THE SPARKY REPORT #26

SunlightWindowsill-sm

Sparky catching some sun in the window

 

 SPARKY'S DRUG OF CHOICE:  GRASS

No, not that kind of grass! Sparky's favorite "happy weed" is wheatgrass. You can buy it in the produce department of grocery stores and as a dietary supplement in health food stores. Most folks, especially juicers, extol its nutritional benefits. Sparky considers it a gourmet delight, even better than catnip.

Wheatgrass1sm

Hmmm. What's this new thing?

I bought a little planter of wheatgrass for Sparky last week and she went totally bonkers over it. I mean really bonkers! At first I kept it at my desk in order to monitor her intake and make sure that this new introduction to her diet didn't cause any digestive upsets.

 

Wheatgrass2sm

Gee, it smells good!

I needn't have worried. A cat that steals the dogs' food, loves Brussels sprouts and pizza, and regularly gnaws on things that shouldn't be gnawed upon, would naturally have no problems with wheatgrass. A look of such bliss crosses her face when she's grazing on her wheatgrass that it's a sight to behold.

 

Wheatgrass3sm

Maybe I'll just take a little taste.

 

 When I carry it to the kitchen for a good soaking under the faucet, Sparky follows me with anxious meows and loud admonishments. Be careful! Don't bruise the grass! It needs more sunlight! You're overwatering it!

Wheatgrass4sm

Oh! This tastes good!

Health food nuts consider wheatgrass a superfood. Sparky quite agrees with them!

 

Wheatgrass5sm

Nom! Nom! Nommm!!!

 

 

100 thoughts on “THE SPARKY REPORT #26”

  1. Best Sparky Report ever! I”m laughing like crazy here. My two won’t touch wheatgrass; they sniffed and walked away. I think their philosophy is if Mom won’t eat it, we won’t eat it.

    Reply
  2. Best Sparky Report ever! I”m laughing like crazy here. My two won’t touch wheatgrass; they sniffed and walked away. I think their philosophy is if Mom won’t eat it, we won’t eat it.

    Reply
  3. Best Sparky Report ever! I”m laughing like crazy here. My two won’t touch wheatgrass; they sniffed and walked away. I think their philosophy is if Mom won’t eat it, we won’t eat it.

    Reply
  4. Best Sparky Report ever! I”m laughing like crazy here. My two won’t touch wheatgrass; they sniffed and walked away. I think their philosophy is if Mom won’t eat it, we won’t eat it.

    Reply
  5. Best Sparky Report ever! I”m laughing like crazy here. My two won’t touch wheatgrass; they sniffed and walked away. I think their philosophy is if Mom won’t eat it, we won’t eat it.

    Reply
  6. Donna, I have a confession: that wheatgrass smelled so fresh and so good, and Sparky was having such fun eating it, that I had to try some myself. I plucked a few blades and chewed them. It tasted like . . . well, like grass. A tasty grass, but grass, nevertheless. I don’t think Sparky needs to worry about anyone else in this household (that would be me!) stealing her private stash of grass. *g*

    Reply
  7. Donna, I have a confession: that wheatgrass smelled so fresh and so good, and Sparky was having such fun eating it, that I had to try some myself. I plucked a few blades and chewed them. It tasted like . . . well, like grass. A tasty grass, but grass, nevertheless. I don’t think Sparky needs to worry about anyone else in this household (that would be me!) stealing her private stash of grass. *g*

    Reply
  8. Donna, I have a confession: that wheatgrass smelled so fresh and so good, and Sparky was having such fun eating it, that I had to try some myself. I plucked a few blades and chewed them. It tasted like . . . well, like grass. A tasty grass, but grass, nevertheless. I don’t think Sparky needs to worry about anyone else in this household (that would be me!) stealing her private stash of grass. *g*

    Reply
  9. Donna, I have a confession: that wheatgrass smelled so fresh and so good, and Sparky was having such fun eating it, that I had to try some myself. I plucked a few blades and chewed them. It tasted like . . . well, like grass. A tasty grass, but grass, nevertheless. I don’t think Sparky needs to worry about anyone else in this household (that would be me!) stealing her private stash of grass. *g*

    Reply
  10. Donna, I have a confession: that wheatgrass smelled so fresh and so good, and Sparky was having such fun eating it, that I had to try some myself. I plucked a few blades and chewed them. It tasted like . . . well, like grass. A tasty grass, but grass, nevertheless. I don’t think Sparky needs to worry about anyone else in this household (that would be me!) stealing her private stash of grass. *g*

    Reply
  11. I had to laugh at this post’s title. When I was home taking care of Mom in Spokane WA, I kept shaking me head at a sign for “Cannabis Energy Drink.”
    My cats also turned up their nose at grass but not my house plants. They didn’t eat them, just leave little holes in the leaves.

    Reply
  12. I had to laugh at this post’s title. When I was home taking care of Mom in Spokane WA, I kept shaking me head at a sign for “Cannabis Energy Drink.”
    My cats also turned up their nose at grass but not my house plants. They didn’t eat them, just leave little holes in the leaves.

    Reply
  13. I had to laugh at this post’s title. When I was home taking care of Mom in Spokane WA, I kept shaking me head at a sign for “Cannabis Energy Drink.”
    My cats also turned up their nose at grass but not my house plants. They didn’t eat them, just leave little holes in the leaves.

