The Passage of Time

ClockChristina here. Before the pandemic, I think it’s fair to say that most of us were very aware of time and it was very important to us – even ruled our lives. We were setting alarms to get up in the morning, checking train or bus schedules to get to work by a certain time, having our lunch at a precise time, plus there were appointments to keep and tv programmes to watch. Being late was something we tried to avoid and we probably glanced at our watch (or the time display on our mobile) regularly, sometimes obsessively, during the day. My days weren’t quite so strictly scheduled as I’m self-employed and work from home, but when I still had my dogs (now sadly deceased), their stomachs had time-keeping down to a fine art. They structured my time and they would never have let me get away with not taking them for a walk at the same hour every day. In other words, I lived by the clock.

However, after nearly a year in lockdown, I’m finding that the concept of time is becoming very fluid. It’s almost as though we’re living in a dream, where everything is unreal or even surreal. There are no appointments, no specific times to keep, no rush or urgency about anything. The days simply float into one another seamlessly, with nothing to distinguish them from one another. Mostly I have no idea what day or date it is, and I find I don’t care because it doesn’t matter. The only day that registers even vaguely is Sunday, and that is only because I have a weekly chat scheduled then with two friends. And Sunday seems to come around approximately every second day!

Wikimedia Commons - Martin Olsson

Wikimedia Commons – Martin Olsson

This has made me wonder how our ancestors felt about time – was it important to them? Presumably, in the past, people weren’t ruled by the clock to the extent we are/were in this century. For one thing, poor people wouldn’t have owned a watch or any sort of timepiece, and presumably their chores had to be finished each day, no matter what time it was. Their bodies must have been used to certain routines, otherwise how would they have been able to wake up in time to do the milking each morning, for example? I’m guessing they had very well-developed internal body clocks.

For someone like me, who is a night owl, I would have been a disaster as a dairy maid or factory worker who had to start at the crack of dawn. When I’m asleep, nothing wakes me. Most of us are either owls or larks and I suppose the morning people of the past must have woken those who were more inclined to sleep late. Or perhaps they were eventually “re-programmed” somehow? Not sure I could be.

So who first started worrying about time? I went to look this up and fell down a research rabbit hole – here’s a potted history:-

Wikimedia Commons - Sids1 NZ

Wikimedia Commons – Sids1 NZ

Obviously, time was originally divided up into years, months, weeks and days using the sun and moon to figure out patterns. Even ancient civilisations could easily do this. Apparently the ancient Egyptians were the first to have some kind of sundials and, at some point, they started to split the day into equal parts. At that time, counting wasn’t based on the decimal system that we have. Instead they used the number 12 (duodecimal system), and this was probably either because that is the number of lunar cycles in a year or the number of joints we have on our hands. (Weirdly, they ignored the thumb and there are three joints in each of the other four fingers.)

They then also split the nights into 12 parts using certain stars for guidance, and that was the beginning of our current system. The Egyptians had something called a clepsydra, a water clock that uses a flow of water to measure time. With this they were able to tell how much time had passed even when it was dark. One of these has been found and dated to as early as 1400BC – ingenious! (The Chinese probably used something similar around the same time).

Wikimedia Commons -  Catlemur

Wikimedia Commons – Catlemur

Other ancient ways of measuring time are candle clocks (a candle with markings on it to indicate that a certain period of time has passed when it burns down) and the hourglass (probably invented after the clepsydra though).

It was the Greeks who thought up the concept of fixed length hours – their astronomers needed a better system for their calculations. A man called Hipparchus proposed that the day should be divided into 24 equinoctial hours, ie. based on the 12 hours each of daylight and darkness that could be measured on equinox days. But most normal people didn’t adopt this system and varied the hours according to season. Hours that were fixed at the same length didn’t really become the norm until mechanical clocks were invented in the 14th century.

The techniques that Hipparchus and others used had actually first been developed by the Babylonians, so were old already then. The Babylonians in turn had learned (or inherited the knowledge) from the Sumerians, who invented them around 2000 BC. They all used the duodecimal system too.

The Romans had both sun dials and water clocks, which were useful on days when there was no sun as well as during the night. Their understanding of time was a bit different to ours though and each day and night was divided into twelve hours (or parts) but these were not the same throughout the year. It varied from month to month and started at dawn, so that for example during winter, one hour could be 45 minutes long by our reckoning, while in the summer it could be as long as one and a half hour. Midnight was always the sixth hour of the night, and midday was easy to see obviously. They would refer to the time as the “first hour” – so just after the sun rose – the “second hour” and so on, up to the “twelfth hour” which was the one before sunset.

The Vikings didn’t count hours as far as I’ve been able to learn, and dawn, dusk and midday were probably the only times that registered with them.  In Scandinavia in winter daylight hours can be as few as four, whereas in summer the light continues through the night, so they would have had to adapt to that. I suppose if you’re spending most of your time inside a dim, smoky hall lit by oil lamps and a hearth, time is fairly immaterial.

UrAs I mentioned, mechanical clocks were invented in Europe around the beginning of the 14th century. They had something called a verge escapement mechanism (which works by moving something at regular intervals), and that stayed in use until the pendulum clock (using a swinging weight) was invented in 1656 by a Dutch scientist called Christiaan Huygens.

The so called mainspring – a sort of metal ribbon that is twisted into a spiral that unwinds – which was invented in the early 15th century, eventually developed into use for pocket watches. Huygens refined it into a spiral balance spring so that pocket watches became a lot more accurate. Minutes weren’t used until the end of the 16th century and seconds came much later. There was really no need for them at that time.

IMG_8142Watch and clockmakers were highly skilled and created some beautiful timepieces. My favourites are the silver and gold fob watches, especially Victorian ones. During the 20th century, pendulum clocks were replaced by quartz oscillators, and later the way of measuring time changed again when atomic clocks were invented. It’s amazing how accurately we can now measure it, down to tiny units like nano-seconds. (I watch a lot of motor racing with my husband and the margins when someone wins can be infinitesimal!)

When (if) the pandemic is over, will we all be more chilled about time or will we start rushing around again being ruled by small time-keeping devices? It will be interesting to see.

Has the pandemic affected the way you view time? And are you a night owl or a lark?

190 thoughts on “The Passage of Time”

  1. I have been retired for some years now, so the days had already begun to blend into a sameness and I’d have to think before I could remember what day it was. In the olden days when I followed certain TV shows that were on certain nights, I’d remember the day by what I watched last night – Monday it was Magnum PI, Thursday it was Remington Steele, Friday night it was The X Files, and so on – but now I don’t have any appointment viewing except for Svengoolie on Saturday nights. So that’s gone already.
    With the lockdown that smurging of time has accentuated. It’s nearly 1 am in LA as I write this, but it doesn’t matter when I get to bed anymore. Dates with friends are nonexistent, family meetings are rare. No reason not to sleep in mornings.
    I find myself looking at my phone or the bottom right hand corner of my monitor for the day and date in a way I never did before.
    I don’t know if this blursday feeling is going to be permanent but I suspect not. Life, I think, is going to return to whatever passes for normal with me, when I finish my vaccinations – and my friends too, and more restaurants and such open up so that we can meet. I don’t think any of us who have lived through this last twelve months will ever quite forget it, and I think some things have changed forever — but already I am seeing more people on the streets and in the stores, doing normal things, and they don’t look freaked out anymore.

    Reply
  2. I have been retired for some years now, so the days had already begun to blend into a sameness and I’d have to think before I could remember what day it was. In the olden days when I followed certain TV shows that were on certain nights, I’d remember the day by what I watched last night – Monday it was Magnum PI, Thursday it was Remington Steele, Friday night it was The X Files, and so on – but now I don’t have any appointment viewing except for Svengoolie on Saturday nights. So that’s gone already.
    With the lockdown that smurging of time has accentuated. It’s nearly 1 am in LA as I write this, but it doesn’t matter when I get to bed anymore. Dates with friends are nonexistent, family meetings are rare. No reason not to sleep in mornings.
    I find myself looking at my phone or the bottom right hand corner of my monitor for the day and date in a way I never did before.
    I don’t know if this blursday feeling is going to be permanent but I suspect not. Life, I think, is going to return to whatever passes for normal with me, when I finish my vaccinations – and my friends too, and more restaurants and such open up so that we can meet. I don’t think any of us who have lived through this last twelve months will ever quite forget it, and I think some things have changed forever — but already I am seeing more people on the streets and in the stores, doing normal things, and they don’t look freaked out anymore.

    Reply
  3. I have been retired for some years now, so the days had already begun to blend into a sameness and I’d have to think before I could remember what day it was. In the olden days when I followed certain TV shows that were on certain nights, I’d remember the day by what I watched last night – Monday it was Magnum PI, Thursday it was Remington Steele, Friday night it was The X Files, and so on – but now I don’t have any appointment viewing except for Svengoolie on Saturday nights. So that’s gone already.
    With the lockdown that smurging of time has accentuated. It’s nearly 1 am in LA as I write this, but it doesn’t matter when I get to bed anymore. Dates with friends are nonexistent, family meetings are rare. No reason not to sleep in mornings.
    I find myself looking at my phone or the bottom right hand corner of my monitor for the day and date in a way I never did before.
    I don’t know if this blursday feeling is going to be permanent but I suspect not. Life, I think, is going to return to whatever passes for normal with me, when I finish my vaccinations – and my friends too, and more restaurants and such open up so that we can meet. I don’t think any of us who have lived through this last twelve months will ever quite forget it, and I think some things have changed forever — but already I am seeing more people on the streets and in the stores, doing normal things, and they don’t look freaked out anymore.

