The Sea . . .

Anne here. My father used to love the poem that started "I must go down to the sea again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by. . . " Sea
He and my mother could quote the entire poem, but I can't, so if you want to read it, it's Sea Fever, by John Masefield.

 At times I feel the same need, to escape to the sea, and have it renew my spirit. A few weeks ago I headed to the sea, to Phillip Island, with a writing pal of mine, Keri Arthur, for a writing retreat and a good dose of fresh sea air.

We were both on deadline—Keri's more imminent than mine—so it was a serious writing retreat. All we did was write, walk, write, eat and write again. Even when we went out for dinner in the evening, afterward we came home and hit our respective computers. But in between, there was the sea.

Phil'plsandSilhouetteSunsetPhillip Island is accessible via a long bridge, and part of it looks toward the gentler aspect of the beach, and part of it faces out into the Southern Ocean, towards Antarctica. The place we rented overlooked the beach and it was magical to stagger out in the chilly morning air (it's winter downunder) and watch the ever-changing vista of the water and sky.

Keri is a keen photographer and nobly got up before dawn to photograph the sunrises. She took most of the photos on this blog and has generously allowed me to use them.

There's something magical about walking on the beach in the morning, when you're the only person on the beach and there's just one set of footprints in the sand. It always makes me think of Robinson Crusoe or some story like that, as if you're the only person in the world. FootprintsOnTheSand

I'm a beachcomber to the bone, even if there's practically nothing to collect. I don't think I've ever walked along a beach and not picked something up—which is saying something when you consider that my parents lived a stone's throw from the beach.

For me sea-glass is the treasure I search for—I make jewelry from it—but pretty shells and driftwood are also appealing. Beach-combing is clearly in my blood.

My grandfather used to bring home gnarled and twisted pieces of driftwood and mount them on slabs of slate as decorative pieces. As a child I thought them fantastical and possibly magical. I still have some of those pieces.

ShipwreckCoastOn the way home I went via the southern side of the island. You can see why much of this coast was called The Shipwreck Coast, can't you? Imagine a ship coming to grief on those rocks.

The "tunnel" below evokes so many childhood memories for me of walking (or running) through the gloomy tunnel of overgrown, twisty tea-trees until you stepped out into the bright sunshine and there was the beach. I don't know if it's particularly Australian or whether other countries have similar vegetation, but it's a scene I know will strike a chord with many Australians. Tunnel

The day I was there, a truck screeched to a halt in the car-park beside me, a young man jumped out and ran along the path. I passed him on the way, running back to his truck, and when I returned he was dressed in his wetsuit and heading back, surfboard under his arm. Apparently the surf was good today at this particular beach.

Keri'sGeese2Part of Phillip Island is protected — the penguin parade is famous, where the penguins come out of the sea each night and march up the beach to their burrows. But they're not the only protected species. Koalas abound, and I was amused to see several families of Cape Barren Geese — mother, father and fluffy baby goslings — grazing on the roadside, and casually crossing the road, despite the many cars — which all, of course, stopped for them. CapeBarrenGeese1

I was only away for the weekend, but sometimes a weekend — or even just a day out — can feel like a whole holiday. The sea did that for me this time, even though it was very much a working holiday. I got more work done than I would have at home — and I had a lovely break as well

RuinedPierThe beach hasn't always been a desirable or fashionable place to visit. Some years ago I wrote a blog about the history of enjoying the beach when it first became a fashionable place to go.

There is something magical about changing your location and soaking up the peace and beauty of the natural environment. Whether it's the sea, or the mountains, or the forest, or the wide sweep of rolling grassland or the starkness of the desert, I think we respond to our surroundings and are refreshed and uplifted by the change. 

What about you — do you ever get a chance for a quick getaway of a day or two? If you could, where would you go for a change of scenery?  

115 thoughts on “The Sea . . .”

  1. My husband and I do have some quick getaways in our lives. Not much seaside — we live in the Middle of Missouri, which is the middle of the Midwest. The sea is half a continent away to the east and west and to the South (the Gulf of Mexico). The United States has 5 fresh water seas — the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan — the pendant in this chain of lakes — is only a day’s drive from us, but it’s been more than 40 years since we’ve been there.
    What we have in Missouri, is mountains: old, old, timeworn mountains, The Ozarks are mainly hills at this time of their existence. There are beautiful to see at any time of the year. And they are full of lakes — mostly man made. The Lake of the Ozarks, formed by one of the earliest Turbine dams in the U. S. is a day trip from our house. Sometimes we run down to the lake. But it’s hard to get away from people there, so we more frequently drive into the hills. Or we drive north through rolling farm land. Very peaceful scenery.

    Reply
  2. My husband and I do have some quick getaways in our lives. Not much seaside — we live in the Middle of Missouri, which is the middle of the Midwest. The sea is half a continent away to the east and west and to the South (the Gulf of Mexico). The United States has 5 fresh water seas — the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan — the pendant in this chain of lakes — is only a day’s drive from us, but it’s been more than 40 years since we’ve been there.
    What we have in Missouri, is mountains: old, old, timeworn mountains, The Ozarks are mainly hills at this time of their existence. There are beautiful to see at any time of the year. And they are full of lakes — mostly man made. The Lake of the Ozarks, formed by one of the earliest Turbine dams in the U. S. is a day trip from our house. Sometimes we run down to the lake. But it’s hard to get away from people there, so we more frequently drive into the hills. Or we drive north through rolling farm land. Very peaceful scenery.