    Reply
  14. I had to laugh at this post’s title. When I was home taking care of Mom in Spokane WA, I kept shaking me head at a sign for “Cannabis Energy Drink.”
    My cats also turned up their nose at grass but not my house plants. They didn’t eat them, just leave little holes in the leaves.

    Reply
  15. I had to laugh at this post’s title. When I was home taking care of Mom in Spokane WA, I kept shaking me head at a sign for “Cannabis Energy Drink.”
    My cats also turned up their nose at grass but not my house plants. They didn’t eat them, just leave little holes in the leaves.

    Reply
  16. Cannabis Energy Drink? Oh my. I’m afraid all it would do for me is give me the munchies! *g* (Sorry, couldn’t resist)
    I suspect if Sparky had access to my houseplants, they’d have holes in them, too. However, due to ongoing remodeling/renovation, my house is in a bit of turmoil, and I’ve put most of my houseplants in the unfinished laundry room, where they are thriving without interference from kitty paws and teeth. Once this project is done, I’ll move the plants back to their normal locations, but for the time being, they are safe from Sparky’s teeth!

    Reply
  17. Cannabis Energy Drink? Oh my. I’m afraid all it would do for me is give me the munchies! *g* (Sorry, couldn’t resist)
    I suspect if Sparky had access to my houseplants, they’d have holes in them, too. However, due to ongoing remodeling/renovation, my house is in a bit of turmoil, and I’ve put most of my houseplants in the unfinished laundry room, where they are thriving without interference from kitty paws and teeth. Once this project is done, I’ll move the plants back to their normal locations, but for the time being, they are safe from Sparky’s teeth!

    Reply
  18. Cannabis Energy Drink? Oh my. I’m afraid all it would do for me is give me the munchies! *g* (Sorry, couldn’t resist)
    I suspect if Sparky had access to my houseplants, they’d have holes in them, too. However, due to ongoing remodeling/renovation, my house is in a bit of turmoil, and I’ve put most of my houseplants in the unfinished laundry room, where they are thriving without interference from kitty paws and teeth. Once this project is done, I’ll move the plants back to their normal locations, but for the time being, they are safe from Sparky’s teeth!

    Reply
  19. Cannabis Energy Drink? Oh my. I’m afraid all it would do for me is give me the munchies! *g* (Sorry, couldn’t resist)
    I suspect if Sparky had access to my houseplants, they’d have holes in them, too. However, due to ongoing remodeling/renovation, my house is in a bit of turmoil, and I’ve put most of my houseplants in the unfinished laundry room, where they are thriving without interference from kitty paws and teeth. Once this project is done, I’ll move the plants back to their normal locations, but for the time being, they are safe from Sparky’s teeth!

    Reply
  20. Cannabis Energy Drink? Oh my. I’m afraid all it would do for me is give me the munchies! *g* (Sorry, couldn’t resist)
    I suspect if Sparky had access to my houseplants, they’d have holes in them, too. However, due to ongoing remodeling/renovation, my house is in a bit of turmoil, and I’ve put most of my houseplants in the unfinished laundry room, where they are thriving without interference from kitty paws and teeth. Once this project is done, I’ll move the plants back to their normal locations, but for the time being, they are safe from Sparky’s teeth!

    Reply
  21. Aloha Sherrie,
    So happy to hear you’re providing wheat grass for Sparky! I’m convinced it’s vital for their health.
    My previous Washington cat Gracie ate wheat grass like a side dish with every meal. Given a choice between catnip and wheatgrass, no contest, wheatgrass won every time. It was a staple in my shopping.
    My Hawaii rug muffins? Won’t touch any grass seed I nuture so carefully; they sniff, turn up noses and walk away, or pull it up by roots and play with it.
    I now harvest leaves of ditch grass before it’s mowed down by tractors as it reaches electric wires above. I’m talking tough elephant grass that grows ten feet tall, and stray stalks of sugar cane left over from old days. The beauties can smell it when I come in the door and pounce into the grocery bags to pull it out. They munch, purr, roll in it, play with it, can’t get enough of the wild stuff. I’m thinking the feral cat digestion has adjusted to the rougher grass over generations of isolation on the Big Island.
    Mahalo for sharing Sparky with us, she’s such a charmer.

    Reply
  22. Aloha Sherrie,
    So happy to hear you’re providing wheat grass for Sparky! I’m convinced it’s vital for their health.
    My previous Washington cat Gracie ate wheat grass like a side dish with every meal. Given a choice between catnip and wheatgrass, no contest, wheatgrass won every time. It was a staple in my shopping.
    My Hawaii rug muffins? Won’t touch any grass seed I nuture so carefully; they sniff, turn up noses and walk away, or pull it up by roots and play with it.
    I now harvest leaves of ditch grass before it’s mowed down by tractors as it reaches electric wires above. I’m talking tough elephant grass that grows ten feet tall, and stray stalks of sugar cane left over from old days. The beauties can smell it when I come in the door and pounce into the grocery bags to pull it out. They munch, purr, roll in it, play with it, can’t get enough of the wild stuff. I’m thinking the feral cat digestion has adjusted to the rougher grass over generations of isolation on the Big Island.
    Mahalo for sharing Sparky with us, she’s such a charmer.

