the heroine to be the best Elizabeth, Emma, Eleanor, etc. that they can be. An old high school English teacher once told me that the main character has to grow or change in some significant way for a novel to be really good. Romance novels are most often about the woman, so the hero should be the man who helps her grow into herself. A rake can’t really do that. A woman who is wrapped up in rescuing her man from the gutter (literal or figurative) can’t be working on becoming her true self–she’s too focused on him. Like you said, he’s got to get his act together first. Everyone wants to be loved for her true self, and wants to like herself when she is with her lover. A good hero makes the woman recognize that her true self is better even than she thought because he challenges her to rise to all she can become. Rakes are too selfish to play that kind of role in a woman’s life.

    Reply
  9. On the subject of Rakes–I’ve given a lot of thought to what makes a good hero and I don’t think a rake can fit the bill. He has to be reformed first. My favorite romantic heroes are Mr. Darcy, Mr. Knightly, Nicolas Delaney, Race DeVere, and Nat Eaton (Witch of Blackbird Pond). An odd assortment, I know, which is why I have given much thought to what they have in common. And the answer is that they all push the heroine to be the best Elizabeth, Emma, Eleanor, etc. that they can be. An old high school English teacher once told me that the main character has to grow or change in some significant way for a novel to be really good. Romance novels are most often about the woman, so the hero should be the man who helps her grow into herself. A rake can’t really do that. A woman who is wrapped up in rescuing her man from the gutter (literal or figurative) can’t be working on becoming her true self–she’s too focused on him. Like you said, he’s got to get his act together first. Everyone wants to be loved for her true self, and wants to like herself when she is with her lover. A good hero makes the woman recognize that her true self is better even than she thought because he challenges her to rise to all she can become. Rakes are too selfish to play that kind of role in a woman’s life.

    Reply
  10. On the subject of Rakes–I’ve given a lot of thought to what makes a good hero and I don’t think a rake can fit the bill. He has to be reformed first. My favorite romantic heroes are Mr. Darcy, Mr. Knightly, Nicolas Delaney, Race DeVere, and Nat Eaton (Witch of Blackbird Pond). An odd assortment, I know, which is why I have given much thought to what they have in common. And the answer is that they all push the heroine to be the best Elizabeth, Emma, Eleanor, etc. that they can be. An old high school English teacher once told me that the main character has to grow or change in some significant way for a novel to be really good. Romance novels are most often about the woman, so the hero should be the man who helps her grow into herself. A rake can’t really do that. A woman who is wrapped up in rescuing her man from the gutter (literal or figurative) can’t be working on becoming her true self–she’s too focused on him. Like you said, he’s got to get his act together first. Everyone wants to be loved for her true self, and wants to like herself when she is with her lover. A good hero makes the woman recognize that her true self is better even than she thought because he challenges her to rise to all she can become. Rakes are too selfish to play that kind of role in a woman’s life.

    Reply
  11. I grew up reading the “sweet” regencies. I still love them. I am so glad your older books that can’t be found are being re-issued. Thank You.

    Reply
  12. I grew up reading the “sweet” regencies. I still love them. I am so glad your older books that can’t be found are being re-issued. Thank You.

    Reply
  13. I grew up reading the “sweet” regencies. I still love them. I am so glad your older books that can’t be found are being re-issued. Thank You.

    Reply
  14. I grew up reading the “sweet” regencies. I still love them. I am so glad your older books that can’t be found are being re-issued. Thank You.

    Reply
  15. I grew up reading the “sweet” regencies. I still love them. I am so glad your older books that can’t be found are being re-issued. Thank You.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for letting us know about your trads and the connections between the books. I think I “need” all of them….

    Reply
  17. Thanks for letting us know about your trads and the connections between the books. I think I “need” all of them….

    Reply
  18. Thanks for letting us know about your trads and the connections between the books. I think I “need” all of them….

    Reply
  19. Thanks for letting us know about your trads and the connections between the books. I think I “need” all of them….

    Reply
  20. Thanks for letting us know about your trads and the connections between the books. I think I “need” all of them….

    Reply
  21. I do miss the traditional Regencies. I wouldn’t want to give up the longer, usually more complex stories, but I’d like to have both.
    I’m really happy to see your Regency reissues because my original copies are all well-worn from many rereads. I’m especially happy to learn that Emily and the Dark Angel is being reissued. It’s among my top ten trad Regencies ever. Now all those friends that I’ve been recommending it too for years can easily find a copy.
    If the past few days here are any indication, our June is going to be filled with thunderstorms.

    Reply
  22. I do miss the traditional Regencies. I wouldn’t want to give up the longer, usually more complex stories, but I’d like to have both.
    I’m really happy to see your Regency reissues because my original copies are all well-worn from many rereads. I’m especially happy to learn that Emily and the Dark Angel is being reissued. It’s among my top ten trad Regencies ever. Now all those friends that I’ve been recommending it too for years can easily find a copy.
    If the past few days here are any indication, our June is going to be filled with thunderstorms.

    Reply
  23. I do miss the traditional Regencies. I wouldn’t want to give up the longer, usually more complex stories, but I’d like to have both.
    I’m really happy to see your Regency reissues because my original copies are all well-worn from many rereads. I’m especially happy to learn that Emily and the Dark Angel is being reissued. It’s among my top ten trad Regencies ever. Now all those friends that I’ve been recommending it too for years can easily find a copy.
    If the past few days here are any indication, our June is going to be filled with thunderstorms.

    Reply
  24. I do miss the traditional Regencies. I wouldn’t want to give up the longer, usually more complex stories, but I’d like to have both.
    I’m really happy to see your Regency reissues because my original copies are all well-worn from many rereads. I’m especially happy to learn that Emily and the Dark Angel is being reissued. It’s among my top ten trad Regencies ever. Now all those friends that I’ve been recommending it too for years can easily find a copy.
    If the past few days here are any indication, our June is going to be filled with thunderstorms.

    Reply
  25. I do miss the traditional Regencies. I wouldn’t want to give up the longer, usually more complex stories, but I’d like to have both.
    I’m really happy to see your Regency reissues because my original copies are all well-worn from many rereads. I’m especially happy to learn that Emily and the Dark Angel is being reissued. It’s among my top ten trad Regencies ever. Now all those friends that I’ve been recommending it too for years can easily find a copy.
    If the past few days here are any indication, our June is going to be filled with thunderstorms.

    Reply
  26. To the ladies who write these wonderful books; I have fallen in love with your books for years now and collect them when I can. I love being transported back in time to the Era’s of long ago. Now that I am in college at my age (54) I turn to your wonderful books to relieve stress of finals, or even nerve racking homework assignments. They really help, I can be transported back to relax, be stressfree and then go forward with a final exam or assignment.
    Thank you so much for these wonderful books, I look forward to each new book whether it is rewritten or not I do not care as long as I can read them.
    Thanks again so much, Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  27. To the ladies who write these wonderful books; I have fallen in love with your books for years now and collect them when I can. I love being transported back in time to the Era’s of long ago. Now that I am in college at my age (54) I turn to your wonderful books to relieve stress of finals, or even nerve racking homework assignments. They really help, I can be transported back to relax, be stressfree and then go forward with a final exam or assignment.
    Thank you so much for these wonderful books, I look forward to each new book whether it is rewritten or not I do not care as long as I can read them.
    Thanks again so much, Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  28. To the ladies who write these wonderful books; I have fallen in love with your books for years now and collect them when I can. I love being transported back in time to the Era’s of long ago. Now that I am in college at my age (54) I turn to your wonderful books to relieve stress of finals, or even nerve racking homework assignments. They really help, I can be transported back to relax, be stressfree and then go forward with a final exam or assignment.
    Thank you so much for these wonderful books, I look forward to each new book whether it is rewritten or not I do not care as long as I can read them.
    Thanks again so much, Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  29. To the ladies who write these wonderful books; I have fallen in love with your books for years now and collect them when I can. I love being transported back in time to the Era’s of long ago. Now that I am in college at my age (54) I turn to your wonderful books to relieve stress of finals, or even nerve racking homework assignments. They really help, I can be transported back to relax, be stressfree and then go forward with a final exam or assignment.
    Thank you so much for these wonderful books, I look forward to each new book whether it is rewritten or not I do not care as long as I can read them.
    Thanks again so much, Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  30. To the ladies who write these wonderful books; I have fallen in love with your books for years now and collect them when I can. I love being transported back in time to the Era’s of long ago. Now that I am in college at my age (54) I turn to your wonderful books to relieve stress of finals, or even nerve racking homework assignments. They really help, I can be transported back to relax, be stressfree and then go forward with a final exam or assignment.
    Thank you so much for these wonderful books, I look forward to each new book whether it is rewritten or not I do not care as long as I can read them.
    Thanks again so much, Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  31. Randal Ashby has always been my absolute favorite of your heroes. There’s something about a guy who can act properly, but you just know is thinking naughty things! For me, that’s Randal Ashby.

    Reply
  32. Randal Ashby has always been my absolute favorite of your heroes. There’s something about a guy who can act properly, but you just know is thinking naughty things! For me, that’s Randal Ashby.

    Reply
  33. Randal Ashby has always been my absolute favorite of your heroes. There’s something about a guy who can act properly, but you just know is thinking naughty things! For me, that’s Randal Ashby.

    Reply
  34. Randal Ashby has always been my absolute favorite of your heroes. There’s something about a guy who can act properly, but you just know is thinking naughty things! For me, that’s Randal Ashby.

    Reply
  35. Randal Ashby has always been my absolute favorite of your heroes. There’s something about a guy who can act properly, but you just know is thinking naughty things! For me, that’s Randal Ashby.

    Reply
  36. 1. It is 81 in the Chicago area and and sun is trying to come out from under the gray (but it is 9 AM). Yesterday it was even hotter with pure sunshine!
    2. Suggestions for when you did get to help with cover art – send a picture of the hairstyle or whatever. I think artists do better with images than words. Although I think that those who do not read history probably think that short hair is a very modern invention! LOL
    3. I have to agree with Margaret about the characters needing to grow and develop through out the book. If they didn’t change it would become boring after awhile.
    What I have noticed are what seems to be two kind of rakes – those nasty kind who are very narcissistic and life is all about them and then there are those who are basically good people who “saw their wild oats” to use a cliche and then get bored and are looking for something better and are then ready to change, especially when the “right” woman appears. The first are usually the villains, the second are the heroes.
    If the definition of “sweet” is no explicit sex, then yes, I like that kind of book. Sex is the last thing I am interested in when it comes to reading romance. I had not considered that to be the definition – maybe what I thought of as sweet might be defined as “cozy” (like mysteries) but unlike mysteries there is no real suspense or conflict to keep me interested and the people tend not to develop much. Having said that – please note – I am not talking about Jo’s book. Her characters always seem to have a good conflict going on that must be resolved before the HEA ending can occur.
    Everyone have a great day and remember the troops on US Memorial Day!

    Reply
  37. 1. It is 81 in the Chicago area and and sun is trying to come out from under the gray (but it is 9 AM). Yesterday it was even hotter with pure sunshine!
    2. Suggestions for when you did get to help with cover art – send a picture of the hairstyle or whatever. I think artists do better with images than words. Although I think that those who do not read history probably think that short hair is a very modern invention! LOL
    3. I have to agree with Margaret about the characters needing to grow and develop through out the book. If they didn’t change it would become boring after awhile.
    What I have noticed are what seems to be two kind of rakes – those nasty kind who are very narcissistic and life is all about them and then there are those who are basically good people who “saw their wild oats” to use a cliche and then get bored and are looking for something better and are then ready to change, especially when the “right” woman appears. The first are usually the villains, the second are the heroes.
    If the definition of “sweet” is no explicit sex, then yes, I like that kind of book. Sex is the last thing I am interested in when it comes to reading romance. I had not considered that to be the definition – maybe what I thought of as sweet might be defined as “cozy” (like mysteries) but unlike mysteries there is no real suspense or conflict to keep me interested and the people tend not to develop much. Having said that – please note – I am not talking about Jo’s book. Her characters always seem to have a good conflict going on that must be resolved before the HEA ending can occur.
    Everyone have a great day and remember the troops on US Memorial Day!

