The Season for Loving?

Tn_elayton21_2

Hi, Edith herownself here!

Speaking of covers, (she said, cleverly referring to her last blog on covers featuring heroic male blondies) as well as talking about books) what do you think is the best season for loving?
How can you tell if the book you’re reading is set in that season?
Most are non-specific.

I just got a look at my new cover for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE, coming out from Avon in December. There’s lots of snow on the cover, as well as some between the pages. (Sorry, no picture of it, I have no access to a scanner today.) But I think my hero and heroine had better put on some more garments. Babies, it looks cold out there.

Snow on a cover is apt for a December book, at least here in the Northeast.

Imagessnojpg

But I’ve come to think on, I’ve never before seen snow featured in a non-Christmas book. Thinking about it led me to some odd conclusions:

1) Snow is most always part of Christmas Historical Romances. This includes prime plot points such as snowstorms stranding heroes and heroines at house parties and inns. Orphans and lost children are frequently found freezing in the streets of London town too. Heroes enter a house stomping the snow from their high glossy boots. Covers feature coach and horses struggling through the snow. Or lovers gazing out of a frosty window.
The interesting thing is that when it does snow in a book, it’s always part of the plot.

2) Yet when it’s spring, summer or autumn in a book, that often has nothing to do with the cover or the plot.

And – 3) There’s never rain on the cover, at least that I can remember.
(And you may remember from a previous blog that I purely love to write about rain.)

Images

Yet most Regency set Historical Romances-and Medieval and Victorian and Georgian ones for that matter-take place in England. England, where they are certainly not strangers to precipitation. True, rain isn’t easy to paint on a cover. And maybe all that sloshing about discourages readers. But still. No rain in GB?

Hmmm.

Aside from Christmas themed books, I can recall only one snowy book apart from my own “LORD OF DISHONOR”: a Regency from Joy Freeman called “THE FROST FAIR.”
The dynamic duo of Tom and Sharon Curtis, writing as Laura London, had a sweltering hot day in London in one of their books. “THE BAD BARON’S DAUGHTER.”
Mary Balogh had a “LADY WITH AN UMBRELLA.”
I do believe I have included rain, heat and blizzards in my time. But then, I am a huge fan of weather. In fact, I had a collection of five linked novellas: “A LOVE FOR All SEASONS,” from Signet, and believe me, I had me some Weather in them!

But is that all there is?
I know I’ve forgotten some good ones.

Springtime is wedding ring time. Brides and flowers, we got plenty of. Summer is for al fresco lovers in the meadow; that’s a classic Romance cover theme. And autumn leaves make making out by a fireplace something wonderful to see. Daytime and nighttime are illustrated. But rarely, the time or year.

So Gentle Readers, I ask you: what books and/or covers have you encountered that feature weather? And what season do you prefer your love stories set in, if any?

Give me some storms! Or heat waves. Wind and floods or cyclones or waterspouts – anything that makes weather more than a mere background in a Historical Romance. Cover or story.

And no fair mentioning “Winnie the Pooh and the Bustery Day” or “Gone With the Wind.”

One randomly selected reader will receive her/his choice from my backlist. (Name two in case I’ve only one.)

So, go ahead. Make my day’s weather.

Seasons

150 thoughts on “The Season for Loving?”

  1. I love spring because it’s so full of growth and promise. I’m not sure about England, but in NC where my Mom grew up, if one married before June it was because there a (growing) reason for hurrying up! It’s probably got something to do with the fact that roses are associated with weddings and they normally don’t bloom until June. Summer gives the opportunity for al fresco lovemaking, as you said, but in Texas it’s so hot in the summer being close has aesthetic problems. Fall is lovely. In Texas we have fall on the 3rd Sunday in October from 2-4 PM. Very rarely do we get snow in this area. 1-2 ice storms per winter is about average. But love is wonderful in any season and brightens the gloomiest day.

    Reply
  2. I love spring because it’s so full of growth and promise. I’m not sure about England, but in NC where my Mom grew up, if one married before June it was because there a (growing) reason for hurrying up! It’s probably got something to do with the fact that roses are associated with weddings and they normally don’t bloom until June. Summer gives the opportunity for al fresco lovemaking, as you said, but in Texas it’s so hot in the summer being close has aesthetic problems. Fall is lovely. In Texas we have fall on the 3rd Sunday in October from 2-4 PM. Very rarely do we get snow in this area. 1-2 ice storms per winter is about average. But love is wonderful in any season and brightens the gloomiest day.

    Reply
  3. I love spring because it’s so full of growth and promise. I’m not sure about England, but in NC where my Mom grew up, if one married before June it was because there a (growing) reason for hurrying up! It’s probably got something to do with the fact that roses are associated with weddings and they normally don’t bloom until June. Summer gives the opportunity for al fresco lovemaking, as you said, but in Texas it’s so hot in the summer being close has aesthetic problems. Fall is lovely. In Texas we have fall on the 3rd Sunday in October from 2-4 PM. Very rarely do we get snow in this area. 1-2 ice storms per winter is about average. But love is wonderful in any season and brightens the gloomiest day.

    Reply
  4. I love spring because it’s so full of growth and promise. I’m not sure about England, but in NC where my Mom grew up, if one married before June it was because there a (growing) reason for hurrying up! It’s probably got something to do with the fact that roses are associated with weddings and they normally don’t bloom until June. Summer gives the opportunity for al fresco lovemaking, as you said, but in Texas it’s so hot in the summer being close has aesthetic problems. Fall is lovely. In Texas we have fall on the 3rd Sunday in October from 2-4 PM. Very rarely do we get snow in this area. 1-2 ice storms per winter is about average. But love is wonderful in any season and brightens the gloomiest day.

    Reply
  5. I love spring because it’s so full of growth and promise. I’m not sure about England, but in NC where my Mom grew up, if one married before June it was because there a (growing) reason for hurrying up! It’s probably got something to do with the fact that roses are associated with weddings and they normally don’t bloom until June. Summer gives the opportunity for al fresco lovemaking, as you said, but in Texas it’s so hot in the summer being close has aesthetic problems. Fall is lovely. In Texas we have fall on the 3rd Sunday in October from 2-4 PM. Very rarely do we get snow in this area. 1-2 ice storms per winter is about average. But love is wonderful in any season and brightens the gloomiest day.

    Reply
  6. Oooh, Edith, weather fun! You are so right about all those marvelous Signet Regency Christmas collections. Lots of scenic snow, not a lot of mud and mush, which would be more accurate.
    While I cannot hope to touch the Weather Queen :), I’m always aware of the season when I write a story. In fact, I pick the seasons very carefully. Often I set my stories in spring moving into summer because the symbolism fits falling in love, renewal, new hopes. Plus, the actions of the characters often need to fit into the London social seasons.
    Having been raised on a farm in upstate New York, where weather could be a VERY serious concern, I’m always aware of the weather in the way some more suburban writers aren’t–and I get irritated with writers who are oblivious of things like sunset times or blooming seasons.
    Regency England (indeed, most of history in most of the world) is an agricultural society, and weather was in-your-face and vital. A bad season meant reductions in food supplies, maybe hungry people rioting in the streets. Rain and muddy roads in the winter meant not being able to get into town for weeks or even months. Sunset meant working by candle or lamp light. As we’re being reminded these days, nature usually has the upper hand.
    Keep that sleet coming, Edith. It makes the stories more fun. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. Oooh, Edith, weather fun! You are so right about all those marvelous Signet Regency Christmas collections. Lots of scenic snow, not a lot of mud and mush, which would be more accurate.
    While I cannot hope to touch the Weather Queen :), I’m always aware of the season when I write a story. In fact, I pick the seasons very carefully. Often I set my stories in spring moving into summer because the symbolism fits falling in love, renewal, new hopes. Plus, the actions of the characters often need to fit into the London social seasons.
    Having been raised on a farm in upstate New York, where weather could be a VERY serious concern, I’m always aware of the weather in the way some more suburban writers aren’t–and I get irritated with writers who are oblivious of things like sunset times or blooming seasons.
    Regency England (indeed, most of history in most of the world) is an agricultural society, and weather was in-your-face and vital. A bad season meant reductions in food supplies, maybe hungry people rioting in the streets. Rain and muddy roads in the winter meant not being able to get into town for weeks or even months. Sunset meant working by candle or lamp light. As we’re being reminded these days, nature usually has the upper hand.
    Keep that sleet coming, Edith. It makes the stories more fun. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. Oooh, Edith, weather fun! You are so right about all those marvelous Signet Regency Christmas collections. Lots of scenic snow, not a lot of mud and mush, which would be more accurate.
    While I cannot hope to touch the Weather Queen :), I’m always aware of the season when I write a story. In fact, I pick the seasons very carefully. Often I set my stories in spring moving into summer because the symbolism fits falling in love, renewal, new hopes. Plus, the actions of the characters often need to fit into the London social seasons.
    Having been raised on a farm in upstate New York, where weather could be a VERY serious concern, I’m always aware of the weather in the way some more suburban writers aren’t–and I get irritated with writers who are oblivious of things like sunset times or blooming seasons.
    Regency England (indeed, most of history in most of the world) is an agricultural society, and weather was in-your-face and vital. A bad season meant reductions in food supplies, maybe hungry people rioting in the streets. Rain and muddy roads in the winter meant not being able to get into town for weeks or even months. Sunset meant working by candle or lamp light. As we’re being reminded these days, nature usually has the upper hand.
    Keep that sleet coming, Edith. It makes the stories more fun. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. Oooh, Edith, weather fun! You are so right about all those marvelous Signet Regency Christmas collections. Lots of scenic snow, not a lot of mud and mush, which would be more accurate.
    While I cannot hope to touch the Weather Queen :), I’m always aware of the season when I write a story. In fact, I pick the seasons very carefully. Often I set my stories in spring moving into summer because the symbolism fits falling in love, renewal, new hopes. Plus, the actions of the characters often need to fit into the London social seasons.
    Having been raised on a farm in upstate New York, where weather could be a VERY serious concern, I’m always aware of the weather in the way some more suburban writers aren’t–and I get irritated with writers who are oblivious of things like sunset times or blooming seasons.
    Regency England (indeed, most of history in most of the world) is an agricultural society, and weather was in-your-face and vital. A bad season meant reductions in food supplies, maybe hungry people rioting in the streets. Rain and muddy roads in the winter meant not being able to get into town for weeks or even months. Sunset meant working by candle or lamp light. As we’re being reminded these days, nature usually has the upper hand.
    Keep that sleet coming, Edith. It makes the stories more fun. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. Oooh, Edith, weather fun! You are so right about all those marvelous Signet Regency Christmas collections. Lots of scenic snow, not a lot of mud and mush, which would be more accurate.
    While I cannot hope to touch the Weather Queen :), I’m always aware of the season when I write a story. In fact, I pick the seasons very carefully. Often I set my stories in spring moving into summer because the symbolism fits falling in love, renewal, new hopes. Plus, the actions of the characters often need to fit into the London social seasons.
    Having been raised on a farm in upstate New York, where weather could be a VERY serious concern, I’m always aware of the weather in the way some more suburban writers aren’t–and I get irritated with writers who are oblivious of things like sunset times or blooming seasons.
    Regency England (indeed, most of history in most of the world) is an agricultural society, and weather was in-your-face and vital. A bad season meant reductions in food supplies, maybe hungry people rioting in the streets. Rain and muddy roads in the winter meant not being able to get into town for weeks or even months. Sunset meant working by candle or lamp light. As we’re being reminded these days, nature usually has the upper hand.
    Keep that sleet coming, Edith. It makes the stories more fun. 🙂
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. I’m a gardener with an agriculture background, so I’m extremely aware of seasons and the effects of rain and drought. But I’m also thin-skinned and suffer from SAD, so I have a need to be in warm sun, so just thinking about snow and rain gives me goose bumps. “G” I probably have a prevalence of summers and droughts because of those unconscious needs, which is probably why my historicals include a tropical island. And why I’m probably more comfortable with American settings. I’ve done my share of floods and storms, mind you, but like MJ, I don’t match the Weather Queen!