    Reply
  4. I have been retired for some years now, so the days had already begun to blend into a sameness and I’d have to think before I could remember what day it was. In the olden days when I followed certain TV shows that were on certain nights, I’d remember the day by what I watched last night – Monday it was Magnum PI, Thursday it was Remington Steele, Friday night it was The X Files, and so on – but now I don’t have any appointment viewing except for Svengoolie on Saturday nights. So that’s gone already.
    With the lockdown that smurging of time has accentuated. It’s nearly 1 am in LA as I write this, but it doesn’t matter when I get to bed anymore. Dates with friends are nonexistent, family meetings are rare. No reason not to sleep in mornings.
    I find myself looking at my phone or the bottom right hand corner of my monitor for the day and date in a way I never did before.
    I don’t know if this blursday feeling is going to be permanent but I suspect not. Life, I think, is going to return to whatever passes for normal with me, when I finish my vaccinations – and my friends too, and more restaurants and such open up so that we can meet. I don’t think any of us who have lived through this last twelve months will ever quite forget it, and I think some things have changed forever — but already I am seeing more people on the streets and in the stores, doing normal things, and they don’t look freaked out anymore.

    Reply
  5. I have been retired for some years now, so the days had already begun to blend into a sameness and I’d have to think before I could remember what day it was. In the olden days when I followed certain TV shows that were on certain nights, I’d remember the day by what I watched last night – Monday it was Magnum PI, Thursday it was Remington Steele, Friday night it was The X Files, and so on – but now I don’t have any appointment viewing except for Svengoolie on Saturday nights. So that’s gone already.
    With the lockdown that smurging of time has accentuated. It’s nearly 1 am in LA as I write this, but it doesn’t matter when I get to bed anymore. Dates with friends are nonexistent, family meetings are rare. No reason not to sleep in mornings.
    I find myself looking at my phone or the bottom right hand corner of my monitor for the day and date in a way I never did before.
    I don’t know if this blursday feeling is going to be permanent but I suspect not. Life, I think, is going to return to whatever passes for normal with me, when I finish my vaccinations – and my friends too, and more restaurants and such open up so that we can meet. I don’t think any of us who have lived through this last twelve months will ever quite forget it, and I think some things have changed forever — but already I am seeing more people on the streets and in the stores, doing normal things, and they don’t look freaked out anymore.

    Reply
  6. Even before the pandemic, I’d lost my sense of time. If I ever had circadian rhythms, they’re long gone. I live with my cat, Sammy, who also doesn’t keep time, so we rise, eat, go on the occasional grocery or library run (just me for that), and go to bed when we’re ready to. No two days are alike. Does this work? Marginally, since I don’t always remember to brush my teeth or take my meds. Will I keep doing it? Pretty sure the answer’s yes.

    Reply
  7. Even before the pandemic, I’d lost my sense of time. If I ever had circadian rhythms, they’re long gone. I live with my cat, Sammy, who also doesn’t keep time, so we rise, eat, go on the occasional grocery or library run (just me for that), and go to bed when we’re ready to. No two days are alike. Does this work? Marginally, since I don’t always remember to brush my teeth or take my meds. Will I keep doing it? Pretty sure the answer’s yes.

    Reply
  8. Even before the pandemic, I’d lost my sense of time. If I ever had circadian rhythms, they’re long gone. I live with my cat, Sammy, who also doesn’t keep time, so we rise, eat, go on the occasional grocery or library run (just me for that), and go to bed when we’re ready to. No two days are alike. Does this work? Marginally, since I don’t always remember to brush my teeth or take my meds. Will I keep doing it? Pretty sure the answer’s yes.

    Reply
  9. Even before the pandemic, I’d lost my sense of time. If I ever had circadian rhythms, they’re long gone. I live with my cat, Sammy, who also doesn’t keep time, so we rise, eat, go on the occasional grocery or library run (just me for that), and go to bed when we’re ready to. No two days are alike. Does this work? Marginally, since I don’t always remember to brush my teeth or take my meds. Will I keep doing it? Pretty sure the answer’s yes.

    Reply
  10. Even before the pandemic, I’d lost my sense of time. If I ever had circadian rhythms, they’re long gone. I live with my cat, Sammy, who also doesn’t keep time, so we rise, eat, go on the occasional grocery or library run (just me for that), and go to bed when we’re ready to. No two days are alike. Does this work? Marginally, since I don’t always remember to brush my teeth or take my meds. Will I keep doing it? Pretty sure the answer’s yes.

    Reply
  11. I think you’re probably right, Janice – things will go back to more or less how they were before but as you say, we won’t forget this. Perhaps that means we’ll appreciate “normality”, whatever that is, more? I used to do the same with TV shows but now I mostly read.

    Reply
  12. I think you’re probably right, Janice – things will go back to more or less how they were before but as you say, we won’t forget this. Perhaps that means we’ll appreciate “normality”, whatever that is, more? I used to do the same with TV shows but now I mostly read.

    Reply
  13. I think you’re probably right, Janice – things will go back to more or less how they were before but as you say, we won’t forget this. Perhaps that means we’ll appreciate “normality”, whatever that is, more? I used to do the same with TV shows but now I mostly read.

    Reply
  14. I think you’re probably right, Janice – things will go back to more or less how they were before but as you say, we won’t forget this. Perhaps that means we’ll appreciate “normality”, whatever that is, more? I used to do the same with TV shows but now I mostly read.

    Reply
  15. I think you’re probably right, Janice – things will go back to more or less how they were before but as you say, we won’t forget this. Perhaps that means we’ll appreciate “normality”, whatever that is, more? I used to do the same with TV shows but now I mostly read.

    Reply
  16. That sounds very relaxing, Mary, and perhaps that is one thing the pandemic has taught us all – to chill more. People have certainly had time to do things they might not usually do while they’ve been stuck at home. Although I must admit I had a lot of good intentions about clearing cupboards etc that haven’t yet been acted upon.

    Reply
  17. That sounds very relaxing, Mary, and perhaps that is one thing the pandemic has taught us all – to chill more. People have certainly had time to do things they might not usually do while they’ve been stuck at home. Although I must admit I had a lot of good intentions about clearing cupboards etc that haven’t yet been acted upon.

    Reply
  18. That sounds very relaxing, Mary, and perhaps that is one thing the pandemic has taught us all – to chill more. People have certainly had time to do things they might not usually do while they’ve been stuck at home. Although I must admit I had a lot of good intentions about clearing cupboards etc that haven’t yet been acted upon.

    Reply
  19. That sounds very relaxing, Mary, and perhaps that is one thing the pandemic has taught us all – to chill more. People have certainly had time to do things they might not usually do while they’ve been stuck at home. Although I must admit I had a lot of good intentions about clearing cupboards etc that haven’t yet been acted upon.

    Reply
  20. That sounds very relaxing, Mary, and perhaps that is one thing the pandemic has taught us all – to chill more. People have certainly had time to do things they might not usually do while they’ve been stuck at home. Although I must admit I had a lot of good intentions about clearing cupboards etc that haven’t yet been acted upon.

    Reply
  21. I still use an alarm for week days since my son is in high school. He attending in person which means a 5 am wake up time. I can keep track of time but have a hard time keeping track of the date. My son is my reminder! 😊

    Reply
  22. I still use an alarm for week days since my son is in high school. He attending in person which means a 5 am wake up time. I can keep track of time but have a hard time keeping track of the date. My son is my reminder! 😊

    Reply
  23. I still use an alarm for week days since my son is in high school. He attending in person which means a 5 am wake up time. I can keep track of time but have a hard time keeping track of the date. My son is my reminder! 😊

    Reply
  24. I still use an alarm for week days since my son is in high school. He attending in person which means a 5 am wake up time. I can keep track of time but have a hard time keeping track of the date. My son is my reminder! 😊

    Reply
  25. I still use an alarm for week days since my son is in high school. He attending in person which means a 5 am wake up time. I can keep track of time but have a hard time keeping track of the date. My son is my reminder! 😊

    Reply
  26. 5 am – that’s the middle of the night for a night owl like me (or sometimes I’m still awake at that time reading :-). Yes, I guess I forgot about the fact that some kids are still in school and some routines have to continue even during the pandemic. I’m very lucky I don’t need to chase my daughters out of bed any longer – it was always a battle as they have the same body clocks as me.

    Reply
  27. 5 am – that’s the middle of the night for a night owl like me (or sometimes I’m still awake at that time reading :-). Yes, I guess I forgot about the fact that some kids are still in school and some routines have to continue even during the pandemic. I’m very lucky I don’t need to chase my daughters out of bed any longer – it was always a battle as they have the same body clocks as me.

    Reply
  28. 5 am – that’s the middle of the night for a night owl like me (or sometimes I’m still awake at that time reading :-). Yes, I guess I forgot about the fact that some kids are still in school and some routines have to continue even during the pandemic. I’m very lucky I don’t need to chase my daughters out of bed any longer – it was always a battle as they have the same body clocks as me.

    Reply
  29. 5 am – that’s the middle of the night for a night owl like me (or sometimes I’m still awake at that time reading :-). Yes, I guess I forgot about the fact that some kids are still in school and some routines have to continue even during the pandemic. I’m very lucky I don’t need to chase my daughters out of bed any longer – it was always a battle as they have the same body clocks as me.