    Reply
  23. Aloha Sherrie,
    So happy to hear you’re providing wheat grass for Sparky! I’m convinced it’s vital for their health.
    My previous Washington cat Gracie ate wheat grass like a side dish with every meal. Given a choice between catnip and wheatgrass, no contest, wheatgrass won every time. It was a staple in my shopping.
    My Hawaii rug muffins? Won’t touch any grass seed I nuture so carefully; they sniff, turn up noses and walk away, or pull it up by roots and play with it.
    I now harvest leaves of ditch grass before it’s mowed down by tractors as it reaches electric wires above. I’m talking tough elephant grass that grows ten feet tall, and stray stalks of sugar cane left over from old days. The beauties can smell it when I come in the door and pounce into the grocery bags to pull it out. They munch, purr, roll in it, play with it, can’t get enough of the wild stuff. I’m thinking the feral cat digestion has adjusted to the rougher grass over generations of isolation on the Big Island.
    Mahalo for sharing Sparky with us, she’s such a charmer.

    Reply
  24. Aloha Sherrie,
    So happy to hear you’re providing wheat grass for Sparky! I’m convinced it’s vital for their health.
    My previous Washington cat Gracie ate wheat grass like a side dish with every meal. Given a choice between catnip and wheatgrass, no contest, wheatgrass won every time. It was a staple in my shopping.
    My Hawaii rug muffins? Won’t touch any grass seed I nuture so carefully; they sniff, turn up noses and walk away, or pull it up by roots and play with it.
    I now harvest leaves of ditch grass before it’s mowed down by tractors as it reaches electric wires above. I’m talking tough elephant grass that grows ten feet tall, and stray stalks of sugar cane left over from old days. The beauties can smell it when I come in the door and pounce into the grocery bags to pull it out. They munch, purr, roll in it, play with it, can’t get enough of the wild stuff. I’m thinking the feral cat digestion has adjusted to the rougher grass over generations of isolation on the Big Island.
    Mahalo for sharing Sparky with us, she’s such a charmer.

    Reply
  25. Aloha Sherrie,
    So happy to hear you’re providing wheat grass for Sparky! I’m convinced it’s vital for their health.
    My previous Washington cat Gracie ate wheat grass like a side dish with every meal. Given a choice between catnip and wheatgrass, no contest, wheatgrass won every time. It was a staple in my shopping.
    My Hawaii rug muffins? Won’t touch any grass seed I nuture so carefully; they sniff, turn up noses and walk away, or pull it up by roots and play with it.
    I now harvest leaves of ditch grass before it’s mowed down by tractors as it reaches electric wires above. I’m talking tough elephant grass that grows ten feet tall, and stray stalks of sugar cane left over from old days. The beauties can smell it when I come in the door and pounce into the grocery bags to pull it out. They munch, purr, roll in it, play with it, can’t get enough of the wild stuff. I’m thinking the feral cat digestion has adjusted to the rougher grass over generations of isolation on the Big Island.
    Mahalo for sharing Sparky with us, she’s such a charmer.

    Reply
  26. So glad she likes it! It really is good for them. My three boys loved it to distraction. Miss Rebecca Marie was uncertain about it when she was young, but eventually seeing her brothers eat it got her to try it. They’ve been gone a little less than a year, but she still misses them. I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.

    Reply
  27. So glad she likes it! It really is good for them. My three boys loved it to distraction. Miss Rebecca Marie was uncertain about it when she was young, but eventually seeing her brothers eat it got her to try it. They’ve been gone a little less than a year, but she still misses them. I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.

    Reply
  28. So glad she likes it! It really is good for them. My three boys loved it to distraction. Miss Rebecca Marie was uncertain about it when she was young, but eventually seeing her brothers eat it got her to try it. They’ve been gone a little less than a year, but she still misses them. I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.

    Reply
  29. So glad she likes it! It really is good for them. My three boys loved it to distraction. Miss Rebecca Marie was uncertain about it when she was young, but eventually seeing her brothers eat it got her to try it. They’ve been gone a little less than a year, but she still misses them. I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.

    Reply
  30. So glad she likes it! It really is good for them. My three boys loved it to distraction. Miss Rebecca Marie was uncertain about it when she was young, but eventually seeing her brothers eat it got her to try it. They’ve been gone a little less than a year, but she still misses them. I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.

    Reply
  31. Cats eat grass and leaves and that for digestion. Generally so they can barf it up later in the most inconvenient location for their human. If you need more fiber that bad, I told him, have a handful of fiber caps and leave my bedroom carpet alone.
    My cats were intrigued by the stuff when it was fresh, but not terribly interested when the novelty wore off. I guess they weren’t in it for the fiber 🙂

    Reply
  32. Cats eat grass and leaves and that for digestion. Generally so they can barf it up later in the most inconvenient location for their human. If you need more fiber that bad, I told him, have a handful of fiber caps and leave my bedroom carpet alone.
    My cats were intrigued by the stuff when it was fresh, but not terribly interested when the novelty wore off. I guess they weren’t in it for the fiber 🙂

    Reply
  33. Cats eat grass and leaves and that for digestion. Generally so they can barf it up later in the most inconvenient location for their human. If you need more fiber that bad, I told him, have a handful of fiber caps and leave my bedroom carpet alone.
    My cats were intrigued by the stuff when it was fresh, but not terribly interested when the novelty wore off. I guess they weren’t in it for the fiber 🙂

