The ninth, part deux!

Aren't we having fun with our ninth anniversary? Here are some more Wenchly first books. By chance the Friday post is Jo, Jo, Jo — and Anne. So we have Joanna Bourne, Mary Jo Putney, me and Anne Gracie talking about our first published book. As on Wednesday, you still has a chance to win our anniversary prize.

It's simple. You'll get a ticket in the Rafflecopter hat for every option you click on below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

On to first books.

Joanna Bourne.

Ladyships companion 2My first book — it was the first fiction I'd written since short stories for Middle School English class — came about for one of the usual reasons.

I was staying at home with my first child. I was going squirrelly. One day I put down a book I was reading (which I did not wallbang only because … sleeping child,) and I said, "Heck. even I can write better than that," as who among us has not.

Except I was armed with a typewriter and I'd written a goodly amount of nonfiction and thereby earned an honest living and I was, as I said, going quietly insane with not working so this was not entirely an empty threat.  I wrote my Regency on an Underwood typewriter using carbon paper and white out. (You might find examples of those in your local museum.)

Avon bought Her Ladyship's Companion. YEAH!

Then we moved to West Africa (and Europe and the Middle East) and I went back to work and I didn't write any more fiction till I retired.  My 'new' writing career started in 2008. It was only after that that I joined the Word Wenches.  I'm still newest kid on the block here, but very proud and pleased to be a Wench.

Mary Jo Putney

Diabolical BaronlI always had stories in my head; I thought everyone did.  While becoming a writer sounded like the coolest thing possible (and by writer, I always meant fiction), it never occurred to me that I could become a Real, Published Author.  As a kid from farm country, I lacked role models, while having dysgraphic typing and illegible handwriting in abundance.

The years passed and included a degree in 18th Century British Literature and two years of living in Oxford, England. Until the day came when I bought a computer and found that when you fix something, it stays fixed!  As soon as I learned word processing, I decided to see if I could write a book.  As one does. <G>

I'd been addicted to Georgette Heyer for years and more recently I'd discovered the Walker hardcover Regencies at the library.  So when I sat down to type, what emerged was a Regency that owed much to Heyer, but with a subversive twist of my own.  (The tall, darkly handsome, jaded lord does not win the heart of the shy but charming ingénue.  She slips off and finds a man she likes better. <G>)

After three months of blithely typing along, I was offered a three book Signet Regency contract based on a 119 page partial manuscript.  Having gone from my original title, The Musical Lady, (meh!) to my editor's suggestion of The Diabolical Baron, the book was published a year later and nominated for a Golden Medallion (the equivalent of today's RITA).  Once I got over the shock of it all, (okay, I still haven't gotten over the shock!) I realized that I had some natural storytelling ability.
And ever since then, I've been trying to learn to write well!

 

Jo Beverley

LwbhcovI, too, always wanted to write fiction, specifically historical fiction, but like Mary Jo I didn't think ordinary people got to do that. That didn't stop me scribbling, but as a non-typist I didn't get serious until the word processor arrived in my life, courtesy of my early-PC-adopter husband. By then, the romance community was beginning to form. Romance Writers of America was in existence, and Romantic Times was in its early days. I had guidance, including Kathryn Falk's How to Write a Romance and Get it Published. (I do like a direct and meaningful title!) I learned stuff, but most of all that yes, ordinary people could become romance authors.

My first published book was Lord Wraybourne's Betrothed, a title I probably wouldn't get away with today. As with Mary Jo's first book, it took the conventions and gave them a twist. I enjoyed reading Regency romance, but I was tired of the unbelievable beginnings, which frequently had heroines plunging into wild escapades or running away from an unwanted marriage without a clue as to how to survive. So I went for convention, as shown from the opening line. "It was the most talked­-­about and­ yet the most ted­ious betrothal of the year." Yes, the well-behaved young heiress becomes betrothed to a sane and sensible, eligible earl.

Despite that it was published and was a finalist for the pre-RITA Golden Medallion. I was on my way. However, as it was published by Walker in a library hardcover with a print run of one thousand copies, it took a few more years and a few more books, and a paperback edition, for my to find my readership.

 Anne Gracie

WaifUSAAnne here (or perhaps, given the fact that this is a Jo-centric blog,  I ought to call myself Anne-Jo.)

When I wrote my first historical, I was aiming for the US market.  Australian publishers didn't even look at romance in those days — it  was all mainstream fiction, mostly literary. I sent off letters to several big US publishers, offering them my Regency novel. They all  said, No thanks, they weren't publishing regencies any more. Big  disappointment. Then I saw my local library had regencies published by  Mills and Boon (Harlequin UK) so I wrote off to them. By this time my  manuscript was 126,000 words.