    Reply
  30. 5 am – that’s the middle of the night for a night owl like me (or sometimes I’m still awake at that time reading :-). Yes, I guess I forgot about the fact that some kids are still in school and some routines have to continue even during the pandemic. I’m very lucky I don’t need to chase my daughters out of bed any longer – it was always a battle as they have the same body clocks as me.

    Reply
  31. Interesting rabbit hole Christina!
    On visits to old houses (National Trust properties) I’m always intrigued by the pendulum clocks that are often on display. I would like to own a pair which I would hang fairly close to observe the pendulum swings synchronizing through resonance entrainment. Alas my wife is not keen as the tick tock sound would annoy!
    If you google ‘arrow of time’ you might end up in another rabbit hole. In maths and science time is a kinematic concept for measuring motion. For small systems with no friction e.g. a smooth box containing a few smooth balls, there is no preferred direction to time. Reversing all velocities to allow time to run backwards looks the same as time running forwards. Its called time-reversal symmetry. To explain why we experience a causal world with time flowing from past to future needs the concept of increasing entropy from thermodynamics. It puzzled philosophers and scientists for a long time but of course it is obvious to the man in the street …. things simply age!
    I think I am a creature of habit ruled by my stomach. I feel hungry at regular times!

    Reply
  32. Interesting rabbit hole Christina!
    On visits to old houses (National Trust properties) I’m always intrigued by the pendulum clocks that are often on display. I would like to own a pair which I would hang fairly close to observe the pendulum swings synchronizing through resonance entrainment. Alas my wife is not keen as the tick tock sound would annoy!
    If you google ‘arrow of time’ you might end up in another rabbit hole. In maths and science time is a kinematic concept for measuring motion. For small systems with no friction e.g. a smooth box containing a few smooth balls, there is no preferred direction to time. Reversing all velocities to allow time to run backwards looks the same as time running forwards. Its called time-reversal symmetry. To explain why we experience a causal world with time flowing from past to future needs the concept of increasing entropy from thermodynamics. It puzzled philosophers and scientists for a long time but of course it is obvious to the man in the street …. things simply age!
    I think I am a creature of habit ruled by my stomach. I feel hungry at regular times!

    Reply
  33. Interesting rabbit hole Christina!
    On visits to old houses (National Trust properties) I’m always intrigued by the pendulum clocks that are often on display. I would like to own a pair which I would hang fairly close to observe the pendulum swings synchronizing through resonance entrainment. Alas my wife is not keen as the tick tock sound would annoy!
    If you google ‘arrow of time’ you might end up in another rabbit hole. In maths and science time is a kinematic concept for measuring motion. For small systems with no friction e.g. a smooth box containing a few smooth balls, there is no preferred direction to time. Reversing all velocities to allow time to run backwards looks the same as time running forwards. Its called time-reversal symmetry. To explain why we experience a causal world with time flowing from past to future needs the concept of increasing entropy from thermodynamics. It puzzled philosophers and scientists for a long time but of course it is obvious to the man in the street …. things simply age!
    I think I am a creature of habit ruled by my stomach. I feel hungry at regular times!

    Reply
  34. Interesting rabbit hole Christina!
    On visits to old houses (National Trust properties) I’m always intrigued by the pendulum clocks that are often on display. I would like to own a pair which I would hang fairly close to observe the pendulum swings synchronizing through resonance entrainment. Alas my wife is not keen as the tick tock sound would annoy!
    If you google ‘arrow of time’ you might end up in another rabbit hole. In maths and science time is a kinematic concept for measuring motion. For small systems with no friction e.g. a smooth box containing a few smooth balls, there is no preferred direction to time. Reversing all velocities to allow time to run backwards looks the same as time running forwards. Its called time-reversal symmetry. To explain why we experience a causal world with time flowing from past to future needs the concept of increasing entropy from thermodynamics. It puzzled philosophers and scientists for a long time but of course it is obvious to the man in the street …. things simply age!
    I think I am a creature of habit ruled by my stomach. I feel hungry at regular times!

    Reply
  35. Interesting rabbit hole Christina!
    On visits to old houses (National Trust properties) I’m always intrigued by the pendulum clocks that are often on display. I would like to own a pair which I would hang fairly close to observe the pendulum swings synchronizing through resonance entrainment. Alas my wife is not keen as the tick tock sound would annoy!
    If you google ‘arrow of time’ you might end up in another rabbit hole. In maths and science time is a kinematic concept for measuring motion. For small systems with no friction e.g. a smooth box containing a few smooth balls, there is no preferred direction to time. Reversing all velocities to allow time to run backwards looks the same as time running forwards. Its called time-reversal symmetry. To explain why we experience a causal world with time flowing from past to future needs the concept of increasing entropy from thermodynamics. It puzzled philosophers and scientists for a long time but of course it is obvious to the man in the street …. things simply age!
    I think I am a creature of habit ruled by my stomach. I feel hungry at regular times!

    Reply
  36. Well, thank you, this was a very informative post. I learned me some new things today.
    I too, have been retired for some time now (12 years) so time doesn’t quite have the same meaning as it once had. I tend to think of the past in terms of pre and post retirement. Funny thing is, it is the post retirement years that I have a hard time pinning down. I find myself thinking – did that happen two years ago or five years ago?
    I’m a morning person and an early riser (5 am) – I always have been. My most productive hours are in the morning. Nowadays, if I don’t have a task done by 1 or 2 in the afternoon – it won’t get done. But I am still able to remember what day and date it is when I wake up in the morning. I fear that there may come a day when I have to check my pill box to see what day it is (smile).
    BTW, I like thinking of myself as a lark.

    Reply
  37. Well, thank you, this was a very informative post. I learned me some new things today.
    I too, have been retired for some time now (12 years) so time doesn’t quite have the same meaning as it once had. I tend to think of the past in terms of pre and post retirement. Funny thing is, it is the post retirement years that I have a hard time pinning down. I find myself thinking – did that happen two years ago or five years ago?
    I’m a morning person and an early riser (5 am) – I always have been. My most productive hours are in the morning. Nowadays, if I don’t have a task done by 1 or 2 in the afternoon – it won’t get done. But I am still able to remember what day and date it is when I wake up in the morning. I fear that there may come a day when I have to check my pill box to see what day it is (smile).
    BTW, I like thinking of myself as a lark.

    Reply
  38. Well, thank you, this was a very informative post. I learned me some new things today.
    I too, have been retired for some time now (12 years) so time doesn’t quite have the same meaning as it once had. I tend to think of the past in terms of pre and post retirement. Funny thing is, it is the post retirement years that I have a hard time pinning down. I find myself thinking – did that happen two years ago or five years ago?
    I’m a morning person and an early riser (5 am) – I always have been. My most productive hours are in the morning. Nowadays, if I don’t have a task done by 1 or 2 in the afternoon – it won’t get done. But I am still able to remember what day and date it is when I wake up in the morning. I fear that there may come a day when I have to check my pill box to see what day it is (smile).
    BTW, I like thinking of myself as a lark.

    Reply
  39. Well, thank you, this was a very informative post. I learned me some new things today.
    I too, have been retired for some time now (12 years) so time doesn’t quite have the same meaning as it once had. I tend to think of the past in terms of pre and post retirement. Funny thing is, it is the post retirement years that I have a hard time pinning down. I find myself thinking – did that happen two years ago or five years ago?
    I’m a morning person and an early riser (5 am) – I always have been. My most productive hours are in the morning. Nowadays, if I don’t have a task done by 1 or 2 in the afternoon – it won’t get done. But I am still able to remember what day and date it is when I wake up in the morning. I fear that there may come a day when I have to check my pill box to see what day it is (smile).
    BTW, I like thinking of myself as a lark.

    Reply
  40. Well, thank you, this was a very informative post. I learned me some new things today.
    I too, have been retired for some time now (12 years) so time doesn’t quite have the same meaning as it once had. I tend to think of the past in terms of pre and post retirement. Funny thing is, it is the post retirement years that I have a hard time pinning down. I find myself thinking – did that happen two years ago or five years ago?
    I’m a morning person and an early riser (5 am) – I always have been. My most productive hours are in the morning. Nowadays, if I don’t have a task done by 1 or 2 in the afternoon – it won’t get done. But I am still able to remember what day and date it is when I wake up in the morning. I fear that there may come a day when I have to check my pill box to see what day it is (smile).
    BTW, I like thinking of myself as a lark.

    Reply
  41. This was a really interesting post! I very much enjoyed reading it and learning about the different ways people measured time in the past. Thanks!

    Reply
  42. This was a really interesting post! I very much enjoyed reading it and learning about the different ways people measured time in the past. Thanks!

    Reply
  43. This was a really interesting post! I very much enjoyed reading it and learning about the different ways people measured time in the past. Thanks!

    Reply
  44. This was a really interesting post! I very much enjoyed reading it and learning about the different ways people measured time in the past. Thanks!

    Reply
  45. This was a really interesting post! I very much enjoyed reading it and learning about the different ways people measured time in the past. Thanks!

    Reply
  46. I’m with you on being ruled by my stomach, Quantum! As for the ‘arrow of time’ that’s fascinating and of course I’m always interested in concepts of time since I write about time travel – thank you. I’ve often thought I’d like a big grandfather type clock in the hallway but then I realise the loud ticking (and bonging every hour) would probably drive me insane. They do look so nice though!