    Reply
  38. 1. It is 81 in the Chicago area and and sun is trying to come out from under the gray (but it is 9 AM). Yesterday it was even hotter with pure sunshine!
    2. Suggestions for when you did get to help with cover art – send a picture of the hairstyle or whatever. I think artists do better with images than words. Although I think that those who do not read history probably think that short hair is a very modern invention! LOL
    3. I have to agree with Margaret about the characters needing to grow and develop through out the book. If they didn’t change it would become boring after awhile.
    What I have noticed are what seems to be two kind of rakes – those nasty kind who are very narcissistic and life is all about them and then there are those who are basically good people who “saw their wild oats” to use a cliche and then get bored and are looking for something better and are then ready to change, especially when the “right” woman appears. The first are usually the villains, the second are the heroes.
    If the definition of “sweet” is no explicit sex, then yes, I like that kind of book. Sex is the last thing I am interested in when it comes to reading romance. I had not considered that to be the definition – maybe what I thought of as sweet might be defined as “cozy” (like mysteries) but unlike mysteries there is no real suspense or conflict to keep me interested and the people tend not to develop much. Having said that – please note – I am not talking about Jo’s book. Her characters always seem to have a good conflict going on that must be resolved before the HEA ending can occur.
    Everyone have a great day and remember the troops on US Memorial Day!

    Reply
  39. 1. It is 81 in the Chicago area and and sun is trying to come out from under the gray (but it is 9 AM). Yesterday it was even hotter with pure sunshine!
    2. Suggestions for when you did get to help with cover art – send a picture of the hairstyle or whatever. I think artists do better with images than words. Although I think that those who do not read history probably think that short hair is a very modern invention! LOL
    3. I have to agree with Margaret about the characters needing to grow and develop through out the book. If they didn’t change it would become boring after awhile.
    What I have noticed are what seems to be two kind of rakes – those nasty kind who are very narcissistic and life is all about them and then there are those who are basically good people who “saw their wild oats” to use a cliche and then get bored and are looking for something better and are then ready to change, especially when the “right” woman appears. The first are usually the villains, the second are the heroes.
    If the definition of “sweet” is no explicit sex, then yes, I like that kind of book. Sex is the last thing I am interested in when it comes to reading romance. I had not considered that to be the definition – maybe what I thought of as sweet might be defined as “cozy” (like mysteries) but unlike mysteries there is no real suspense or conflict to keep me interested and the people tend not to develop much. Having said that – please note – I am not talking about Jo’s book. Her characters always seem to have a good conflict going on that must be resolved before the HEA ending can occur.
    Everyone have a great day and remember the troops on US Memorial Day!

    Reply
  40. 1. It is 81 in the Chicago area and and sun is trying to come out from under the gray (but it is 9 AM). Yesterday it was even hotter with pure sunshine!
    2. Suggestions for when you did get to help with cover art – send a picture of the hairstyle or whatever. I think artists do better with images than words. Although I think that those who do not read history probably think that short hair is a very modern invention! LOL
    3. I have to agree with Margaret about the characters needing to grow and develop through out the book. If they didn’t change it would become boring after awhile.
    What I have noticed are what seems to be two kind of rakes – those nasty kind who are very narcissistic and life is all about them and then there are those who are basically good people who “saw their wild oats” to use a cliche and then get bored and are looking for something better and are then ready to change, especially when the “right” woman appears. The first are usually the villains, the second are the heroes.
    If the definition of “sweet” is no explicit sex, then yes, I like that kind of book. Sex is the last thing I am interested in when it comes to reading romance. I had not considered that to be the definition – maybe what I thought of as sweet might be defined as “cozy” (like mysteries) but unlike mysteries there is no real suspense or conflict to keep me interested and the people tend not to develop much. Having said that – please note – I am not talking about Jo’s book. Her characters always seem to have a good conflict going on that must be resolved before the HEA ending can occur.
    Everyone have a great day and remember the troops on US Memorial Day!

    Reply
  41. First off, it’s 80 degrees and partly cloudy in mid North Carolina today. Hopefully, no rain!
    Jo, I’ve read a few of your books but I have many more on my book shelves waiting to be read. I’m in the midst of reading the COR books right now.
    I like the fact that your older books are being re-released. Gives us the opportunity to get the ones we missed. I like books with a moderate heat level with the occasional ‘sweet’ book thrown in for good measure. But too much sweet makes my teeth ache! On the other hand, too much heat in a story without a valid reason to be there doesn’t do anything for me either.
    Question: Do you feel it is necessary to read ‘Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed’ before reading ‘The Stolen Bride’? They seem to be closely tied together.

    Reply
  42. First off, it’s 80 degrees and partly cloudy in mid North Carolina today. Hopefully, no rain!
    Jo, I’ve read a few of your books but I have many more on my book shelves waiting to be read. I’m in the midst of reading the COR books right now.
    I like the fact that your older books are being re-released. Gives us the opportunity to get the ones we missed. I like books with a moderate heat level with the occasional ‘sweet’ book thrown in for good measure. But too much sweet makes my teeth ache! On the other hand, too much heat in a story without a valid reason to be there doesn’t do anything for me either.
    Question: Do you feel it is necessary to read ‘Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed’ before reading ‘The Stolen Bride’? They seem to be closely tied together.

    Reply
  43. First off, it’s 80 degrees and partly cloudy in mid North Carolina today. Hopefully, no rain!
    Jo, I’ve read a few of your books but I have many more on my book shelves waiting to be read. I’m in the midst of reading the COR books right now.
    I like the fact that your older books are being re-released. Gives us the opportunity to get the ones we missed. I like books with a moderate heat level with the occasional ‘sweet’ book thrown in for good measure. But too much sweet makes my teeth ache! On the other hand, too much heat in a story without a valid reason to be there doesn’t do anything for me either.
    Question: Do you feel it is necessary to read ‘Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed’ before reading ‘The Stolen Bride’? They seem to be closely tied together.

    Reply
  44. First off, it’s 80 degrees and partly cloudy in mid North Carolina today. Hopefully, no rain!
    Jo, I’ve read a few of your books but I have many more on my book shelves waiting to be read. I’m in the midst of reading the COR books right now.
    I like the fact that your older books are being re-released. Gives us the opportunity to get the ones we missed. I like books with a moderate heat level with the occasional ‘sweet’ book thrown in for good measure. But too much sweet makes my teeth ache! On the other hand, too much heat in a story without a valid reason to be there doesn’t do anything for me either.
    Question: Do you feel it is necessary to read ‘Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed’ before reading ‘The Stolen Bride’? They seem to be closely tied together.

    Reply
  45. First off, it’s 80 degrees and partly cloudy in mid North Carolina today. Hopefully, no rain!
    Jo, I’ve read a few of your books but I have many more on my book shelves waiting to be read. I’m in the midst of reading the COR books right now.
    I like the fact that your older books are being re-released. Gives us the opportunity to get the ones we missed. I like books with a moderate heat level with the occasional ‘sweet’ book thrown in for good measure. But too much sweet makes my teeth ache! On the other hand, too much heat in a story without a valid reason to be there doesn’t do anything for me either.
    Question: Do you feel it is necessary to read ‘Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed’ before reading ‘The Stolen Bride’? They seem to be closely tied together.

    Reply
  46. As to the rake matter – I think I agree that he had better be on his way to reformed for me to believe that the heroine will be happy with their life together, but the tension of the story may very well depend upon the fact that he is capable of ‘reverting’ and it is only her good influence that will ultimately prevent that from happening. If I truly believe he was ‘reformed’ before they met, then there is no tension – no wondering just what it would take to propel him back to his former unrestrained ways. For me, the best stores include the possibility that he will be tempted to chuck it, her, and their future…or I describing romantic suspense?

    Reply
  47. As to the rake matter – I think I agree that he had better be on his way to reformed for me to believe that the heroine will be happy with their life together, but the tension of the story may very well depend upon the fact that he is capable of ‘reverting’ and it is only her good influence that will ultimately prevent that from happening. If I truly believe he was ‘reformed’ before they met, then there is no tension – no wondering just what it would take to propel him back to his former unrestrained ways. For me, the best stores include the possibility that he will be tempted to chuck it, her, and their future…or I describing romantic suspense?

    Reply
  48. As to the rake matter – I think I agree that he had better be on his way to reformed for me to believe that the heroine will be happy with their life together, but the tension of the story may very well depend upon the fact that he is capable of ‘reverting’ and it is only her good influence that will ultimately prevent that from happening. If I truly believe he was ‘reformed’ before they met, then there is no tension – no wondering just what it would take to propel him back to his former unrestrained ways. For me, the best stores include the possibility that he will be tempted to chuck it, her, and their future…or I describing romantic suspense?

    Reply
  49. As to the rake matter – I think I agree that he had better be on his way to reformed for me to believe that the heroine will be happy with their life together, but the tension of the story may very well depend upon the fact that he is capable of ‘reverting’ and it is only her good influence that will ultimately prevent that from happening. If I truly believe he was ‘reformed’ before they met, then there is no tension – no wondering just what it would take to propel him back to his former unrestrained ways. For me, the best stores include the possibility that he will be tempted to chuck it, her, and their future…or I describing romantic suspense?

    Reply
  50. As to the rake matter – I think I agree that he had better be on his way to reformed for me to believe that the heroine will be happy with their life together, but the tension of the story may very well depend upon the fact that he is capable of ‘reverting’ and it is only her good influence that will ultimately prevent that from happening. If I truly believe he was ‘reformed’ before they met, then there is no tension – no wondering just what it would take to propel him back to his former unrestrained ways. For me, the best stores include the possibility that he will be tempted to chuck it, her, and their future…or I describing romantic suspense?

    Reply
  51. I’m thrilled w/ the re-release of your novels and anticipate getting a chance to read them. I love a rake who is well on his way to reforming himself and completes that transformation through the love of a good woman. Especially if she didn’t make it easy on him! As for the covers…I happen to prefer the updated look of today’s covers rather than the ones that remind me of the ones produced a decade and a half or more ago. Just my opinion though and as it is your work, it really only needs to please you!

    Reply
  52. I’m thrilled w/ the re-release of your novels and anticipate getting a chance to read them. I love a rake who is well on his way to reforming himself and completes that transformation through the love of a good woman. Especially if she didn’t make it easy on him! As for the covers…I happen to prefer the updated look of today’s covers rather than the ones that remind me of the ones produced a decade and a half or more ago. Just my opinion though and as it is your work, it really only needs to please you!

    Reply
  53. I’m thrilled w/ the re-release of your novels and anticipate getting a chance to read them. I love a rake who is well on his way to reforming himself and completes that transformation through the love of a good woman. Especially if she didn’t make it easy on him! As for the covers…I happen to prefer the updated look of today’s covers rather than the ones that remind me of the ones produced a decade and a half or more ago. Just my opinion though and as it is your work, it really only needs to please you!

    Reply
  54. I’m thrilled w/ the re-release of your novels and anticipate getting a chance to read them. I love a rake who is well on his way to reforming himself and completes that transformation through the love of a good woman. Especially if she didn’t make it easy on him! As for the covers…I happen to prefer the updated look of today’s covers rather than the ones that remind me of the ones produced a decade and a half or more ago. Just my opinion though and as it is your work, it really only needs to please you!

    Reply
  55. I’m thrilled w/ the re-release of your novels and anticipate getting a chance to read them. I love a rake who is well on his way to reforming himself and completes that transformation through the love of a good woman. Especially if she didn’t make it easy on him! As for the covers…I happen to prefer the updated look of today’s covers rather than the ones that remind me of the ones produced a decade and a half or more ago. Just my opinion though and as it is your work, it really only needs to please you!