    Reply
  3. My husband and I do have some quick getaways in our lives. Not much seaside — we live in the Middle of Missouri, which is the middle of the Midwest. The sea is half a continent away to the east and west and to the South (the Gulf of Mexico). The United States has 5 fresh water seas — the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan — the pendant in this chain of lakes — is only a day’s drive from us, but it’s been more than 40 years since we’ve been there.
    What we have in Missouri, is mountains: old, old, timeworn mountains, The Ozarks are mainly hills at this time of their existence. There are beautiful to see at any time of the year. And they are full of lakes — mostly man made. The Lake of the Ozarks, formed by one of the earliest Turbine dams in the U. S. is a day trip from our house. Sometimes we run down to the lake. But it’s hard to get away from people there, so we more frequently drive into the hills. Or we drive north through rolling farm land. Very peaceful scenery.

    Reply
  4. My husband and I do have some quick getaways in our lives. Not much seaside — we live in the Middle of Missouri, which is the middle of the Midwest. The sea is half a continent away to the east and west and to the South (the Gulf of Mexico). The United States has 5 fresh water seas — the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan — the pendant in this chain of lakes — is only a day’s drive from us, but it’s been more than 40 years since we’ve been there.
    What we have in Missouri, is mountains: old, old, timeworn mountains, The Ozarks are mainly hills at this time of their existence. There are beautiful to see at any time of the year. And they are full of lakes — mostly man made. The Lake of the Ozarks, formed by one of the earliest Turbine dams in the U. S. is a day trip from our house. Sometimes we run down to the lake. But it’s hard to get away from people there, so we more frequently drive into the hills. Or we drive north through rolling farm land. Very peaceful scenery.

    Reply
  5. My husband and I do have some quick getaways in our lives. Not much seaside — we live in the Middle of Missouri, which is the middle of the Midwest. The sea is half a continent away to the east and west and to the South (the Gulf of Mexico). The United States has 5 fresh water seas — the Great Lakes. Lake Michigan — the pendant in this chain of lakes — is only a day’s drive from us, but it’s been more than 40 years since we’ve been there.
    What we have in Missouri, is mountains: old, old, timeworn mountains, The Ozarks are mainly hills at this time of their existence. There are beautiful to see at any time of the year. And they are full of lakes — mostly man made. The Lake of the Ozarks, formed by one of the earliest Turbine dams in the U. S. is a day trip from our house. Sometimes we run down to the lake. But it’s hard to get away from people there, so we more frequently drive into the hills. Or we drive north through rolling farm land. Very peaceful scenery.

    Reply
  6. What a wonderful blog post, Anne. Thank you! That poem by John Masefield is one of my favourites too. A sea break is also my favourite sort of trip away. I find there is something very refreshing and relaxing about a trip to the seaside. We’re looking forward to a trip to the coast next month. Not that I ever argue with a break anywhere – seaside, country or city!

    Reply
  7. What a wonderful blog post, Anne. Thank you! That poem by John Masefield is one of my favourites too. A sea break is also my favourite sort of trip away. I find there is something very refreshing and relaxing about a trip to the seaside. We’re looking forward to a trip to the coast next month. Not that I ever argue with a break anywhere – seaside, country or city!

    Reply
  8. What a wonderful blog post, Anne. Thank you! That poem by John Masefield is one of my favourites too. A sea break is also my favourite sort of trip away. I find there is something very refreshing and relaxing about a trip to the seaside. We’re looking forward to a trip to the coast next month. Not that I ever argue with a break anywhere – seaside, country or city!

    Reply
  9. What a wonderful blog post, Anne. Thank you! That poem by John Masefield is one of my favourites too. A sea break is also my favourite sort of trip away. I find there is something very refreshing and relaxing about a trip to the seaside. We’re looking forward to a trip to the coast next month. Not that I ever argue with a break anywhere – seaside, country or city!

    Reply
  10. What a wonderful blog post, Anne. Thank you! That poem by John Masefield is one of my favourites too. A sea break is also my favourite sort of trip away. I find there is something very refreshing and relaxing about a trip to the seaside. We’re looking forward to a trip to the coast next month. Not that I ever argue with a break anywhere – seaside, country or city!

    Reply
  11. Gorgeous pictures.
    I have never been to Phillip Island, even though we very nearly got there a couple of years ago! One day…
    We have Hyams Beach not too far from Canberra, which holds the record for the world’s whitest sand. It’s gorgeous for a short trip, but the sunburn I got the last time – I needed painkillers with codeine it hurt so much. Stupid, reflective sand!
    It’s funny how different cultures and eras view the beach. Some countries my family has been based in they’ve pretty much used it as a sewer, while the oblivious tourists were paying a small fortune for a resort room right on the same sand.

    Reply
  12. Gorgeous pictures.
    I have never been to Phillip Island, even though we very nearly got there a couple of years ago! One day…
    We have Hyams Beach not too far from Canberra, which holds the record for the world’s whitest sand. It’s gorgeous for a short trip, but the sunburn I got the last time – I needed painkillers with codeine it hurt so much. Stupid, reflective sand!
    It’s funny how different cultures and eras view the beach. Some countries my family has been based in they’ve pretty much used it as a sewer, while the oblivious tourists were paying a small fortune for a resort room right on the same sand.

    Reply
  13. Gorgeous pictures.
    I have never been to Phillip Island, even though we very nearly got there a couple of years ago! One day…
    We have Hyams Beach not too far from Canberra, which holds the record for the world’s whitest sand. It’s gorgeous for a short trip, but the sunburn I got the last time – I needed painkillers with codeine it hurt so much. Stupid, reflective sand!
    It’s funny how different cultures and eras view the beach. Some countries my family has been based in they’ve pretty much used it as a sewer, while the oblivious tourists were paying a small fortune for a resort room right on the same sand.