    Reply
  12. I’m a gardener with an agriculture background, so I’m extremely aware of seasons and the effects of rain and drought. But I’m also thin-skinned and suffer from SAD, so I have a need to be in warm sun, so just thinking about snow and rain gives me goose bumps. “G” I probably have a prevalence of summers and droughts because of those unconscious needs, which is probably why my historicals include a tropical island. And why I’m probably more comfortable with American settings. I’ve done my share of floods and storms, mind you, but like MJ, I don’t match the Weather Queen!

    Reply
  13. I’m a gardener with an agriculture background, so I’m extremely aware of seasons and the effects of rain and drought. But I’m also thin-skinned and suffer from SAD, so I have a need to be in warm sun, so just thinking about snow and rain gives me goose bumps. “G” I probably have a prevalence of summers and droughts because of those unconscious needs, which is probably why my historicals include a tropical island. And why I’m probably more comfortable with American settings. I’ve done my share of floods and storms, mind you, but like MJ, I don’t match the Weather Queen!

    Reply
  14. I’m a gardener with an agriculture background, so I’m extremely aware of seasons and the effects of rain and drought. But I’m also thin-skinned and suffer from SAD, so I have a need to be in warm sun, so just thinking about snow and rain gives me goose bumps. “G” I probably have a prevalence of summers and droughts because of those unconscious needs, which is probably why my historicals include a tropical island. And why I’m probably more comfortable with American settings. I’ve done my share of floods and storms, mind you, but like MJ, I don’t match the Weather Queen!

    Reply
  15. I’m a gardener with an agriculture background, so I’m extremely aware of seasons and the effects of rain and drought. But I’m also thin-skinned and suffer from SAD, so I have a need to be in warm sun, so just thinking about snow and rain gives me goose bumps. “G” I probably have a prevalence of summers and droughts because of those unconscious needs, which is probably why my historicals include a tropical island. And why I’m probably more comfortable with American settings. I’ve done my share of floods and storms, mind you, but like MJ, I don’t match the Weather Queen!

    Reply
  16. I’m sure I’ve read more than one Regency where the hero and heroine get caught in the rain and have to take shelter in a conveniently abandoned gamekeeper’s cottage. And I remember a scene somewhere with a rakish hero who has finagled the reluctant heroine into Sydney Gardens and rain begins. There always seems to be a summerhouse or gazebo conveniently at hand. Well, a writer must arrange some privacy for these hopeful souls, right? And of course there’s Jane, in Pride and Prejudice, who gets caught in the rain and catches cold, necessitating a nice period of R&R in Bingley’s house.
    I don’t really have a preference for any particular season as a setting; I just like to have it evoked clearly but without too much fuss.

    Reply
  17. I’m sure I’ve read more than one Regency where the hero and heroine get caught in the rain and have to take shelter in a conveniently abandoned gamekeeper’s cottage. And I remember a scene somewhere with a rakish hero who has finagled the reluctant heroine into Sydney Gardens and rain begins. There always seems to be a summerhouse or gazebo conveniently at hand. Well, a writer must arrange some privacy for these hopeful souls, right? And of course there’s Jane, in Pride and Prejudice, who gets caught in the rain and catches cold, necessitating a nice period of R&R in Bingley’s house.
    I don’t really have a preference for any particular season as a setting; I just like to have it evoked clearly but without too much fuss.

    Reply
  18. I’m sure I’ve read more than one Regency where the hero and heroine get caught in the rain and have to take shelter in a conveniently abandoned gamekeeper’s cottage. And I remember a scene somewhere with a rakish hero who has finagled the reluctant heroine into Sydney Gardens and rain begins. There always seems to be a summerhouse or gazebo conveniently at hand. Well, a writer must arrange some privacy for these hopeful souls, right? And of course there’s Jane, in Pride and Prejudice, who gets caught in the rain and catches cold, necessitating a nice period of R&R in Bingley’s house.
    I don’t really have a preference for any particular season as a setting; I just like to have it evoked clearly but without too much fuss.

    Reply
  19. I’m sure I’ve read more than one Regency where the hero and heroine get caught in the rain and have to take shelter in a conveniently abandoned gamekeeper’s cottage. And I remember a scene somewhere with a rakish hero who has finagled the reluctant heroine into Sydney Gardens and rain begins. There always seems to be a summerhouse or gazebo conveniently at hand. Well, a writer must arrange some privacy for these hopeful souls, right? And of course there’s Jane, in Pride and Prejudice, who gets caught in the rain and catches cold, necessitating a nice period of R&R in Bingley’s house.
    I don’t really have a preference for any particular season as a setting; I just like to have it evoked clearly but without too much fuss.

    Reply
  20. I’m sure I’ve read more than one Regency where the hero and heroine get caught in the rain and have to take shelter in a conveniently abandoned gamekeeper’s cottage. And I remember a scene somewhere with a rakish hero who has finagled the reluctant heroine into Sydney Gardens and rain begins. There always seems to be a summerhouse or gazebo conveniently at hand. Well, a writer must arrange some privacy for these hopeful souls, right? And of course there’s Jane, in Pride and Prejudice, who gets caught in the rain and catches cold, necessitating a nice period of R&R in Bingley’s house.
    I don’t really have a preference for any particular season as a setting; I just like to have it evoked clearly but without too much fuss.

    Reply
  21. I seem to have a *thing* for fall into winter books (both my published books start in late summer or fall and run through the winter). *shrug* I don’t know what to make of that. I based the setting on my desire to have my characters attend specific events (like horse races or fall hunts). I’ve just realized that rain plays a part in my both my books, LOL! Lots of storms and riding about in wet wool, outrunning storms or taking shelter . . . my WIP is a summer into fall book, so I’ll have to explore summer showers this time around. *grin* And maybe—gasp!—actual heat. I’ll have to do some digging and see what the temps were like the year I’ve set my book (geek that I am). Maybe I can find records for some crazy weather? I love that kind of stuff.

    Reply
  22. I seem to have a *thing* for fall into winter books (both my published books start in late summer or fall and run through the winter). *shrug* I don’t know what to make of that. I based the setting on my desire to have my characters attend specific events (like horse races or fall hunts). I’ve just realized that rain plays a part in my both my books, LOL! Lots of storms and riding about in wet wool, outrunning storms or taking shelter . . . my WIP is a summer into fall book, so I’ll have to explore summer showers this time around. *grin* And maybe—gasp!—actual heat. I’ll have to do some digging and see what the temps were like the year I’ve set my book (geek that I am). Maybe I can find records for some crazy weather? I love that kind of stuff.

    Reply
  23. I seem to have a *thing* for fall into winter books (both my published books start in late summer or fall and run through the winter). *shrug* I don’t know what to make of that. I based the setting on my desire to have my characters attend specific events (like horse races or fall hunts). I’ve just realized that rain plays a part in my both my books, LOL! Lots of storms and riding about in wet wool, outrunning storms or taking shelter . . . my WIP is a summer into fall book, so I’ll have to explore summer showers this time around. *grin* And maybe—gasp!—actual heat. I’ll have to do some digging and see what the temps were like the year I’ve set my book (geek that I am). Maybe I can find records for some crazy weather? I love that kind of stuff.

    Reply
  24. I seem to have a *thing* for fall into winter books (both my published books start in late summer or fall and run through the winter). *shrug* I don’t know what to make of that. I based the setting on my desire to have my characters attend specific events (like horse races or fall hunts). I’ve just realized that rain plays a part in my both my books, LOL! Lots of storms and riding about in wet wool, outrunning storms or taking shelter . . . my WIP is a summer into fall book, so I’ll have to explore summer showers this time around. *grin* And maybe—gasp!—actual heat. I’ll have to do some digging and see what the temps were like the year I’ve set my book (geek that I am). Maybe I can find records for some crazy weather? I love that kind of stuff.

    Reply
  25. I seem to have a *thing* for fall into winter books (both my published books start in late summer or fall and run through the winter). *shrug* I don’t know what to make of that. I based the setting on my desire to have my characters attend specific events (like horse races or fall hunts). I’ve just realized that rain plays a part in my both my books, LOL! Lots of storms and riding about in wet wool, outrunning storms or taking shelter . . . my WIP is a summer into fall book, so I’ll have to explore summer showers this time around. *grin* And maybe—gasp!—actual heat. I’ll have to do some digging and see what the temps were like the year I’ve set my book (geek that I am). Maybe I can find records for some crazy weather? I love that kind of stuff.