M&B wrote back to me saying, we like it, but our maximum length is  85,000 words. So I cut 40,000 words. It nearly killed me, but they  bought it. Gallant Waif came out nearly eighteen months later. By then  I'd learned that had I known to call it a "Regency historical" to the  US publishers, (instead of a Regency) they would have been interested.  I  know this because an editor from one of those big US houses read  it, emailed me and invited me to submit.

I decided to enter it in the RITA, but in those days M&B authors only  got 6 free copies, and when I asked my editor for more, she said there  weren't any. She also said there was no point in my entering it — I  
didn't have a hope. But I managed to scrape up the 15 requisite copies  (for first book) and I entered the RITA.

Reader, it made the final cut! I was so thrilled. I attended my first  RWA conference, met a whole lot of lovely people and made some friends  who are still my good buddies today. And because of the RITA final, it  was released as a Harlequin Historical, and I entered the US market.

Gallant Waif is now available as an ebook. I have to say, I could  probably cut it some more — I was too in love with adjectives and  adverbs in those days — but I still love the story. It's not  available in e-book to Australians, but it's getting an Australian/NZ  re-release in paperback, two books in one — in August.

So you see, we all started by plunging in, even if we didn't think it was possible. It's not a bad approach to life.

Have you ever taken the plunge, dared to dream, or simply done something unusual because  you couldn't not? I look forward to you response, and don't forget to enter the contest and celebrate with the Wenches.

Best wishes,

Jo. (Just Jo.)

225 thoughts on “The ninth, part deux!”

  1. From the (Mary) Jo–
    I suppose it’s not surprising that so many of us Wenches hadn’t a clue how to get published, but a certain obsessiveness got us all into print. Now aspiring writers can find masses of online information to guide them to a path, and this is A Good Thing.
    It is impressive how many of us published our first attempts at books, and how many became RITA (or equivalent) finalists. There’s a lot to be said for deciding what the heck, let’s give it a try. *G* Happy birthday to us!

    Reply
  2. From the (Mary) Jo–
    I suppose it’s not surprising that so many of us Wenches hadn’t a clue how to get published, but a certain obsessiveness got us all into print. Now aspiring writers can find masses of online information to guide them to a path, and this is A Good Thing.
    It is impressive how many of us published our first attempts at books, and how many became RITA (or equivalent) finalists. There’s a lot to be said for deciding what the heck, let’s give it a try. *G* Happy birthday to us!

    Reply
  3. From the (Mary) Jo–
    I suppose it’s not surprising that so many of us Wenches hadn’t a clue how to get published, but a certain obsessiveness got us all into print. Now aspiring writers can find masses of online information to guide them to a path, and this is A Good Thing.
    It is impressive how many of us published our first attempts at books, and how many became RITA (or equivalent) finalists. There’s a lot to be said for deciding what the heck, let’s give it a try. *G* Happy birthday to us!

    Reply
  4. From the (Mary) Jo–
    I suppose it’s not surprising that so many of us Wenches hadn’t a clue how to get published, but a certain obsessiveness got us all into print. Now aspiring writers can find masses of online information to guide them to a path, and this is A Good Thing.
    It is impressive how many of us published our first attempts at books, and how many became RITA (or equivalent) finalists. There’s a lot to be said for deciding what the heck, let’s give it a try. *G* Happy birthday to us!

    Reply
  5. From the (Mary) Jo–
    I suppose it’s not surprising that so many of us Wenches hadn’t a clue how to get published, but a certain obsessiveness got us all into print. Now aspiring writers can find masses of online information to guide them to a path, and this is A Good Thing.
    It is impressive how many of us published our first attempts at books, and how many became RITA (or equivalent) finalists. There’s a lot to be said for deciding what the heck, let’s give it a try. *G* Happy birthday to us!

    Reply
  6. Loved reading your first book stories. I’d forgotten all about Walker–I remember getting their books from the library. And I had to laugh–I’d decided I couldn’t be an author because I couldn’t type! I do have at least one manuscript floating around–I think we’d call in a scifi romance these days–that I wrote by hand and then painfully typed–with carbon paper and those white out sheet things. Though I did have an electric typewriter. Manuals were just too, too hard. Oh, man–thank God for Word is all I can say.

    Reply
  7. Loved reading your first book stories. I’d forgotten all about Walker–I remember getting their books from the library. And I had to laugh–I’d decided I couldn’t be an author because I couldn’t type! I do have at least one manuscript floating around–I think we’d call in a scifi romance these days–that I wrote by hand and then painfully typed–with carbon paper and those white out sheet things. Though I did have an electric typewriter. Manuals were just too, too hard. Oh, man–thank God for Word is all I can say.