    Reply
  34. Cats eat grass and leaves and that for digestion. Generally so they can barf it up later in the most inconvenient location for their human. If you need more fiber that bad, I told him, have a handful of fiber caps and leave my bedroom carpet alone.
    My cats were intrigued by the stuff when it was fresh, but not terribly interested when the novelty wore off. I guess they weren’t in it for the fiber 🙂

    Reply
  35. Cats eat grass and leaves and that for digestion. Generally so they can barf it up later in the most inconvenient location for their human. If you need more fiber that bad, I told him, have a handful of fiber caps and leave my bedroom carpet alone.
    My cats were intrigued by the stuff when it was fresh, but not terribly interested when the novelty wore off. I guess they weren’t in it for the fiber 🙂

    Reply
  36. Aloha, dear MaeLou! I’m tickled to hear your Gracie loved wheatgrass as much as Sparky does. And LOL that your Hawaii kitters prefer elephant grass and sugar cane. You’re probably right about feral Hawaiian cats’ digestion evolving over time. I can just picture your two pouncing on the grocery bags the minute you walk into the house!

    Reply
  37. Aloha, dear MaeLou! I’m tickled to hear your Gracie loved wheatgrass as much as Sparky does. And LOL that your Hawaii kitters prefer elephant grass and sugar cane. You’re probably right about feral Hawaiian cats’ digestion evolving over time. I can just picture your two pouncing on the grocery bags the minute you walk into the house!

    Reply
  38. Aloha, dear MaeLou! I’m tickled to hear your Gracie loved wheatgrass as much as Sparky does. And LOL that your Hawaii kitters prefer elephant grass and sugar cane. You’re probably right about feral Hawaiian cats’ digestion evolving over time. I can just picture your two pouncing on the grocery bags the minute you walk into the house!

    Reply
  39. Aloha, dear MaeLou! I’m tickled to hear your Gracie loved wheatgrass as much as Sparky does. And LOL that your Hawaii kitters prefer elephant grass and sugar cane. You’re probably right about feral Hawaiian cats’ digestion evolving over time. I can just picture your two pouncing on the grocery bags the minute you walk into the house!

    Reply
  40. Aloha, dear MaeLou! I’m tickled to hear your Gracie loved wheatgrass as much as Sparky does. And LOL that your Hawaii kitters prefer elephant grass and sugar cane. You’re probably right about feral Hawaiian cats’ digestion evolving over time. I can just picture your two pouncing on the grocery bags the minute you walk into the house!

    Reply
  41. **I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.**
    LOL! That’s one reason I have all-girl pets, both dogs and cats. Interesting that Miss Rebecca Marie learned to like wheatgrass after seeing her brothers’ interest in it. Cats are great imitators. I can certainly attest to that, having experienced it with my own cats over the years. Case in point: I used to have a dog with a congenital kidney problem that meant she had to go outside to tinkle 3-4 times more often than a normal dog.
    I trained her to nudge bells hanging from the doorknob whenever she needed to go out. (I didn’t have a doggy door back then) My cats learned to ring those same bells when they wanted outside, just by observing the dog. And cats, being the clever creatures they are, also used those bells to warn *me* that the dog wanted back inside whenever they saw her hunched anxiously in front of the slider!

    Reply
  42. **I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.**
    LOL! That’s one reason I have all-girl pets, both dogs and cats. Interesting that Miss Rebecca Marie learned to like wheatgrass after seeing her brothers’ interest in it. Cats are great imitators. I can certainly attest to that, having experienced it with my own cats over the years. Case in point: I used to have a dog with a congenital kidney problem that meant she had to go outside to tinkle 3-4 times more often than a normal dog.
    I trained her to nudge bells hanging from the doorknob whenever she needed to go out. (I didn’t have a doggy door back then) My cats learned to ring those same bells when they wanted outside, just by observing the dog. And cats, being the clever creatures they are, also used those bells to warn *me* that the dog wanted back inside whenever they saw her hunched anxiously in front of the slider!

    Reply
  43. **I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.**
    LOL! That’s one reason I have all-girl pets, both dogs and cats. Interesting that Miss Rebecca Marie learned to like wheatgrass after seeing her brothers’ interest in it. Cats are great imitators. I can certainly attest to that, having experienced it with my own cats over the years. Case in point: I used to have a dog with a congenital kidney problem that meant she had to go outside to tinkle 3-4 times more often than a normal dog.
    I trained her to nudge bells hanging from the doorknob whenever she needed to go out. (I didn’t have a doggy door back then) My cats learned to ring those same bells when they wanted outside, just by observing the dog. And cats, being the clever creatures they are, also used those bells to warn *me* that the dog wanted back inside whenever they saw her hunched anxiously in front of the slider!

    Reply
  44. **I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.**
    LOL! That’s one reason I have all-girl pets, both dogs and cats. Interesting that Miss Rebecca Marie learned to like wheatgrass after seeing her brothers’ interest in it. Cats are great imitators. I can certainly attest to that, having experienced it with my own cats over the years. Case in point: I used to have a dog with a congenital kidney problem that meant she had to go outside to tinkle 3-4 times more often than a normal dog.
    I trained her to nudge bells hanging from the doorknob whenever she needed to go out. (I didn’t have a doggy door back then) My cats learned to ring those same bells when they wanted outside, just by observing the dog. And cats, being the clever creatures they are, also used those bells to warn *me* that the dog wanted back inside whenever they saw her hunched anxiously in front of the slider!