    Reply
  14. Gorgeous pictures.
    I have never been to Phillip Island, even though we very nearly got there a couple of years ago! One day…
    We have Hyams Beach not too far from Canberra, which holds the record for the world’s whitest sand. It’s gorgeous for a short trip, but the sunburn I got the last time – I needed painkillers with codeine it hurt so much. Stupid, reflective sand!
    It’s funny how different cultures and eras view the beach. Some countries my family has been based in they’ve pretty much used it as a sewer, while the oblivious tourists were paying a small fortune for a resort room right on the same sand.

    Reply
  15. Gorgeous pictures.
    I have never been to Phillip Island, even though we very nearly got there a couple of years ago! One day…
    We have Hyams Beach not too far from Canberra, which holds the record for the world’s whitest sand. It’s gorgeous for a short trip, but the sunburn I got the last time – I needed painkillers with codeine it hurt so much. Stupid, reflective sand!
    It’s funny how different cultures and eras view the beach. Some countries my family has been based in they’ve pretty much used it as a sewer, while the oblivious tourists were paying a small fortune for a resort room right on the same sand.

    Reply
  16. Wonderful blog, Anne—you’ve really struck a chord with me. The sea is one of my favorite places for walking and reflecting. There’s something about the elemental rhythm of ebb and flow, the sense of vast space and the the unique salt-tinged currents of air that just seem to put one’s own individual problems in perspective. It’s calming and thought-provoking. And somehow I always feel revitalized after a long walk, even when I’m wrestling with complicated conundrums . . .
    Now you have me thinking of islands with long deserted beaches—Prince Edward Island. Nantucket in late Fall, Nova Scotia’s north shore. The Arran Islands. Maui . . .
    Ah well, a girl can dream.

    Reply
  17. Wonderful blog, Anne—you’ve really struck a chord with me. The sea is one of my favorite places for walking and reflecting. There’s something about the elemental rhythm of ebb and flow, the sense of vast space and the the unique salt-tinged currents of air that just seem to put one’s own individual problems in perspective. It’s calming and thought-provoking. And somehow I always feel revitalized after a long walk, even when I’m wrestling with complicated conundrums . . .
    Now you have me thinking of islands with long deserted beaches—Prince Edward Island. Nantucket in late Fall, Nova Scotia’s north shore. The Arran Islands. Maui . . .
    Ah well, a girl can dream.

    Reply
  18. Wonderful blog, Anne—you’ve really struck a chord with me. The sea is one of my favorite places for walking and reflecting. There’s something about the elemental rhythm of ebb and flow, the sense of vast space and the the unique salt-tinged currents of air that just seem to put one’s own individual problems in perspective. It’s calming and thought-provoking. And somehow I always feel revitalized after a long walk, even when I’m wrestling with complicated conundrums . . .
    Now you have me thinking of islands with long deserted beaches—Prince Edward Island. Nantucket in late Fall, Nova Scotia’s north shore. The Arran Islands. Maui . . .
    Ah well, a girl can dream.

    Reply
  19. Wonderful blog, Anne—you’ve really struck a chord with me. The sea is one of my favorite places for walking and reflecting. There’s something about the elemental rhythm of ebb and flow, the sense of vast space and the the unique salt-tinged currents of air that just seem to put one’s own individual problems in perspective. It’s calming and thought-provoking. And somehow I always feel revitalized after a long walk, even when I’m wrestling with complicated conundrums . . .
    Now you have me thinking of islands with long deserted beaches—Prince Edward Island. Nantucket in late Fall, Nova Scotia’s north shore. The Arran Islands. Maui . . .
    Ah well, a girl can dream.

    Reply
  20. Wonderful blog, Anne—you’ve really struck a chord with me. The sea is one of my favorite places for walking and reflecting. There’s something about the elemental rhythm of ebb and flow, the sense of vast space and the the unique salt-tinged currents of air that just seem to put one’s own individual problems in perspective. It’s calming and thought-provoking. And somehow I always feel revitalized after a long walk, even when I’m wrestling with complicated conundrums . . .
    Now you have me thinking of islands with long deserted beaches—Prince Edward Island. Nantucket in late Fall, Nova Scotia’s north shore. The Arran Islands. Maui . . .
    Ah well, a girl can dream.

    Reply
  21. Ah, magical, Anne! I’m another great fan of Masefield’s immortal line, and like you, I never pass up a chance to go to the sea. I’ve been to many beaches around the world, but a favorite is one on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgins. A pale empty swathe of sand, turquoise seas–and pelicans, not penguins. *G* And yes, I also pick up bits and pieces and there is more than one piece of tangled driftwood around here!

    Reply
  22. Ah, magical, Anne! I’m another great fan of Masefield’s immortal line, and like you, I never pass up a chance to go to the sea. I’ve been to many beaches around the world, but a favorite is one on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgins. A pale empty swathe of sand, turquoise seas–and pelicans, not penguins. *G* And yes, I also pick up bits and pieces and there is more than one piece of tangled driftwood around here!

    Reply
  23. Ah, magical, Anne! I’m another great fan of Masefield’s immortal line, and like you, I never pass up a chance to go to the sea. I’ve been to many beaches around the world, but a favorite is one on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgins. A pale empty swathe of sand, turquoise seas–and pelicans, not penguins. *G* And yes, I also pick up bits and pieces and there is more than one piece of tangled driftwood around here!