    Reply
  8. Loved reading your first book stories. I’d forgotten all about Walker–I remember getting their books from the library. And I had to laugh–I’d decided I couldn’t be an author because I couldn’t type! I do have at least one manuscript floating around–I think we’d call in a scifi romance these days–that I wrote by hand and then painfully typed–with carbon paper and those white out sheet things. Though I did have an electric typewriter. Manuals were just too, too hard. Oh, man–thank God for Word is all I can say.

    Reply
  9. Loved reading your first book stories. I’d forgotten all about Walker–I remember getting their books from the library. And I had to laugh–I’d decided I couldn’t be an author because I couldn’t type! I do have at least one manuscript floating around–I think we’d call in a scifi romance these days–that I wrote by hand and then painfully typed–with carbon paper and those white out sheet things. Though I did have an electric typewriter. Manuals were just too, too hard. Oh, man–thank God for Word is all I can say.

    Reply
  10. Loved reading your first book stories. I’d forgotten all about Walker–I remember getting their books from the library. And I had to laugh–I’d decided I couldn’t be an author because I couldn’t type! I do have at least one manuscript floating around–I think we’d call in a scifi romance these days–that I wrote by hand and then painfully typed–with carbon paper and those white out sheet things. Though I did have an electric typewriter. Manuals were just too, too hard. Oh, man–thank God for Word is all I can say.

    Reply
  11. I love that the wenches of this blog share my mother’s name (Joanne) among them. Just as she shared her love of reading with me (by “allowing” me to read her college lit books when I was 9 years old), and fostered a love of learning through the written word. Although I was not a fan of history in public school (all those dry facts and dates to memorize), that changed when I discovered Georgette Heyer. Her books put the flesh on the dry bones of the history skeleton and made it come alive in my mind. I accept my limitations, knowing I cannot craft the words I love into readable stories. This only serves to make me more appreciative of those who can. Thank you, Wenches, for feeding my “habit” over the years!

    Reply
  12. I love that the wenches of this blog share my mother’s name (Joanne) among them. Just as she shared her love of reading with me (by “allowing” me to read her college lit books when I was 9 years old), and fostered a love of learning through the written word. Although I was not a fan of history in public school (all those dry facts and dates to memorize), that changed when I discovered Georgette Heyer. Her books put the flesh on the dry bones of the history skeleton and made it come alive in my mind. I accept my limitations, knowing I cannot craft the words I love into readable stories. This only serves to make me more appreciative of those who can. Thank you, Wenches, for feeding my “habit” over the years!

    Reply
  13. I love that the wenches of this blog share my mother’s name (Joanne) among them. Just as she shared her love of reading with me (by “allowing” me to read her college lit books when I was 9 years old), and fostered a love of learning through the written word. Although I was not a fan of history in public school (all those dry facts and dates to memorize), that changed when I discovered Georgette Heyer. Her books put the flesh on the dry bones of the history skeleton and made it come alive in my mind. I accept my limitations, knowing I cannot craft the words I love into readable stories. This only serves to make me more appreciative of those who can. Thank you, Wenches, for feeding my “habit” over the years!

    Reply
  14. I love that the wenches of this blog share my mother’s name (Joanne) among them. Just as she shared her love of reading with me (by “allowing” me to read her college lit books when I was 9 years old), and fostered a love of learning through the written word. Although I was not a fan of history in public school (all those dry facts and dates to memorize), that changed when I discovered Georgette Heyer. Her books put the flesh on the dry bones of the history skeleton and made it come alive in my mind. I accept my limitations, knowing I cannot craft the words I love into readable stories. This only serves to make me more appreciative of those who can. Thank you, Wenches, for feeding my “habit” over the years!

    Reply
  15. I love that the wenches of this blog share my mother’s name (Joanne) among them. Just as she shared her love of reading with me (by “allowing” me to read her college lit books when I was 9 years old), and fostered a love of learning through the written word. Although I was not a fan of history in public school (all those dry facts and dates to memorize), that changed when I discovered Georgette Heyer. Her books put the flesh on the dry bones of the history skeleton and made it come alive in my mind. I accept my limitations, knowing I cannot craft the words I love into readable stories. This only serves to make me more appreciative of those who can. Thank you, Wenches, for feeding my “habit” over the years!

    Reply
  16. Amen to you Claire, beautifully said. I also cannot create those heroes and heroines or plots, but Lord Almighty do I ever love to read them!

    Reply
  17. Amen to you Claire, beautifully said. I also cannot create those heroes and heroines or plots, but Lord Almighty do I ever love to read them!

    Reply
  18. Amen to you Claire, beautifully said. I also cannot create those heroes and heroines or plots, but Lord Almighty do I ever love to read them!

    Reply
  19. Amen to you Claire, beautifully said. I also cannot create those heroes and heroines or plots, but Lord Almighty do I ever love to read them!