    Reply
  26. I love covers with snow on it too. Seasonal/Weather-friendly covers that come to mind include Lisa Kleypas’s four seasons series, Mary Balogh’s Snow Angel or A Promise of Spring, and an old Heather Graham Pozzesere Silhouette Intimate Moment novel about a hurricane in Florida – Blame it on Andrew.
    Re: weather in miniseries
    There’s this great BBC miniseries – North and South (based on the Elizabeth Gaskell novel). It has the most evocative scenes of the hero and herione in a factory with all this falling cotton and scenes of them outside with falling snow. I’ve always thought this juxtaposition had to have some kind of symbolic meaning, but I have no idea what. Thougths?

    Reply
  27. I love covers with snow on it too. Seasonal/Weather-friendly covers that come to mind include Lisa Kleypas’s four seasons series, Mary Balogh’s Snow Angel or A Promise of Spring, and an old Heather Graham Pozzesere Silhouette Intimate Moment novel about a hurricane in Florida – Blame it on Andrew.
    Re: weather in miniseries
    There’s this great BBC miniseries – North and South (based on the Elizabeth Gaskell novel). It has the most evocative scenes of the hero and herione in a factory with all this falling cotton and scenes of them outside with falling snow. I’ve always thought this juxtaposition had to have some kind of symbolic meaning, but I have no idea what. Thougths?

    Reply
  28. I love covers with snow on it too. Seasonal/Weather-friendly covers that come to mind include Lisa Kleypas’s four seasons series, Mary Balogh’s Snow Angel or A Promise of Spring, and an old Heather Graham Pozzesere Silhouette Intimate Moment novel about a hurricane in Florida – Blame it on Andrew.
    Re: weather in miniseries
    There’s this great BBC miniseries – North and South (based on the Elizabeth Gaskell novel). It has the most evocative scenes of the hero and herione in a factory with all this falling cotton and scenes of them outside with falling snow. I’ve always thought this juxtaposition had to have some kind of symbolic meaning, but I have no idea what. Thougths?

    Reply
  29. I love covers with snow on it too. Seasonal/Weather-friendly covers that come to mind include Lisa Kleypas’s four seasons series, Mary Balogh’s Snow Angel or A Promise of Spring, and an old Heather Graham Pozzesere Silhouette Intimate Moment novel about a hurricane in Florida – Blame it on Andrew.
    Re: weather in miniseries
    There’s this great BBC miniseries – North and South (based on the Elizabeth Gaskell novel). It has the most evocative scenes of the hero and herione in a factory with all this falling cotton and scenes of them outside with falling snow. I’ve always thought this juxtaposition had to have some kind of symbolic meaning, but I have no idea what. Thougths?

    Reply
  30. I love covers with snow on it too. Seasonal/Weather-friendly covers that come to mind include Lisa Kleypas’s four seasons series, Mary Balogh’s Snow Angel or A Promise of Spring, and an old Heather Graham Pozzesere Silhouette Intimate Moment novel about a hurricane in Florida – Blame it on Andrew.
    Re: weather in miniseries
    There’s this great BBC miniseries – North and South (based on the Elizabeth Gaskell novel). It has the most evocative scenes of the hero and herione in a factory with all this falling cotton and scenes of them outside with falling snow. I’ve always thought this juxtaposition had to have some kind of symbolic meaning, but I have no idea what. Thougths?

    Reply
  31. You have me thinking of how beautiful fall is (I grew up in New England), and Diane Farr had a lovely signet regency cover that showed a fall setting. I think it might have been called Fall for Me. I think she was on a ladder to pick an apple?

    Reply
  32. You have me thinking of how beautiful fall is (I grew up in New England), and Diane Farr had a lovely signet regency cover that showed a fall setting. I think it might have been called Fall for Me. I think she was on a ladder to pick an apple?

    Reply
  33. You have me thinking of how beautiful fall is (I grew up in New England), and Diane Farr had a lovely signet regency cover that showed a fall setting. I think it might have been called Fall for Me. I think she was on a ladder to pick an apple?

    Reply
  34. You have me thinking of how beautiful fall is (I grew up in New England), and Diane Farr had a lovely signet regency cover that showed a fall setting. I think it might have been called Fall for Me. I think she was on a ladder to pick an apple?

    Reply
  35. You have me thinking of how beautiful fall is (I grew up in New England), and Diane Farr had a lovely signet regency cover that showed a fall setting. I think it might have been called Fall for Me. I think she was on a ladder to pick an apple?

    Reply
  36. I do enjoy when the author incorporates the weather and season in her story. Lisa Kleypas did the Wallflower series with seasonal titles: The Devil in Winter, Scandal in Spring, Secrets of a Summer Night and It Happened One Autumn. Also, I think Deborah Smith’s book A Gentle Rain has a cover with rain on it but I’m not sure.

    Reply
  37. I do enjoy when the author incorporates the weather and season in her story. Lisa Kleypas did the Wallflower series with seasonal titles: The Devil in Winter, Scandal in Spring, Secrets of a Summer Night and It Happened One Autumn. Also, I think Deborah Smith’s book A Gentle Rain has a cover with rain on it but I’m not sure.

    Reply
  38. I do enjoy when the author incorporates the weather and season in her story. Lisa Kleypas did the Wallflower series with seasonal titles: The Devil in Winter, Scandal in Spring, Secrets of a Summer Night and It Happened One Autumn. Also, I think Deborah Smith’s book A Gentle Rain has a cover with rain on it but I’m not sure.

    Reply
  39. I do enjoy when the author incorporates the weather and season in her story. Lisa Kleypas did the Wallflower series with seasonal titles: The Devil in Winter, Scandal in Spring, Secrets of a Summer Night and It Happened One Autumn. Also, I think Deborah Smith’s book A Gentle Rain has a cover with rain on it but I’m not sure.

    Reply
  40. I do enjoy when the author incorporates the weather and season in her story. Lisa Kleypas did the Wallflower series with seasonal titles: The Devil in Winter, Scandal in Spring, Secrets of a Summer Night and It Happened One Autumn. Also, I think Deborah Smith’s book A Gentle Rain has a cover with rain on it but I’m not sure.

    Reply
  41. Mary Balogh’s Simply Unforgettable starts out in a snowstorm. I think it’s Christmastime, but it isn’t a Christmas story – it’s just why the H&H were on the road in a snowstorm. Francis is stranded at a deserted country inn with the hero for a few days. IIRC, the book takes place over several months or even closer to a year, and the weather affects the plot in other ways too. I remember a dreary day in the park in Bath, where much of the story is set.
    That’s the most memorable weather story for me. I know there must be more, but I’d have to take a look at my bookshelves to come up with others that haven’t been mentioned already.

    Reply
  42. Mary Balogh’s Simply Unforgettable starts out in a snowstorm. I think it’s Christmastime, but it isn’t a Christmas story – it’s just why the H&H were on the road in a snowstorm. Francis is stranded at a deserted country inn with the hero for a few days. IIRC, the book takes place over several months or even closer to a year, and the weather affects the plot in other ways too. I remember a dreary day in the park in Bath, where much of the story is set.
    That’s the most memorable weather story for me. I know there must be more, but I’d have to take a look at my bookshelves to come up with others that haven’t been mentioned already.

    Reply
  43. Mary Balogh’s Simply Unforgettable starts out in a snowstorm. I think it’s Christmastime, but it isn’t a Christmas story – it’s just why the H&H were on the road in a snowstorm. Francis is stranded at a deserted country inn with the hero for a few days. IIRC, the book takes place over several months or even closer to a year, and the weather affects the plot in other ways too. I remember a dreary day in the park in Bath, where much of the story is set.
    That’s the most memorable weather story for me. I know there must be more, but I’d have to take a look at my bookshelves to come up with others that haven’t been mentioned already.

    Reply
  44. Mary Balogh’s Simply Unforgettable starts out in a snowstorm. I think it’s Christmastime, but it isn’t a Christmas story – it’s just why the H&H were on the road in a snowstorm. Francis is stranded at a deserted country inn with the hero for a few days. IIRC, the book takes place over several months or even closer to a year, and the weather affects the plot in other ways too. I remember a dreary day in the park in Bath, where much of the story is set.
    That’s the most memorable weather story for me. I know there must be more, but I’d have to take a look at my bookshelves to come up with others that haven’t been mentioned already.

    Reply
  45. Mary Balogh’s Simply Unforgettable starts out in a snowstorm. I think it’s Christmastime, but it isn’t a Christmas story – it’s just why the H&H were on the road in a snowstorm. Francis is stranded at a deserted country inn with the hero for a few days. IIRC, the book takes place over several months or even closer to a year, and the weather affects the plot in other ways too. I remember a dreary day in the park in Bath, where much of the story is set.
    That’s the most memorable weather story for me. I know there must be more, but I’d have to take a look at my bookshelves to come up with others that haven’t been mentioned already.