    Reply
  56. For me, the story is more about the hero than the heroine (of course, both are obviously very important to a romance). I prefer a heroine who is grounded and sure of herself, even if her situation is precarious. I like to start a story with a rake who lives up to his name. It is the entrance of the heroine in his life that changes him. Perhaps he has begun to weary of his dissolute existence and has subconsciously yearned for more, but he isn’t sure what that could be until he is poleaxed by the heroine somehow. That could take the initial form of anger at her in some way or attraction that he at first identifies as a seduction possibility. I don’t care if the hero also has some redeeming role (undercover spy, houseful of sisters who love him, a great aunt who is a leader of the ton who vouches for the good man underneath), but I do want to see the hero as the rake his label implies. The book is the place where he reforms, not before the story ever gets started. To me the rake merely finds the woman he wants and uses his seductive skills now on her – and only her. Then it turns into something more, to his surprise. I’m fond of the ‘beauty and the beast’ template, however the beastliness may be designed. The ‘Cinderella’ story is fine too, if the hero isn’t quite Prince Charming at first. Overall, the HEROINE leads the HERO to grow (perhaps as he is saving her from some life situation).

    Reply
  57. For me, the story is more about the hero than the heroine (of course, both are obviously very important to a romance). I prefer a heroine who is grounded and sure of herself, even if her situation is precarious. I like to start a story with a rake who lives up to his name. It is the entrance of the heroine in his life that changes him. Perhaps he has begun to weary of his dissolute existence and has subconsciously yearned for more, but he isn’t sure what that could be until he is poleaxed by the heroine somehow. That could take the initial form of anger at her in some way or attraction that he at first identifies as a seduction possibility. I don’t care if the hero also has some redeeming role (undercover spy, houseful of sisters who love him, a great aunt who is a leader of the ton who vouches for the good man underneath), but I do want to see the hero as the rake his label implies. The book is the place where he reforms, not before the story ever gets started. To me the rake merely finds the woman he wants and uses his seductive skills now on her – and only her. Then it turns into something more, to his surprise. I’m fond of the ‘beauty and the beast’ template, however the beastliness may be designed. The ‘Cinderella’ story is fine too, if the hero isn’t quite Prince Charming at first. Overall, the HEROINE leads the HERO to grow (perhaps as he is saving her from some life situation).

    Reply
  58. For me, the story is more about the hero than the heroine (of course, both are obviously very important to a romance). I prefer a heroine who is grounded and sure of herself, even if her situation is precarious. I like to start a story with a rake who lives up to his name. It is the entrance of the heroine in his life that changes him. Perhaps he has begun to weary of his dissolute existence and has subconsciously yearned for more, but he isn’t sure what that could be until he is poleaxed by the heroine somehow. That could take the initial form of anger at her in some way or attraction that he at first identifies as a seduction possibility. I don’t care if the hero also has some redeeming role (undercover spy, houseful of sisters who love him, a great aunt who is a leader of the ton who vouches for the good man underneath), but I do want to see the hero as the rake his label implies. The book is the place where he reforms, not before the story ever gets started. To me the rake merely finds the woman he wants and uses his seductive skills now on her – and only her. Then it turns into something more, to his surprise. I’m fond of the ‘beauty and the beast’ template, however the beastliness may be designed. The ‘Cinderella’ story is fine too, if the hero isn’t quite Prince Charming at first. Overall, the HEROINE leads the HERO to grow (perhaps as he is saving her from some life situation).

    Reply
  59. For me, the story is more about the hero than the heroine (of course, both are obviously very important to a romance). I prefer a heroine who is grounded and sure of herself, even if her situation is precarious. I like to start a story with a rake who lives up to his name. It is the entrance of the heroine in his life that changes him. Perhaps he has begun to weary of his dissolute existence and has subconsciously yearned for more, but he isn’t sure what that could be until he is poleaxed by the heroine somehow. That could take the initial form of anger at her in some way or attraction that he at first identifies as a seduction possibility. I don’t care if the hero also has some redeeming role (undercover spy, houseful of sisters who love him, a great aunt who is a leader of the ton who vouches for the good man underneath), but I do want to see the hero as the rake his label implies. The book is the place where he reforms, not before the story ever gets started. To me the rake merely finds the woman he wants and uses his seductive skills now on her – and only her. Then it turns into something more, to his surprise. I’m fond of the ‘beauty and the beast’ template, however the beastliness may be designed. The ‘Cinderella’ story is fine too, if the hero isn’t quite Prince Charming at first. Overall, the HEROINE leads the HERO to grow (perhaps as he is saving her from some life situation).

    Reply
  60. For me, the story is more about the hero than the heroine (of course, both are obviously very important to a romance). I prefer a heroine who is grounded and sure of herself, even if her situation is precarious. I like to start a story with a rake who lives up to his name. It is the entrance of the heroine in his life that changes him. Perhaps he has begun to weary of his dissolute existence and has subconsciously yearned for more, but he isn’t sure what that could be until he is poleaxed by the heroine somehow. That could take the initial form of anger at her in some way or attraction that he at first identifies as a seduction possibility. I don’t care if the hero also has some redeeming role (undercover spy, houseful of sisters who love him, a great aunt who is a leader of the ton who vouches for the good man underneath), but I do want to see the hero as the rake his label implies. The book is the place where he reforms, not before the story ever gets started. To me the rake merely finds the woman he wants and uses his seductive skills now on her – and only her. Then it turns into something more, to his surprise. I’m fond of the ‘beauty and the beast’ template, however the beastliness may be designed. The ‘Cinderella’ story is fine too, if the hero isn’t quite Prince Charming at first. Overall, the HEROINE leads the HERO to grow (perhaps as he is saving her from some life situation).

    Reply
  61. I am so tired of very explicit sex acts in the Historical books that I finally resort to skipping over that part (I have become my mother!!! LOL) but to me you don’t need that kind of thing spelled out and it seems to be there instead of not to inhance the plot!
    PLOTS that are weaker seem to fill in the word count with sex!
    I know how it works and don’t need explicit.
    That’s why I love Jo’s books so very much as the people are people that I could know and PLOT is not a “four letter word”!
    Thank you Jo!

    Reply
  62. I am so tired of very explicit sex acts in the Historical books that I finally resort to skipping over that part (I have become my mother!!! LOL) but to me you don’t need that kind of thing spelled out and it seems to be there instead of not to inhance the plot!
    PLOTS that are weaker seem to fill in the word count with sex!
    I know how it works and don’t need explicit.
    That’s why I love Jo’s books so very much as the people are people that I could know and PLOT is not a “four letter word”!
    Thank you Jo!

    Reply
  63. I am so tired of very explicit sex acts in the Historical books that I finally resort to skipping over that part (I have become my mother!!! LOL) but to me you don’t need that kind of thing spelled out and it seems to be there instead of not to inhance the plot!
    PLOTS that are weaker seem to fill in the word count with sex!
    I know how it works and don’t need explicit.
    That’s why I love Jo’s books so very much as the people are people that I could know and PLOT is not a “four letter word”!
    Thank you Jo!

    Reply
  64. I am so tired of very explicit sex acts in the Historical books that I finally resort to skipping over that part (I have become my mother!!! LOL) but to me you don’t need that kind of thing spelled out and it seems to be there instead of not to inhance the plot!
    PLOTS that are weaker seem to fill in the word count with sex!
    I know how it works and don’t need explicit.
    That’s why I love Jo’s books so very much as the people are people that I could know and PLOT is not a “four letter word”!
    Thank you Jo!

    Reply
  65. I am so tired of very explicit sex acts in the Historical books that I finally resort to skipping over that part (I have become my mother!!! LOL) but to me you don’t need that kind of thing spelled out and it seems to be there instead of not to inhance the plot!
    PLOTS that are weaker seem to fill in the word count with sex!
    I know how it works and don’t need explicit.
    That’s why I love Jo’s books so very much as the people are people that I could know and PLOT is not a “four letter word”!
    Thank you Jo!

    Reply
  66. Forgot to add to that note–JO–be glad those were your ONLY cover problems and that your people had only two arms each!
    Ask Christina about 3 armed heroines!

    Reply
  67. Forgot to add to that note–JO–be glad those were your ONLY cover problems and that your people had only two arms each!
    Ask Christina about 3 armed heroines!

    Reply
  68. Forgot to add to that note–JO–be glad those were your ONLY cover problems and that your people had only two arms each!
    Ask Christina about 3 armed heroines!

    Reply
  69. Forgot to add to that note–JO–be glad those were your ONLY cover problems and that your people had only two arms each!
    Ask Christina about 3 armed heroines!

    Reply
  70. Forgot to add to that note–JO–be glad those were your ONLY cover problems and that your people had only two arms each!
    Ask Christina about 3 armed heroines!

    Reply
  71. The Stolen Bride is the only JoBev I don’t have so called me thrilled it’s being re-released! Randal is so interesting — OK, “hawt” — and there’s a scene in another book (The Fortune Hunter?) where he and Piers are playing cricket and it’s “temperature rising time!” for all the ladies watching!

    Reply
  72. The Stolen Bride is the only JoBev I don’t have so called me thrilled it’s being re-released! Randal is so interesting — OK, “hawt” — and there’s a scene in another book (The Fortune Hunter?) where he and Piers are playing cricket and it’s “temperature rising time!” for all the ladies watching!

    Reply
  73. The Stolen Bride is the only JoBev I don’t have so called me thrilled it’s being re-released! Randal is so interesting — OK, “hawt” — and there’s a scene in another book (The Fortune Hunter?) where he and Piers are playing cricket and it’s “temperature rising time!” for all the ladies watching!

    Reply
  74. The Stolen Bride is the only JoBev I don’t have so called me thrilled it’s being re-released! Randal is so interesting — OK, “hawt” — and there’s a scene in another book (The Fortune Hunter?) where he and Piers are playing cricket and it’s “temperature rising time!” for all the ladies watching!

    Reply
  75. The Stolen Bride is the only JoBev I don’t have so called me thrilled it’s being re-released! Randal is so interesting — OK, “hawt” — and there’s a scene in another book (The Fortune Hunter?) where he and Piers are playing cricket and it’s “temperature rising time!” for all the ladies watching!

    Reply
  76. The cover for EATDA does set the stage for darkness. I like it.
    Just went thru a “May Gray” here in Southern California. “June Gloom” so far is a sunny day but cool.
    Keep on writing Ms. Jo.

    Reply
  77. The cover for EATDA does set the stage for darkness. I like it.
    Just went thru a “May Gray” here in Southern California. “June Gloom” so far is a sunny day but cool.
    Keep on writing Ms. Jo.

    Reply
  78. The cover for EATDA does set the stage for darkness. I like it.
    Just went thru a “May Gray” here in Southern California. “June Gloom” so far is a sunny day but cool.
    Keep on writing Ms. Jo.

    Reply
  79. The cover for EATDA does set the stage for darkness. I like it.
    Just went thru a “May Gray” here in Southern California. “June Gloom” so far is a sunny day but cool.
    Keep on writing Ms. Jo.

    Reply
  80. The cover for EATDA does set the stage for darkness. I like it.
    Just went thru a “May Gray” here in Southern California. “June Gloom” so far is a sunny day but cool.
    Keep on writing Ms. Jo.

    Reply
  81. I have read many of your books over the years. I think my favorites are the Company of Rogues. I am looking forward to the Stolen Bride and others being reissued that I haven’t read.
    Nancy

    Reply
  82. I have read many of your books over the years. I think my favorites are the Company of Rogues. I am looking forward to the Stolen Bride and others being reissued that I haven’t read.
    Nancy

    Reply
  83. I have read many of your books over the years. I think my favorites are the Company of Rogues. I am looking forward to the Stolen Bride and others being reissued that I haven’t read.
    Nancy

    Reply
  84. I have read many of your books over the years. I think my favorites are the Company of Rogues. I am looking forward to the Stolen Bride and others being reissued that I haven’t read.
    Nancy

    Reply
  85. I have read many of your books over the years. I think my favorites are the Company of Rogues. I am looking forward to the Stolen Bride and others being reissued that I haven’t read.
    Nancy

    Reply
  86. I prefer cover art that pretty accurately depicts the hero and heroine. No blonde hair when the heroine is described as a raven-haired beauty — you know what I mean. Also, I do a lot of reading in public places so would prefer not having to hide the book cover because it and/or the title is too racy.