    Reply
  20. Amen to you Claire, beautifully said. I also cannot create those heroes and heroines or plots, but Lord Almighty do I ever love to read them!

    Reply
  21. I agree totally with Claire and Anne Hoile about not being able to write, I had an awful time in school when I was required to write an essay or the like. The only exception was my college psychology report that I got an A- on because I forgot the table of contents. I’ve been reading Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverly, and Joanna Bourne for what seems like forever while Anne Gracie is a new to me author but I love all their books.

    Reply
  22. I agree totally with Claire and Anne Hoile about not being able to write, I had an awful time in school when I was required to write an essay or the like. The only exception was my college psychology report that I got an A- on because I forgot the table of contents. I’ve been reading Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverly, and Joanna Bourne for what seems like forever while Anne Gracie is a new to me author but I love all their books.

    Reply
  23. I agree totally with Claire and Anne Hoile about not being able to write, I had an awful time in school when I was required to write an essay or the like. The only exception was my college psychology report that I got an A- on because I forgot the table of contents. I’ve been reading Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverly, and Joanna Bourne for what seems like forever while Anne Gracie is a new to me author but I love all their books.

    Reply
  24. I agree totally with Claire and Anne Hoile about not being able to write, I had an awful time in school when I was required to write an essay or the like. The only exception was my college psychology report that I got an A- on because I forgot the table of contents. I’ve been reading Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverly, and Joanna Bourne for what seems like forever while Anne Gracie is a new to me author but I love all their books.

    Reply
  25. I agree totally with Claire and Anne Hoile about not being able to write, I had an awful time in school when I was required to write an essay or the like. The only exception was my college psychology report that I got an A- on because I forgot the table of contents. I’ve been reading Mary Jo Putney, Jo Beverly, and Joanna Bourne for what seems like forever while Anne Gracie is a new to me author but I love all their books.

    Reply
  26. Claire, I’m glad our storytelling is appreciated. My childhood home was a book place, too, though mainly from the library. But we visited a few times a week so I always had books.

    Reply
  27. Claire, I’m glad our storytelling is appreciated. My childhood home was a book place, too, though mainly from the library. But we visited a few times a week so I always had books.

    Reply
  28. Claire, I’m glad our storytelling is appreciated. My childhood home was a book place, too, though mainly from the library. But we visited a few times a week so I always had books.

    Reply
  29. Claire, I’m glad our storytelling is appreciated. My childhood home was a book place, too, though mainly from the library. But we visited a few times a week so I always had books.

    Reply
  30. Claire, I’m glad our storytelling is appreciated. My childhood home was a book place, too, though mainly from the library. But we visited a few times a week so I always had books.

    Reply
  31. Ah typewriters ! The trouble with them was they couldn’t spell – or on occasions punctuate ! And as for carbon paper – -!I am so pleased you all persevered so that I could find something to read . Happy Anniversary

    Reply
  32. Ah typewriters ! The trouble with them was they couldn’t spell – or on occasions punctuate ! And as for carbon paper – -!I am so pleased you all persevered so that I could find something to read . Happy Anniversary

    Reply
  33. Ah typewriters ! The trouble with them was they couldn’t spell – or on occasions punctuate ! And as for carbon paper – -!I am so pleased you all persevered so that I could find something to read . Happy Anniversary

    Reply
  34. Ah typewriters ! The trouble with them was they couldn’t spell – or on occasions punctuate ! And as for carbon paper – -!I am so pleased you all persevered so that I could find something to read . Happy Anniversary

    Reply
  35. Ah typewriters ! The trouble with them was they couldn’t spell – or on occasions punctuate ! And as for carbon paper – -!I am so pleased you all persevered so that I could find something to read . Happy Anniversary

    Reply
  36. Amazingly enough…I managed to score a copy of Joanna B’s Her Ladyship’s Companion just this week from Thrift Books (online used book seller). I had it on my wish list and then voila…a copy came in and was ONLY $6.23!
    As for Mary Jo’s books…I’ve been reading them ever since they came out. I think I’ve got all of them now…even the very very hard to find early one.
    I discovered Jo Beverly and Anne Gracie through this blog and I’m working on their back list as we speak.

    Reply
  37. Amazingly enough…I managed to score a copy of Joanna B’s Her Ladyship’s Companion just this week from Thrift Books (online used book seller). I had it on my wish list and then voila…a copy came in and was ONLY $6.23!
    As for Mary Jo’s books…I’ve been reading them ever since they came out. I think I’ve got all of them now…even the very very hard to find early one.
    I discovered Jo Beverly and Anne Gracie through this blog and I’m working on their back list as we speak.