    Reply
  46. By coincidence, I just found A LOVE FOR ALL SEASONS in a box of books I opened and immediately took it out for a reread. I particularly love the version of “Tam Lin,” except for one thing–you named the heroine “Ellen,” when she’s one of the very few ballad heroines who ISN’T named Ellen; her name is “Janet,” just like MY MIDDLE NAME!!!.
    There’s a good Christmas traditional Regency by Mary Balogh in which the hero, who has married a wealthy Cit’s daughter to save his estate and it’s not working out, invites his friends to spend Christmas at his country place, and she invites all her “vulgar” relatives–who turn out to be jolly people who know how to have fun, as his family never did, with bringing in the Yule log and gathering greenery, sledding parties, carol singing, attending the Christmas play at the village school, and the like.
    I have another really good traditional Regency (title and author escape me), in which the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. She is perched on the saddle ahead of him, wearing an open cape over a fairly low-cut day dress. In the book, they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.
    I do love LADY WITH A BLACK UMBRELLA; but there’s no rain in it–she only uses it to beat the villain about the head and ears while rescuing the hero.
    Weather often plays a role in books in which one of the characters is either passionate about gardening or worried about the crops failing. In one of Carla Kelly’s books, the hero is growing an experimental variety of wheat he’s developed; the crop is wiped out at the last minute. One of the main themes of Katherine Kingsley’s NO GREATER LOVE is the efforts of the heroine, a skilled herbalist, to restore the ruined garden of the hero’s long-abandoned house. And the hero of the sequel, NO SWEETER HEAVEN, is the French boy they rescued and adopted in the first book, who has become a famous botanist. (And of course, he turns out to be a duke, as well. Doesn’t everybody?)
    Just recalled that one of Pamela Morsi’s books, set around 1900 in the American South, involves a hero trying to start a rice industry in, I think, Arkansas.
    In one of Catherine Fellows’s books–I think it’s THE LOVE MATCH–a flood resulting from heavy rains, which cuts off the country house where the characters have gathered for the reading of a will, plays a major part in the plot, as it results in a scenario with someone trying to do in the heroine because of the terms of the will. Her first words to the hero, a distant cousin she’s never met, are “Have you come to marry me or murder me?” His polite reply, “Not being acquainted with you, I haven’t made a decision.”
    And how about all those werewolf books with the hero posing bare-chested in the middle of a snowbank?
    And last, but very far from least, how about “Dulce Domum” in THE WIND AND THE WILLOWS? And there’s plenty of weather in the sequels by William Horwood, too.
    According to Northrop Frye’s seasonal symbology, romance is associated with autumn, but with summer elements as well. Spring is the season of renewal, summer of ripening, autumn of harvest, and winter–or at least Christmas–the season of conversion and redemption, so all can fit nicely into the theme of a romance.
    P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.
    I think this comment is longer than your original column! Sorry!

    Reply
  47. By coincidence, I just found A LOVE FOR ALL SEASONS in a box of books I opened and immediately took it out for a reread. I particularly love the version of “Tam Lin,” except for one thing–you named the heroine “Ellen,” when she’s one of the very few ballad heroines who ISN’T named Ellen; her name is “Janet,” just like MY MIDDLE NAME!!!.
    There’s a good Christmas traditional Regency by Mary Balogh in which the hero, who has married a wealthy Cit’s daughter to save his estate and it’s not working out, invites his friends to spend Christmas at his country place, and she invites all her “vulgar” relatives–who turn out to be jolly people who know how to have fun, as his family never did, with bringing in the Yule log and gathering greenery, sledding parties, carol singing, attending the Christmas play at the village school, and the like.
    I have another really good traditional Regency (title and author escape me), in which the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. She is perched on the saddle ahead of him, wearing an open cape over a fairly low-cut day dress. In the book, they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.
    I do love LADY WITH A BLACK UMBRELLA; but there’s no rain in it–she only uses it to beat the villain about the head and ears while rescuing the hero.
    Weather often plays a role in books in which one of the characters is either passionate about gardening or worried about the crops failing. In one of Carla Kelly’s books, the hero is growing an experimental variety of wheat he’s developed; the crop is wiped out at the last minute. One of the main themes of Katherine Kingsley’s NO GREATER LOVE is the efforts of the heroine, a skilled herbalist, to restore the ruined garden of the hero’s long-abandoned house. And the hero of the sequel, NO SWEETER HEAVEN, is the French boy they rescued and adopted in the first book, who has become a famous botanist. (And of course, he turns out to be a duke, as well. Doesn’t everybody?)
    Just recalled that one of Pamela Morsi’s books, set around 1900 in the American South, involves a hero trying to start a rice industry in, I think, Arkansas.
    In one of Catherine Fellows’s books–I think it’s THE LOVE MATCH–a flood resulting from heavy rains, which cuts off the country house where the characters have gathered for the reading of a will, plays a major part in the plot, as it results in a scenario with someone trying to do in the heroine because of the terms of the will. Her first words to the hero, a distant cousin she’s never met, are “Have you come to marry me or murder me?” His polite reply, “Not being acquainted with you, I haven’t made a decision.”
    And how about all those werewolf books with the hero posing bare-chested in the middle of a snowbank?
    And last, but very far from least, how about “Dulce Domum” in THE WIND AND THE WILLOWS? And there’s plenty of weather in the sequels by William Horwood, too.
    According to Northrop Frye’s seasonal symbology, romance is associated with autumn, but with summer elements as well. Spring is the season of renewal, summer of ripening, autumn of harvest, and winter–or at least Christmas–the season of conversion and redemption, so all can fit nicely into the theme of a romance.
    P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.
    I think this comment is longer than your original column! Sorry!

    Reply
  48. By coincidence, I just found A LOVE FOR ALL SEASONS in a box of books I opened and immediately took it out for a reread. I particularly love the version of “Tam Lin,” except for one thing–you named the heroine “Ellen,” when she’s one of the very few ballad heroines who ISN’T named Ellen; her name is “Janet,” just like MY MIDDLE NAME!!!.
    There’s a good Christmas traditional Regency by Mary Balogh in which the hero, who has married a wealthy Cit’s daughter to save his estate and it’s not working out, invites his friends to spend Christmas at his country place, and she invites all her “vulgar” relatives–who turn out to be jolly people who know how to have fun, as his family never did, with bringing in the Yule log and gathering greenery, sledding parties, carol singing, attending the Christmas play at the village school, and the like.
    I have another really good traditional Regency (title and author escape me), in which the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. She is perched on the saddle ahead of him, wearing an open cape over a fairly low-cut day dress. In the book, they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.
    I do love LADY WITH A BLACK UMBRELLA; but there’s no rain in it–she only uses it to beat the villain about the head and ears while rescuing the hero.
    Weather often plays a role in books in which one of the characters is either passionate about gardening or worried about the crops failing. In one of Carla Kelly’s books, the hero is growing an experimental variety of wheat he’s developed; the crop is wiped out at the last minute. One of the main themes of Katherine Kingsley’s NO GREATER LOVE is the efforts of the heroine, a skilled herbalist, to restore the ruined garden of the hero’s long-abandoned house. And the hero of the sequel, NO SWEETER HEAVEN, is the French boy they rescued and adopted in the first book, who has become a famous botanist. (And of course, he turns out to be a duke, as well. Doesn’t everybody?)
    Just recalled that one of Pamela Morsi’s books, set around 1900 in the American South, involves a hero trying to start a rice industry in, I think, Arkansas.
    In one of Catherine Fellows’s books–I think it’s THE LOVE MATCH–a flood resulting from heavy rains, which cuts off the country house where the characters have gathered for the reading of a will, plays a major part in the plot, as it results in a scenario with someone trying to do in the heroine because of the terms of the will. Her first words to the hero, a distant cousin she’s never met, are “Have you come to marry me or murder me?” His polite reply, “Not being acquainted with you, I haven’t made a decision.”
    And how about all those werewolf books with the hero posing bare-chested in the middle of a snowbank?
    And last, but very far from least, how about “Dulce Domum” in THE WIND AND THE WILLOWS? And there’s plenty of weather in the sequels by William Horwood, too.
    According to Northrop Frye’s seasonal symbology, romance is associated with autumn, but with summer elements as well. Spring is the season of renewal, summer of ripening, autumn of harvest, and winter–or at least Christmas–the season of conversion and redemption, so all can fit nicely into the theme of a romance.
    P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.
    I think this comment is longer than your original column! Sorry!

    Reply
  49. By coincidence, I just found A LOVE FOR ALL SEASONS in a box of books I opened and immediately took it out for a reread. I particularly love the version of “Tam Lin,” except for one thing–you named the heroine “Ellen,” when she’s one of the very few ballad heroines who ISN’T named Ellen; her name is “Janet,” just like MY MIDDLE NAME!!!.
    There’s a good Christmas traditional Regency by Mary Balogh in which the hero, who has married a wealthy Cit’s daughter to save his estate and it’s not working out, invites his friends to spend Christmas at his country place, and she invites all her “vulgar” relatives–who turn out to be jolly people who know how to have fun, as his family never did, with bringing in the Yule log and gathering greenery, sledding parties, carol singing, attending the Christmas play at the village school, and the like.
    I have another really good traditional Regency (title and author escape me), in which the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. She is perched on the saddle ahead of him, wearing an open cape over a fairly low-cut day dress. In the book, they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.
    I do love LADY WITH A BLACK UMBRELLA; but there’s no rain in it–she only uses it to beat the villain about the head and ears while rescuing the hero.
    Weather often plays a role in books in which one of the characters is either passionate about gardening or worried about the crops failing. In one of Carla Kelly’s books, the hero is growing an experimental variety of wheat he’s developed; the crop is wiped out at the last minute. One of the main themes of Katherine Kingsley’s NO GREATER LOVE is the efforts of the heroine, a skilled herbalist, to restore the ruined garden of the hero’s long-abandoned house. And the hero of the sequel, NO SWEETER HEAVEN, is the French boy they rescued and adopted in the first book, who has become a famous botanist. (And of course, he turns out to be a duke, as well. Doesn’t everybody?)
    Just recalled that one of Pamela Morsi’s books, set around 1900 in the American South, involves a hero trying to start a rice industry in, I think, Arkansas.
    In one of Catherine Fellows’s books–I think it’s THE LOVE MATCH–a flood resulting from heavy rains, which cuts off the country house where the characters have gathered for the reading of a will, plays a major part in the plot, as it results in a scenario with someone trying to do in the heroine because of the terms of the will. Her first words to the hero, a distant cousin she’s never met, are “Have you come to marry me or murder me?” His polite reply, “Not being acquainted with you, I haven’t made a decision.”
    And how about all those werewolf books with the hero posing bare-chested in the middle of a snowbank?
    And last, but very far from least, how about “Dulce Domum” in THE WIND AND THE WILLOWS? And there’s plenty of weather in the sequels by William Horwood, too.
    According to Northrop Frye’s seasonal symbology, romance is associated with autumn, but with summer elements as well. Spring is the season of renewal, summer of ripening, autumn of harvest, and winter–or at least Christmas–the season of conversion and redemption, so all can fit nicely into the theme of a romance.
    P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.
    I think this comment is longer than your original column! Sorry!