    Reply
  47. I’m with you on being ruled by my stomach, Quantum! As for the ‘arrow of time’ that’s fascinating and of course I’m always interested in concepts of time since I write about time travel – thank you. I’ve often thought I’d like a big grandfather type clock in the hallway but then I realise the loud ticking (and bonging every hour) would probably drive me insane. They do look so nice though!

    Reply
  48. I’m with you on being ruled by my stomach, Quantum! As for the ‘arrow of time’ that’s fascinating and of course I’m always interested in concepts of time since I write about time travel – thank you. I’ve often thought I’d like a big grandfather type clock in the hallway but then I realise the loud ticking (and bonging every hour) would probably drive me insane. They do look so nice though!

    Reply
  49. I’m with you on being ruled by my stomach, Quantum! As for the ‘arrow of time’ that’s fascinating and of course I’m always interested in concepts of time since I write about time travel – thank you. I’ve often thought I’d like a big grandfather type clock in the hallway but then I realise the loud ticking (and bonging every hour) would probably drive me insane. They do look so nice though!

    Reply
  50. I’m with you on being ruled by my stomach, Quantum! As for the ‘arrow of time’ that’s fascinating and of course I’m always interested in concepts of time since I write about time travel – thank you. I’ve often thought I’d like a big grandfather type clock in the hallway but then I realise the loud ticking (and bonging every hour) would probably drive me insane. They do look so nice though!

    Reply
  51. It’s a good thing we’re all different, Mary! And I agree it gets more and more difficult to remember when something happened as the years go by so quickly. I’m the opposite to you – most of the things I need to do get done in the afternoon or evening. I’m useless in the mornings 🙂

    Reply
  52. It’s a good thing we’re all different, Mary! And I agree it gets more and more difficult to remember when something happened as the years go by so quickly. I’m the opposite to you – most of the things I need to do get done in the afternoon or evening. I’m useless in the mornings 🙂

    Reply
  53. It’s a good thing we’re all different, Mary! And I agree it gets more and more difficult to remember when something happened as the years go by so quickly. I’m the opposite to you – most of the things I need to do get done in the afternoon or evening. I’m useless in the mornings 🙂

    Reply
  54. It’s a good thing we’re all different, Mary! And I agree it gets more and more difficult to remember when something happened as the years go by so quickly. I’m the opposite to you – most of the things I need to do get done in the afternoon or evening. I’m useless in the mornings 🙂

    Reply
  55. It’s a good thing we’re all different, Mary! And I agree it gets more and more difficult to remember when something happened as the years go by so quickly. I’m the opposite to you – most of the things I need to do get done in the afternoon or evening. I’m useless in the mornings 🙂

    Reply
  56. This was a very interesting post; but time did me in with it. Because I wasn’t informed of it until just now!
    I have been retired for nearly as many years as I worked at editing! So I lost my calender years ago. I make sure the computer reminds us of doctor appointments (and my husband also does this). Otherwise general time doesn’t matter. I don’t attend online events because the hearing problem gets in the way.
    BUT daily medicines keep me “on the clock”; I have set up a rough timed cycle for taking my 10 pills. Only one pill has been scheduled by prescription. But I have no interest in swallowing 9 pills at one sitting. So I have set up a schedule for them. The cut off time is controlled by the time for my evening blood sugar reading. I double up without danger whenever I forget. But there are still 3 ‘”piil times” and 2 blood sugar times in each day.
    I have never had a normal sleep cycle. Probably I never will, so I didn’t even think about those times as I read this article.

    Reply
  57. This was a very interesting post; but time did me in with it. Because I wasn’t informed of it until just now!
    I have been retired for nearly as many years as I worked at editing! So I lost my calender years ago. I make sure the computer reminds us of doctor appointments (and my husband also does this). Otherwise general time doesn’t matter. I don’t attend online events because the hearing problem gets in the way.
    BUT daily medicines keep me “on the clock”; I have set up a rough timed cycle for taking my 10 pills. Only one pill has been scheduled by prescription. But I have no interest in swallowing 9 pills at one sitting. So I have set up a schedule for them. The cut off time is controlled by the time for my evening blood sugar reading. I double up without danger whenever I forget. But there are still 3 ‘”piil times” and 2 blood sugar times in each day.
    I have never had a normal sleep cycle. Probably I never will, so I didn’t even think about those times as I read this article.

    Reply
  58. This was a very interesting post; but time did me in with it. Because I wasn’t informed of it until just now!
    I have been retired for nearly as many years as I worked at editing! So I lost my calender years ago. I make sure the computer reminds us of doctor appointments (and my husband also does this). Otherwise general time doesn’t matter. I don’t attend online events because the hearing problem gets in the way.
    BUT daily medicines keep me “on the clock”; I have set up a rough timed cycle for taking my 10 pills. Only one pill has been scheduled by prescription. But I have no interest in swallowing 9 pills at one sitting. So I have set up a schedule for them. The cut off time is controlled by the time for my evening blood sugar reading. I double up without danger whenever I forget. But there are still 3 ‘”piil times” and 2 blood sugar times in each day.
    I have never had a normal sleep cycle. Probably I never will, so I didn’t even think about those times as I read this article.

    Reply
  59. This was a very interesting post; but time did me in with it. Because I wasn’t informed of it until just now!
    I have been retired for nearly as many years as I worked at editing! So I lost my calender years ago. I make sure the computer reminds us of doctor appointments (and my husband also does this). Otherwise general time doesn’t matter. I don’t attend online events because the hearing problem gets in the way.
    BUT daily medicines keep me “on the clock”; I have set up a rough timed cycle for taking my 10 pills. Only one pill has been scheduled by prescription. But I have no interest in swallowing 9 pills at one sitting. So I have set up a schedule for them. The cut off time is controlled by the time for my evening blood sugar reading. I double up without danger whenever I forget. But there are still 3 ‘”piil times” and 2 blood sugar times in each day.
    I have never had a normal sleep cycle. Probably I never will, so I didn’t even think about those times as I read this article.

    Reply
  60. This was a very interesting post; but time did me in with it. Because I wasn’t informed of it until just now!
    I have been retired for nearly as many years as I worked at editing! So I lost my calender years ago. I make sure the computer reminds us of doctor appointments (and my husband also does this). Otherwise general time doesn’t matter. I don’t attend online events because the hearing problem gets in the way.
    BUT daily medicines keep me “on the clock”; I have set up a rough timed cycle for taking my 10 pills. Only one pill has been scheduled by prescription. But I have no interest in swallowing 9 pills at one sitting. So I have set up a schedule for them. The cut off time is controlled by the time for my evening blood sugar reading. I double up without danger whenever I forget. But there are still 3 ‘”piil times” and 2 blood sugar times in each day.
    I have never had a normal sleep cycle. Probably I never will, so I didn’t even think about those times as I read this article.

    Reply
  61. Setting up alerts on the computer or mobile is a great way to remember things, isn’t it! I always set the alarm on my mobile if I need to do something as I know that it’s always in my pocket. (And don’t get me started on how dependent I am on that!) Must be difficult to have to keep track of lots of different pill times but I’m glad you’ve got it all sorted. I only take one kind of medication at the moment and have trained myself to do it when I get ready for bed. Still manage to forget occasionally, but mostly not. Glad you found the post interesting – thank you!

    Reply
  62. Setting up alerts on the computer or mobile is a great way to remember things, isn’t it! I always set the alarm on my mobile if I need to do something as I know that it’s always in my pocket. (And don’t get me started on how dependent I am on that!) Must be difficult to have to keep track of lots of different pill times but I’m glad you’ve got it all sorted. I only take one kind of medication at the moment and have trained myself to do it when I get ready for bed. Still manage to forget occasionally, but mostly not. Glad you found the post interesting – thank you!

    Reply
  63. Setting up alerts on the computer or mobile is a great way to remember things, isn’t it! I always set the alarm on my mobile if I need to do something as I know that it’s always in my pocket. (And don’t get me started on how dependent I am on that!) Must be difficult to have to keep track of lots of different pill times but I’m glad you’ve got it all sorted. I only take one kind of medication at the moment and have trained myself to do it when I get ready for bed. Still manage to forget occasionally, but mostly not. Glad you found the post interesting – thank you!

    Reply
  64. Setting up alerts on the computer or mobile is a great way to remember things, isn’t it! I always set the alarm on my mobile if I need to do something as I know that it’s always in my pocket. (And don’t get me started on how dependent I am on that!) Must be difficult to have to keep track of lots of different pill times but I’m glad you’ve got it all sorted. I only take one kind of medication at the moment and have trained myself to do it when I get ready for bed. Still manage to forget occasionally, but mostly not. Glad you found the post interesting – thank you!

    Reply
  65. Setting up alerts on the computer or mobile is a great way to remember things, isn’t it! I always set the alarm on my mobile if I need to do something as I know that it’s always in my pocket. (And don’t get me started on how dependent I am on that!) Must be difficult to have to keep track of lots of different pill times but I’m glad you’ve got it all sorted. I only take one kind of medication at the moment and have trained myself to do it when I get ready for bed. Still manage to forget occasionally, but mostly not. Glad you found the post interesting – thank you!

    Reply
  66. Thank you for an informative post, Christina.
    Growing up, my parents obtained a reproduction of an old (~1400s?) wooden clock which had one hand. It looked something like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352125264589860972/
    If it was midway between two hours, it was half past the hour. If it was a quarter of the way, it was quarter past the hour. It was definitely out of the ordinary.
    I have night owl tendencies. My knowledge of day of the week mostly comes from my husband’s teaching and tutoring schedule.