    Reply
  45. **I have to keep her wheat grass up out of the way or the dachshunds would “water” it for her.**
    LOL! That’s one reason I have all-girl pets, both dogs and cats. Interesting that Miss Rebecca Marie learned to like wheatgrass after seeing her brothers’ interest in it. Cats are great imitators. I can certainly attest to that, having experienced it with my own cats over the years. Case in point: I used to have a dog with a congenital kidney problem that meant she had to go outside to tinkle 3-4 times more often than a normal dog.
    I trained her to nudge bells hanging from the doorknob whenever she needed to go out. (I didn’t have a doggy door back then) My cats learned to ring those same bells when they wanted outside, just by observing the dog. And cats, being the clever creatures they are, also used those bells to warn *me* that the dog wanted back inside whenever they saw her hunched anxiously in front of the slider!

    Reply
  46. Janice, I did a little research about wheatgrass and its effect on cats and read the same thing–that cats enjoy eating grass so they can barf up hairballs and such. Luckily, Sparky hasn’t done any barfing yet (except for the time she ate half a Brillo pad).
    Sparky makes a big mess when she eats her wheatgrass, which is one reason it now resides next to her food dish in her bedroom. But so far, the novelty hasn’t worn off, so as long as she seems interested in it, I’ll keep her supplied!

    Reply
  47. Janice, I did a little research about wheatgrass and its effect on cats and read the same thing–that cats enjoy eating grass so they can barf up hairballs and such. Luckily, Sparky hasn’t done any barfing yet (except for the time she ate half a Brillo pad).
    Sparky makes a big mess when she eats her wheatgrass, which is one reason it now resides next to her food dish in her bedroom. But so far, the novelty hasn’t worn off, so as long as she seems interested in it, I’ll keep her supplied!

    Reply
  48. Janice, I did a little research about wheatgrass and its effect on cats and read the same thing–that cats enjoy eating grass so they can barf up hairballs and such. Luckily, Sparky hasn’t done any barfing yet (except for the time she ate half a Brillo pad).
    Sparky makes a big mess when she eats her wheatgrass, which is one reason it now resides next to her food dish in her bedroom. But so far, the novelty hasn’t worn off, so as long as she seems interested in it, I’ll keep her supplied!

    Reply
  49. Janice, I did a little research about wheatgrass and its effect on cats and read the same thing–that cats enjoy eating grass so they can barf up hairballs and such. Luckily, Sparky hasn’t done any barfing yet (except for the time she ate half a Brillo pad).
    Sparky makes a big mess when she eats her wheatgrass, which is one reason it now resides next to her food dish in her bedroom. But so far, the novelty hasn’t worn off, so as long as she seems interested in it, I’ll keep her supplied!

    Reply
  50. Janice, I did a little research about wheatgrass and its effect on cats and read the same thing–that cats enjoy eating grass so they can barf up hairballs and such. Luckily, Sparky hasn’t done any barfing yet (except for the time she ate half a Brillo pad).
    Sparky makes a big mess when she eats her wheatgrass, which is one reason it now resides next to her food dish in her bedroom. But so far, the novelty hasn’t worn off, so as long as she seems interested in it, I’ll keep her supplied!

    Reply
  51. My cats like their pot of wheat grass–like you, I buy a container at the store periodically so they have some to munch on. What they *love* though is lemon grass. I buy a plant at the beginning of the season and keep it in a pot on the patio. Once they know it’s there, they’ll be for an (escorted) trip outside to get to the lemon grass. It takes a while after the first frost kills it for them to believe it’s not there any more.
    Mine will also eat sprigs of fresh catnip, for roughage *and* a high. 🙂

    Reply
  52. My cats like their pot of wheat grass–like you, I buy a container at the store periodically so they have some to munch on. What they *love* though is lemon grass. I buy a plant at the beginning of the season and keep it in a pot on the patio. Once they know it’s there, they’ll be for an (escorted) trip outside to get to the lemon grass. It takes a while after the first frost kills it for them to believe it’s not there any more.
    Mine will also eat sprigs of fresh catnip, for roughage *and* a high. 🙂

    Reply
  53. My cats like their pot of wheat grass–like you, I buy a container at the store periodically so they have some to munch on. What they *love* though is lemon grass. I buy a plant at the beginning of the season and keep it in a pot on the patio. Once they know it’s there, they’ll be for an (escorted) trip outside to get to the lemon grass. It takes a while after the first frost kills it for them to believe it’s not there any more.
    Mine will also eat sprigs of fresh catnip, for roughage *and* a high. 🙂

    Reply
  54. My cats like their pot of wheat grass–like you, I buy a container at the store periodically so they have some to munch on. What they *love* though is lemon grass. I buy a plant at the beginning of the season and keep it in a pot on the patio. Once they know it’s there, they’ll be for an (escorted) trip outside to get to the lemon grass. It takes a while after the first frost kills it for them to believe it’s not there any more.
    Mine will also eat sprigs of fresh catnip, for roughage *and* a high. 🙂

    Reply
  55. My cats like their pot of wheat grass–like you, I buy a container at the store periodically so they have some to munch on. What they *love* though is lemon grass. I buy a plant at the beginning of the season and keep it in a pot on the patio. Once they know it’s there, they’ll be for an (escorted) trip outside to get to the lemon grass. It takes a while after the first frost kills it for them to believe it’s not there any more.
    Mine will also eat sprigs of fresh catnip, for roughage *and* a high. 🙂

    Reply
  56. FionaRobyn, you come up with the greatest cat-related new words! Love “fanaticat.” Yes, I must say, Sparky definitely has some strange eating habits, though I wouldn’t call her a health food freak. She has far too bohemian tastes to qualify as a lover of health foods. It’s just an accident that her “drug” of choice happens to be healthy! Hey, if wheatgrass keeps her from eating the lid off my bottle of multivitamins, I’m all for it!