    Reply
  50. By coincidence, I just found A LOVE FOR ALL SEASONS in a box of books I opened and immediately took it out for a reread. I particularly love the version of “Tam Lin,” except for one thing–you named the heroine “Ellen,” when she’s one of the very few ballad heroines who ISN’T named Ellen; her name is “Janet,” just like MY MIDDLE NAME!!!.
    There’s a good Christmas traditional Regency by Mary Balogh in which the hero, who has married a wealthy Cit’s daughter to save his estate and it’s not working out, invites his friends to spend Christmas at his country place, and she invites all her “vulgar” relatives–who turn out to be jolly people who know how to have fun, as his family never did, with bringing in the Yule log and gathering greenery, sledding parties, carol singing, attending the Christmas play at the village school, and the like.
    I have another really good traditional Regency (title and author escape me), in which the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. She is perched on the saddle ahead of him, wearing an open cape over a fairly low-cut day dress. In the book, they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.
    I do love LADY WITH A BLACK UMBRELLA; but there’s no rain in it–she only uses it to beat the villain about the head and ears while rescuing the hero.
    Weather often plays a role in books in which one of the characters is either passionate about gardening or worried about the crops failing. In one of Carla Kelly’s books, the hero is growing an experimental variety of wheat he’s developed; the crop is wiped out at the last minute. One of the main themes of Katherine Kingsley’s NO GREATER LOVE is the efforts of the heroine, a skilled herbalist, to restore the ruined garden of the hero’s long-abandoned house. And the hero of the sequel, NO SWEETER HEAVEN, is the French boy they rescued and adopted in the first book, who has become a famous botanist. (And of course, he turns out to be a duke, as well. Doesn’t everybody?)
    Just recalled that one of Pamela Morsi’s books, set around 1900 in the American South, involves a hero trying to start a rice industry in, I think, Arkansas.
    In one of Catherine Fellows’s books–I think it’s THE LOVE MATCH–a flood resulting from heavy rains, which cuts off the country house where the characters have gathered for the reading of a will, plays a major part in the plot, as it results in a scenario with someone trying to do in the heroine because of the terms of the will. Her first words to the hero, a distant cousin she’s never met, are “Have you come to marry me or murder me?” His polite reply, “Not being acquainted with you, I haven’t made a decision.”
    And how about all those werewolf books with the hero posing bare-chested in the middle of a snowbank?
    And last, but very far from least, how about “Dulce Domum” in THE WIND AND THE WILLOWS? And there’s plenty of weather in the sequels by William Horwood, too.
    According to Northrop Frye’s seasonal symbology, romance is associated with autumn, but with summer elements as well. Spring is the season of renewal, summer of ripening, autumn of harvest, and winter–or at least Christmas–the season of conversion and redemption, so all can fit nicely into the theme of a romance.
    P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.
    I think this comment is longer than your original column! Sorry!

    Reply
  51. I am one of those people who reads lots of Christmas anthologies every year. One of the big draws in those stories is the winter season. There is just something so romantic about being snowed in and snuggling up in front of the fireplace.
    I also enjoy stories that feature summer at a lake or ocean. Half-naked guys, hot sun, and cool drinks!
    As for all the seasons, Susan Wiggs showcased the changing seasons very well in her Lakeshore Chronicles series.

    Reply
  52. I am one of those people who reads lots of Christmas anthologies every year. One of the big draws in those stories is the winter season. There is just something so romantic about being snowed in and snuggling up in front of the fireplace.
    I also enjoy stories that feature summer at a lake or ocean. Half-naked guys, hot sun, and cool drinks!
    As for all the seasons, Susan Wiggs showcased the changing seasons very well in her Lakeshore Chronicles series.

    Reply
  53. I am one of those people who reads lots of Christmas anthologies every year. One of the big draws in those stories is the winter season. There is just something so romantic about being snowed in and snuggling up in front of the fireplace.
    I also enjoy stories that feature summer at a lake or ocean. Half-naked guys, hot sun, and cool drinks!
    As for all the seasons, Susan Wiggs showcased the changing seasons very well in her Lakeshore Chronicles series.

    Reply
  54. I am one of those people who reads lots of Christmas anthologies every year. One of the big draws in those stories is the winter season. There is just something so romantic about being snowed in and snuggling up in front of the fireplace.
    I also enjoy stories that feature summer at a lake or ocean. Half-naked guys, hot sun, and cool drinks!
    As for all the seasons, Susan Wiggs showcased the changing seasons very well in her Lakeshore Chronicles series.

    Reply
  55. I am one of those people who reads lots of Christmas anthologies every year. One of the big draws in those stories is the winter season. There is just something so romantic about being snowed in and snuggling up in front of the fireplace.
    I also enjoy stories that feature summer at a lake or ocean. Half-naked guys, hot sun, and cool drinks!
    As for all the seasons, Susan Wiggs showcased the changing seasons very well in her Lakeshore Chronicles series.

    Reply
  56. Talpianna mentioned “the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. . .they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.”
    –Talpianna, could that be “Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand” by Carla Kelly? It’s the one that comes to mind when I think of snowy weather–the hero and heroine’s “emergency trip” is across the snowy countryside to Gretna Green (hundreds of miles) so they can get married and outwit the heroine’s slimy brother-in-law.
    And in Stephanie Laurens’ “Devil’s Bride,” (one of my favorites ever) it’s a big rain/lightning storm which jump-starts the shirtless-Duke-on-a-big-horse, trapped-in-the-gamekeeper’s-cottage with-the-governess, mysterious-dying-cousin plot. Storms figure prominently as the book unfolds, too, as we realize Why the Heroine Hates Storms. . .
    Actually I find rainstorms very sensual and evocative in books and in movies. Does anyone else remember the Rain Scene from the movie “The Year of Living Dangerously” with (young) Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver? Oh my.
    And isn’t there something stirring and spiritual about rain and water as well?

    Reply
  57. Talpianna mentioned “the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. . .they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.”
    –Talpianna, could that be “Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand” by Carla Kelly? It’s the one that comes to mind when I think of snowy weather–the hero and heroine’s “emergency trip” is across the snowy countryside to Gretna Green (hundreds of miles) so they can get married and outwit the heroine’s slimy brother-in-law.
    And in Stephanie Laurens’ “Devil’s Bride,” (one of my favorites ever) it’s a big rain/lightning storm which jump-starts the shirtless-Duke-on-a-big-horse, trapped-in-the-gamekeeper’s-cottage with-the-governess, mysterious-dying-cousin plot. Storms figure prominently as the book unfolds, too, as we realize Why the Heroine Hates Storms. . .
    Actually I find rainstorms very sensual and evocative in books and in movies. Does anyone else remember the Rain Scene from the movie “The Year of Living Dangerously” with (young) Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver? Oh my.
    And isn’t there something stirring and spiritual about rain and water as well?

    Reply
  58. Talpianna mentioned “the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. . .they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.”
    –Talpianna, could that be “Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand” by Carla Kelly? It’s the one that comes to mind when I think of snowy weather–the hero and heroine’s “emergency trip” is across the snowy countryside to Gretna Green (hundreds of miles) so they can get married and outwit the heroine’s slimy brother-in-law.
    And in Stephanie Laurens’ “Devil’s Bride,” (one of my favorites ever) it’s a big rain/lightning storm which jump-starts the shirtless-Duke-on-a-big-horse, trapped-in-the-gamekeeper’s-cottage with-the-governess, mysterious-dying-cousin plot. Storms figure prominently as the book unfolds, too, as we realize Why the Heroine Hates Storms. . .
    Actually I find rainstorms very sensual and evocative in books and in movies. Does anyone else remember the Rain Scene from the movie “The Year of Living Dangerously” with (young) Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver? Oh my.
    And isn’t there something stirring and spiritual about rain and water as well?

    Reply
  59. Talpianna mentioned “the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. . .they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.”
    –Talpianna, could that be “Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand” by Carla Kelly? It’s the one that comes to mind when I think of snowy weather–the hero and heroine’s “emergency trip” is across the snowy countryside to Gretna Green (hundreds of miles) so they can get married and outwit the heroine’s slimy brother-in-law.
    And in Stephanie Laurens’ “Devil’s Bride,” (one of my favorites ever) it’s a big rain/lightning storm which jump-starts the shirtless-Duke-on-a-big-horse, trapped-in-the-gamekeeper’s-cottage with-the-governess, mysterious-dying-cousin plot. Storms figure prominently as the book unfolds, too, as we realize Why the Heroine Hates Storms. . .
    Actually I find rainstorms very sensual and evocative in books and in movies. Does anyone else remember the Rain Scene from the movie “The Year of Living Dangerously” with (young) Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver? Oh my.
    And isn’t there something stirring and spiritual about rain and water as well?

    Reply
  60. Talpianna mentioned “the hero and heroine are depicted riding through a snowy landscape. . .they are making an emergency trip, and they are appropriately dressed for the weather, which happens to be a blizzard so fierce that the hero loses a couple of toes to frostbite.”
    –Talpianna, could that be “Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand” by Carla Kelly? It’s the one that comes to mind when I think of snowy weather–the hero and heroine’s “emergency trip” is across the snowy countryside to Gretna Green (hundreds of miles) so they can get married and outwit the heroine’s slimy brother-in-law.
    And in Stephanie Laurens’ “Devil’s Bride,” (one of my favorites ever) it’s a big rain/lightning storm which jump-starts the shirtless-Duke-on-a-big-horse, trapped-in-the-gamekeeper’s-cottage with-the-governess, mysterious-dying-cousin plot. Storms figure prominently as the book unfolds, too, as we realize Why the Heroine Hates Storms. . .
    Actually I find rainstorms very sensual and evocative in books and in movies. Does anyone else remember the Rain Scene from the movie “The Year of Living Dangerously” with (young) Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver? Oh my.
    And isn’t there something stirring and spiritual about rain and water as well?

    Reply
  61. No life would be complete without a perusal of “The Tay Bridge Disaster” by the immortal(ly awful) William Topaz McGonagall:
    http://www.taynet.co.uk/users/mcgon/disaster.htm
    With sufficient inducement, I will post a link to the YouTube film of this masterpiece as performed by the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre.
    Melinda, ’tis the very book!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0451181816/sr=1-1/qid=1218522574/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books&qid=1218522574&sr=1-1
    I knew it was by one of my favorite authors.
    I can’t remember why they wound up on one horse. Did hers founder, or did she get so cold she couldn’t hold the reins?