    Reply
  38. Amazingly enough…I managed to score a copy of Joanna B’s Her Ladyship’s Companion just this week from Thrift Books (online used book seller). I had it on my wish list and then voila…a copy came in and was ONLY $6.23!
    As for Mary Jo’s books…I’ve been reading them ever since they came out. I think I’ve got all of them now…even the very very hard to find early one.
    I discovered Jo Beverly and Anne Gracie through this blog and I’m working on their back list as we speak.

    Reply
  39. Amazingly enough…I managed to score a copy of Joanna B’s Her Ladyship’s Companion just this week from Thrift Books (online used book seller). I had it on my wish list and then voila…a copy came in and was ONLY $6.23!
    As for Mary Jo’s books…I’ve been reading them ever since they came out. I think I’ve got all of them now…even the very very hard to find early one.
    I discovered Jo Beverly and Anne Gracie through this blog and I’m working on their back list as we speak.

    Reply
  40. Amazingly enough…I managed to score a copy of Joanna B’s Her Ladyship’s Companion just this week from Thrift Books (online used book seller). I had it on my wish list and then voila…a copy came in and was ONLY $6.23!
    As for Mary Jo’s books…I’ve been reading them ever since they came out. I think I’ve got all of them now…even the very very hard to find early one.
    I discovered Jo Beverly and Anne Gracie through this blog and I’m working on their back list as we speak.

    Reply
  41. Happy Ninth Anniversary to all the Wenches. Not only have I been visiting the blog since early in its first year, but I read most of these first books shortly after they were released. I confess that I didn’t read Her Ladyship’s Companion until it was released for Kindle, but I did read The Spymaster’s Lady early on when Jo Bourne was a guest on the Eloisa James bulletin board. I own tattered copies of the original paperback editions editions of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed and The Would-Be Widow, although I first read a library copy of the former. Since they are more recent, my paperback copies of The Gallant Waif (still my favorite Anne Gracie book) and The Spymaster’s Lady are less tattered, but they all are worn enough that I also have digital copies. Maybe it’s more important to say that I also own copies of all the books since those first ones, and I recently pre-ordered my copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball to be sure that my reading and my collection stays up to date. 🙂

    Reply
  42. Happy Ninth Anniversary to all the Wenches. Not only have I been visiting the blog since early in its first year, but I read most of these first books shortly after they were released. I confess that I didn’t read Her Ladyship’s Companion until it was released for Kindle, but I did read The Spymaster’s Lady early on when Jo Bourne was a guest on the Eloisa James bulletin board. I own tattered copies of the original paperback editions editions of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed and The Would-Be Widow, although I first read a library copy of the former. Since they are more recent, my paperback copies of The Gallant Waif (still my favorite Anne Gracie book) and The Spymaster’s Lady are less tattered, but they all are worn enough that I also have digital copies. Maybe it’s more important to say that I also own copies of all the books since those first ones, and I recently pre-ordered my copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball to be sure that my reading and my collection stays up to date. 🙂

    Reply
  43. Happy Ninth Anniversary to all the Wenches. Not only have I been visiting the blog since early in its first year, but I read most of these first books shortly after they were released. I confess that I didn’t read Her Ladyship’s Companion until it was released for Kindle, but I did read The Spymaster’s Lady early on when Jo Bourne was a guest on the Eloisa James bulletin board. I own tattered copies of the original paperback editions editions of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed and The Would-Be Widow, although I first read a library copy of the former. Since they are more recent, my paperback copies of The Gallant Waif (still my favorite Anne Gracie book) and The Spymaster’s Lady are less tattered, but they all are worn enough that I also have digital copies. Maybe it’s more important to say that I also own copies of all the books since those first ones, and I recently pre-ordered my copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball to be sure that my reading and my collection stays up to date. 🙂

    Reply
  44. Happy Ninth Anniversary to all the Wenches. Not only have I been visiting the blog since early in its first year, but I read most of these first books shortly after they were released. I confess that I didn’t read Her Ladyship’s Companion until it was released for Kindle, but I did read The Spymaster’s Lady early on when Jo Bourne was a guest on the Eloisa James bulletin board. I own tattered copies of the original paperback editions editions of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed and The Would-Be Widow, although I first read a library copy of the former. Since they are more recent, my paperback copies of The Gallant Waif (still my favorite Anne Gracie book) and The Spymaster’s Lady are less tattered, but they all are worn enough that I also have digital copies. Maybe it’s more important to say that I also own copies of all the books since those first ones, and I recently pre-ordered my copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball to be sure that my reading and my collection stays up to date. 🙂