    Reply
  67. Thank you for an informative post, Christina.
    Growing up, my parents obtained a reproduction of an old (~1400s?) wooden clock which had one hand. It looked something like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352125264589860972/
    If it was midway between two hours, it was half past the hour. If it was a quarter of the way, it was quarter past the hour. It was definitely out of the ordinary.
    I have night owl tendencies. My knowledge of day of the week mostly comes from my husband’s teaching and tutoring schedule.

    Reply
  68. Thank you for an informative post, Christina.
    Growing up, my parents obtained a reproduction of an old (~1400s?) wooden clock which had one hand. It looked something like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352125264589860972/
    If it was midway between two hours, it was half past the hour. If it was a quarter of the way, it was quarter past the hour. It was definitely out of the ordinary.
    I have night owl tendencies. My knowledge of day of the week mostly comes from my husband’s teaching and tutoring schedule.

    Reply
  69. Thank you for an informative post, Christina.
    Growing up, my parents obtained a reproduction of an old (~1400s?) wooden clock which had one hand. It looked something like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352125264589860972/
    If it was midway between two hours, it was half past the hour. If it was a quarter of the way, it was quarter past the hour. It was definitely out of the ordinary.
    I have night owl tendencies. My knowledge of day of the week mostly comes from my husband’s teaching and tutoring schedule.

    Reply
  70. Thank you for an informative post, Christina.
    Growing up, my parents obtained a reproduction of an old (~1400s?) wooden clock which had one hand. It looked something like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352125264589860972/
    If it was midway between two hours, it was half past the hour. If it was a quarter of the way, it was quarter past the hour. It was definitely out of the ordinary.
    I have night owl tendencies. My knowledge of day of the week mostly comes from my husband’s teaching and tutoring schedule.

    Reply
  71. That’s an amazing old clock, Kareni! Ingenious really, how those work and how our ancestors invented these things. Thank you for sharing that!

    Reply
  72. That’s an amazing old clock, Kareni! Ingenious really, how those work and how our ancestors invented these things. Thank you for sharing that!

    Reply
  73. That’s an amazing old clock, Kareni! Ingenious really, how those work and how our ancestors invented these things. Thank you for sharing that!

    Reply
  74. That’s an amazing old clock, Kareni! Ingenious really, how those work and how our ancestors invented these things. Thank you for sharing that!

    Reply
  75. That’s an amazing old clock, Kareni! Ingenious really, how those work and how our ancestors invented these things. Thank you for sharing that!

    Reply
  76. Fascinating, Christina! Being self employed makes it easier to set my own schedule, but sometimes, I have to get up earlier than I like–and I resent it! (Yes, I’m an owl. *G*)

    Reply
  77. Fascinating, Christina! Being self employed makes it easier to set my own schedule, but sometimes, I have to get up earlier than I like–and I resent it! (Yes, I’m an owl. *G*)

    Reply
  78. Fascinating, Christina! Being self employed makes it easier to set my own schedule, but sometimes, I have to get up earlier than I like–and I resent it! (Yes, I’m an owl. *G*)

    Reply
  79. Fascinating, Christina! Being self employed makes it easier to set my own schedule, but sometimes, I have to get up earlier than I like–and I resent it! (Yes, I’m an owl. *G*)

    Reply
  80. Fascinating, Christina! Being self employed makes it easier to set my own schedule, but sometimes, I have to get up earlier than I like–and I resent it! (Yes, I’m an owl. *G*)

    Reply
  81. Christina – what a wonderful post about time. Several in our family love clocks of all kinds. My brother lives in a small house but has a Grandmother clock as well as a cuckoo clock and several digital ones as well. I love to hear them all go off at various times. We grew up with cuckoo clocks.
    So happy to read, so many others who are retired, how the days and the time are not a constant drive to keep us on schedule. I also have found that every morning I wake I need to remind myself what day of the week, what date and then if there is anything I need to do today. I have to place a note on the floor with a message to remind me what I must not miss today. Life has changed since retirement. I worked all my life and had to stick to a schedule.
    Covid has just kept me at home more than I would like to.
    I am a night owl but most days, I have to rise early due to my cat waking me up and insisting that I must wait on her. I love to read till 1 or 2 am. Luckily I have done well with 6 hours of sleep all my life.
    I will re-read your post as there is so much to absorb and follow even further. Thank you.

    Reply
  82. Christina – what a wonderful post about time. Several in our family love clocks of all kinds. My brother lives in a small house but has a Grandmother clock as well as a cuckoo clock and several digital ones as well. I love to hear them all go off at various times. We grew up with cuckoo clocks.
    So happy to read, so many others who are retired, how the days and the time are not a constant drive to keep us on schedule. I also have found that every morning I wake I need to remind myself what day of the week, what date and then if there is anything I need to do today. I have to place a note on the floor with a message to remind me what I must not miss today. Life has changed since retirement. I worked all my life and had to stick to a schedule.
    Covid has just kept me at home more than I would like to.
    I am a night owl but most days, I have to rise early due to my cat waking me up and insisting that I must wait on her. I love to read till 1 or 2 am. Luckily I have done well with 6 hours of sleep all my life.
    I will re-read your post as there is so much to absorb and follow even further. Thank you.

    Reply
  83. Christina – what a wonderful post about time. Several in our family love clocks of all kinds. My brother lives in a small house but has a Grandmother clock as well as a cuckoo clock and several digital ones as well. I love to hear them all go off at various times. We grew up with cuckoo clocks.
    So happy to read, so many others who are retired, how the days and the time are not a constant drive to keep us on schedule. I also have found that every morning I wake I need to remind myself what day of the week, what date and then if there is anything I need to do today. I have to place a note on the floor with a message to remind me what I must not miss today. Life has changed since retirement. I worked all my life and had to stick to a schedule.
    Covid has just kept me at home more than I would like to.
    I am a night owl but most days, I have to rise early due to my cat waking me up and insisting that I must wait on her. I love to read till 1 or 2 am. Luckily I have done well with 6 hours of sleep all my life.
    I will re-read your post as there is so much to absorb and follow even further. Thank you.

    Reply
  84. Christina – what a wonderful post about time. Several in our family love clocks of all kinds. My brother lives in a small house but has a Grandmother clock as well as a cuckoo clock and several digital ones as well. I love to hear them all go off at various times. We grew up with cuckoo clocks.
    So happy to read, so many others who are retired, how the days and the time are not a constant drive to keep us on schedule. I also have found that every morning I wake I need to remind myself what day of the week, what date and then if there is anything I need to do today. I have to place a note on the floor with a message to remind me what I must not miss today. Life has changed since retirement. I worked all my life and had to stick to a schedule.
    Covid has just kept me at home more than I would like to.
    I am a night owl but most days, I have to rise early due to my cat waking me up and insisting that I must wait on her. I love to read till 1 or 2 am. Luckily I have done well with 6 hours of sleep all my life.
    I will re-read your post as there is so much to absorb and follow even further. Thank you.

    Reply
  85. Christina – what a wonderful post about time. Several in our family love clocks of all kinds. My brother lives in a small house but has a Grandmother clock as well as a cuckoo clock and several digital ones as well. I love to hear them all go off at various times. We grew up with cuckoo clocks.
    So happy to read, so many others who are retired, how the days and the time are not a constant drive to keep us on schedule. I also have found that every morning I wake I need to remind myself what day of the week, what date and then if there is anything I need to do today. I have to place a note on the floor with a message to remind me what I must not miss today. Life has changed since retirement. I worked all my life and had to stick to a schedule.
    Covid has just kept me at home more than I would like to.
    I am a night owl but most days, I have to rise early due to my cat waking me up and insisting that I must wait on her. I love to read till 1 or 2 am. Luckily I have done well with 6 hours of sleep all my life.
    I will re-read your post as there is so much to absorb and follow even further. Thank you.

    Reply
  86. The pandemic has made me not be so attuned to the time. It has also made me re-evaluate what is important in life.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  87. The pandemic has made me not be so attuned to the time. It has also made me re-evaluate what is important in life.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  88. The pandemic has made me not be so attuned to the time. It has also made me re-evaluate what is important in life.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  89. The pandemic has made me not be so attuned to the time. It has also made me re-evaluate what is important in life.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  90. The pandemic has made me not be so attuned to the time. It has also made me re-evaluate what is important in life.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  91. Oh, me too, Mary Jo – resent it so much! I always thought I ought to have a job like a night porter in a hotel or something but now I don’t need to worry about it.

    Reply
  92. Oh, me too, Mary Jo – resent it so much! I always thought I ought to have a job like a night porter in a hotel or something but now I don’t need to worry about it.

    Reply
  93. Oh, me too, Mary Jo – resent it so much! I always thought I ought to have a job like a night porter in a hotel or something but now I don’t need to worry about it.

    Reply
  94. Oh, me too, Mary Jo – resent it so much! I always thought I ought to have a job like a night porter in a hotel or something but now I don’t need to worry about it.

    Reply
  95. Oh, me too, Mary Jo – resent it so much! I always thought I ought to have a job like a night porter in a hotel or something but now I don’t need to worry about it.

    Reply
  96. Thank you Margot! Love the sound of your brother’s clocks, especially the cuckoo ones. They are so cute! Pets do keep you on schedule don’t they – my mother has a cat who wakes her at 4am because he thinks he ought to have breakfast then. Not sure I could cope with that!