    Reply
  87. I prefer cover art that pretty accurately depicts the hero and heroine. No blonde hair when the heroine is described as a raven-haired beauty — you know what I mean. Also, I do a lot of reading in public places so would prefer not having to hide the book cover because it and/or the title is too racy.

    Reply
  88. I prefer cover art that pretty accurately depicts the hero and heroine. No blonde hair when the heroine is described as a raven-haired beauty — you know what I mean. Also, I do a lot of reading in public places so would prefer not having to hide the book cover because it and/or the title is too racy.

    Reply
  89. I prefer cover art that pretty accurately depicts the hero and heroine. No blonde hair when the heroine is described as a raven-haired beauty — you know what I mean. Also, I do a lot of reading in public places so would prefer not having to hide the book cover because it and/or the title is too racy.

    Reply
  90. I prefer cover art that pretty accurately depicts the hero and heroine. No blonde hair when the heroine is described as a raven-haired beauty — you know what I mean. Also, I do a lot of reading in public places so would prefer not having to hide the book cover because it and/or the title is too racy.

    Reply
  91. I happen to be quite fond of reissues, as long as they are marketed properly as being reissues. Publishers should not toss a trow cover on the couch and call it new! I’ve seen that happen, and I think it insults the body of work of the author and the intelligence of the reader.
    As far as reforming rakes, that really only happens when they are ready to be reformed. They may protest, bluster and sputter, but somewhere in their psyche, they are ready to be reeled in, netted and contained. Intelligence, strength, character and beauty of one very special woman will bring the rascal to heel.
    My favorite covers are those which show at least the face (not just torso, without showing face) of the both the hero and heroine, and some scene from the story line in the background. The image on the cover must match the character descriptions and story line detail within the book. The back blurb must also match the book content, especially the characters’ correct names!

    Reply
  92. I happen to be quite fond of reissues, as long as they are marketed properly as being reissues. Publishers should not toss a trow cover on the couch and call it new! I’ve seen that happen, and I think it insults the body of work of the author and the intelligence of the reader.
    As far as reforming rakes, that really only happens when they are ready to be reformed. They may protest, bluster and sputter, but somewhere in their psyche, they are ready to be reeled in, netted and contained. Intelligence, strength, character and beauty of one very special woman will bring the rascal to heel.
    My favorite covers are those which show at least the face (not just torso, without showing face) of the both the hero and heroine, and some scene from the story line in the background. The image on the cover must match the character descriptions and story line detail within the book. The back blurb must also match the book content, especially the characters’ correct names!

    Reply
  93. I happen to be quite fond of reissues, as long as they are marketed properly as being reissues. Publishers should not toss a trow cover on the couch and call it new! I’ve seen that happen, and I think it insults the body of work of the author and the intelligence of the reader.
    As far as reforming rakes, that really only happens when they are ready to be reformed. They may protest, bluster and sputter, but somewhere in their psyche, they are ready to be reeled in, netted and contained. Intelligence, strength, character and beauty of one very special woman will bring the rascal to heel.
    My favorite covers are those which show at least the face (not just torso, without showing face) of the both the hero and heroine, and some scene from the story line in the background. The image on the cover must match the character descriptions and story line detail within the book. The back blurb must also match the book content, especially the characters’ correct names!

    Reply
  94. I happen to be quite fond of reissues, as long as they are marketed properly as being reissues. Publishers should not toss a trow cover on the couch and call it new! I’ve seen that happen, and I think it insults the body of work of the author and the intelligence of the reader.
    As far as reforming rakes, that really only happens when they are ready to be reformed. They may protest, bluster and sputter, but somewhere in their psyche, they are ready to be reeled in, netted and contained. Intelligence, strength, character and beauty of one very special woman will bring the rascal to heel.
    My favorite covers are those which show at least the face (not just torso, without showing face) of the both the hero and heroine, and some scene from the story line in the background. The image on the cover must match the character descriptions and story line detail within the book. The back blurb must also match the book content, especially the characters’ correct names!

    Reply
  95. I happen to be quite fond of reissues, as long as they are marketed properly as being reissues. Publishers should not toss a trow cover on the couch and call it new! I’ve seen that happen, and I think it insults the body of work of the author and the intelligence of the reader.
    As far as reforming rakes, that really only happens when they are ready to be reformed. They may protest, bluster and sputter, but somewhere in their psyche, they are ready to be reeled in, netted and contained. Intelligence, strength, character and beauty of one very special woman will bring the rascal to heel.
    My favorite covers are those which show at least the face (not just torso, without showing face) of the both the hero and heroine, and some scene from the story line in the background. The image on the cover must match the character descriptions and story line detail within the book. The back blurb must also match the book content, especially the characters’ correct names!

    Reply
  96. Hi, Jo here, after a day out taking friends around the area. It turned into quite a nice day!
    Margaret, excellent point. Yes, I like the hero to be helping the heroine to become all she can be. She can be helping him a bit, too, but I like balance.
    Karen, yes, I would recommend reading Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed before The Stolen Bride. LWB is available in the new edition. If your bookstore doesn’t have it on the shelf, they can order it, and on line places should have it.
    Great comments, everyone.
    Jo

    Reply
  97. Hi, Jo here, after a day out taking friends around the area. It turned into quite a nice day!
    Margaret, excellent point. Yes, I like the hero to be helping the heroine to become all she can be. She can be helping him a bit, too, but I like balance.
    Karen, yes, I would recommend reading Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed before The Stolen Bride. LWB is available in the new edition. If your bookstore doesn’t have it on the shelf, they can order it, and on line places should have it.
    Great comments, everyone.
    Jo

    Reply
  98. Hi, Jo here, after a day out taking friends around the area. It turned into quite a nice day!
    Margaret, excellent point. Yes, I like the hero to be helping the heroine to become all she can be. She can be helping him a bit, too, but I like balance.
    Karen, yes, I would recommend reading Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed before The Stolen Bride. LWB is available in the new edition. If your bookstore doesn’t have it on the shelf, they can order it, and on line places should have it.
    Great comments, everyone.
    Jo

    Reply
  99. Hi, Jo here, after a day out taking friends around the area. It turned into quite a nice day!
    Margaret, excellent point. Yes, I like the hero to be helping the heroine to become all she can be. She can be helping him a bit, too, but I like balance.
    Karen, yes, I would recommend reading Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed before The Stolen Bride. LWB is available in the new edition. If your bookstore doesn’t have it on the shelf, they can order it, and on line places should have it.
    Great comments, everyone.
    Jo

    Reply
  100. Hi, Jo here, after a day out taking friends around the area. It turned into quite a nice day!
    Margaret, excellent point. Yes, I like the hero to be helping the heroine to become all she can be. She can be helping him a bit, too, but I like balance.
    Karen, yes, I would recommend reading Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed before The Stolen Bride. LWB is available in the new edition. If your bookstore doesn’t have it on the shelf, they can order it, and on line places should have it.
    Great comments, everyone.
    Jo

    Reply
  101. I’ve been reading about the re-issued Regency novels but my interest hadn’t really been caught until I read the excerpts from The Stolen Bride today. I believe there will always be a market for the “sweet” Regencies. I like variety so I’m willing to add them to my reading “menu” but would welcome more medieval era novels from you(maybe a medieval who-done-it?) as I really enjoyed The Shattered Rose. Thanks for writing all the wonderful books I’ve enjoyed over the years and a special thanks for that glimpse of Patrick Swayze!

    Reply
  102. I’ve been reading about the re-issued Regency novels but my interest hadn’t really been caught until I read the excerpts from The Stolen Bride today. I believe there will always be a market for the “sweet” Regencies. I like variety so I’m willing to add them to my reading “menu” but would welcome more medieval era novels from you(maybe a medieval who-done-it?) as I really enjoyed The Shattered Rose. Thanks for writing all the wonderful books I’ve enjoyed over the years and a special thanks for that glimpse of Patrick Swayze!

    Reply
  103. I’ve been reading about the re-issued Regency novels but my interest hadn’t really been caught until I read the excerpts from The Stolen Bride today. I believe there will always be a market for the “sweet” Regencies. I like variety so I’m willing to add them to my reading “menu” but would welcome more medieval era novels from you(maybe a medieval who-done-it?) as I really enjoyed The Shattered Rose. Thanks for writing all the wonderful books I’ve enjoyed over the years and a special thanks for that glimpse of Patrick Swayze!

    Reply
  104. I’ve been reading about the re-issued Regency novels but my interest hadn’t really been caught until I read the excerpts from The Stolen Bride today. I believe there will always be a market for the “sweet” Regencies. I like variety so I’m willing to add them to my reading “menu” but would welcome more medieval era novels from you(maybe a medieval who-done-it?) as I really enjoyed The Shattered Rose. Thanks for writing all the wonderful books I’ve enjoyed over the years and a special thanks for that glimpse of Patrick Swayze!

    Reply
  105. I’ve been reading about the re-issued Regency novels but my interest hadn’t really been caught until I read the excerpts from The Stolen Bride today. I believe there will always be a market for the “sweet” Regencies. I like variety so I’m willing to add them to my reading “menu” but would welcome more medieval era novels from you(maybe a medieval who-done-it?) as I really enjoyed The Shattered Rose. Thanks for writing all the wonderful books I’ve enjoyed over the years and a special thanks for that glimpse of Patrick Swayze!

    Reply
  106. I love a good rake who eventually learns that the best things in life do no necessiraily begin with numerous bed partners. The best akes are the ones who are tired of it all but don’t wnnt to admit it. I am always amazed at the equivalent female who seems to welcome many to her bedroom. Somehope they are not as appealing as their male counterpart. I think the best hero is similar to Duke Thorne – he has a reputtion as a rake but really isn’t one. The Dark Marquis is similar and I think he is probably my favorite of all your heros – so far.

    Reply
  107. I love a good rake who eventually learns that the best things in life do no necessiraily begin with numerous bed partners. The best akes are the ones who are tired of it all but don’t wnnt to admit it. I am always amazed at the equivalent female who seems to welcome many to her bedroom. Somehope they are not as appealing as their male counterpart. I think the best hero is similar to Duke Thorne – he has a reputtion as a rake but really isn’t one. The Dark Marquis is similar and I think he is probably my favorite of all your heros – so far.

    Reply
  108. I love a good rake who eventually learns that the best things in life do no necessiraily begin with numerous bed partners. The best akes are the ones who are tired of it all but don’t wnnt to admit it. I am always amazed at the equivalent female who seems to welcome many to her bedroom. Somehope they are not as appealing as their male counterpart. I think the best hero is similar to Duke Thorne – he has a reputtion as a rake but really isn’t one. The Dark Marquis is similar and I think he is probably my favorite of all your heros – so far.

    Reply
  109. I love a good rake who eventually learns that the best things in life do no necessiraily begin with numerous bed partners. The best akes are the ones who are tired of it all but don’t wnnt to admit it. I am always amazed at the equivalent female who seems to welcome many to her bedroom. Somehope they are not as appealing as their male counterpart. I think the best hero is similar to Duke Thorne – he has a reputtion as a rake but really isn’t one. The Dark Marquis is similar and I think he is probably my favorite of all your heros – so far.

    Reply
  110. I love a good rake who eventually learns that the best things in life do no necessiraily begin with numerous bed partners. The best akes are the ones who are tired of it all but don’t wnnt to admit it. I am always amazed at the equivalent female who seems to welcome many to her bedroom. Somehope they are not as appealing as their male counterpart. I think the best hero is similar to Duke Thorne – he has a reputtion as a rake but really isn’t one. The Dark Marquis is similar and I think he is probably my favorite of all your heros – so far.

    Reply
  111. You’ve hit my problem with ‘reformed’ rakes — mostly, from what I’ve seen in real life, rakes don’t reform; they may appear to, for a while, but when the bad stresses hit, they go back to whatever outlet they were using before, be it drugs, alcohol, cheating, gambling or whatever. A true rake is a pretty vile sort of person; he believes it’s OK to take his satisfaction without regard to the harm & havoc he causes others. That sort of core selfishness just doesn’t change short of a brain transplant.
    So I can accept a hero who sowed a few wild oats, and perhaps learned something — but a hardcore lifelong rake … no. I can’t like such a man enough to root for him, and I generally want to plant a neon warning sign where the heroine can see it lest she believe in him and ruin her life.
    I think this fascination in romances with ‘bad bad boy’ heroes is counterproductive and should be rethought. Fiction does help form people’s attitudes, or nobody would bother buying advertising. I sometimes wonder where some authors’ heads are at, that they can think hardcore rakes admirable or capable of permanently changing their ways.