    Reply
  45. Happy Ninth Anniversary to all the Wenches. Not only have I been visiting the blog since early in its first year, but I read most of these first books shortly after they were released. I confess that I didn’t read Her Ladyship’s Companion until it was released for Kindle, but I did read The Spymaster’s Lady early on when Jo Bourne was a guest on the Eloisa James bulletin board. I own tattered copies of the original paperback editions editions of Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed and The Would-Be Widow, although I first read a library copy of the former. Since they are more recent, my paperback copies of The Gallant Waif (still my favorite Anne Gracie book) and The Spymaster’s Lady are less tattered, but they all are worn enough that I also have digital copies. Maybe it’s more important to say that I also own copies of all the books since those first ones, and I recently pre-ordered my copy of The Last Chance Christmas Ball to be sure that my reading and my collection stays up to date. 🙂

    Reply
  46. Molly, I always thought I was terrible at “creative writing” because we only ever did strange exercises, like write about traffic in the rain at night and use as many colors as you can. That was an actual exercise, by the way. Nobody ever asked us to write a story. I never even realised creative writing was about stories.
    But I did American history in year 11 and the teacher was excellent and encouraged creative responses. I remember writing letters from settlers, and native American stories etc. Not surprising I loved it, since I read lots of historical novels.

    Reply
  47. Molly, I always thought I was terrible at “creative writing” because we only ever did strange exercises, like write about traffic in the rain at night and use as many colors as you can. That was an actual exercise, by the way. Nobody ever asked us to write a story. I never even realised creative writing was about stories.
    But I did American history in year 11 and the teacher was excellent and encouraged creative responses. I remember writing letters from settlers, and native American stories etc. Not surprising I loved it, since I read lots of historical novels.

    Reply
  48. Molly, I always thought I was terrible at “creative writing” because we only ever did strange exercises, like write about traffic in the rain at night and use as many colors as you can. That was an actual exercise, by the way. Nobody ever asked us to write a story. I never even realised creative writing was about stories.
    But I did American history in year 11 and the teacher was excellent and encouraged creative responses. I remember writing letters from settlers, and native American stories etc. Not surprising I loved it, since I read lots of historical novels.

    Reply
  49. Molly, I always thought I was terrible at “creative writing” because we only ever did strange exercises, like write about traffic in the rain at night and use as many colors as you can. That was an actual exercise, by the way. Nobody ever asked us to write a story. I never even realised creative writing was about stories.
    But I did American history in year 11 and the teacher was excellent and encouraged creative responses. I remember writing letters from settlers, and native American stories etc. Not surprising I loved it, since I read lots of historical novels.

    Reply
  50. Molly, I always thought I was terrible at “creative writing” because we only ever did strange exercises, like write about traffic in the rain at night and use as many colors as you can. That was an actual exercise, by the way. Nobody ever asked us to write a story. I never even realised creative writing was about stories.
    But I did American history in year 11 and the teacher was excellent and encouraged creative responses. I remember writing letters from settlers, and native American stories etc. Not surprising I loved it, since I read lots of historical novels.

    Reply
  51. Thanks for your kind words about my first book, Janga — and for the mention of Joanna’s first book on kindle. I’ve just bought it. Isn’t it wonderful how so many old and out of print books are now being made available?

    Reply
  52. Thanks for your kind words about my first book, Janga — and for the mention of Joanna’s first book on kindle. I’ve just bought it. Isn’t it wonderful how so many old and out of print books are now being made available?

    Reply
  53. Thanks for your kind words about my first book, Janga — and for the mention of Joanna’s first book on kindle. I’ve just bought it. Isn’t it wonderful how so many old and out of print books are now being made available?

    Reply
  54. Thanks for your kind words about my first book, Janga — and for the mention of Joanna’s first book on kindle. I’ve just bought it. Isn’t it wonderful how so many old and out of print books are now being made available?

    Reply
  55. Thanks for your kind words about my first book, Janga — and for the mention of Joanna’s first book on kindle. I’ve just bought it. Isn’t it wonderful how so many old and out of print books are now being made available?

    Reply
  56. My mother and I both enjoy historical romances. I started with Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland. Gosh, I read everything by them. For years and years, Signet published several historical romances a month. Mom and I loved going to Waldenbooks (remember them?) to pick up the new ones. We’d both have them read within a week and then have to wait a month for another batch. We were both disappointed when Signet stopped publishing them. Love that we can now get so many in ebooks. Mom’s in her 80s, so being able to changed the font size is the best part for her. Thanks for continuing to publish great books!

    Reply
  57. My mother and I both enjoy historical romances. I started with Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland. Gosh, I read everything by them. For years and years, Signet published several historical romances a month. Mom and I loved going to Waldenbooks (remember them?) to pick up the new ones. We’d both have them read within a week and then have to wait a month for another batch. We were both disappointed when Signet stopped publishing them. Love that we can now get so many in ebooks. Mom’s in her 80s, so being able to changed the font size is the best part for her. Thanks for continuing to publish great books!