    Reply
  97. Thank you Margot! Love the sound of your brother’s clocks, especially the cuckoo ones. They are so cute! Pets do keep you on schedule don’t they – my mother has a cat who wakes her at 4am because he thinks he ought to have breakfast then. Not sure I could cope with that!

    Reply
  98. Thank you Margot! Love the sound of your brother’s clocks, especially the cuckoo ones. They are so cute! Pets do keep you on schedule don’t they – my mother has a cat who wakes her at 4am because he thinks he ought to have breakfast then. Not sure I could cope with that!

    Reply
  99. Thank you Margot! Love the sound of your brother’s clocks, especially the cuckoo ones. They are so cute! Pets do keep you on schedule don’t they – my mother has a cat who wakes her at 4am because he thinks he ought to have breakfast then. Not sure I could cope with that!

    Reply
  100. Thank you Margot! Love the sound of your brother’s clocks, especially the cuckoo ones. They are so cute! Pets do keep you on schedule don’t they – my mother has a cat who wakes her at 4am because he thinks he ought to have breakfast then. Not sure I could cope with that!

    Reply
  101. It does make you think, doesn’t it? It will be interesting to see what changes people make in their lives after the pandemic. At least it has shown companies that it’s possible to work from home to a much greater extent – that should help lots of people who normally face a horrendous commute! Better quality of life.

    Reply
  102. It does make you think, doesn’t it? It will be interesting to see what changes people make in their lives after the pandemic. At least it has shown companies that it’s possible to work from home to a much greater extent – that should help lots of people who normally face a horrendous commute! Better quality of life.

    Reply
  103. It does make you think, doesn’t it? It will be interesting to see what changes people make in their lives after the pandemic. At least it has shown companies that it’s possible to work from home to a much greater extent – that should help lots of people who normally face a horrendous commute! Better quality of life.

    Reply
  104. It does make you think, doesn’t it? It will be interesting to see what changes people make in their lives after the pandemic. At least it has shown companies that it’s possible to work from home to a much greater extent – that should help lots of people who normally face a horrendous commute! Better quality of life.

    Reply
  105. It does make you think, doesn’t it? It will be interesting to see what changes people make in their lives after the pandemic. At least it has shown companies that it’s possible to work from home to a much greater extent – that should help lots of people who normally face a horrendous commute! Better quality of life.

    Reply
  106. With this pandemic one day feels no different than any other day. I’m retired so I haven’t had to worry about keeping to a schedule for some time. I am an owl and have been able to revert to my natural schedule with no job and no school kids. Hallelujah! Unfortunately my husband is a lark and thinks an owl’s schedule is unnatural.

    Reply
  107. With this pandemic one day feels no different than any other day. I’m retired so I haven’t had to worry about keeping to a schedule for some time. I am an owl and have been able to revert to my natural schedule with no job and no school kids. Hallelujah! Unfortunately my husband is a lark and thinks an owl’s schedule is unnatural.

    Reply
  108. With this pandemic one day feels no different than any other day. I’m retired so I haven’t had to worry about keeping to a schedule for some time. I am an owl and have been able to revert to my natural schedule with no job and no school kids. Hallelujah! Unfortunately my husband is a lark and thinks an owl’s schedule is unnatural.

    Reply
  109. With this pandemic one day feels no different than any other day. I’m retired so I haven’t had to worry about keeping to a schedule for some time. I am an owl and have been able to revert to my natural schedule with no job and no school kids. Hallelujah! Unfortunately my husband is a lark and thinks an owl’s schedule is unnatural.

    Reply
  110. With this pandemic one day feels no different than any other day. I’m retired so I haven’t had to worry about keeping to a schedule for some time. I am an owl and have been able to revert to my natural schedule with no job and no school kids. Hallelujah! Unfortunately my husband is a lark and thinks an owl’s schedule is unnatural.

    Reply
  111. I retired several years ago, but it wasn’t until the pandemic that I lost track of the days of the week and dates of the month. However I know pretty accurately when sunrise and sunset take place. We like watching the moon too, so I usually know what phase it’s in. And my husband and I continue to eat lunch and dinner together at a regular time, although there’s no reason we have to. That pretty much structures our day. If I lived alone, I would probably lose all semblance of a schedule.

    Reply
  112. I retired several years ago, but it wasn’t until the pandemic that I lost track of the days of the week and dates of the month. However I know pretty accurately when sunrise and sunset take place. We like watching the moon too, so I usually know what phase it’s in. And my husband and I continue to eat lunch and dinner together at a regular time, although there’s no reason we have to. That pretty much structures our day. If I lived alone, I would probably lose all semblance of a schedule.

    Reply
  113. I retired several years ago, but it wasn’t until the pandemic that I lost track of the days of the week and dates of the month. However I know pretty accurately when sunrise and sunset take place. We like watching the moon too, so I usually know what phase it’s in. And my husband and I continue to eat lunch and dinner together at a regular time, although there’s no reason we have to. That pretty much structures our day. If I lived alone, I would probably lose all semblance of a schedule.

    Reply
  114. I retired several years ago, but it wasn’t until the pandemic that I lost track of the days of the week and dates of the month. However I know pretty accurately when sunrise and sunset take place. We like watching the moon too, so I usually know what phase it’s in. And my husband and I continue to eat lunch and dinner together at a regular time, although there’s no reason we have to. That pretty much structures our day. If I lived alone, I would probably lose all semblance of a schedule.

    Reply
  115. I retired several years ago, but it wasn’t until the pandemic that I lost track of the days of the week and dates of the month. However I know pretty accurately when sunrise and sunset take place. We like watching the moon too, so I usually know what phase it’s in. And my husband and I continue to eat lunch and dinner together at a regular time, although there’s no reason we have to. That pretty much structures our day. If I lived alone, I would probably lose all semblance of a schedule.

    Reply
  116. I’m a night owl. Always have been. I’ve been feeling the effects of the lock down badly lately. I was just getting my life back when this happened. I’m at home everyday anyway but I was just getting my life back. I’d been looking after my mother for years and taking care of my daughter for about ten years. She got ill when she was twenty two.
    My mother died three years ago and my daughter got back on track and went back to college as a mature student. I was enjoying my freedom and then this all happened.
    On another note, my husband gets up at six o clock every morning and has never needed an alarm clock for as long as I’ve known him. I don’t know how he does it!!
    Great post Christina.

    Reply
  117. I’m a night owl. Always have been. I’ve been feeling the effects of the lock down badly lately. I was just getting my life back when this happened. I’m at home everyday anyway but I was just getting my life back. I’d been looking after my mother for years and taking care of my daughter for about ten years. She got ill when she was twenty two.
    My mother died three years ago and my daughter got back on track and went back to college as a mature student. I was enjoying my freedom and then this all happened.
    On another note, my husband gets up at six o clock every morning and has never needed an alarm clock for as long as I’ve known him. I don’t know how he does it!!
    Great post Christina.

    Reply
  118. I’m a night owl. Always have been. I’ve been feeling the effects of the lock down badly lately. I was just getting my life back when this happened. I’m at home everyday anyway but I was just getting my life back. I’d been looking after my mother for years and taking care of my daughter for about ten years. She got ill when she was twenty two.
    My mother died three years ago and my daughter got back on track and went back to college as a mature student. I was enjoying my freedom and then this all happened.
    On another note, my husband gets up at six o clock every morning and has never needed an alarm clock for as long as I’ve known him. I don’t know how he does it!!
    Great post Christina.

    Reply
  119. I’m a night owl. Always have been. I’ve been feeling the effects of the lock down badly lately. I was just getting my life back when this happened. I’m at home everyday anyway but I was just getting my life back. I’d been looking after my mother for years and taking care of my daughter for about ten years. She got ill when she was twenty two.
    My mother died three years ago and my daughter got back on track and went back to college as a mature student. I was enjoying my freedom and then this all happened.
    On another note, my husband gets up at six o clock every morning and has never needed an alarm clock for as long as I’ve known him. I don’t know how he does it!!
    Great post Christina.

    Reply
  120. I’m a night owl. Always have been. I’ve been feeling the effects of the lock down badly lately. I was just getting my life back when this happened. I’m at home everyday anyway but I was just getting my life back. I’d been looking after my mother for years and taking care of my daughter for about ten years. She got ill when she was twenty two.
    My mother died three years ago and my daughter got back on track and went back to college as a mature student. I was enjoying my freedom and then this all happened.
    On another note, my husband gets up at six o clock every morning and has never needed an alarm clock for as long as I’ve known him. I don’t know how he does it!!
    Great post Christina.

    Reply
  121. My husband is the same Pat but it came in very handy when our kids were babies – he did the early mornings and I did the late nights. It is lovely not to have to stick to a schedule isn’t it!

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  122. My husband is the same Pat but it came in very handy when our kids were babies – he did the early mornings and I did the late nights. It is lovely not to have to stick to a schedule isn’t it!

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  123. My husband is the same Pat but it came in very handy when our kids were babies – he did the early mornings and I did the late nights. It is lovely not to have to stick to a schedule isn’t it!

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  124. My husband is the same Pat but it came in very handy when our kids were babies – he did the early mornings and I did the late nights. It is lovely not to have to stick to a schedule isn’t it!

    Reply
  125. My husband is the same Pat but it came in very handy when our kids were babies – he did the early mornings and I did the late nights. It is lovely not to have to stick to a schedule isn’t it!

    Reply
  126. Yes I guess living with someone makes us want to schedule our days a bit so we can do things together. I don’t keep track of the sunrise or sunset but that sounds great!