    Reply
  62. No life would be complete without a perusal of “The Tay Bridge Disaster” by the immortal(ly awful) William Topaz McGonagall:
    http://www.taynet.co.uk/users/mcgon/disaster.htm
    With sufficient inducement, I will post a link to the YouTube film of this masterpiece as performed by the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre.
    Melinda, ’tis the very book!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0451181816/sr=1-1/qid=1218522574/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books&qid=1218522574&sr=1-1
    I knew it was by one of my favorite authors.
    I can’t remember why they wound up on one horse. Did hers founder, or did she get so cold she couldn’t hold the reins?

    Reply
  63. No life would be complete without a perusal of “The Tay Bridge Disaster” by the immortal(ly awful) William Topaz McGonagall:
    http://www.taynet.co.uk/users/mcgon/disaster.htm
    With sufficient inducement, I will post a link to the YouTube film of this masterpiece as performed by the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre.
    Melinda, ’tis the very book!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0451181816/sr=1-1/qid=1218522574/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books&qid=1218522574&sr=1-1
    I knew it was by one of my favorite authors.
    I can’t remember why they wound up on one horse. Did hers founder, or did she get so cold she couldn’t hold the reins?

    Reply
  64. No life would be complete without a perusal of “The Tay Bridge Disaster” by the immortal(ly awful) William Topaz McGonagall:
    http://www.taynet.co.uk/users/mcgon/disaster.htm
    With sufficient inducement, I will post a link to the YouTube film of this masterpiece as performed by the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre.
    Melinda, ’tis the very book!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0451181816/sr=1-1/qid=1218522574/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books&qid=1218522574&sr=1-1
    I knew it was by one of my favorite authors.
    I can’t remember why they wound up on one horse. Did hers founder, or did she get so cold she couldn’t hold the reins?

    Reply
  65. No life would be complete without a perusal of “The Tay Bridge Disaster” by the immortal(ly awful) William Topaz McGonagall:
    http://www.taynet.co.uk/users/mcgon/disaster.htm
    With sufficient inducement, I will post a link to the YouTube film of this masterpiece as performed by the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre.
    Melinda, ’tis the very book!
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/images/0451181816/sr=1-1/qid=1218522574/ref=dp_image_text_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books&qid=1218522574&sr=1-1
    I knew it was by one of my favorite authors.
    I can’t remember why they wound up on one horse. Did hers founder, or did she get so cold she couldn’t hold the reins?

    Reply
  66. Lisa Kleypas’ Devil in Winter with the bitter cold (not pretty snow) on the trip to Scotland. And Laura Lee Guhrke’s Guilty Pleasures with the heroine, who grew up in deserts, standing out in the rain for the sheer pleasure of it.

    Reply
  67. Lisa Kleypas’ Devil in Winter with the bitter cold (not pretty snow) on the trip to Scotland. And Laura Lee Guhrke’s Guilty Pleasures with the heroine, who grew up in deserts, standing out in the rain for the sheer pleasure of it.

    Reply
  68. Lisa Kleypas’ Devil in Winter with the bitter cold (not pretty snow) on the trip to Scotland. And Laura Lee Guhrke’s Guilty Pleasures with the heroine, who grew up in deserts, standing out in the rain for the sheer pleasure of it.

    Reply
  69. Lisa Kleypas’ Devil in Winter with the bitter cold (not pretty snow) on the trip to Scotland. And Laura Lee Guhrke’s Guilty Pleasures with the heroine, who grew up in deserts, standing out in the rain for the sheer pleasure of it.

    Reply
  70. Lisa Kleypas’ Devil in Winter with the bitter cold (not pretty snow) on the trip to Scotland. And Laura Lee Guhrke’s Guilty Pleasures with the heroine, who grew up in deserts, standing out in the rain for the sheer pleasure of it.

    Reply
  71. Ahem.
    Re: half nakedy heros in the snow.
    as for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE… please to just remember that I do not draw the covers.
    The cover is lovely -but – whattheheck, everyone knows the Hero is impervious to weather (at least on covers) and the heroine is carried away by passion, and too, there is that stately house just behind them, with doubetless lots of roaring fireplaces to which he can carry her off to, and thence thaw her out in multiple ways.
    And it is a pretty picture, with the snow all purpley and pink.
    Hey.
    I just writes them. But the snow is a part of the plot! More about that some other snowy day.
    So, them amongst you who don’t like snowy covers, kndly to please buck up and bypass the cover and read the book. OK?

    Reply
  72. Ahem.
    Re: half nakedy heros in the snow.
    as for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE… please to just remember that I do not draw the covers.
    The cover is lovely -but – whattheheck, everyone knows the Hero is impervious to weather (at least on covers) and the heroine is carried away by passion, and too, there is that stately house just behind them, with doubetless lots of roaring fireplaces to which he can carry her off to, and thence thaw her out in multiple ways.
    And it is a pretty picture, with the snow all purpley and pink.
    Hey.
    I just writes them. But the snow is a part of the plot! More about that some other snowy day.
    So, them amongst you who don’t like snowy covers, kndly to please buck up and bypass the cover and read the book. OK?

    Reply
  73. Ahem.
    Re: half nakedy heros in the snow.
    as for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE… please to just remember that I do not draw the covers.
    The cover is lovely -but – whattheheck, everyone knows the Hero is impervious to weather (at least on covers) and the heroine is carried away by passion, and too, there is that stately house just behind them, with doubetless lots of roaring fireplaces to which he can carry her off to, and thence thaw her out in multiple ways.
    And it is a pretty picture, with the snow all purpley and pink.
    Hey.
    I just writes them. But the snow is a part of the plot! More about that some other snowy day.
    So, them amongst you who don’t like snowy covers, kndly to please buck up and bypass the cover and read the book. OK?

    Reply
  74. Ahem.
    Re: half nakedy heros in the snow.
    as for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE… please to just remember that I do not draw the covers.
    The cover is lovely -but – whattheheck, everyone knows the Hero is impervious to weather (at least on covers) and the heroine is carried away by passion, and too, there is that stately house just behind them, with doubetless lots of roaring fireplaces to which he can carry her off to, and thence thaw her out in multiple ways.
    And it is a pretty picture, with the snow all purpley and pink.
    Hey.
    I just writes them. But the snow is a part of the plot! More about that some other snowy day.
    So, them amongst you who don’t like snowy covers, kndly to please buck up and bypass the cover and read the book. OK?

    Reply
  75. Ahem.
    Re: half nakedy heros in the snow.
    as for A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE… please to just remember that I do not draw the covers.
    The cover is lovely -but – whattheheck, everyone knows the Hero is impervious to weather (at least on covers) and the heroine is carried away by passion, and too, there is that stately house just behind them, with doubetless lots of roaring fireplaces to which he can carry her off to, and thence thaw her out in multiple ways.
    And it is a pretty picture, with the snow all purpley and pink.
    Hey.
    I just writes them. But the snow is a part of the plot! More about that some other snowy day.
    So, them amongst you who don’t like snowy covers, kndly to please buck up and bypass the cover and read the book. OK?

    Reply
  76. And Mary Jo,, Pat, Tal, RevMilinda – yes!
    Rain, glorious rain.
    There’s somethng magical about it. We’re getting or share this summer here on Long Island and as for the settings of my books – of course, of course.
    Let it pour, we’re singing in the rain.
    Keep it coming, please.

    Reply
  77. And Mary Jo,, Pat, Tal, RevMilinda – yes!
    Rain, glorious rain.
    There’s somethng magical about it. We’re getting or share this summer here on Long Island and as for the settings of my books – of course, of course.
    Let it pour, we’re singing in the rain.
    Keep it coming, please.

    Reply
  78. And Mary Jo,, Pat, Tal, RevMilinda – yes!
    Rain, glorious rain.
    There’s somethng magical about it. We’re getting or share this summer here on Long Island and as for the settings of my books – of course, of course.
    Let it pour, we’re singing in the rain.
    Keep it coming, please.

    Reply
  79. And Mary Jo,, Pat, Tal, RevMilinda – yes!
    Rain, glorious rain.
    There’s somethng magical about it. We’re getting or share this summer here on Long Island and as for the settings of my books – of course, of course.
    Let it pour, we’re singing in the rain.
    Keep it coming, please.

    Reply
  80. And Mary Jo,, Pat, Tal, RevMilinda – yes!
    Rain, glorious rain.
    There’s somethng magical about it. We’re getting or share this summer here on Long Island and as for the settings of my books – of course, of course.
    Let it pour, we’re singing in the rain.
    Keep it coming, please.

    Reply
  81. One of Dee Davis’s romantic suspense novels for Ballantine had rain on the cover.
    I have read non-romance novels where weather is very important. Elmer Kelton’s The Time It Never Rained comes to mind.
    Also, Mary Jo Putney’s first fantasy/romance had weather stuff in it. The hero could manipulate weather if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  82. One of Dee Davis’s romantic suspense novels for Ballantine had rain on the cover.
    I have read non-romance novels where weather is very important. Elmer Kelton’s The Time It Never Rained comes to mind.
    Also, Mary Jo Putney’s first fantasy/romance had weather stuff in it. The hero could manipulate weather if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  83. One of Dee Davis’s romantic suspense novels for Ballantine had rain on the cover.
    I have read non-romance novels where weather is very important. Elmer Kelton’s The Time It Never Rained comes to mind.
    Also, Mary Jo Putney’s first fantasy/romance had weather stuff in it. The hero could manipulate weather if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  84. One of Dee Davis’s romantic suspense novels for Ballantine had rain on the cover.
    I have read non-romance novels where weather is very important. Elmer Kelton’s The Time It Never Rained comes to mind.
    Also, Mary Jo Putney’s first fantasy/romance had weather stuff in it. The hero could manipulate weather if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  85. One of Dee Davis’s romantic suspense novels for Ballantine had rain on the cover.
    I have read non-romance novels where weather is very important. Elmer Kelton’s The Time It Never Rained comes to mind.
    Also, Mary Jo Putney’s first fantasy/romance had weather stuff in it. The hero could manipulate weather if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  86. Well, can’t remember the book’s title, but in one of Christine Feehan’s books there’s a lightning striking a Christmas tree.

    Reply
  87. Well, can’t remember the book’s title, but in one of Christine Feehan’s books there’s a lightning striking a Christmas tree.