    Reply
  57. FionaRobyn, you come up with the greatest cat-related new words! Love “fanaticat.” Yes, I must say, Sparky definitely has some strange eating habits, though I wouldn’t call her a health food freak. She has far too bohemian tastes to qualify as a lover of health foods. It’s just an accident that her “drug” of choice happens to be healthy! Hey, if wheatgrass keeps her from eating the lid off my bottle of multivitamins, I’m all for it!

    Reply
  58. FionaRobyn, you come up with the greatest cat-related new words! Love “fanaticat.” Yes, I must say, Sparky definitely has some strange eating habits, though I wouldn’t call her a health food freak. She has far too bohemian tastes to qualify as a lover of health foods. It’s just an accident that her “drug” of choice happens to be healthy! Hey, if wheatgrass keeps her from eating the lid off my bottle of multivitamins, I’m all for it!

    Reply
  59. FionaRobyn, you come up with the greatest cat-related new words! Love “fanaticat.” Yes, I must say, Sparky definitely has some strange eating habits, though I wouldn’t call her a health food freak. She has far too bohemian tastes to qualify as a lover of health foods. It’s just an accident that her “drug” of choice happens to be healthy! Hey, if wheatgrass keeps her from eating the lid off my bottle of multivitamins, I’m all for it!

    Reply
  60. FionaRobyn, you come up with the greatest cat-related new words! Love “fanaticat.” Yes, I must say, Sparky definitely has some strange eating habits, though I wouldn’t call her a health food freak. She has far too bohemian tastes to qualify as a lover of health foods. It’s just an accident that her “drug” of choice happens to be healthy! Hey, if wheatgrass keeps her from eating the lid off my bottle of multivitamins, I’m all for it!

    Reply
  61. Nancy, I’m becoming more and more surprised by how many people have cats who like wheatgrass. I’ve never tried lemon grass for Sparky, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I’ll definitely buy some the next time I’m at the grocery store! I love the smell of lemon grass, and if Sparky doesn’t like it, I can always sprinkle it on my scrambled eggs! *g*

    Reply
  62. Nancy, I’m becoming more and more surprised by how many people have cats who like wheatgrass. I’ve never tried lemon grass for Sparky, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I’ll definitely buy some the next time I’m at the grocery store! I love the smell of lemon grass, and if Sparky doesn’t like it, I can always sprinkle it on my scrambled eggs! *g*

    Reply
  63. Nancy, I’m becoming more and more surprised by how many people have cats who like wheatgrass. I’ve never tried lemon grass for Sparky, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I’ll definitely buy some the next time I’m at the grocery store! I love the smell of lemon grass, and if Sparky doesn’t like it, I can always sprinkle it on my scrambled eggs! *g*

    Reply
  64. Nancy, I’m becoming more and more surprised by how many people have cats who like wheatgrass. I’ve never tried lemon grass for Sparky, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I’ll definitely buy some the next time I’m at the grocery store! I love the smell of lemon grass, and if Sparky doesn’t like it, I can always sprinkle it on my scrambled eggs! *g*

    Reply
  65. Nancy, I’m becoming more and more surprised by how many people have cats who like wheatgrass. I’ve never tried lemon grass for Sparky, but now that you’ve mentioned it, I’ll definitely buy some the next time I’m at the grocery store! I love the smell of lemon grass, and if Sparky doesn’t like it, I can always sprinkle it on my scrambled eggs! *g*

    Reply
  66. Okay, this is probably silly of me to agree, Karin, but I do confess that Sparky definitely scores high on the cuteness meter! To even things out, though, she also scores high on the exasperation meter!

    Reply
  67. Okay, this is probably silly of me to agree, Karin, but I do confess that Sparky definitely scores high on the cuteness meter! To even things out, though, she also scores high on the exasperation meter!

    Reply
  68. Okay, this is probably silly of me to agree, Karin, but I do confess that Sparky definitely scores high on the cuteness meter! To even things out, though, she also scores high on the exasperation meter!

    Reply
  69. Okay, this is probably silly of me to agree, Karin, but I do confess that Sparky definitely scores high on the cuteness meter! To even things out, though, she also scores high on the exasperation meter!

    Reply
  70. Okay, this is probably silly of me to agree, Karin, but I do confess that Sparky definitely scores high on the cuteness meter! To even things out, though, she also scores high on the exasperation meter!

    Reply
  71. Cats aren’t the only ones who like grass. My brother’s dog certainly likes it. I certainly couldn’t tell one kind of grass from another, but in certain spots on our yard in countryside there seems to be grass that she REALLY likes. She would scratch that particular spot, put her nose in the grass and go round and round -I’m surprised she doesn’t faint. Then she would go down and rub her back in that spot. And in one place where that grass also apparently grows, there’s a small hill and after rubbing her back she would slide down the hill on her back -and then start it all over again. It’s weird.