    Reply
  24. Ah, magical, Anne! I’m another great fan of Masefield’s immortal line, and like you, I never pass up a chance to go to the sea. I’ve been to many beaches around the world, but a favorite is one on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgins. A pale empty swathe of sand, turquoise seas–and pelicans, not penguins. *G* And yes, I also pick up bits and pieces and there is more than one piece of tangled driftwood around here!

    Reply
  25. Ah, magical, Anne! I’m another great fan of Masefield’s immortal line, and like you, I never pass up a chance to go to the sea. I’ve been to many beaches around the world, but a favorite is one on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgins. A pale empty swathe of sand, turquoise seas–and pelicans, not penguins. *G* And yes, I also pick up bits and pieces and there is more than one piece of tangled driftwood around here!

    Reply
  26. I grew up by the sea and still miss it as I’ve lived ‘inland’ for 2/3 of my life now. But even a river can serve the purpose when necessary. It’s the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting. Thanks for the reminder, Anne, and thank Keri for the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  27. I grew up by the sea and still miss it as I’ve lived ‘inland’ for 2/3 of my life now. But even a river can serve the purpose when necessary. It’s the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting. Thanks for the reminder, Anne, and thank Keri for the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  28. I grew up by the sea and still miss it as I’ve lived ‘inland’ for 2/3 of my life now. But even a river can serve the purpose when necessary. It’s the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting. Thanks for the reminder, Anne, and thank Keri for the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  29. I grew up by the sea and still miss it as I’ve lived ‘inland’ for 2/3 of my life now. But even a river can serve the purpose when necessary. It’s the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting. Thanks for the reminder, Anne, and thank Keri for the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  30. I grew up by the sea and still miss it as I’ve lived ‘inland’ for 2/3 of my life now. But even a river can serve the purpose when necessary. It’s the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting. Thanks for the reminder, Anne, and thank Keri for the gorgeous pictures!

    Reply
  31. Living on a small island (UK), I’m never more than a few hours away from the coast. I think that the sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance, possibly related to our remote origins with life on earth originating in the oceans.
    Some dramatic coastlines also reveal the massive forces that molded the landscape. Folded and shattered rocks in towering cliffs and amazing natural sculpture forged by weather and sea erosion. Yes I’m definitely a fan of the seaside!
    Lovely photos Anne! I’ve always wanted to visit Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef, but Phillip Island sounds like a great holliday retreat

    Reply
  32. Living on a small island (UK), I’m never more than a few hours away from the coast. I think that the sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance, possibly related to our remote origins with life on earth originating in the oceans.
    Some dramatic coastlines also reveal the massive forces that molded the landscape. Folded and shattered rocks in towering cliffs and amazing natural sculpture forged by weather and sea erosion. Yes I’m definitely a fan of the seaside!
    Lovely photos Anne! I’ve always wanted to visit Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef, but Phillip Island sounds like a great holliday retreat

    Reply
  33. Living on a small island (UK), I’m never more than a few hours away from the coast. I think that the sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance, possibly related to our remote origins with life on earth originating in the oceans.
    Some dramatic coastlines also reveal the massive forces that molded the landscape. Folded and shattered rocks in towering cliffs and amazing natural sculpture forged by weather and sea erosion. Yes I’m definitely a fan of the seaside!
    Lovely photos Anne! I’ve always wanted to visit Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef, but Phillip Island sounds like a great holliday retreat

    Reply
  34. Living on a small island (UK), I’m never more than a few hours away from the coast. I think that the sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance, possibly related to our remote origins with life on earth originating in the oceans.
    Some dramatic coastlines also reveal the massive forces that molded the landscape. Folded and shattered rocks in towering cliffs and amazing natural sculpture forged by weather and sea erosion. Yes I’m definitely a fan of the seaside!
    Lovely photos Anne! I’ve always wanted to visit Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef, but Phillip Island sounds like a great holliday retreat

    Reply
  35. Living on a small island (UK), I’m never more than a few hours away from the coast. I think that the sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance, possibly related to our remote origins with life on earth originating in the oceans.
    Some dramatic coastlines also reveal the massive forces that molded the landscape. Folded and shattered rocks in towering cliffs and amazing natural sculpture forged by weather and sea erosion. Yes I’m definitely a fan of the seaside!
    Lovely photos Anne! I’ve always wanted to visit Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef, but Phillip Island sounds like a great holliday retreat

    Reply
  36. If I want to find peace and relaxation, I need to be somewhere with deciduous trees and grass. There is just something about the rustling of leaves in a breeze that soothes my soul, and a soft carpet of grass beneath my (preferably) bare feet is both calming and restorative. (I guess that’s why I used to sit in a tree to read.)

    Reply
  37. If I want to find peace and relaxation, I need to be somewhere with deciduous trees and grass. There is just something about the rustling of leaves in a breeze that soothes my soul, and a soft carpet of grass beneath my (preferably) bare feet is both calming and restorative. (I guess that’s why I used to sit in a tree to read.)

    Reply
  38. If I want to find peace and relaxation, I need to be somewhere with deciduous trees and grass. There is just something about the rustling of leaves in a breeze that soothes my soul, and a soft carpet of grass beneath my (preferably) bare feet is both calming and restorative. (I guess that’s why I used to sit in a tree to read.)

    Reply
  39. If I want to find peace and relaxation, I need to be somewhere with deciduous trees and grass. There is just something about the rustling of leaves in a breeze that soothes my soul, and a soft carpet of grass beneath my (preferably) bare feet is both calming and restorative. (I guess that’s why I used to sit in a tree to read.)