    Reply
  88. Well, can’t remember the book’s title, but in one of Christine Feehan’s books there’s a lightning striking a Christmas tree.

    Reply
  89. Well, can’t remember the book’s title, but in one of Christine Feehan’s books there’s a lightning striking a Christmas tree.

    Reply
  90. Well, can’t remember the book’s title, but in one of Christine Feehan’s books there’s a lightning striking a Christmas tree.

    Reply
  91. Lots of Mary Balogh books come to mind, her Christmas stories, Snow Angel, The First Snowdrop etc. My favorite of hers, though, is The Notorious Rake, in which thunderstorms play a pivotal role.
    I think love stories work in any season. My parents song has always been “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot, and in the movie, there is a montage of love scenes between Lancelot and Guinevere in every season, aptly depicting, I think, that the emotions can weather any weather.

    Reply
  92. Lots of Mary Balogh books come to mind, her Christmas stories, Snow Angel, The First Snowdrop etc. My favorite of hers, though, is The Notorious Rake, in which thunderstorms play a pivotal role.
    I think love stories work in any season. My parents song has always been “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot, and in the movie, there is a montage of love scenes between Lancelot and Guinevere in every season, aptly depicting, I think, that the emotions can weather any weather.

    Reply
  93. Lots of Mary Balogh books come to mind, her Christmas stories, Snow Angel, The First Snowdrop etc. My favorite of hers, though, is The Notorious Rake, in which thunderstorms play a pivotal role.
    I think love stories work in any season. My parents song has always been “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot, and in the movie, there is a montage of love scenes between Lancelot and Guinevere in every season, aptly depicting, I think, that the emotions can weather any weather.

    Reply
  94. Lots of Mary Balogh books come to mind, her Christmas stories, Snow Angel, The First Snowdrop etc. My favorite of hers, though, is The Notorious Rake, in which thunderstorms play a pivotal role.
    I think love stories work in any season. My parents song has always been “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot, and in the movie, there is a montage of love scenes between Lancelot and Guinevere in every season, aptly depicting, I think, that the emotions can weather any weather.

    Reply
  95. Lots of Mary Balogh books come to mind, her Christmas stories, Snow Angel, The First Snowdrop etc. My favorite of hers, though, is The Notorious Rake, in which thunderstorms play a pivotal role.
    I think love stories work in any season. My parents song has always been “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot, and in the movie, there is a montage of love scenes between Lancelot and Guinevere in every season, aptly depicting, I think, that the emotions can weather any weather.

    Reply
  96. talpianna wrote “P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.”
    This is so funny. There is a frost faire in my first book, because I stumbled across the fact that the Thames froze that year (winter 1788/9) and I thought “Gee, what a great place for the villain to think he could murder the heroine, if only her hulking footman would go away!”, LOL!
    I have lots of accounts of earthquakes in England too. Eventually I’ll have to use one of them in a story . . .
    Balogh has a whole book of winter/Chirstmas stories that I just love. I read it at least once a year. And I’m a sucker for Jo’s CHIRSTMAS ANGEL (the first book I ever read by her; I still own that copy!) and WINTER FIRE.

    Reply
  97. talpianna wrote “P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.”
    This is so funny. There is a frost faire in my first book, because I stumbled across the fact that the Thames froze that year (winter 1788/9) and I thought “Gee, what a great place for the villain to think he could murder the heroine, if only her hulking footman would go away!”, LOL!
    I have lots of accounts of earthquakes in England too. Eventually I’ll have to use one of them in a story . . .
    Balogh has a whole book of winter/Chirstmas stories that I just love. I read it at least once a year. And I’m a sucker for Jo’s CHIRSTMAS ANGEL (the first book I ever read by her; I still own that copy!) and WINTER FIRE.

    Reply
  98. talpianna wrote “P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.”
    This is so funny. There is a frost faire in my first book, because I stumbled across the fact that the Thames froze that year (winter 1788/9) and I thought “Gee, what a great place for the villain to think he could murder the heroine, if only her hulking footman would go away!”, LOL!
    I have lots of accounts of earthquakes in England too. Eventually I’ll have to use one of them in a story . . .
    Balogh has a whole book of winter/Chirstmas stories that I just love. I read it at least once a year. And I’m a sucker for Jo’s CHIRSTMAS ANGEL (the first book I ever read by her; I still own that copy!) and WINTER FIRE.

    Reply
  99. talpianna wrote “P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.”
    This is so funny. There is a frost faire in my first book, because I stumbled across the fact that the Thames froze that year (winter 1788/9) and I thought “Gee, what a great place for the villain to think he could murder the heroine, if only her hulking footman would go away!”, LOL!
    I have lots of accounts of earthquakes in England too. Eventually I’ll have to use one of them in a story . . .
    Balogh has a whole book of winter/Chirstmas stories that I just love. I read it at least once a year. And I’m a sucker for Jo’s CHIRSTMAS ANGEL (the first book I ever read by her; I still own that copy!) and WINTER FIRE.

    Reply
  100. talpianna wrote “P.S. Kalen–don’t forget the Frost Fair. And there were the dreadful North Sea floods in the 1950s, I think, which you could always export to the setting of your story. In fact, you can research various disasters in Wikipedia–lists of great floods, storms, fires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, bridge collapses, and the like.”
    This is so funny. There is a frost faire in my first book, because I stumbled across the fact that the Thames froze that year (winter 1788/9) and I thought “Gee, what a great place for the villain to think he could murder the heroine, if only her hulking footman would go away!”, LOL!
    I have lots of accounts of earthquakes in England too. Eventually I’ll have to use one of them in a story . . .
    Balogh has a whole book of winter/Chirstmas stories that I just love. I read it at least once a year. And I’m a sucker for Jo’s CHIRSTMAS ANGEL (the first book I ever read by her; I still own that copy!) and WINTER FIRE.

    Reply
  101. Kalen, our Tigress has experienced an earthquake in England. Ask her for details.
    Edith, here is the cover I was thinking of:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/k/susan-krinard/prince-of-shadows.htm
    We are having our monsoon season here in Arizona, which often means 5000 lightning strikes per DAY. Really bad news when there is no rain following, just wind, especially in remote forested areas.
    We had a big storm weekend before last which left my back yard trashed–full of stuff from my neighbors’ trees as well as my own.
    And remember Professor Bhaer proposing to Jo under the blue umbrella in GOOD WIVES (aka LITTLE WOMEN, Part 2)?

    Reply
  102. Kalen, our Tigress has experienced an earthquake in England. Ask her for details.
    Edith, here is the cover I was thinking of:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/k/susan-krinard/prince-of-shadows.htm
    We are having our monsoon season here in Arizona, which often means 5000 lightning strikes per DAY. Really bad news when there is no rain following, just wind, especially in remote forested areas.
    We had a big storm weekend before last which left my back yard trashed–full of stuff from my neighbors’ trees as well as my own.
    And remember Professor Bhaer proposing to Jo under the blue umbrella in GOOD WIVES (aka LITTLE WOMEN, Part 2)?

    Reply
  103. Kalen, our Tigress has experienced an earthquake in England. Ask her for details.
    Edith, here is the cover I was thinking of:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/k/susan-krinard/prince-of-shadows.htm
    We are having our monsoon season here in Arizona, which often means 5000 lightning strikes per DAY. Really bad news when there is no rain following, just wind, especially in remote forested areas.
    We had a big storm weekend before last which left my back yard trashed–full of stuff from my neighbors’ trees as well as my own.
    And remember Professor Bhaer proposing to Jo under the blue umbrella in GOOD WIVES (aka LITTLE WOMEN, Part 2)?

    Reply
  104. Kalen, our Tigress has experienced an earthquake in England. Ask her for details.
    Edith, here is the cover I was thinking of:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/k/susan-krinard/prince-of-shadows.htm
    We are having our monsoon season here in Arizona, which often means 5000 lightning strikes per DAY. Really bad news when there is no rain following, just wind, especially in remote forested areas.
    We had a big storm weekend before last which left my back yard trashed–full of stuff from my neighbors’ trees as well as my own.
    And remember Professor Bhaer proposing to Jo under the blue umbrella in GOOD WIVES (aka LITTLE WOMEN, Part 2)?

    Reply
  105. Kalen, our Tigress has experienced an earthquake in England. Ask her for details.
    Edith, here is the cover I was thinking of:
    http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/k/susan-krinard/prince-of-shadows.htm
    We are having our monsoon season here in Arizona, which often means 5000 lightning strikes per DAY. Really bad news when there is no rain following, just wind, especially in remote forested areas.
    We had a big storm weekend before last which left my back yard trashed–full of stuff from my neighbors’ trees as well as my own.
    And remember Professor Bhaer proposing to Jo under the blue umbrella in GOOD WIVES (aka LITTLE WOMEN, Part 2)?

    Reply
  106. Covers that come to mind are Lisa Kleypas’ wallflower series books. I don’t have a particular preference for season, but winter is good because of course it’s all about keeping warm or being stranded.
    Weather-related tangent: there’s a part of Judith Ivory’s Untie My Heart that comes to mind – Emma is fascinated with Stuart’s winter coat, which has fur lining. It turns out to be chinchilla (pure petting delight if you’ve never felt it).
    Michelle: about the BBC miniseries North and South – not sure if there’s a particular symbolism to the cotton looking like snow, but it is referenced by Margaret when she writes to her cousin, saying that “I’ve seen hell and it’s white — snow white” when talking about Milton.

    Reply
  107. Covers that come to mind are Lisa Kleypas’ wallflower series books. I don’t have a particular preference for season, but winter is good because of course it’s all about keeping warm or being stranded.
    Weather-related tangent: there’s a part of Judith Ivory’s Untie My Heart that comes to mind – Emma is fascinated with Stuart’s winter coat, which has fur lining. It turns out to be chinchilla (pure petting delight if you’ve never felt it).
    Michelle: about the BBC miniseries North and South – not sure if there’s a particular symbolism to the cotton looking like snow, but it is referenced by Margaret when she writes to her cousin, saying that “I’ve seen hell and it’s white — snow white” when talking about Milton.