    Reply
  58. My mother and I both enjoy historical romances. I started with Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland. Gosh, I read everything by them. For years and years, Signet published several historical romances a month. Mom and I loved going to Waldenbooks (remember them?) to pick up the new ones. We’d both have them read within a week and then have to wait a month for another batch. We were both disappointed when Signet stopped publishing them. Love that we can now get so many in ebooks. Mom’s in her 80s, so being able to changed the font size is the best part for her. Thanks for continuing to publish great books!

    Reply
  59. My mother and I both enjoy historical romances. I started with Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland. Gosh, I read everything by them. For years and years, Signet published several historical romances a month. Mom and I loved going to Waldenbooks (remember them?) to pick up the new ones. We’d both have them read within a week and then have to wait a month for another batch. We were both disappointed when Signet stopped publishing them. Love that we can now get so many in ebooks. Mom’s in her 80s, so being able to changed the font size is the best part for her. Thanks for continuing to publish great books!

    Reply
  60. My mother and I both enjoy historical romances. I started with Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland. Gosh, I read everything by them. For years and years, Signet published several historical romances a month. Mom and I loved going to Waldenbooks (remember them?) to pick up the new ones. We’d both have them read within a week and then have to wait a month for another batch. We were both disappointed when Signet stopped publishing them. Love that we can now get so many in ebooks. Mom’s in her 80s, so being able to changed the font size is the best part for her. Thanks for continuing to publish great books!

    Reply
  61. Nine years! It’s great.
    I was trying to answer your question, but I cannot think of anything unusual I’ve ever done just because I couldn’t ‘not doing it’. Mine has been a rather conventional life, I guess.
    It’s funny. Joanna Bourne’s first novel was my TBR Challenge this week.
    And what’s beside my laptop just this same moment?
    The Wenches’ Mischief and Mistletoe. Next to Why we make Mistakes by Joseph T. Hallinan. Yes, I’m one of those readers that’s always reading several books at the same time.
    The thing is that although I haven’t read the rest of your first novels, I have all of them in my virtual TBR pile. So I will read them sooner and later.

    Reply
  62. Nine years! It’s great.
    I was trying to answer your question, but I cannot think of anything unusual I’ve ever done just because I couldn’t ‘not doing it’. Mine has been a rather conventional life, I guess.
    It’s funny. Joanna Bourne’s first novel was my TBR Challenge this week.
    And what’s beside my laptop just this same moment?
    The Wenches’ Mischief and Mistletoe. Next to Why we make Mistakes by Joseph T. Hallinan. Yes, I’m one of those readers that’s always reading several books at the same time.
    The thing is that although I haven’t read the rest of your first novels, I have all of them in my virtual TBR pile. So I will read them sooner and later.

    Reply
  63. Nine years! It’s great.
    I was trying to answer your question, but I cannot think of anything unusual I’ve ever done just because I couldn’t ‘not doing it’. Mine has been a rather conventional life, I guess.
    It’s funny. Joanna Bourne’s first novel was my TBR Challenge this week.
    And what’s beside my laptop just this same moment?
    The Wenches’ Mischief and Mistletoe. Next to Why we make Mistakes by Joseph T. Hallinan. Yes, I’m one of those readers that’s always reading several books at the same time.
    The thing is that although I haven’t read the rest of your first novels, I have all of them in my virtual TBR pile. So I will read them sooner and later.

    Reply
  64. Nine years! It’s great.
    I was trying to answer your question, but I cannot think of anything unusual I’ve ever done just because I couldn’t ‘not doing it’. Mine has been a rather conventional life, I guess.
    It’s funny. Joanna Bourne’s first novel was my TBR Challenge this week.
    And what’s beside my laptop just this same moment?
    The Wenches’ Mischief and Mistletoe. Next to Why we make Mistakes by Joseph T. Hallinan. Yes, I’m one of those readers that’s always reading several books at the same time.
    The thing is that although I haven’t read the rest of your first novels, I have all of them in my virtual TBR pile. So I will read them sooner and later.

    Reply
  65. Nine years! It’s great.
    I was trying to answer your question, but I cannot think of anything unusual I’ve ever done just because I couldn’t ‘not doing it’. Mine has been a rather conventional life, I guess.
    It’s funny. Joanna Bourne’s first novel was my TBR Challenge this week.
    And what’s beside my laptop just this same moment?
    The Wenches’ Mischief and Mistletoe. Next to Why we make Mistakes by Joseph T. Hallinan. Yes, I’m one of those readers that’s always reading several books at the same time.
    The thing is that although I haven’t read the rest of your first novels, I have all of them in my virtual TBR pile. So I will read them sooner and later.