    Reply
  40. If I want to find peace and relaxation, I need to be somewhere with deciduous trees and grass. There is just something about the rustling of leaves in a breeze that soothes my soul, and a soft carpet of grass beneath my (preferably) bare feet is both calming and restorative. (I guess that’s why I used to sit in a tree to read.)

    Reply
  41. I don’t get to go to the sea, but I do go to a Great Lake at the western tip of the thumb in Michigan. Next best thing to the ocean without the itchy salt residue left behind. So relaxing to hear the waves on the beach, walking in the morning on the clean, untouched sand and the sunsets! Oh, just beautiful. Very soothing to my soul…

    Reply
  42. I don’t get to go to the sea, but I do go to a Great Lake at the western tip of the thumb in Michigan. Next best thing to the ocean without the itchy salt residue left behind. So relaxing to hear the waves on the beach, walking in the morning on the clean, untouched sand and the sunsets! Oh, just beautiful. Very soothing to my soul…

    Reply
  43. I don’t get to go to the sea, but I do go to a Great Lake at the western tip of the thumb in Michigan. Next best thing to the ocean without the itchy salt residue left behind. So relaxing to hear the waves on the beach, walking in the morning on the clean, untouched sand and the sunsets! Oh, just beautiful. Very soothing to my soul…

    Reply
  44. I don’t get to go to the sea, but I do go to a Great Lake at the western tip of the thumb in Michigan. Next best thing to the ocean without the itchy salt residue left behind. So relaxing to hear the waves on the beach, walking in the morning on the clean, untouched sand and the sunsets! Oh, just beautiful. Very soothing to my soul…

    Reply
  45. I don’t get to go to the sea, but I do go to a Great Lake at the western tip of the thumb in Michigan. Next best thing to the ocean without the itchy salt residue left behind. So relaxing to hear the waves on the beach, walking in the morning on the clean, untouched sand and the sunsets! Oh, just beautiful. Very soothing to my soul…

    Reply
  46. Sue, your mountains and lakes sound very lovely. I love mountain landscapes and I think anything with water adds a magical element. You can understand why the old pagan religions thought there was something magical about those interfaces between land and water.

    Reply
  47. Sue, your mountains and lakes sound very lovely. I love mountain landscapes and I think anything with water adds a magical element. You can understand why the old pagan religions thought there was something magical about those interfaces between land and water.

    Reply
  48. Sue, your mountains and lakes sound very lovely. I love mountain landscapes and I think anything with water adds a magical element. You can understand why the old pagan religions thought there was something magical about those interfaces between land and water.

    Reply
  49. Sue, your mountains and lakes sound very lovely. I love mountain landscapes and I think anything with water adds a magical element. You can understand why the old pagan religions thought there was something magical about those interfaces between land and water.

    Reply
  50. Sue, your mountains and lakes sound very lovely. I love mountain landscapes and I think anything with water adds a magical element. You can understand why the old pagan religions thought there was something magical about those interfaces between land and water.

    Reply
  51. Sonya I don't think I've ever been to Hyams beach. It sounds lovely. I'm heading up to Jindabyne in the mountains at the end of October and I'm planning to go via the coast road so maybe I will see Hyams beach.

    Reply
  52. Sonya I don't think I've ever been to Hyams beach. It sounds lovely. I'm heading up to Jindabyne in the mountains at the end of October and I'm planning to go via the coast road so maybe I will see Hyams beach.

    Reply
  53. Sonya I don't think I've ever been to Hyams beach. It sounds lovely. I'm heading up to Jindabyne in the mountains at the end of October and I'm planning to go via the coast road so maybe I will see Hyams beach.

    Reply
  54. Sonya I don't think I've ever been to Hyams beach. It sounds lovely. I'm heading up to Jindabyne in the mountains at the end of October and I'm planning to go via the coast road so maybe I will see Hyams beach.

    Reply
  55. Sonya I don't think I've ever been to Hyams beach. It sounds lovely. I'm heading up to Jindabyne in the mountains at the end of October and I'm planning to go via the coast road so maybe I will see Hyams beach.

    Reply
  56. Cara/Andrea I would love to visit some of the islands in north-east North America, especially in the autumn. Anytime.. really, but the autumn colors would be an extra treat. We don't have large forests turning color here — the Australian native trees aren't deciduous, so the autumnal change of color happens mostly in people's gardens and some street trees.

    Reply
  57. Cara/Andrea I would love to visit some of the islands in north-east North America, especially in the autumn. Anytime.. really, but the autumn colors would be an extra treat. We don't have large forests turning color here — the Australian native trees aren't deciduous, so the autumnal change of color happens mostly in people's gardens and some street trees.

    Reply
  58. Cara/Andrea I would love to visit some of the islands in north-east North America, especially in the autumn. Anytime.. really, but the autumn colors would be an extra treat. We don't have large forests turning color here — the Australian native trees aren't deciduous, so the autumnal change of color happens mostly in people's gardens and some street trees.

    Reply
  59. Cara/Andrea I would love to visit some of the islands in north-east North America, especially in the autumn. Anytime.. really, but the autumn colors would be an extra treat. We don't have large forests turning color here — the Australian native trees aren't deciduous, so the autumnal change of color happens mostly in people's gardens and some street trees.

    Reply
  60. Cara/Andrea I would love to visit some of the islands in north-east North America, especially in the autumn. Anytime.. really, but the autumn colors would be an extra treat. We don't have large forests turning color here — the Australian native trees aren't deciduous, so the autumnal change of color happens mostly in people's gardens and some street trees.