    Reply
  72. Cats aren’t the only ones who like grass. My brother’s dog certainly likes it. I certainly couldn’t tell one kind of grass from another, but in certain spots on our yard in countryside there seems to be grass that she REALLY likes. She would scratch that particular spot, put her nose in the grass and go round and round -I’m surprised she doesn’t faint. Then she would go down and rub her back in that spot. And in one place where that grass also apparently grows, there’s a small hill and after rubbing her back she would slide down the hill on her back -and then start it all over again. It’s weird.

    Reply
  73. Cats aren’t the only ones who like grass. My brother’s dog certainly likes it. I certainly couldn’t tell one kind of grass from another, but in certain spots on our yard in countryside there seems to be grass that she REALLY likes. She would scratch that particular spot, put her nose in the grass and go round and round -I’m surprised she doesn’t faint. Then she would go down and rub her back in that spot. And in one place where that grass also apparently grows, there’s a small hill and after rubbing her back she would slide down the hill on her back -and then start it all over again. It’s weird.

    Reply
  74. Cats aren’t the only ones who like grass. My brother’s dog certainly likes it. I certainly couldn’t tell one kind of grass from another, but in certain spots on our yard in countryside there seems to be grass that she REALLY likes. She would scratch that particular spot, put her nose in the grass and go round and round -I’m surprised she doesn’t faint. Then she would go down and rub her back in that spot. And in one place where that grass also apparently grows, there’s a small hill and after rubbing her back she would slide down the hill on her back -and then start it all over again. It’s weird.

    Reply
  75. Cats aren’t the only ones who like grass. My brother’s dog certainly likes it. I certainly couldn’t tell one kind of grass from another, but in certain spots on our yard in countryside there seems to be grass that she REALLY likes. She would scratch that particular spot, put her nose in the grass and go round and round -I’m surprised she doesn’t faint. Then she would go down and rub her back in that spot. And in one place where that grass also apparently grows, there’s a small hill and after rubbing her back she would slide down the hill on her back -and then start it all over again. It’s weird.

    Reply
  76. Sparky is absolutely adorable! Our cats don’t eat real plants. Just fake ones…We tried. We bought the good stuff. Didn’t matter. Turned their noses up at it, but you stick a silk plant in the house and there’s nothing left of it within a day. I can’t have them in the house anymore.

    Reply
  77. Sparky is absolutely adorable! Our cats don’t eat real plants. Just fake ones…We tried. We bought the good stuff. Didn’t matter. Turned their noses up at it, but you stick a silk plant in the house and there’s nothing left of it within a day. I can’t have them in the house anymore.

    Reply
  78. Sparky is absolutely adorable! Our cats don’t eat real plants. Just fake ones…We tried. We bought the good stuff. Didn’t matter. Turned their noses up at it, but you stick a silk plant in the house and there’s nothing left of it within a day. I can’t have them in the house anymore.

    Reply
  79. Sparky is absolutely adorable! Our cats don’t eat real plants. Just fake ones…We tried. We bought the good stuff. Didn’t matter. Turned their noses up at it, but you stick a silk plant in the house and there’s nothing left of it within a day. I can’t have them in the house anymore.

    Reply
  80. Sparky is absolutely adorable! Our cats don’t eat real plants. Just fake ones…We tried. We bought the good stuff. Didn’t matter. Turned their noses up at it, but you stick a silk plant in the house and there’s nothing left of it within a day. I can’t have them in the house anymore.

    Reply
  81. Minna, I’m laughing over the description of your brother’s dog! It sounds like she is definitely a discerning grass hound. As far as her sliding down the hill on her back, I can attest to the “play” gene in dogs. My own dogs have always loved rolling onto their backs and scratching and wiggling with delight. Who’d think that dogs could wrestle with each other while lyuing on their backs, but my two will lie side-by-side on their backs, then turn their heads toward each other, and begin what I call “face fighting.” They make ferocious growling sounds, pummel the air with their feet, and just have a ripping good time.
    Meanwhile, Sparky sits on the sidelines, wanting to join the play, but a little suspicious of all the noise the dogs make. LOL! The Wench godkitten ain’t no dummy. She figures she’ll just be the referree!

    Reply
  82. Minna, I’m laughing over the description of your brother’s dog! It sounds like she is definitely a discerning grass hound. As far as her sliding down the hill on her back, I can attest to the “play” gene in dogs. My own dogs have always loved rolling onto their backs and scratching and wiggling with delight. Who’d think that dogs could wrestle with each other while lyuing on their backs, but my two will lie side-by-side on their backs, then turn their heads toward each other, and begin what I call “face fighting.” They make ferocious growling sounds, pummel the air with their feet, and just have a ripping good time.
    Meanwhile, Sparky sits on the sidelines, wanting to join the play, but a little suspicious of all the noise the dogs make. LOL! The Wench godkitten ain’t no dummy. She figures she’ll just be the referree!

    Reply
  83. Minna, I’m laughing over the description of your brother’s dog! It sounds like she is definitely a discerning grass hound. As far as her sliding down the hill on her back, I can attest to the “play” gene in dogs. My own dogs have always loved rolling onto their backs and scratching and wiggling with delight. Who’d think that dogs could wrestle with each other while lyuing on their backs, but my two will lie side-by-side on their backs, then turn their heads toward each other, and begin what I call “face fighting.” They make ferocious growling sounds, pummel the air with their feet, and just have a ripping good time.
    Meanwhile, Sparky sits on the sidelines, wanting to join the play, but a little suspicious of all the noise the dogs make. LOL! The Wench godkitten ain’t no dummy. She figures she’ll just be the referree!