    Reply
  108. Covers that come to mind are Lisa Kleypas’ wallflower series books. I don’t have a particular preference for season, but winter is good because of course it’s all about keeping warm or being stranded.
    Weather-related tangent: there’s a part of Judith Ivory’s Untie My Heart that comes to mind – Emma is fascinated with Stuart’s winter coat, which has fur lining. It turns out to be chinchilla (pure petting delight if you’ve never felt it).
    Michelle: about the BBC miniseries North and South – not sure if there’s a particular symbolism to the cotton looking like snow, but it is referenced by Margaret when she writes to her cousin, saying that “I’ve seen hell and it’s white — snow white” when talking about Milton.

    Reply
  109. Covers that come to mind are Lisa Kleypas’ wallflower series books. I don’t have a particular preference for season, but winter is good because of course it’s all about keeping warm or being stranded.
    Weather-related tangent: there’s a part of Judith Ivory’s Untie My Heart that comes to mind – Emma is fascinated with Stuart’s winter coat, which has fur lining. It turns out to be chinchilla (pure petting delight if you’ve never felt it).
    Michelle: about the BBC miniseries North and South – not sure if there’s a particular symbolism to the cotton looking like snow, but it is referenced by Margaret when she writes to her cousin, saying that “I’ve seen hell and it’s white — snow white” when talking about Milton.

    Reply
  110. Covers that come to mind are Lisa Kleypas’ wallflower series books. I don’t have a particular preference for season, but winter is good because of course it’s all about keeping warm or being stranded.
    Weather-related tangent: there’s a part of Judith Ivory’s Untie My Heart that comes to mind – Emma is fascinated with Stuart’s winter coat, which has fur lining. It turns out to be chinchilla (pure petting delight if you’ve never felt it).
    Michelle: about the BBC miniseries North and South – not sure if there’s a particular symbolism to the cotton looking like snow, but it is referenced by Margaret when she writes to her cousin, saying that “I’ve seen hell and it’s white — snow white” when talking about Milton.

    Reply
  111. >
    Michelle, I think the book you’re thinking of is Fair Game. Heroine in a russet dress, on a ladder, handing an apple down to hero, black & white dog looking on.
    Diane Farr has another one called Falling for Chloe, but it has a different sort of cover.
    Both excellent reads!

    Reply
  112. >
    Michelle, I think the book you’re thinking of is Fair Game. Heroine in a russet dress, on a ladder, handing an apple down to hero, black & white dog looking on.
    Diane Farr has another one called Falling for Chloe, but it has a different sort of cover.
    Both excellent reads!

    Reply
  113. >
    Michelle, I think the book you’re thinking of is Fair Game. Heroine in a russet dress, on a ladder, handing an apple down to hero, black & white dog looking on.
    Diane Farr has another one called Falling for Chloe, but it has a different sort of cover.
    Both excellent reads!

    Reply
  114. >
    Michelle, I think the book you’re thinking of is Fair Game. Heroine in a russet dress, on a ladder, handing an apple down to hero, black & white dog looking on.
    Diane Farr has another one called Falling for Chloe, but it has a different sort of cover.
    Both excellent reads!

    Reply
  115. >
    Michelle, I think the book you’re thinking of is Fair Game. Heroine in a russet dress, on a ladder, handing an apple down to hero, black & white dog looking on.
    Diane Farr has another one called Falling for Chloe, but it has a different sort of cover.
    Both excellent reads!

    Reply
  116. I just read a lovely Christmas book, with a very pretty snow scene on the cover, “A Midnight Clear” by Karen L. King. The story spans a year, from November to November, but most of the action takes place in November and December.

    Reply
  117. I just read a lovely Christmas book, with a very pretty snow scene on the cover, “A Midnight Clear” by Karen L. King. The story spans a year, from November to November, but most of the action takes place in November and December.

    Reply
  118. I just read a lovely Christmas book, with a very pretty snow scene on the cover, “A Midnight Clear” by Karen L. King. The story spans a year, from November to November, but most of the action takes place in November and December.

    Reply
  119. I just read a lovely Christmas book, with a very pretty snow scene on the cover, “A Midnight Clear” by Karen L. King. The story spans a year, from November to November, but most of the action takes place in November and December.

    Reply
  120. I just read a lovely Christmas book, with a very pretty snow scene on the cover, “A Midnight Clear” by Karen L. King. The story spans a year, from November to November, but most of the action takes place in November and December.

    Reply
  121. Lyra – Thanks for the reference from north & south. It’s really helpful. I just thought the juxtaposition of those two images were so strong. I’ve never read any of Elizabeth Gaskell novels – just seen the BBC miniseries for North & South and Wives and Daughters.
    Thanks, Janice. Fair Game is definitely the cover I was describing, but I did confuse it with Falling for Chloe. Fair Game was really good.

    Reply
  122. Lyra – Thanks for the reference from north & south. It’s really helpful. I just thought the juxtaposition of those two images were so strong. I’ve never read any of Elizabeth Gaskell novels – just seen the BBC miniseries for North & South and Wives and Daughters.
    Thanks, Janice. Fair Game is definitely the cover I was describing, but I did confuse it with Falling for Chloe. Fair Game was really good.

    Reply
  123. Lyra – Thanks for the reference from north & south. It’s really helpful. I just thought the juxtaposition of those two images were so strong. I’ve never read any of Elizabeth Gaskell novels – just seen the BBC miniseries for North & South and Wives and Daughters.
    Thanks, Janice. Fair Game is definitely the cover I was describing, but I did confuse it with Falling for Chloe. Fair Game was really good.

    Reply
  124. Lyra – Thanks for the reference from north & south. It’s really helpful. I just thought the juxtaposition of those two images were so strong. I’ve never read any of Elizabeth Gaskell novels – just seen the BBC miniseries for North & South and Wives and Daughters.
    Thanks, Janice. Fair Game is definitely the cover I was describing, but I did confuse it with Falling for Chloe. Fair Game was really good.

    Reply
  125. Lyra – Thanks for the reference from north & south. It’s really helpful. I just thought the juxtaposition of those two images were so strong. I’ve never read any of Elizabeth Gaskell novels – just seen the BBC miniseries for North & South and Wives and Daughters.
    Thanks, Janice. Fair Game is definitely the cover I was describing, but I did confuse it with Falling for Chloe. Fair Game was really good.

    Reply
  126. In “To Wed a Highland Bride” the huge rainstorm provides more than mere background for our bewitched lovers. 🙂
    In the newest version of P&P, the first proposal takes place in a pagoda with the rain falling in the background. (Suffice to say, I am not a fan of the newest version, but the fortuitous weather is the point here.) And in Sense and Sensibility, Marianne becomes ill after standing, lovelorn, in the pouring rain. In Wuthering Heights, the wind and rain on the moors is an important part of the story, more than just a mood setter.
    And, of course, Jo’s winter offerings are some of my faves. I wouldn’t mind a Rogue to keep me company by the fire… 😉

    Reply
  127. In “To Wed a Highland Bride” the huge rainstorm provides more than mere background for our bewitched lovers. 🙂
    In the newest version of P&P, the first proposal takes place in a pagoda with the rain falling in the background. (Suffice to say, I am not a fan of the newest version, but the fortuitous weather is the point here.) And in Sense and Sensibility, Marianne becomes ill after standing, lovelorn, in the pouring rain. In Wuthering Heights, the wind and rain on the moors is an important part of the story, more than just a mood setter.
    And, of course, Jo’s winter offerings are some of my faves. I wouldn’t mind a Rogue to keep me company by the fire… 😉

    Reply
  128. In “To Wed a Highland Bride” the huge rainstorm provides more than mere background for our bewitched lovers. 🙂
    In the newest version of P&P, the first proposal takes place in a pagoda with the rain falling in the background. (Suffice to say, I am not a fan of the newest version, but the fortuitous weather is the point here.) And in Sense and Sensibility, Marianne becomes ill after standing, lovelorn, in the pouring rain. In Wuthering Heights, the wind and rain on the moors is an important part of the story, more than just a mood setter.
    And, of course, Jo’s winter offerings are some of my faves. I wouldn’t mind a Rogue to keep me company by the fire… 😉

    Reply
  129. In “To Wed a Highland Bride” the huge rainstorm provides more than mere background for our bewitched lovers. 🙂
    In the newest version of P&P, the first proposal takes place in a pagoda with the rain falling in the background. (Suffice to say, I am not a fan of the newest version, but the fortuitous weather is the point here.) And in Sense and Sensibility, Marianne becomes ill after standing, lovelorn, in the pouring rain. In Wuthering Heights, the wind and rain on the moors is an important part of the story, more than just a mood setter.
    And, of course, Jo’s winter offerings are some of my faves. I wouldn’t mind a Rogue to keep me company by the fire… 😉

    Reply
  130. In “To Wed a Highland Bride” the huge rainstorm provides more than mere background for our bewitched lovers. 🙂
    In the newest version of P&P, the first proposal takes place in a pagoda with the rain falling in the background. (Suffice to say, I am not a fan of the newest version, but the fortuitous weather is the point here.) And in Sense and Sensibility, Marianne becomes ill after standing, lovelorn, in the pouring rain. In Wuthering Heights, the wind and rain on the moors is an important part of the story, more than just a mood setter.
    And, of course, Jo’s winter offerings are some of my faves. I wouldn’t mind a Rogue to keep me company by the fire… 😉

    Reply
  131. Oh, and in one of Patricia Veryan’s, the first of her Jacobite series, the heroine discovers the hero because she must shelter from the storm. Where? In the gamekeeper’s cottage, of course! 🙂

    Reply
  132. Oh, and in one of Patricia Veryan’s, the first of her Jacobite series, the heroine discovers the hero because she must shelter from the storm. Where? In the gamekeeper’s cottage, of course! 🙂

    Reply
  133. Oh, and in one of Patricia Veryan’s, the first of her Jacobite series, the heroine discovers the hero because she must shelter from the storm. Where? In the gamekeeper’s cottage, of course! 🙂

    Reply
  134. Oh, and in one of Patricia Veryan’s, the first of her Jacobite series, the heroine discovers the hero because she must shelter from the storm. Where? In the gamekeeper’s cottage, of course! 🙂

    Reply
  135. Oh, and in one of Patricia Veryan’s, the first of her Jacobite series, the heroine discovers the hero because she must shelter from the storm. Where? In the gamekeeper’s cottage, of course! 🙂

    Reply

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