    Reply
  61. I think that's so true, Anne — "It's the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting."
    I remember paddling in the mighty Mississippi and feeling the mystique of it. I brought home a few pebbles and some driftwood from there, too <G>

    Reply
  62. I think that's so true, Anne — "It's the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting."
    I remember paddling in the mighty Mississippi and feeling the mystique of it. I brought home a few pebbles and some driftwood from there, too <G>

    Reply
  63. I think that's so true, Anne — "It's the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting."
    I remember paddling in the mighty Mississippi and feeling the mystique of it. I brought home a few pebbles and some driftwood from there, too <G>

    Reply
  64. I think that's so true, Anne — "It's the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting."
    I remember paddling in the mighty Mississippi and feeling the mystique of it. I brought home a few pebbles and some driftwood from there, too <G>

    Reply
  65. I think that's so true, Anne — "It's the liminal place between one world and another, I think. At least it is for me. The edge — the place where sea and land meet — is always changing, always tempting."
    I remember paddling in the mighty Mississippi and feeling the mystique of it. I brought home a few pebbles and some driftwood from there, too <G>

    Reply
  66. Quantum, that's how I feel, too — "sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance." Yes indeed. I also think that modern life puts us at a distance from the natural world and the sea — and the forests and the mountain — reconnects us. 

    Reply
  67. Quantum, that's how I feel, too — "sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance." Yes indeed. I also think that modern life puts us at a distance from the natural world and the sea — and the forests and the mountain — reconnects us. 

    Reply
  68. Quantum, that's how I feel, too — "sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance." Yes indeed. I also think that modern life puts us at a distance from the natural world and the sea — and the forests and the mountain — reconnects us. 

    Reply
  69. Quantum, that's how I feel, too — "sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance." Yes indeed. I also think that modern life puts us at a distance from the natural world and the sea — and the forests and the mountain — reconnects us. 

    Reply
  70. Quantum, that's how I feel, too — "sound of the sea and the sight of white surf glistening in sunlight somehow strikes a deep resonance." Yes indeed. I also think that modern life puts us at a distance from the natural world and the sea — and the forests and the mountain — reconnects us. 

    Reply
  71. Quantum, I meant to add, the Great Barrier Reef is wonderful, and there are many gorgeous places all along the coast. My sister and her husband and kids once sailed the Whitsundays and she wrote to me from the boat, and ever since I've always wanted to do it. Here's a google image search for "the Whitsundays" — see what I mean ? http://bit.ly/1MWRkDx

    Reply
  72. Quantum, I meant to add, the Great Barrier Reef is wonderful, and there are many gorgeous places all along the coast. My sister and her husband and kids once sailed the Whitsundays and she wrote to me from the boat, and ever since I've always wanted to do it. Here's a google image search for "the Whitsundays" — see what I mean ? http://bit.ly/1MWRkDx

    Reply
  73. Quantum, I meant to add, the Great Barrier Reef is wonderful, and there are many gorgeous places all along the coast. My sister and her husband and kids once sailed the Whitsundays and she wrote to me from the boat, and ever since I've always wanted to do it. Here's a google image search for "the Whitsundays" — see what I mean ? http://bit.ly/1MWRkDx

    Reply
  74. Quantum, I meant to add, the Great Barrier Reef is wonderful, and there are many gorgeous places all along the coast. My sister and her husband and kids once sailed the Whitsundays and she wrote to me from the boat, and ever since I've always wanted to do it. Here's a google image search for "the Whitsundays" — see what I mean ? http://bit.ly/1MWRkDx

    Reply
  75. Quantum, I meant to add, the Great Barrier Reef is wonderful, and there are many gorgeous places all along the coast. My sister and her husband and kids once sailed the Whitsundays and she wrote to me from the boat, and ever since I've always wanted to do it. Here's a google image search for "the Whitsundays" — see what I mean ? http://bit.ly/1MWRkDx

    Reply
  76. Claire, I don't know how many books I read while sitting in a tree. I have such precious, vivid memories of sitting high up in the branches, looking out from my own leafy castle — and then diving back into the world of the book. Thanks for reminding me.

    Reply
  77. Claire, I don't know how many books I read while sitting in a tree. I have such precious, vivid memories of sitting high up in the branches, looking out from my own leafy castle — and then diving back into the world of the book. Thanks for reminding me.

    Reply
  78. Claire, I don't know how many books I read while sitting in a tree. I have such precious, vivid memories of sitting high up in the branches, looking out from my own leafy castle — and then diving back into the world of the book. Thanks for reminding me.

    Reply
  79. Claire, I don't know how many books I read while sitting in a tree. I have such precious, vivid memories of sitting high up in the branches, looking out from my own leafy castle — and then diving back into the world of the book. Thanks for reminding me.

    Reply
  80. Claire, I don't know how many books I read while sitting in a tree. I have such precious, vivid memories of sitting high up in the branches, looking out from my own leafy castle — and then diving back into the world of the book. Thanks for reminding me.

    Reply
  81. Theo, it's hard for me to imagine the size of the Great Lakes, and not think of them as a sea. I've only seen them from a city hotel window.
    One day I'll get there and see them properly.

    Reply
  82. Theo, it's hard for me to imagine the size of the Great Lakes, and not think of them as a sea. I've only seen them from a city hotel window.
    One day I'll get there and see them properly.

    Reply
  83. Theo, it's hard for me to imagine the size of the Great Lakes, and not think of them as a sea. I've only seen them from a city hotel window.
    One day I'll get there and see them properly.