    Reply
  112. You’ve hit my problem with ‘reformed’ rakes — mostly, from what I’ve seen in real life, rakes don’t reform; they may appear to, for a while, but when the bad stresses hit, they go back to whatever outlet they were using before, be it drugs, alcohol, cheating, gambling or whatever. A true rake is a pretty vile sort of person; he believes it’s OK to take his satisfaction without regard to the harm & havoc he causes others. That sort of core selfishness just doesn’t change short of a brain transplant.
    So I can accept a hero who sowed a few wild oats, and perhaps learned something — but a hardcore lifelong rake … no. I can’t like such a man enough to root for him, and I generally want to plant a neon warning sign where the heroine can see it lest she believe in him and ruin her life.
    I think this fascination in romances with ‘bad bad boy’ heroes is counterproductive and should be rethought. Fiction does help form people’s attitudes, or nobody would bother buying advertising. I sometimes wonder where some authors’ heads are at, that they can think hardcore rakes admirable or capable of permanently changing their ways.

    Reply
  113. You’ve hit my problem with ‘reformed’ rakes — mostly, from what I’ve seen in real life, rakes don’t reform; they may appear to, for a while, but when the bad stresses hit, they go back to whatever outlet they were using before, be it drugs, alcohol, cheating, gambling or whatever. A true rake is a pretty vile sort of person; he believes it’s OK to take his satisfaction without regard to the harm & havoc he causes others. That sort of core selfishness just doesn’t change short of a brain transplant.
    So I can accept a hero who sowed a few wild oats, and perhaps learned something — but a hardcore lifelong rake … no. I can’t like such a man enough to root for him, and I generally want to plant a neon warning sign where the heroine can see it lest she believe in him and ruin her life.
    I think this fascination in romances with ‘bad bad boy’ heroes is counterproductive and should be rethought. Fiction does help form people’s attitudes, or nobody would bother buying advertising. I sometimes wonder where some authors’ heads are at, that they can think hardcore rakes admirable or capable of permanently changing their ways.

    Reply
  114. You’ve hit my problem with ‘reformed’ rakes — mostly, from what I’ve seen in real life, rakes don’t reform; they may appear to, for a while, but when the bad stresses hit, they go back to whatever outlet they were using before, be it drugs, alcohol, cheating, gambling or whatever. A true rake is a pretty vile sort of person; he believes it’s OK to take his satisfaction without regard to the harm & havoc he causes others. That sort of core selfishness just doesn’t change short of a brain transplant.
    So I can accept a hero who sowed a few wild oats, and perhaps learned something — but a hardcore lifelong rake … no. I can’t like such a man enough to root for him, and I generally want to plant a neon warning sign where the heroine can see it lest she believe in him and ruin her life.
    I think this fascination in romances with ‘bad bad boy’ heroes is counterproductive and should be rethought. Fiction does help form people’s attitudes, or nobody would bother buying advertising. I sometimes wonder where some authors’ heads are at, that they can think hardcore rakes admirable or capable of permanently changing their ways.

    Reply
  115. You’ve hit my problem with ‘reformed’ rakes — mostly, from what I’ve seen in real life, rakes don’t reform; they may appear to, for a while, but when the bad stresses hit, they go back to whatever outlet they were using before, be it drugs, alcohol, cheating, gambling or whatever. A true rake is a pretty vile sort of person; he believes it’s OK to take his satisfaction without regard to the harm & havoc he causes others. That sort of core selfishness just doesn’t change short of a brain transplant.
    So I can accept a hero who sowed a few wild oats, and perhaps learned something — but a hardcore lifelong rake … no. I can’t like such a man enough to root for him, and I generally want to plant a neon warning sign where the heroine can see it lest she believe in him and ruin her life.
    I think this fascination in romances with ‘bad bad boy’ heroes is counterproductive and should be rethought. Fiction does help form people’s attitudes, or nobody would bother buying advertising. I sometimes wonder where some authors’ heads are at, that they can think hardcore rakes admirable or capable of permanently changing their ways.

    Reply
  116. I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women. I’d say a rake is the former and a hard-core rake is the latter — a man who is basically insecure, who uses women for his own pleasure with no care for their welfare or feelings, who sees them as notches on a bedpost.
    Bad boys also appeal, my definition of bad boys being flirtatious, serial monogamists with a bit of a wild streak, who haven’t yet settled down to the business of marriage and child-rearing and monogamy forever more.
    I know a men who were like this in their youth, and they’re lovely husbands now. They didn’t rush into marriage, they kicked up their heels and enjoyed their youth, and when they were ready to settle down, they did, with no feeling of their youth having passed them by, and with nothing to prove. So when I write a rake, it’s that kind of man.

    Reply
  117. I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women. I’d say a rake is the former and a hard-core rake is the latter — a man who is basically insecure, who uses women for his own pleasure with no care for their welfare or feelings, who sees them as notches on a bedpost.
    Bad boys also appeal, my definition of bad boys being flirtatious, serial monogamists with a bit of a wild streak, who haven’t yet settled down to the business of marriage and child-rearing and monogamy forever more.
    I know a men who were like this in their youth, and they’re lovely husbands now. They didn’t rush into marriage, they kicked up their heels and enjoyed their youth, and when they were ready to settle down, they did, with no feeling of their youth having passed them by, and with nothing to prove. So when I write a rake, it’s that kind of man.

    Reply
  118. I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women. I’d say a rake is the former and a hard-core rake is the latter — a man who is basically insecure, who uses women for his own pleasure with no care for their welfare or feelings, who sees them as notches on a bedpost.
    Bad boys also appeal, my definition of bad boys being flirtatious, serial monogamists with a bit of a wild streak, who haven’t yet settled down to the business of marriage and child-rearing and monogamy forever more.
    I know a men who were like this in their youth, and they’re lovely husbands now. They didn’t rush into marriage, they kicked up their heels and enjoyed their youth, and when they were ready to settle down, they did, with no feeling of their youth having passed them by, and with nothing to prove. So when I write a rake, it’s that kind of man.

    Reply
  119. I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women. I’d say a rake is the former and a hard-core rake is the latter — a man who is basically insecure, who uses women for his own pleasure with no care for their welfare or feelings, who sees them as notches on a bedpost.
    Bad boys also appeal, my definition of bad boys being flirtatious, serial monogamists with a bit of a wild streak, who haven’t yet settled down to the business of marriage and child-rearing and monogamy forever more.
    I know a men who were like this in their youth, and they’re lovely husbands now. They didn’t rush into marriage, they kicked up their heels and enjoyed their youth, and when they were ready to settle down, they did, with no feeling of their youth having passed them by, and with nothing to prove. So when I write a rake, it’s that kind of man.

    Reply
  120. I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women. I’d say a rake is the former and a hard-core rake is the latter — a man who is basically insecure, who uses women for his own pleasure with no care for their welfare or feelings, who sees them as notches on a bedpost.
    Bad boys also appeal, my definition of bad boys being flirtatious, serial monogamists with a bit of a wild streak, who haven’t yet settled down to the business of marriage and child-rearing and monogamy forever more.
    I know a men who were like this in their youth, and they’re lovely husbands now. They didn’t rush into marriage, they kicked up their heels and enjoyed their youth, and when they were ready to settle down, they did, with no feeling of their youth having passed them by, and with nothing to prove. So when I write a rake, it’s that kind of man.

    Reply
  121. I totally agree with grace. A picture that actually looks like the heroine and hero and not too racy. Or even better, a serene front cover with the next page depicting the main characters. Keep up the great work Jo! I can’t wait for this one!

    Reply
  122. I totally agree with grace. A picture that actually looks like the heroine and hero and not too racy. Or even better, a serene front cover with the next page depicting the main characters. Keep up the great work Jo! I can’t wait for this one!

    Reply
  123. I totally agree with grace. A picture that actually looks like the heroine and hero and not too racy. Or even better, a serene front cover with the next page depicting the main characters. Keep up the great work Jo! I can’t wait for this one!

    Reply
  124. I totally agree with grace. A picture that actually looks like the heroine and hero and not too racy. Or even better, a serene front cover with the next page depicting the main characters. Keep up the great work Jo! I can’t wait for this one!

    Reply
  125. I totally agree with grace. A picture that actually looks like the heroine and hero and not too racy. Or even better, a serene front cover with the next page depicting the main characters. Keep up the great work Jo! I can’t wait for this one!

    Reply
  126. My very first romance was a Barbara Cartland book so I can definitely appreciate a more sweet/dark historical. I like a more complex hero, a rake may have hidden depths…you just never know.
    As for cover art, I’m more about the blurb so it doesn’t really sway me either way but it’s always nice when they accurately portray the characters.

    Reply
  127. My very first romance was a Barbara Cartland book so I can definitely appreciate a more sweet/dark historical. I like a more complex hero, a rake may have hidden depths…you just never know.
    As for cover art, I’m more about the blurb so it doesn’t really sway me either way but it’s always nice when they accurately portray the characters.

    Reply
  128. My very first romance was a Barbara Cartland book so I can definitely appreciate a more sweet/dark historical. I like a more complex hero, a rake may have hidden depths…you just never know.
    As for cover art, I’m more about the blurb so it doesn’t really sway me either way but it’s always nice when they accurately portray the characters.

    Reply
  129. My very first romance was a Barbara Cartland book so I can definitely appreciate a more sweet/dark historical. I like a more complex hero, a rake may have hidden depths…you just never know.
    As for cover art, I’m more about the blurb so it doesn’t really sway me either way but it’s always nice when they accurately portray the characters.

    Reply
  130. My very first romance was a Barbara Cartland book so I can definitely appreciate a more sweet/dark historical. I like a more complex hero, a rake may have hidden depths…you just never know.
    As for cover art, I’m more about the blurb so it doesn’t really sway me either way but it’s always nice when they accurately portray the characters.

    Reply
  131. When I think about how hard I had to work to hunt down your early books and now they are on bookshelves!!! (Although I couldn’t have waited 7 -8 years so I’m glad I have the earlier books even with the 80’s hairdos). I am glad to hear that you have some say in the cover art. I always wonder if authors actually do because there are some doozies. My biggest pet hate is the change in presentation style midway through a series. I keep most of my books and I like a series to look like one on the shelf. Too may times the theme ends, as it did with the Rogues and Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series. It drives me up the wall. I also detest the zippered up Regency dresses and the trousers with flys.
    I am glad to see these books reissued and know that people will lap them up because they are such great stories. I have re- read them many times.

    Reply
  132. When I think about how hard I had to work to hunt down your early books and now they are on bookshelves!!! (Although I couldn’t have waited 7 -8 years so I’m glad I have the earlier books even with the 80’s hairdos). I am glad to hear that you have some say in the cover art. I always wonder if authors actually do because there are some doozies. My biggest pet hate is the change in presentation style midway through a series. I keep most of my books and I like a series to look like one on the shelf. Too may times the theme ends, as it did with the Rogues and Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series. It drives me up the wall. I also detest the zippered up Regency dresses and the trousers with flys.
    I am glad to see these books reissued and know that people will lap them up because they are such great stories. I have re- read them many times.

    Reply
  133. When I think about how hard I had to work to hunt down your early books and now they are on bookshelves!!! (Although I couldn’t have waited 7 -8 years so I’m glad I have the earlier books even with the 80’s hairdos). I am glad to hear that you have some say in the cover art. I always wonder if authors actually do because there are some doozies. My biggest pet hate is the change in presentation style midway through a series. I keep most of my books and I like a series to look like one on the shelf. Too may times the theme ends, as it did with the Rogues and Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series. It drives me up the wall. I also detest the zippered up Regency dresses and the trousers with flys.
    I am glad to see these books reissued and know that people will lap them up because they are such great stories. I have re- read them many times.