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  127. Yes I guess living with someone makes us want to schedule our days a bit so we can do things together. I don’t keep track of the sunrise or sunset but that sounds great!

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  128. Yes I guess living with someone makes us want to schedule our days a bit so we can do things together. I don’t keep track of the sunrise or sunset but that sounds great!

    Reply
  129. Yes I guess living with someone makes us want to schedule our days a bit so we can do things together. I don’t keep track of the sunrise or sunset but that sounds great!

    Reply
  130. Yes I guess living with someone makes us want to schedule our days a bit so we can do things together. I don’t keep track of the sunrise or sunset but that sounds great!

    Reply
  131. Oh I do hope we’ll soon be out of lockdown so you can enjoy going out Teresa! It definitely sounds like you deserve it. And yes I have no idea how people wake so early without an alarm clock, but then again larks don’t understand why we owls don’t fall asleep in front of the tv every night!

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  132. Oh I do hope we’ll soon be out of lockdown so you can enjoy going out Teresa! It definitely sounds like you deserve it. And yes I have no idea how people wake so early without an alarm clock, but then again larks don’t understand why we owls don’t fall asleep in front of the tv every night!

    Reply
  133. Oh I do hope we’ll soon be out of lockdown so you can enjoy going out Teresa! It definitely sounds like you deserve it. And yes I have no idea how people wake so early without an alarm clock, but then again larks don’t understand why we owls don’t fall asleep in front of the tv every night!

    Reply
  134. Oh I do hope we’ll soon be out of lockdown so you can enjoy going out Teresa! It definitely sounds like you deserve it. And yes I have no idea how people wake so early without an alarm clock, but then again larks don’t understand why we owls don’t fall asleep in front of the tv every night!

    Reply
  135. Oh I do hope we’ll soon be out of lockdown so you can enjoy going out Teresa! It definitely sounds like you deserve it. And yes I have no idea how people wake so early without an alarm clock, but then again larks don’t understand why we owls don’t fall asleep in front of the tv every night!

    Reply
  136. This is interesting because I had thought I no longer paid much attention to time. Before I retired, my job required a very tight schedule, so I was always checking my watch to make sure I was on time. Now, I no longer have together up at a certain time so I rely on the sun (I get up much earlier in the summer than in the winter), and I start dinner when I’m beginning to feel hungry.
    However, last week the battery in my watch died, and I realized that I still constantly glance at my wrist to check the time. Weird.

    Reply
  137. This is interesting because I had thought I no longer paid much attention to time. Before I retired, my job required a very tight schedule, so I was always checking my watch to make sure I was on time. Now, I no longer have together up at a certain time so I rely on the sun (I get up much earlier in the summer than in the winter), and I start dinner when I’m beginning to feel hungry.
    However, last week the battery in my watch died, and I realized that I still constantly glance at my wrist to check the time. Weird.

    Reply
  138. This is interesting because I had thought I no longer paid much attention to time. Before I retired, my job required a very tight schedule, so I was always checking my watch to make sure I was on time. Now, I no longer have together up at a certain time so I rely on the sun (I get up much earlier in the summer than in the winter), and I start dinner when I’m beginning to feel hungry.
    However, last week the battery in my watch died, and I realized that I still constantly glance at my wrist to check the time. Weird.

    Reply
  139. This is interesting because I had thought I no longer paid much attention to time. Before I retired, my job required a very tight schedule, so I was always checking my watch to make sure I was on time. Now, I no longer have together up at a certain time so I rely on the sun (I get up much earlier in the summer than in the winter), and I start dinner when I’m beginning to feel hungry.
    However, last week the battery in my watch died, and I realized that I still constantly glance at my wrist to check the time. Weird.

    Reply
  140. This is interesting because I had thought I no longer paid much attention to time. Before I retired, my job required a very tight schedule, so I was always checking my watch to make sure I was on time. Now, I no longer have together up at a certain time so I rely on the sun (I get up much earlier in the summer than in the winter), and I start dinner when I’m beginning to feel hungry.
    However, last week the battery in my watch died, and I realized that I still constantly glance at my wrist to check the time. Weird.

    Reply
  141. Isn’t it funny how we do things like that on automatic? But even though you glance at your watch a lot, you’re still a lot more relaxed about time in general I think, which sounds great!

    Reply
  142. Isn’t it funny how we do things like that on automatic? But even though you glance at your watch a lot, you’re still a lot more relaxed about time in general I think, which sounds great!

    Reply
  143. Isn’t it funny how we do things like that on automatic? But even though you glance at your watch a lot, you’re still a lot more relaxed about time in general I think, which sounds great!

    Reply
  144. Isn’t it funny how we do things like that on automatic? But even though you glance at your watch a lot, you’re still a lot more relaxed about time in general I think, which sounds great!

    Reply
  145. Isn’t it funny how we do things like that on automatic? But even though you glance at your watch a lot, you’re still a lot more relaxed about time in general I think, which sounds great!

    Reply
  146. I’m definitely a nightowl but most of my life my job required getting up at 6am. So I’d usually wind up with 5 or 6 hours of sleep a night. Now, being retirement age, I’m on part time where I set up my hours which I love because I have a couple sleep in mornings. The pandemic really didn’t affect my husband & me because we sell dairy equipment and were considered essential. We never varied our office hours. He’s a lark and actually likes to get up before my alarm because he hates the bong-bong sound of it. LOL.

    Reply
  147. I’m definitely a nightowl but most of my life my job required getting up at 6am. So I’d usually wind up with 5 or 6 hours of sleep a night. Now, being retirement age, I’m on part time where I set up my hours which I love because I have a couple sleep in mornings. The pandemic really didn’t affect my husband & me because we sell dairy equipment and were considered essential. We never varied our office hours. He’s a lark and actually likes to get up before my alarm because he hates the bong-bong sound of it. LOL.

    Reply
  148. I’m definitely a nightowl but most of my life my job required getting up at 6am. So I’d usually wind up with 5 or 6 hours of sleep a night. Now, being retirement age, I’m on part time where I set up my hours which I love because I have a couple sleep in mornings. The pandemic really didn’t affect my husband & me because we sell dairy equipment and were considered essential. We never varied our office hours. He’s a lark and actually likes to get up before my alarm because he hates the bong-bong sound of it. LOL.

    Reply
  149. I’m definitely a nightowl but most of my life my job required getting up at 6am. So I’d usually wind up with 5 or 6 hours of sleep a night. Now, being retirement age, I’m on part time where I set up my hours which I love because I have a couple sleep in mornings. The pandemic really didn’t affect my husband & me because we sell dairy equipment and were considered essential. We never varied our office hours. He’s a lark and actually likes to get up before my alarm because he hates the bong-bong sound of it. LOL.

    Reply
  150. I’m definitely a nightowl but most of my life my job required getting up at 6am. So I’d usually wind up with 5 or 6 hours of sleep a night. Now, being retirement age, I’m on part time where I set up my hours which I love because I have a couple sleep in mornings. The pandemic really didn’t affect my husband & me because we sell dairy equipment and were considered essential. We never varied our office hours. He’s a lark and actually likes to get up before my alarm because he hates the bong-bong sound of it. LOL.

    Reply
  151. I haven’t worked for 12 years but I was kind of keeping up with days of the week, days of the month. It helps that my husband still has to go to work. But a lot of what I measured the progress of the month by has ceased.
    Craft club, cooking club, etc aren’t happening. But the trash still has to go out on a weekly basis! But holidays throw me off because they delay picking trash up by one day.
    So yes, I have to look at my date/time spot on the computer and the phone to make sure I know what the day of the month is.
    I’m not sure how I’ll manage to keep track of trash day when my husband no longer goes in to work!

    Reply
  152. I haven’t worked for 12 years but I was kind of keeping up with days of the week, days of the month. It helps that my husband still has to go to work. But a lot of what I measured the progress of the month by has ceased.
    Craft club, cooking club, etc aren’t happening. But the trash still has to go out on a weekly basis! But holidays throw me off because they delay picking trash up by one day.
    So yes, I have to look at my date/time spot on the computer and the phone to make sure I know what the day of the month is.
    I’m not sure how I’ll manage to keep track of trash day when my husband no longer goes in to work!

    Reply
  153. I haven’t worked for 12 years but I was kind of keeping up with days of the week, days of the month. It helps that my husband still has to go to work. But a lot of what I measured the progress of the month by has ceased.
    Craft club, cooking club, etc aren’t happening. But the trash still has to go out on a weekly basis! But holidays throw me off because they delay picking trash up by one day.
    So yes, I have to look at my date/time spot on the computer and the phone to make sure I know what the day of the month is.
    I’m not sure how I’ll manage to keep track of trash day when my husband no longer goes in to work!

    Reply
  154. I haven’t worked for 12 years but I was kind of keeping up with days of the week, days of the month. It helps that my husband still has to go to work. But a lot of what I measured the progress of the month by has ceased.
    Craft club, cooking club, etc aren’t happening. But the trash still has to go out on a weekly basis! But holidays throw me off because they delay picking trash up by one day.
    So yes, I have to look at my date/time spot on the computer and the phone to make sure I know what the day of the month is.
    I’m not sure how I’ll manage to keep track of trash day when my husband no longer goes in to work!