    Reply
  84. Theo, it's hard for me to imagine the size of the Great Lakes, and not think of them as a sea. I've only seen them from a city hotel window.
    One day I'll get there and see them properly.

    Reply
  85. Theo, it's hard for me to imagine the size of the Great Lakes, and not think of them as a sea. I've only seen them from a city hotel window.
    One day I'll get there and see them properly.

    Reply
  86. I live very near the Atlantic Ocean. The sound of the sea is wonderful, and the sunrises are beautiful. But I grew up in woods and mountains, so I think that’s what’s imprinted on my brain. My favorite place would be a lake in the woods, and going out in a canoe or kayak and just drifting. I would love to see the beach you are writing about on Phillip Island, it looks wonderful.
    I’m also a big fan of the Great Lakes, they are big enough that they go over the horizon, and you think you’re at the ocean. They get ocean-size storms too. I heard just the other day that Michigan has more lighthouses that any other state in the U.S.

    Reply
  87. I live very near the Atlantic Ocean. The sound of the sea is wonderful, and the sunrises are beautiful. But I grew up in woods and mountains, so I think that’s what’s imprinted on my brain. My favorite place would be a lake in the woods, and going out in a canoe or kayak and just drifting. I would love to see the beach you are writing about on Phillip Island, it looks wonderful.
    I’m also a big fan of the Great Lakes, they are big enough that they go over the horizon, and you think you’re at the ocean. They get ocean-size storms too. I heard just the other day that Michigan has more lighthouses that any other state in the U.S.

    Reply
  88. I live very near the Atlantic Ocean. The sound of the sea is wonderful, and the sunrises are beautiful. But I grew up in woods and mountains, so I think that’s what’s imprinted on my brain. My favorite place would be a lake in the woods, and going out in a canoe or kayak and just drifting. I would love to see the beach you are writing about on Phillip Island, it looks wonderful.
    I’m also a big fan of the Great Lakes, they are big enough that they go over the horizon, and you think you’re at the ocean. They get ocean-size storms too. I heard just the other day that Michigan has more lighthouses that any other state in the U.S.

    Reply
  89. I live very near the Atlantic Ocean. The sound of the sea is wonderful, and the sunrises are beautiful. But I grew up in woods and mountains, so I think that’s what’s imprinted on my brain. My favorite place would be a lake in the woods, and going out in a canoe or kayak and just drifting. I would love to see the beach you are writing about on Phillip Island, it looks wonderful.
    I’m also a big fan of the Great Lakes, they are big enough that they go over the horizon, and you think you’re at the ocean. They get ocean-size storms too. I heard just the other day that Michigan has more lighthouses that any other state in the U.S.

    Reply
  90. I live very near the Atlantic Ocean. The sound of the sea is wonderful, and the sunrises are beautiful. But I grew up in woods and mountains, so I think that’s what’s imprinted on my brain. My favorite place would be a lake in the woods, and going out in a canoe or kayak and just drifting. I would love to see the beach you are writing about on Phillip Island, it looks wonderful.
    I’m also a big fan of the Great Lakes, they are big enough that they go over the horizon, and you think you’re at the ocean. They get ocean-size storms too. I heard just the other day that Michigan has more lighthouses that any other state in the U.S.

    Reply
  91. Really a wonderful blog page, thank you for having showed me a part of Australia, it’s a part of world I’d like to visit one day, I leave in Italy, Rome, we have the sea but it’s very different from ocean… And besides if I had to go away to regenerate I’ll choose a green ambient, like the countryside, but it’s true what you said about the contact with natural environment, it replaces us, telling us we are just a part of it, not the centre of the universe as often seems, and we can discover again the beauty of nature, I’ve recently been in west US and visited Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego e San Francisco, really beautiful and amazing cities, but what struck me for its strongness, has been the Desert of Mohave, with the Grand Canyon view and the Parks, Yosemite and Sequoia… So wonderfully amazing!
    I wish one day I can walk on an Australian beach, passing under a tunnel like that in the picture!
    Laura.

    Reply
  92. Really a wonderful blog page, thank you for having showed me a part of Australia, it’s a part of world I’d like to visit one day, I leave in Italy, Rome, we have the sea but it’s very different from ocean… And besides if I had to go away to regenerate I’ll choose a green ambient, like the countryside, but it’s true what you said about the contact with natural environment, it replaces us, telling us we are just a part of it, not the centre of the universe as often seems, and we can discover again the beauty of nature, I’ve recently been in west US and visited Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego e San Francisco, really beautiful and amazing cities, but what struck me for its strongness, has been the Desert of Mohave, with the Grand Canyon view and the Parks, Yosemite and Sequoia… So wonderfully amazing!
    I wish one day I can walk on an Australian beach, passing under a tunnel like that in the picture!
    Laura.

    Reply
  93. Really a wonderful blog page, thank you for having showed me a part of Australia, it’s a part of world I’d like to visit one day, I leave in Italy, Rome, we have the sea but it’s very different from ocean… And besides if I had to go away to regenerate I’ll choose a green ambient, like the countryside, but it’s true what you said about the contact with natural environment, it replaces us, telling us we are just a part of it, not the centre of the universe as often seems, and we can discover again the beauty of nature, I’ve recently been in west US and visited Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego e San Francisco, really beautiful and amazing cities, but what struck me for its strongness, has been the Desert of Mohave, with the Grand Canyon view and the Parks, Yosemite and Sequoia… So wonderfully amazing!
    I wish one day I can walk on an Australian beach, passing under a tunnel like that in the picture!
    Laura.