    Reply
  134. When I think about how hard I had to work to hunt down your early books and now they are on bookshelves!!! (Although I couldn’t have waited 7 -8 years so I’m glad I have the earlier books even with the 80’s hairdos). I am glad to hear that you have some say in the cover art. I always wonder if authors actually do because there are some doozies. My biggest pet hate is the change in presentation style midway through a series. I keep most of my books and I like a series to look like one on the shelf. Too may times the theme ends, as it did with the Rogues and Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series. It drives me up the wall. I also detest the zippered up Regency dresses and the trousers with flys.
    I am glad to see these books reissued and know that people will lap them up because they are such great stories. I have re- read them many times.

    Reply
  135. When I think about how hard I had to work to hunt down your early books and now they are on bookshelves!!! (Although I couldn’t have waited 7 -8 years so I’m glad I have the earlier books even with the 80’s hairdos). I am glad to hear that you have some say in the cover art. I always wonder if authors actually do because there are some doozies. My biggest pet hate is the change in presentation style midway through a series. I keep most of my books and I like a series to look like one on the shelf. Too may times the theme ends, as it did with the Rogues and Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series. It drives me up the wall. I also detest the zippered up Regency dresses and the trousers with flys.
    I am glad to see these books reissued and know that people will lap them up because they are such great stories. I have re- read them many times.

    Reply
  136. It is nice to see the “sweet” books reissued. I have a box of the old Regencies and keep them around for a break from the newer, hotter books. I don’t mind sex in the books, but I think things are getting a bit carried away. I am not a voyeur and don’t really care to “sit on the bed and watch.”
    If the heroine is a strong character, she won’t become anyone’s prop for the rest of her life. A mix of stories with already reformed rakes and those needing some guidance and prodding from their leading ladies will do just fine. Keep it interesting.
    As for more than one love story in a book, why not. Some characters are pretty straight forward an don’t need a story of their own. It is nice to see how 2 different relationships develop within the same story.

    Reply
  137. It is nice to see the “sweet” books reissued. I have a box of the old Regencies and keep them around for a break from the newer, hotter books. I don’t mind sex in the books, but I think things are getting a bit carried away. I am not a voyeur and don’t really care to “sit on the bed and watch.”
    If the heroine is a strong character, she won’t become anyone’s prop for the rest of her life. A mix of stories with already reformed rakes and those needing some guidance and prodding from their leading ladies will do just fine. Keep it interesting.
    As for more than one love story in a book, why not. Some characters are pretty straight forward an don’t need a story of their own. It is nice to see how 2 different relationships develop within the same story.

    Reply
  138. It is nice to see the “sweet” books reissued. I have a box of the old Regencies and keep them around for a break from the newer, hotter books. I don’t mind sex in the books, but I think things are getting a bit carried away. I am not a voyeur and don’t really care to “sit on the bed and watch.”
    If the heroine is a strong character, she won’t become anyone’s prop for the rest of her life. A mix of stories with already reformed rakes and those needing some guidance and prodding from their leading ladies will do just fine. Keep it interesting.
    As for more than one love story in a book, why not. Some characters are pretty straight forward an don’t need a story of their own. It is nice to see how 2 different relationships develop within the same story.

    Reply
  139. It is nice to see the “sweet” books reissued. I have a box of the old Regencies and keep them around for a break from the newer, hotter books. I don’t mind sex in the books, but I think things are getting a bit carried away. I am not a voyeur and don’t really care to “sit on the bed and watch.”
    If the heroine is a strong character, she won’t become anyone’s prop for the rest of her life. A mix of stories with already reformed rakes and those needing some guidance and prodding from their leading ladies will do just fine. Keep it interesting.
    As for more than one love story in a book, why not. Some characters are pretty straight forward an don’t need a story of their own. It is nice to see how 2 different relationships develop within the same story.

    Reply
  140. It is nice to see the “sweet” books reissued. I have a box of the old Regencies and keep them around for a break from the newer, hotter books. I don’t mind sex in the books, but I think things are getting a bit carried away. I am not a voyeur and don’t really care to “sit on the bed and watch.”
    If the heroine is a strong character, she won’t become anyone’s prop for the rest of her life. A mix of stories with already reformed rakes and those needing some guidance and prodding from their leading ladies will do just fine. Keep it interesting.
    As for more than one love story in a book, why not. Some characters are pretty straight forward an don’t need a story of their own. It is nice to see how 2 different relationships develop within the same story.

    Reply
  141. Oh, it is hot in Texas! Upper 90’s with no rain in sight. It is going to be a LONG summer this year!
    I absolutely LOVE the older Regencies and am so excited they are reissuing yours! I am not into all the explicit sex, but love all the tension that comes beforehand. So they Regencies are perfect!!!
    I tend to like the hero who is basically a good guy who is bored and plays around, trying to find what he really wants…though he has no idea what that is. 🙂 Give me a rebel any day!!!!

    Reply
  142. Oh, it is hot in Texas! Upper 90’s with no rain in sight. It is going to be a LONG summer this year!
    I absolutely LOVE the older Regencies and am so excited they are reissuing yours! I am not into all the explicit sex, but love all the tension that comes beforehand. So they Regencies are perfect!!!
    I tend to like the hero who is basically a good guy who is bored and plays around, trying to find what he really wants…though he has no idea what that is. 🙂 Give me a rebel any day!!!!

    Reply
  143. Oh, it is hot in Texas! Upper 90’s with no rain in sight. It is going to be a LONG summer this year!
    I absolutely LOVE the older Regencies and am so excited they are reissuing yours! I am not into all the explicit sex, but love all the tension that comes beforehand. So they Regencies are perfect!!!
    I tend to like the hero who is basically a good guy who is bored and plays around, trying to find what he really wants…though he has no idea what that is. 🙂 Give me a rebel any day!!!!

    Reply
  144. Oh, it is hot in Texas! Upper 90’s with no rain in sight. It is going to be a LONG summer this year!
    I absolutely LOVE the older Regencies and am so excited they are reissuing yours! I am not into all the explicit sex, but love all the tension that comes beforehand. So they Regencies are perfect!!!
    I tend to like the hero who is basically a good guy who is bored and plays around, trying to find what he really wants…though he has no idea what that is. 🙂 Give me a rebel any day!!!!

    Reply
  145. Oh, it is hot in Texas! Upper 90’s with no rain in sight. It is going to be a LONG summer this year!
    I absolutely LOVE the older Regencies and am so excited they are reissuing yours! I am not into all the explicit sex, but love all the tension that comes beforehand. So they Regencies are perfect!!!
    I tend to like the hero who is basically a good guy who is bored and plays around, trying to find what he really wants…though he has no idea what that is. 🙂 Give me a rebel any day!!!!

    Reply
  146. I am a librarian and I purchase mass market romance. I never knew there were so many distinctions between regencies and historicals etc. It is fascinating the amount of work and thought that goes into production.

    Reply
  147. I am a librarian and I purchase mass market romance. I never knew there were so many distinctions between regencies and historicals etc. It is fascinating the amount of work and thought that goes into production.

    Reply
  148. I am a librarian and I purchase mass market romance. I never knew there were so many distinctions between regencies and historicals etc. It is fascinating the amount of work and thought that goes into production.

    Reply
  149. I am a librarian and I purchase mass market romance. I never knew there were so many distinctions between regencies and historicals etc. It is fascinating the amount of work and thought that goes into production.

    Reply
  150. I am a librarian and I purchase mass market romance. I never knew there were so many distinctions between regencies and historicals etc. It is fascinating the amount of work and thought that goes into production.

    Reply
  151. As Anne Gracie said: “I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women.” ITA and sometimes think of it as men who love women versus men who merely love sex. The former may love sex, but women are part of the prize. For the latter, women are merely the means to an end, not the end itself.
    I think the catalyst for change needs to come from within, although the hero and/or heroine can certainly help the other in finding redemption. In P&P, it’s not just Darcy who helps Elizabeth but each helps the other. After all, the title refers to his pride as well as her prejudice. A truly hardcore rake whose reform is, nonetheless, believable is Sebastian from Patricia Gaffney’s “To Have and To Hold”. He is a true (not fake, merely sowing his wild oats) rake who appears to be selfish to the bone, but his epiphany does come. His heroine is herself quite damaged, so it is most definitely not the standard “virginal young thing showing the jaded rake” the error of his ways. Sebastian needs to find the empathy within himself to understand — and care — about others.

    Reply
  152. As Anne Gracie said: “I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women.” ITA and sometimes think of it as men who love women versus men who merely love sex. The former may love sex, but women are part of the prize. For the latter, women are merely the means to an end, not the end itself.
    I think the catalyst for change needs to come from within, although the hero and/or heroine can certainly help the other in finding redemption. In P&P, it’s not just Darcy who helps Elizabeth but each helps the other. After all, the title refers to his pride as well as her prejudice. A truly hardcore rake whose reform is, nonetheless, believable is Sebastian from Patricia Gaffney’s “To Have and To Hold”. He is a true (not fake, merely sowing his wild oats) rake who appears to be selfish to the bone, but his epiphany does come. His heroine is herself quite damaged, so it is most definitely not the standard “virginal young thing showing the jaded rake” the error of his ways. Sebastian needs to find the empathy within himself to understand — and care — about others.

    Reply
  153. As Anne Gracie said: “I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women.” ITA and sometimes think of it as men who love women versus men who merely love sex. The former may love sex, but women are part of the prize. For the latter, women are merely the means to an end, not the end itself.
    I think the catalyst for change needs to come from within, although the hero and/or heroine can certainly help the other in finding redemption. In P&P, it’s not just Darcy who helps Elizabeth but each helps the other. After all, the title refers to his pride as well as her prejudice. A truly hardcore rake whose reform is, nonetheless, believable is Sebastian from Patricia Gaffney’s “To Have and To Hold”. He is a true (not fake, merely sowing his wild oats) rake who appears to be selfish to the bone, but his epiphany does come. His heroine is herself quite damaged, so it is most definitely not the standard “virginal young thing showing the jaded rake” the error of his ways. Sebastian needs to find the empathy within himself to understand — and care — about others.

    Reply
  154. As Anne Gracie said: “I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women.” ITA and sometimes think of it as men who love women versus men who merely love sex. The former may love sex, but women are part of the prize. For the latter, women are merely the means to an end, not the end itself.
    I think the catalyst for change needs to come from within, although the hero and/or heroine can certainly help the other in finding redemption. In P&P, it’s not just Darcy who helps Elizabeth but each helps the other. After all, the title refers to his pride as well as her prejudice. A truly hardcore rake whose reform is, nonetheless, believable is Sebastian from Patricia Gaffney’s “To Have and To Hold”. He is a true (not fake, merely sowing his wild oats) rake who appears to be selfish to the bone, but his epiphany does come. His heroine is herself quite damaged, so it is most definitely not the standard “virginal young thing showing the jaded rake” the error of his ways. Sebastian needs to find the empathy within himself to understand — and care — about others.

    Reply
  155. As Anne Gracie said: “I think it depends on what you see as a hardcore rake. I haven’t written many rakes, but those I have tend to be men who love women, rather than men who use women.” ITA and sometimes think of it as men who love women versus men who merely love sex. The former may love sex, but women are part of the prize. For the latter, women are merely the means to an end, not the end itself.
    I think the catalyst for change needs to come from within, although the hero and/or heroine can certainly help the other in finding redemption. In P&P, it’s not just Darcy who helps Elizabeth but each helps the other. After all, the title refers to his pride as well as her prejudice. A truly hardcore rake whose reform is, nonetheless, believable is Sebastian from Patricia Gaffney’s “To Have and To Hold”. He is a true (not fake, merely sowing his wild oats) rake who appears to be selfish to the bone, but his epiphany does come. His heroine is herself quite damaged, so it is most definitely not the standard “virginal young thing showing the jaded rake” the error of his ways. Sebastian needs to find the empathy within himself to understand — and care — about others.

    Reply
  156. I think the cover looks great. I agree with you about the reforming rake. Sometimes they author can get bogged down in the unnecessary details.
    I hope you have a great June.