    Reply
  155. I haven’t worked for 12 years but I was kind of keeping up with days of the week, days of the month. It helps that my husband still has to go to work. But a lot of what I measured the progress of the month by has ceased.
    Craft club, cooking club, etc aren’t happening. But the trash still has to go out on a weekly basis! But holidays throw me off because they delay picking trash up by one day.
    So yes, I have to look at my date/time spot on the computer and the phone to make sure I know what the day of the month is.
    I’m not sure how I’ll manage to keep track of trash day when my husband no longer goes in to work!

    Reply
  156. Forgot to say I kind of know what day of the week it is – sort of, kind of, because of my medicines. I take one pill 4 times a week. So I know from my pill container if it is Thursday, etc by which one is the next to be used. Roll eyes.

    Reply
  157. Forgot to say I kind of know what day of the week it is – sort of, kind of, because of my medicines. I take one pill 4 times a week. So I know from my pill container if it is Thursday, etc by which one is the next to be used. Roll eyes.

    Reply
  158. Forgot to say I kind of know what day of the week it is – sort of, kind of, because of my medicines. I take one pill 4 times a week. So I know from my pill container if it is Thursday, etc by which one is the next to be used. Roll eyes.

    Reply
  159. Forgot to say I kind of know what day of the week it is – sort of, kind of, because of my medicines. I take one pill 4 times a week. So I know from my pill container if it is Thursday, etc by which one is the next to be used. Roll eyes.

    Reply
  160. Forgot to say I kind of know what day of the week it is – sort of, kind of, because of my medicines. I take one pill 4 times a week. So I know from my pill container if it is Thursday, etc by which one is the next to be used. Roll eyes.

    Reply
  161. It’s difficult having to get up early when you’re an owl, isn’t it! It can be done (and I used to as well when the kids were small) but I’ve never liked it. Glad you’re getting some late mornings now Jeanne!

    Reply
  162. It’s difficult having to get up early when you’re an owl, isn’t it! It can be done (and I used to as well when the kids were small) but I’ve never liked it. Glad you’re getting some late mornings now Jeanne!

    Reply
  163. It’s difficult having to get up early when you’re an owl, isn’t it! It can be done (and I used to as well when the kids were small) but I’ve never liked it. Glad you’re getting some late mornings now Jeanne!

    Reply
  164. It’s difficult having to get up early when you’re an owl, isn’t it! It can be done (and I used to as well when the kids were small) but I’ve never liked it. Glad you’re getting some late mornings now Jeanne!

    Reply
  165. It’s difficult having to get up early when you’re an owl, isn’t it! It can be done (and I used to as well when the kids were small) but I’ve never liked it. Glad you’re getting some late mornings now Jeanne!

    Reply
  166. Oh yes, I miss get-together with friends and colleagues. Some have moved over to Zoom but it’s not the same is it. I know what you mean about the trash!

    Reply
  167. Oh yes, I miss get-together with friends and colleagues. Some have moved over to Zoom but it’s not the same is it. I know what you mean about the trash!

    Reply
  168. Oh yes, I miss get-together with friends and colleagues. Some have moved over to Zoom but it’s not the same is it. I know what you mean about the trash!

    Reply
  169. Oh yes, I miss get-together with friends and colleagues. Some have moved over to Zoom but it’s not the same is it. I know what you mean about the trash!

    Reply
  170. Oh yes, I miss get-together with friends and colleagues. Some have moved over to Zoom but it’s not the same is it. I know what you mean about the trash!

    Reply
  171. I’m definitely a night owl. When I was in my early teens my mother would insist on lights out at some ridiculous hour (like 10 pm}. Sometimes I would read by full moonlight, with the curtains wide open. Other times, by flashlight. In later years, with no reading curfew, I would just keep reading. When I was working, I had to get up in time, no matter what. But when I quit my job and started writing full time, I could sleep late. Until my beloved Max (the dog) died and I adopted Chloe the Dalmatian. She trained me to get up at 5:30 am, no matter how long I read before going to sleep. She wanted breakfast and that was that. After Chloe passed, I adopted my late friend’s cat, Mitzer. She also insisted on breakfast at 5:30 am. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that she channeled the dog. Sigh. Now, evem though Mitzer has been gone nearly two years, I still wake up at 5:30, 6:00 am at the latest. In case anyone is wondering, I’m writing this post at 2:44 am, Eastern Standard Time. As soon as I type the final period, I will open the latest book in my stack (by Susan Wiggs) and read at least a chapter or two. Until the internal alarm clock wakes me…

    Reply
  172. I’m definitely a night owl. When I was in my early teens my mother would insist on lights out at some ridiculous hour (like 10 pm}. Sometimes I would read by full moonlight, with the curtains wide open. Other times, by flashlight. In later years, with no reading curfew, I would just keep reading. When I was working, I had to get up in time, no matter what. But when I quit my job and started writing full time, I could sleep late. Until my beloved Max (the dog) died and I adopted Chloe the Dalmatian. She trained me to get up at 5:30 am, no matter how long I read before going to sleep. She wanted breakfast and that was that. After Chloe passed, I adopted my late friend’s cat, Mitzer. She also insisted on breakfast at 5:30 am. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that she channeled the dog. Sigh. Now, evem though Mitzer has been gone nearly two years, I still wake up at 5:30, 6:00 am at the latest. In case anyone is wondering, I’m writing this post at 2:44 am, Eastern Standard Time. As soon as I type the final period, I will open the latest book in my stack (by Susan Wiggs) and read at least a chapter or two. Until the internal alarm clock wakes me…

    Reply
  173. I’m definitely a night owl. When I was in my early teens my mother would insist on lights out at some ridiculous hour (like 10 pm}. Sometimes I would read by full moonlight, with the curtains wide open. Other times, by flashlight. In later years, with no reading curfew, I would just keep reading. When I was working, I had to get up in time, no matter what. But when I quit my job and started writing full time, I could sleep late. Until my beloved Max (the dog) died and I adopted Chloe the Dalmatian. She trained me to get up at 5:30 am, no matter how long I read before going to sleep. She wanted breakfast and that was that. After Chloe passed, I adopted my late friend’s cat, Mitzer. She also insisted on breakfast at 5:30 am. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that she channeled the dog. Sigh. Now, evem though Mitzer has been gone nearly two years, I still wake up at 5:30, 6:00 am at the latest. In case anyone is wondering, I’m writing this post at 2:44 am, Eastern Standard Time. As soon as I type the final period, I will open the latest book in my stack (by Susan Wiggs) and read at least a chapter or two. Until the internal alarm clock wakes me…

    Reply
  174. I’m definitely a night owl. When I was in my early teens my mother would insist on lights out at some ridiculous hour (like 10 pm}. Sometimes I would read by full moonlight, with the curtains wide open. Other times, by flashlight. In later years, with no reading curfew, I would just keep reading. When I was working, I had to get up in time, no matter what. But when I quit my job and started writing full time, I could sleep late. Until my beloved Max (the dog) died and I adopted Chloe the Dalmatian. She trained me to get up at 5:30 am, no matter how long I read before going to sleep. She wanted breakfast and that was that. After Chloe passed, I adopted my late friend’s cat, Mitzer. She also insisted on breakfast at 5:30 am. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that she channeled the dog. Sigh. Now, evem though Mitzer has been gone nearly two years, I still wake up at 5:30, 6:00 am at the latest. In case anyone is wondering, I’m writing this post at 2:44 am, Eastern Standard Time. As soon as I type the final period, I will open the latest book in my stack (by Susan Wiggs) and read at least a chapter or two. Until the internal alarm clock wakes me…

    Reply
  175. I’m definitely a night owl. When I was in my early teens my mother would insist on lights out at some ridiculous hour (like 10 pm}. Sometimes I would read by full moonlight, with the curtains wide open. Other times, by flashlight. In later years, with no reading curfew, I would just keep reading. When I was working, I had to get up in time, no matter what. But when I quit my job and started writing full time, I could sleep late. Until my beloved Max (the dog) died and I adopted Chloe the Dalmatian. She trained me to get up at 5:30 am, no matter how long I read before going to sleep. She wanted breakfast and that was that. After Chloe passed, I adopted my late friend’s cat, Mitzer. She also insisted on breakfast at 5:30 am. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that she channeled the dog. Sigh. Now, evem though Mitzer has been gone nearly two years, I still wake up at 5:30, 6:00 am at the latest. In case anyone is wondering, I’m writing this post at 2:44 am, Eastern Standard Time. As soon as I type the final period, I will open the latest book in my stack (by Susan Wiggs) and read at least a chapter or two. Until the internal alarm clock wakes me…

    Reply
  176. Oh I remember reading under the covers with a torch! My mother usually caught me but I carried on anyway. Funny how animals train us and not the other way round! My dogs were the same but now they’re gone I have gone back to sleeping late.

    Reply
  177. Oh I remember reading under the covers with a torch! My mother usually caught me but I carried on anyway. Funny how animals train us and not the other way round! My dogs were the same but now they’re gone I have gone back to sleeping late.

    Reply
  178. Oh I remember reading under the covers with a torch! My mother usually caught me but I carried on anyway. Funny how animals train us and not the other way round! My dogs were the same but now they’re gone I have gone back to sleeping late.

    Reply
  179. Oh I remember reading under the covers with a torch! My mother usually caught me but I carried on anyway. Funny how animals train us and not the other way round! My dogs were the same but now they’re gone I have gone back to sleeping late.

    Reply
  180. Oh I remember reading under the covers with a torch! My mother usually caught me but I carried on anyway. Funny how animals train us and not the other way round! My dogs were the same but now they’re gone I have gone back to sleeping late.

    Reply

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