    Reply
  84. Minna, I’m laughing over the description of your brother’s dog! It sounds like she is definitely a discerning grass hound. As far as her sliding down the hill on her back, I can attest to the “play” gene in dogs. My own dogs have always loved rolling onto their backs and scratching and wiggling with delight. Who’d think that dogs could wrestle with each other while lyuing on their backs, but my two will lie side-by-side on their backs, then turn their heads toward each other, and begin what I call “face fighting.” They make ferocious growling sounds, pummel the air with their feet, and just have a ripping good time.
    Meanwhile, Sparky sits on the sidelines, wanting to join the play, but a little suspicious of all the noise the dogs make. LOL! The Wench godkitten ain’t no dummy. She figures she’ll just be the referree!

    Reply
  85. Minna, I’m laughing over the description of your brother’s dog! It sounds like she is definitely a discerning grass hound. As far as her sliding down the hill on her back, I can attest to the “play” gene in dogs. My own dogs have always loved rolling onto their backs and scratching and wiggling with delight. Who’d think that dogs could wrestle with each other while lyuing on their backs, but my two will lie side-by-side on their backs, then turn their heads toward each other, and begin what I call “face fighting.” They make ferocious growling sounds, pummel the air with their feet, and just have a ripping good time.
    Meanwhile, Sparky sits on the sidelines, wanting to join the play, but a little suspicious of all the noise the dogs make. LOL! The Wench godkitten ain’t no dummy. She figures she’ll just be the referree!

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Theo. I will pass on your “adorable” comment to Sparky, though I fear she will soon get a swelled head from all her fans calling her adorable. *g*
    How funny that your cats turn up their noses at real plants but like to munch on silk ones. Now that I think about it, I have caught Sparky batting at my few silk plants. These are plants placed high up, in awkward locations for watering, such as the tops of bookshelves or cupboards. Still, Sparky has made the attempt more than once, though she doesn’t eat them. She just likes to bat them around.
    I’ve found that since getting her own patch of wheatgrass, Sparky is content to leave the real plants alone, which is a side bonus. My poor pothos, which is so beautiful and has grown to a large size, always had the lower leaves punctured with teeth marks. Now, Sparky leaves the pothos alone, thank goodness!

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Theo. I will pass on your “adorable” comment to Sparky, though I fear she will soon get a swelled head from all her fans calling her adorable. *g*
    How funny that your cats turn up their noses at real plants but like to munch on silk ones. Now that I think about it, I have caught Sparky batting at my few silk plants. These are plants placed high up, in awkward locations for watering, such as the tops of bookshelves or cupboards. Still, Sparky has made the attempt more than once, though she doesn’t eat them. She just likes to bat them around.
    I’ve found that since getting her own patch of wheatgrass, Sparky is content to leave the real plants alone, which is a side bonus. My poor pothos, which is so beautiful and has grown to a large size, always had the lower leaves punctured with teeth marks. Now, Sparky leaves the pothos alone, thank goodness!

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Theo. I will pass on your “adorable” comment to Sparky, though I fear she will soon get a swelled head from all her fans calling her adorable. *g*
    How funny that your cats turn up their noses at real plants but like to munch on silk ones. Now that I think about it, I have caught Sparky batting at my few silk plants. These are plants placed high up, in awkward locations for watering, such as the tops of bookshelves or cupboards. Still, Sparky has made the attempt more than once, though she doesn’t eat them. She just likes to bat them around.
    I’ve found that since getting her own patch of wheatgrass, Sparky is content to leave the real plants alone, which is a side bonus. My poor pothos, which is so beautiful and has grown to a large size, always had the lower leaves punctured with teeth marks. Now, Sparky leaves the pothos alone, thank goodness!

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Theo. I will pass on your “adorable” comment to Sparky, though I fear she will soon get a swelled head from all her fans calling her adorable. *g*
    How funny that your cats turn up their noses at real plants but like to munch on silk ones. Now that I think about it, I have caught Sparky batting at my few silk plants. These are plants placed high up, in awkward locations for watering, such as the tops of bookshelves or cupboards. Still, Sparky has made the attempt more than once, though she doesn’t eat them. She just likes to bat them around.
    I’ve found that since getting her own patch of wheatgrass, Sparky is content to leave the real plants alone, which is a side bonus. My poor pothos, which is so beautiful and has grown to a large size, always had the lower leaves punctured with teeth marks. Now, Sparky leaves the pothos alone, thank goodness!

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Theo. I will pass on your “adorable” comment to Sparky, though I fear she will soon get a swelled head from all her fans calling her adorable. *g*
    How funny that your cats turn up their noses at real plants but like to munch on silk ones. Now that I think about it, I have caught Sparky batting at my few silk plants. These are plants placed high up, in awkward locations for watering, such as the tops of bookshelves or cupboards. Still, Sparky has made the attempt more than once, though she doesn’t eat them. She just likes to bat them around.
    I’ve found that since getting her own patch of wheatgrass, Sparky is content to leave the real plants alone, which is a side bonus. My poor pothos, which is so beautiful and has grown to a large size, always had the lower leaves punctured with teeth marks. Now, Sparky leaves the pothos alone, thank goodness!

    Reply

Leave a Comment