    Reply
  157. I think the cover looks great. I agree with you about the reforming rake. Sometimes they author can get bogged down in the unnecessary details.
    I hope you have a great June.

    Reply
  158. I think the cover looks great. I agree with you about the reforming rake. Sometimes they author can get bogged down in the unnecessary details.
    I hope you have a great June.

    Reply
  159. I think the cover looks great. I agree with you about the reforming rake. Sometimes they author can get bogged down in the unnecessary details.
    I hope you have a great June.

    Reply
  160. I think the cover looks great. I agree with you about the reforming rake. Sometimes they author can get bogged down in the unnecessary details.
    I hope you have a great June.

    Reply
  161. I loved your “sweet” stories like those being re-released, but then I can’t think of a story of yours that I haven’t loved. I do enjoy a sweet, uncomplicated story every so often, though there aren’t very many of them around these days. To me, the sex isn’t as important as the romance of the story, “watching” the hero and heroine fall in love. The story doesn’t have to be complicated, as long as the characters are fully developed enough that I care about them and their happiness. Some conflict between hero and heroine is almost inevitable (they’re human, after all) but it isn’t important to me whether that is internal or external. I need to care about them and want to see them work out their problems and make to HEA. Tell me a good story about that (which you ALWAYS do) and I’m happy.

    Reply
  162. I loved your “sweet” stories like those being re-released, but then I can’t think of a story of yours that I haven’t loved. I do enjoy a sweet, uncomplicated story every so often, though there aren’t very many of them around these days. To me, the sex isn’t as important as the romance of the story, “watching” the hero and heroine fall in love. The story doesn’t have to be complicated, as long as the characters are fully developed enough that I care about them and their happiness. Some conflict between hero and heroine is almost inevitable (they’re human, after all) but it isn’t important to me whether that is internal or external. I need to care about them and want to see them work out their problems and make to HEA. Tell me a good story about that (which you ALWAYS do) and I’m happy.

    Reply
  163. I loved your “sweet” stories like those being re-released, but then I can’t think of a story of yours that I haven’t loved. I do enjoy a sweet, uncomplicated story every so often, though there aren’t very many of them around these days. To me, the sex isn’t as important as the romance of the story, “watching” the hero and heroine fall in love. The story doesn’t have to be complicated, as long as the characters are fully developed enough that I care about them and their happiness. Some conflict between hero and heroine is almost inevitable (they’re human, after all) but it isn’t important to me whether that is internal or external. I need to care about them and want to see them work out their problems and make to HEA. Tell me a good story about that (which you ALWAYS do) and I’m happy.

    Reply
  164. I loved your “sweet” stories like those being re-released, but then I can’t think of a story of yours that I haven’t loved. I do enjoy a sweet, uncomplicated story every so often, though there aren’t very many of them around these days. To me, the sex isn’t as important as the romance of the story, “watching” the hero and heroine fall in love. The story doesn’t have to be complicated, as long as the characters are fully developed enough that I care about them and their happiness. Some conflict between hero and heroine is almost inevitable (they’re human, after all) but it isn’t important to me whether that is internal or external. I need to care about them and want to see them work out their problems and make to HEA. Tell me a good story about that (which you ALWAYS do) and I’m happy.

    Reply
  165. I loved your “sweet” stories like those being re-released, but then I can’t think of a story of yours that I haven’t loved. I do enjoy a sweet, uncomplicated story every so often, though there aren’t very many of them around these days. To me, the sex isn’t as important as the romance of the story, “watching” the hero and heroine fall in love. The story doesn’t have to be complicated, as long as the characters are fully developed enough that I care about them and their happiness. Some conflict between hero and heroine is almost inevitable (they’re human, after all) but it isn’t important to me whether that is internal or external. I need to care about them and want to see them work out their problems and make to HEA. Tell me a good story about that (which you ALWAYS do) and I’m happy.

    Reply
  166. Jo, I am so glad your early books are being reissued. How exciting! I have been reading historical romances for about 9 years now, but just “discovered” your books. I look forward to getting these reissues!

    Reply
  167. Jo, I am so glad your early books are being reissued. How exciting! I have been reading historical romances for about 9 years now, but just “discovered” your books. I look forward to getting these reissues!

    Reply
  168. Jo, I am so glad your early books are being reissued. How exciting! I have been reading historical romances for about 9 years now, but just “discovered” your books. I look forward to getting these reissues!

    Reply
  169. Jo, I am so glad your early books are being reissued. How exciting! I have been reading historical romances for about 9 years now, but just “discovered” your books. I look forward to getting these reissues!

    Reply
  170. Jo, I am so glad your early books are being reissued. How exciting! I have been reading historical romances for about 9 years now, but just “discovered” your books. I look forward to getting these reissues!

    Reply
  171. Sweet is fine as long as danger is there to enliven it. I love the regency period and can’t seem to find enough written now. If the hero and his interest are great people that works but strong doesn’t have to be bland. Glad reissuing, now maybe i can replace some of my books i lost in our caddo lake flood this winter lol.

    Reply
  172. Sweet is fine as long as danger is there to enliven it. I love the regency period and can’t seem to find enough written now. If the hero and his interest are great people that works but strong doesn’t have to be bland. Glad reissuing, now maybe i can replace some of my books i lost in our caddo lake flood this winter lol.

    Reply
  173. Sweet is fine as long as danger is there to enliven it. I love the regency period and can’t seem to find enough written now. If the hero and his interest are great people that works but strong doesn’t have to be bland. Glad reissuing, now maybe i can replace some of my books i lost in our caddo lake flood this winter lol.

    Reply
  174. Sweet is fine as long as danger is there to enliven it. I love the regency period and can’t seem to find enough written now. If the hero and his interest are great people that works but strong doesn’t have to be bland. Glad reissuing, now maybe i can replace some of my books i lost in our caddo lake flood this winter lol.

    Reply
  175. Sweet is fine as long as danger is there to enliven it. I love the regency period and can’t seem to find enough written now. If the hero and his interest are great people that works but strong doesn’t have to be bland. Glad reissuing, now maybe i can replace some of my books i lost in our caddo lake flood this winter lol.

    Reply
  176. Loved ‘Shattered Rose’. Would like to read more dual romances; it adds another dimension to the overall plot. Love ALL ‘Company of Rogues’ books and how they tend to intertwine. Have been reading historicals for decades but just recently started reading Jo’s books. Catching up and enjoying every minute of it.

    Reply
  177. Loved ‘Shattered Rose’. Would like to read more dual romances; it adds another dimension to the overall plot. Love ALL ‘Company of Rogues’ books and how they tend to intertwine. Have been reading historicals for decades but just recently started reading Jo’s books. Catching up and enjoying every minute of it.

    Reply
  178. Loved ‘Shattered Rose’. Would like to read more dual romances; it adds another dimension to the overall plot. Love ALL ‘Company of Rogues’ books and how they tend to intertwine. Have been reading historicals for decades but just recently started reading Jo’s books. Catching up and enjoying every minute of it.

    Reply
  179. Loved ‘Shattered Rose’. Would like to read more dual romances; it adds another dimension to the overall plot. Love ALL ‘Company of Rogues’ books and how they tend to intertwine. Have been reading historicals for decades but just recently started reading Jo’s books. Catching up and enjoying every minute of it.

    Reply
  180. Loved ‘Shattered Rose’. Would like to read more dual romances; it adds another dimension to the overall plot. Love ALL ‘Company of Rogues’ books and how they tend to intertwine. Have been reading historicals for decades but just recently started reading Jo’s books. Catching up and enjoying every minute of it.

    Reply
  181. I’m glad these old Regencys are being re-released. It would be nice if their success would make publishers realize that there is a market for books that are more true to the manners and mores of the period and not focused on spies, wagers and sex.
    I like the covers, too–people fully clothed in fashions appropriate to the period and no bare backs with heads cut off!

    Reply
  182. I’m glad these old Regencys are being re-released. It would be nice if their success would make publishers realize that there is a market for books that are more true to the manners and mores of the period and not focused on spies, wagers and sex.
    I like the covers, too–people fully clothed in fashions appropriate to the period and no bare backs with heads cut off!

    Reply
  183. I’m glad these old Regencys are being re-released. It would be nice if their success would make publishers realize that there is a market for books that are more true to the manners and mores of the period and not focused on spies, wagers and sex.
    I like the covers, too–people fully clothed in fashions appropriate to the period and no bare backs with heads cut off!

    Reply
  184. I’m glad these old Regencys are being re-released. It would be nice if their success would make publishers realize that there is a market for books that are more true to the manners and mores of the period and not focused on spies, wagers and sex.
    I like the covers, too–people fully clothed in fashions appropriate to the period and no bare backs with heads cut off!

    Reply
  185. I’m glad these old Regencys are being re-released. It would be nice if their success would make publishers realize that there is a market for books that are more true to the manners and mores of the period and not focused on spies, wagers and sex.
    I like the covers, too–people fully clothed in fashions appropriate to the period and no bare backs with heads cut off!

    Reply
  186. Bev, I now have only these two trads left of your backlist to acquire to complete my collection. Will you be signing both these trads at RWA?
    Re: the romances in “The Shattered Rose”… I was very pleased to see the straightforward, with a few obstacles but otherwise positive, romance of Raoul and Aline to balance the second-chance, dark romance between Galeran and Jehanne. The main couple’s romance began way off-stage. And now there’s this moral dilemma that’s been self-inflicted and that they have to get through in order to attain a smooth resolution. However, at heart, they both openly acknowledge their love for each other. So there isn’t the usual romance novel arc here.
    The secondary easier romance puts the difficulties of the main romance in relief, while also offering light moments from the darkness. The secondary romance also shows how the original path of G & J’s romance was. It also works for those readers who like to have a romance from start (cute meet) to finish (HEA) in one book.
    Often times in other books, the secondary romance gets short shrift, acts as a plot point, and becomes slightly unbelievable. R & A’s on the other hand plays like a trad Regency, while G & J’s plays like a noir, both full stories.

    Reply
  187. Bev, I now have only these two trads left of your backlist to acquire to complete my collection. Will you be signing both these trads at RWA?
    Re: the romances in “The Shattered Rose”… I was very pleased to see the straightforward, with a few obstacles but otherwise positive, romance of Raoul and Aline to balance the second-chance, dark romance between Galeran and Jehanne. The main couple’s romance began way off-stage. And now there’s this moral dilemma that’s been self-inflicted and that they have to get through in order to attain a smooth resolution. However, at heart, they both openly acknowledge their love for each other. So there isn’t the usual romance novel arc here.
    The secondary easier romance puts the difficulties of the main romance in relief, while also offering light moments from the darkness. The secondary romance also shows how the original path of G & J’s romance was. It also works for those readers who like to have a romance from start (cute meet) to finish (HEA) in one book.
    Often times in other books, the secondary romance gets short shrift, acts as a plot point, and becomes slightly unbelievable. R & A’s on the other hand plays like a trad Regency, while G & J’s plays like a noir, both full stories.

    Reply
  188. Bev, I now have only these two trads left of your backlist to acquire to complete my collection. Will you be signing both these trads at RWA?
    Re: the romances in “The Shattered Rose”… I was very pleased to see the straightforward, with a few obstacles but otherwise positive, romance of Raoul and Aline to balance the second-chance, dark romance between Galeran and Jehanne. The main couple’s romance began way off-stage. And now there’s this moral dilemma that’s been self-inflicted and that they have to get through in order to attain a smooth resolution. However, at heart, they both openly acknowledge their love for each other. So there isn’t the usual romance novel arc here.
    The secondary easier romance puts the difficulties of the main romance in relief, while also offering light moments from the darkness. The secondary romance also shows how the original path of G & J’s romance was. It also works for those readers who like to have a romance from start (cute meet) to finish (HEA) in one book.
    Often times in other books, the secondary romance gets short shrift, acts as a plot point, and becomes slightly unbelievable. R & A’s on the other hand plays like a trad Regency, while G & J’s plays like a noir, both full stories.