    Reply
  94. Really a wonderful blog page, thank you for having showed me a part of Australia, it’s a part of world I’d like to visit one day, I leave in Italy, Rome, we have the sea but it’s very different from ocean… And besides if I had to go away to regenerate I’ll choose a green ambient, like the countryside, but it’s true what you said about the contact with natural environment, it replaces us, telling us we are just a part of it, not the centre of the universe as often seems, and we can discover again the beauty of nature, I’ve recently been in west US and visited Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego e San Francisco, really beautiful and amazing cities, but what struck me for its strongness, has been the Desert of Mohave, with the Grand Canyon view and the Parks, Yosemite and Sequoia… So wonderfully amazing!
    I wish one day I can walk on an Australian beach, passing under a tunnel like that in the picture!
    Laura.

    Reply
  95. Really a wonderful blog page, thank you for having showed me a part of Australia, it’s a part of world I’d like to visit one day, I leave in Italy, Rome, we have the sea but it’s very different from ocean… And besides if I had to go away to regenerate I’ll choose a green ambient, like the countryside, but it’s true what you said about the contact with natural environment, it replaces us, telling us we are just a part of it, not the centre of the universe as often seems, and we can discover again the beauty of nature, I’ve recently been in west US and visited Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego e San Francisco, really beautiful and amazing cities, but what struck me for its strongness, has been the Desert of Mohave, with the Grand Canyon view and the Parks, Yosemite and Sequoia… So wonderfully amazing!
    I wish one day I can walk on an Australian beach, passing under a tunnel like that in the picture!
    Laura.

    Reply
  96. Karin, drifting in a kayak on a lake surrounded by the forest sounds lovely, as does the idea of a storm on the Great Lakes. One of my favorite places that I sometimes retreat to has densely forested mountains (hills really) that come down to the sea, so you have forest, mountains beach and sea. Just perfect. And at this time of year the roadsides are thick with freesias that have naturalized and escaped into the wild — small creamy flowers that smell heavenly.

    Reply
  97. Karin, drifting in a kayak on a lake surrounded by the forest sounds lovely, as does the idea of a storm on the Great Lakes. One of my favorite places that I sometimes retreat to has densely forested mountains (hills really) that come down to the sea, so you have forest, mountains beach and sea. Just perfect. And at this time of year the roadsides are thick with freesias that have naturalized and escaped into the wild — small creamy flowers that smell heavenly.

    Reply
  98. Karin, drifting in a kayak on a lake surrounded by the forest sounds lovely, as does the idea of a storm on the Great Lakes. One of my favorite places that I sometimes retreat to has densely forested mountains (hills really) that come down to the sea, so you have forest, mountains beach and sea. Just perfect. And at this time of year the roadsides are thick with freesias that have naturalized and escaped into the wild — small creamy flowers that smell heavenly.

    Reply
  99. Karin, drifting in a kayak on a lake surrounded by the forest sounds lovely, as does the idea of a storm on the Great Lakes. One of my favorite places that I sometimes retreat to has densely forested mountains (hills really) that come down to the sea, so you have forest, mountains beach and sea. Just perfect. And at this time of year the roadsides are thick with freesias that have naturalized and escaped into the wild — small creamy flowers that smell heavenly.

    Reply
  100. Karin, drifting in a kayak on a lake surrounded by the forest sounds lovely, as does the idea of a storm on the Great Lakes. One of my favorite places that I sometimes retreat to has densely forested mountains (hills really) that come down to the sea, so you have forest, mountains beach and sea. Just perfect. And at this time of year the roadsides are thick with freesias that have naturalized and escaped into the wild — small creamy flowers that smell heavenly.

    Reply
  101. Hi Laura — thanks for dropping by. Italy has so many beautiful places, and the seaside is glorious — which is why some towns here are named after Italian seaside towns that became tourist destinations in the Victorian era. Here we have Sorrento and San Remo — San Remo is the gateway to Phillip Island in fact — but there are more in other parts of Australia.
    I know what you mean about the desert — it's so huge and stark and extreme — elemental.

    Reply
  102. Hi Laura — thanks for dropping by. Italy has so many beautiful places, and the seaside is glorious — which is why some towns here are named after Italian seaside towns that became tourist destinations in the Victorian era. Here we have Sorrento and San Remo — San Remo is the gateway to Phillip Island in fact — but there are more in other parts of Australia.
    I know what you mean about the desert — it's so huge and stark and extreme — elemental.

    Reply
  103. Hi Laura — thanks for dropping by. Italy has so many beautiful places, and the seaside is glorious — which is why some towns here are named after Italian seaside towns that became tourist destinations in the Victorian era. Here we have Sorrento and San Remo — San Remo is the gateway to Phillip Island in fact — but there are more in other parts of Australia.
    I know what you mean about the desert — it's so huge and stark and extreme — elemental.

    Reply
  104. Hi Laura — thanks for dropping by. Italy has so many beautiful places, and the seaside is glorious — which is why some towns here are named after Italian seaside towns that became tourist destinations in the Victorian era. Here we have Sorrento and San Remo — San Remo is the gateway to Phillip Island in fact — but there are more in other parts of Australia.
    I know what you mean about the desert — it's so huge and stark and extreme — elemental.

    Reply
  105. Hi Laura — thanks for dropping by. Italy has so many beautiful places, and the seaside is glorious — which is why some towns here are named after Italian seaside towns that became tourist destinations in the Victorian era. Here we have Sorrento and San Remo — San Remo is the gateway to Phillip Island in fact — but there are more in other parts of Australia.
    I know what you mean about the desert — it's so huge and stark and extreme — elemental.

    Reply

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