    Reply
  189. Bev, I now have only these two trads left of your backlist to acquire to complete my collection. Will you be signing both these trads at RWA?
    Re: the romances in “The Shattered Rose”… I was very pleased to see the straightforward, with a few obstacles but otherwise positive, romance of Raoul and Aline to balance the second-chance, dark romance between Galeran and Jehanne. The main couple’s romance began way off-stage. And now there’s this moral dilemma that’s been self-inflicted and that they have to get through in order to attain a smooth resolution. However, at heart, they both openly acknowledge their love for each other. So there isn’t the usual romance novel arc here.
    The secondary easier romance puts the difficulties of the main romance in relief, while also offering light moments from the darkness. The secondary romance also shows how the original path of G & J’s romance was. It also works for those readers who like to have a romance from start (cute meet) to finish (HEA) in one book.
    Often times in other books, the secondary romance gets short shrift, acts as a plot point, and becomes slightly unbelievable. R & A’s on the other hand plays like a trad Regency, while G & J’s plays like a noir, both full stories.

    Reply
  190. Bev, I now have only these two trads left of your backlist to acquire to complete my collection. Will you be signing both these trads at RWA?
    Re: the romances in “The Shattered Rose”… I was very pleased to see the straightforward, with a few obstacles but otherwise positive, romance of Raoul and Aline to balance the second-chance, dark romance between Galeran and Jehanne. The main couple’s romance began way off-stage. And now there’s this moral dilemma that’s been self-inflicted and that they have to get through in order to attain a smooth resolution. However, at heart, they both openly acknowledge their love for each other. So there isn’t the usual romance novel arc here.
    The secondary easier romance puts the difficulties of the main romance in relief, while also offering light moments from the darkness. The secondary romance also shows how the original path of G & J’s romance was. It also works for those readers who like to have a romance from start (cute meet) to finish (HEA) in one book.
    Often times in other books, the secondary romance gets short shrift, acts as a plot point, and becomes slightly unbelievable. R & A’s on the other hand plays like a trad Regency, while G & J’s plays like a noir, both full stories.

    Reply
  191. Anne Gracie, I like it that your rakes are truly rakish, not just wallpaper fakes. The word rakish does imply total enjoyment and wholehearted pursuit of the things off the straight-n-narrow.
    Lisa Kleypas’s St. Vincent comes to mind for the true reformed rake. He suffers twinges for his previous life throughout his HEA-like life in sequels, though he is very clear that the HEA is what he desires and loves. He makes a believable rake.
    JoBev’s Lucien (Arden/Rogues) is another such rake. His tendency to flirt with good-looking women remains unchanged even though he and his wife are very clear on their trust, respect, and love for each other.

    Reply
  192. Anne Gracie, I like it that your rakes are truly rakish, not just wallpaper fakes. The word rakish does imply total enjoyment and wholehearted pursuit of the things off the straight-n-narrow.
    Lisa Kleypas’s St. Vincent comes to mind for the true reformed rake. He suffers twinges for his previous life throughout his HEA-like life in sequels, though he is very clear that the HEA is what he desires and loves. He makes a believable rake.
    JoBev’s Lucien (Arden/Rogues) is another such rake. His tendency to flirt with good-looking women remains unchanged even though he and his wife are very clear on their trust, respect, and love for each other.

    Reply
  193. Anne Gracie, I like it that your rakes are truly rakish, not just wallpaper fakes. The word rakish does imply total enjoyment and wholehearted pursuit of the things off the straight-n-narrow.
    Lisa Kleypas’s St. Vincent comes to mind for the true reformed rake. He suffers twinges for his previous life throughout his HEA-like life in sequels, though he is very clear that the HEA is what he desires and loves. He makes a believable rake.
    JoBev’s Lucien (Arden/Rogues) is another such rake. His tendency to flirt with good-looking women remains unchanged even though he and his wife are very clear on their trust, respect, and love for each other.

    Reply
  194. Anne Gracie, I like it that your rakes are truly rakish, not just wallpaper fakes. The word rakish does imply total enjoyment and wholehearted pursuit of the things off the straight-n-narrow.
    Lisa Kleypas’s St. Vincent comes to mind for the true reformed rake. He suffers twinges for his previous life throughout his HEA-like life in sequels, though he is very clear that the HEA is what he desires and loves. He makes a believable rake.
    JoBev’s Lucien (Arden/Rogues) is another such rake. His tendency to flirt with good-looking women remains unchanged even though he and his wife are very clear on their trust, respect, and love for each other.

    Reply
  195. Anne Gracie, I like it that your rakes are truly rakish, not just wallpaper fakes. The word rakish does imply total enjoyment and wholehearted pursuit of the things off the straight-n-narrow.
    Lisa Kleypas’s St. Vincent comes to mind for the true reformed rake. He suffers twinges for his previous life throughout his HEA-like life in sequels, though he is very clear that the HEA is what he desires and loves. He makes a believable rake.
    JoBev’s Lucien (Arden/Rogues) is another such rake. His tendency to flirt with good-looking women remains unchanged even though he and his wife are very clear on their trust, respect, and love for each other.

    Reply
  196. Betty Breithaupt, it’s a bit difficult for me to conceive of Rothgar as a rake. He isn’t a virgin, but neither is he promiscuous, he’s somewhere in between. Mostly because to him politics, business, and automata are far more fascinating than women. And to be a rake, you have to love women and having sex with them.

    Reply
  197. Betty Breithaupt, it’s a bit difficult for me to conceive of Rothgar as a rake. He isn’t a virgin, but neither is he promiscuous, he’s somewhere in between. Mostly because to him politics, business, and automata are far more fascinating than women. And to be a rake, you have to love women and having sex with them.

    Reply
  198. Betty Breithaupt, it’s a bit difficult for me to conceive of Rothgar as a rake. He isn’t a virgin, but neither is he promiscuous, he’s somewhere in between. Mostly because to him politics, business, and automata are far more fascinating than women. And to be a rake, you have to love women and having sex with them.

    Reply
  199. Betty Breithaupt, it’s a bit difficult for me to conceive of Rothgar as a rake. He isn’t a virgin, but neither is he promiscuous, he’s somewhere in between. Mostly because to him politics, business, and automata are far more fascinating than women. And to be a rake, you have to love women and having sex with them.

    Reply
  200. Betty Breithaupt, it’s a bit difficult for me to conceive of Rothgar as a rake. He isn’t a virgin, but neither is he promiscuous, he’s somewhere in between. Mostly because to him politics, business, and automata are far more fascinating than women. And to be a rake, you have to love women and having sex with them.

    Reply
  201. I think it’s been overlooked that some men are motivated by love of sex & women, but many are motivated by worry over their standing with other men in their pack (however they define that). The latter are the sort who collect notches & brag about their seductions, affairs, etc., because the main point of their raking is not pleasure but social standing; if none of the other men knew what they did, they’d be very unhappy!
    The sort of man who cares more what the guys think than he does about the women he consorts with seems to me to be so self-centered as to be difficult, if not impossible, to be reformed by ‘true love’. In those days, seducing a woman was a pretty selfish act, since he risked little (a vengeful spouse or an STD if he chose poorly or unluckily) and she risked so much more (pregnancy, disease, exposure & social ruin, family anger, whispers & snubs wherever she went, never ‘belonging’ again). I think we moderns have forgotten how dangerous extramarital sex was for women then, and I often think that current regency historicals don’t take it anywhere near seriously enough. So any hero who targets a woman and exposes her to such dangers can’t really care about her very much. Accidents will be accidents & all that, but it doesn’t seem very heroic to me.

    Reply
  202. I think it’s been overlooked that some men are motivated by love of sex & women, but many are motivated by worry over their standing with other men in their pack (however they define that). The latter are the sort who collect notches & brag about their seductions, affairs, etc., because the main point of their raking is not pleasure but social standing; if none of the other men knew what they did, they’d be very unhappy!
    The sort of man who cares more what the guys think than he does about the women he consorts with seems to me to be so self-centered as to be difficult, if not impossible, to be reformed by ‘true love’. In those days, seducing a woman was a pretty selfish act, since he risked little (a vengeful spouse or an STD if he chose poorly or unluckily) and she risked so much more (pregnancy, disease, exposure & social ruin, family anger, whispers & snubs wherever she went, never ‘belonging’ again). I think we moderns have forgotten how dangerous extramarital sex was for women then, and I often think that current regency historicals don’t take it anywhere near seriously enough. So any hero who targets a woman and exposes her to such dangers can’t really care about her very much. Accidents will be accidents & all that, but it doesn’t seem very heroic to me.

    Reply
  203. I think it’s been overlooked that some men are motivated by love of sex & women, but many are motivated by worry over their standing with other men in their pack (however they define that). The latter are the sort who collect notches & brag about their seductions, affairs, etc., because the main point of their raking is not pleasure but social standing; if none of the other men knew what they did, they’d be very unhappy!
    The sort of man who cares more what the guys think than he does about the women he consorts with seems to me to be so self-centered as to be difficult, if not impossible, to be reformed by ‘true love’. In those days, seducing a woman was a pretty selfish act, since he risked little (a vengeful spouse or an STD if he chose poorly or unluckily) and she risked so much more (pregnancy, disease, exposure & social ruin, family anger, whispers & snubs wherever she went, never ‘belonging’ again). I think we moderns have forgotten how dangerous extramarital sex was for women then, and I often think that current regency historicals don’t take it anywhere near seriously enough. So any hero who targets a woman and exposes her to such dangers can’t really care about her very much. Accidents will be accidents & all that, but it doesn’t seem very heroic to me.

    Reply
  204. I think it’s been overlooked that some men are motivated by love of sex & women, but many are motivated by worry over their standing with other men in their pack (however they define that). The latter are the sort who collect notches & brag about their seductions, affairs, etc., because the main point of their raking is not pleasure but social standing; if none of the other men knew what they did, they’d be very unhappy!
    The sort of man who cares more what the guys think than he does about the women he consorts with seems to me to be so self-centered as to be difficult, if not impossible, to be reformed by ‘true love’. In those days, seducing a woman was a pretty selfish act, since he risked little (a vengeful spouse or an STD if he chose poorly or unluckily) and she risked so much more (pregnancy, disease, exposure & social ruin, family anger, whispers & snubs wherever she went, never ‘belonging’ again). I think we moderns have forgotten how dangerous extramarital sex was for women then, and I often think that current regency historicals don’t take it anywhere near seriously enough. So any hero who targets a woman and exposes her to such dangers can’t really care about her very much. Accidents will be accidents & all that, but it doesn’t seem very heroic to me.

    Reply
  205. I think it’s been overlooked that some men are motivated by love of sex & women, but many are motivated by worry over their standing with other men in their pack (however they define that). The latter are the sort who collect notches & brag about their seductions, affairs, etc., because the main point of their raking is not pleasure but social standing; if none of the other men knew what they did, they’d be very unhappy!
    The sort of man who cares more what the guys think than he does about the women he consorts with seems to me to be so self-centered as to be difficult, if not impossible, to be reformed by ‘true love’. In those days, seducing a woman was a pretty selfish act, since he risked little (a vengeful spouse or an STD if he chose poorly or unluckily) and she risked so much more (pregnancy, disease, exposure & social ruin, family anger, whispers & snubs wherever she went, never ‘belonging’ again). I think we moderns have forgotten how dangerous extramarital sex was for women then, and I often think that current regency historicals don’t take it anywhere near seriously enough. So any hero who targets a woman and exposes her to such dangers can’t really care about her very much. Accidents will be accidents & all that, but it doesn’t seem very heroic to me.

    Reply
  206. I was away for a few days but hope I got back in time to comment on the new books. I am glad to see them back..love these books so much. susan L.

    Reply
  207. I was away for a few days but hope I got back in time to comment on the new books. I am glad to see them back..love these books so much. susan L.

    Reply
  208. I was away for a few days but hope I got back in time to comment on the new books. I am glad to see them back..love these books so much. susan L.

    Reply
  209. I was away for a few days but hope I got back in time to comment on the new books. I am glad to see them back..love these books so much. susan L.

    Reply
  210. I was away for a few days but hope I got back in time to comment on the new books. I am glad to see them back..love these books so much. susan L.

    Reply

Leave a Comment