    Reply
  66. Thanks for the great stories. I have not read Joanne’s or Mary Jo’s first book yet, but they are on my TBR list. However I have read “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” several times and love it, it’s one of my keepers. It is a bit of a twist on the usual genre conventions, because of the very sensible heroine, who behaves reasonably and avoids all the cliched pitfalls you expect her to fall into.
    I also love “Gallant Waif” but in a different way, Anne has such a talent for tearjerkers!
    Yes, I have taken the plunge on new adventures in life a couple of times, but being a bit like Lord Wraybourne’s Jane, I did it in a careful and methodical way!

    Reply
  67. Thanks for the great stories. I have not read Joanne’s or Mary Jo’s first book yet, but they are on my TBR list. However I have read “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” several times and love it, it’s one of my keepers. It is a bit of a twist on the usual genre conventions, because of the very sensible heroine, who behaves reasonably and avoids all the cliched pitfalls you expect her to fall into.
    I also love “Gallant Waif” but in a different way, Anne has such a talent for tearjerkers!
    Yes, I have taken the plunge on new adventures in life a couple of times, but being a bit like Lord Wraybourne’s Jane, I did it in a careful and methodical way!

    Reply
  68. Thanks for the great stories. I have not read Joanne’s or Mary Jo’s first book yet, but they are on my TBR list. However I have read “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” several times and love it, it’s one of my keepers. It is a bit of a twist on the usual genre conventions, because of the very sensible heroine, who behaves reasonably and avoids all the cliched pitfalls you expect her to fall into.
    I also love “Gallant Waif” but in a different way, Anne has such a talent for tearjerkers!
    Yes, I have taken the plunge on new adventures in life a couple of times, but being a bit like Lord Wraybourne’s Jane, I did it in a careful and methodical way!

    Reply
  69. Thanks for the great stories. I have not read Joanne’s or Mary Jo’s first book yet, but they are on my TBR list. However I have read “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” several times and love it, it’s one of my keepers. It is a bit of a twist on the usual genre conventions, because of the very sensible heroine, who behaves reasonably and avoids all the cliched pitfalls you expect her to fall into.
    I also love “Gallant Waif” but in a different way, Anne has such a talent for tearjerkers!
    Yes, I have taken the plunge on new adventures in life a couple of times, but being a bit like Lord Wraybourne’s Jane, I did it in a careful and methodical way!

    Reply
  70. Thanks for the great stories. I have not read Joanne’s or Mary Jo’s first book yet, but they are on my TBR list. However I have read “Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed” several times and love it, it’s one of my keepers. It is a bit of a twist on the usual genre conventions, because of the very sensible heroine, who behaves reasonably and avoids all the cliched pitfalls you expect her to fall into.
    I also love “Gallant Waif” but in a different way, Anne has such a talent for tearjerkers!
    Yes, I have taken the plunge on new adventures in life a couple of times, but being a bit like Lord Wraybourne’s Jane, I did it in a careful and methodical way!

    Reply
  71. My original copy of Gallant Waif was bought at a used bookstore after I read Perfect Kiss. I’d heard so much about GW but could never find a copy. Then one day, on the clearance table of my used bookstore, I found it! Tied together because the pages were falling out, I ended up getting a tug of war with a woman who was just grabbing up books off the table. When I offered the clerk $10 for it, she jumped on in, declared it mine and rang me up before anyone could change their mind. I still have it, I’ve carefully read it a dozen times and now, finally, I have it in eBook form. Though I’m not much on eBooks as a whole, in this case, I’ll have a nice clean copy for a long time and I can retire my paperback to a place of honor on my shelf.
    I won’t sing this time, just Happy Ninth and many more!

    Reply
  72. My original copy of Gallant Waif was bought at a used bookstore after I read Perfect Kiss. I’d heard so much about GW but could never find a copy. Then one day, on the clearance table of my used bookstore, I found it! Tied together because the pages were falling out, I ended up getting a tug of war with a woman who was just grabbing up books off the table. When I offered the clerk $10 for it, she jumped on in, declared it mine and rang me up before anyone could change their mind. I still have it, I’ve carefully read it a dozen times and now, finally, I have it in eBook form. Though I’m not much on eBooks as a whole, in this case, I’ll have a nice clean copy for a long time and I can retire my paperback to a place of honor on my shelf.
    I won’t sing this time, just Happy Ninth and many more!

    Reply
  73. My original copy of Gallant Waif was bought at a used bookstore after I read Perfect Kiss. I’d heard so much about GW but could never find a copy. Then one day, on the clearance table of my used bookstore, I found it! Tied together because the pages were falling out, I ended up getting a tug of war with a woman who was just grabbing up books off the table. When I offered the clerk $10 for it, she jumped on in, declared it mine and rang me up before anyone could change their mind. I still have it, I’ve carefully read it a dozen times and now, finally, I have it in eBook form. Though I’m not much on eBooks as a whole, in this case, I’ll have a nice clean copy for a long time and I can retire my paperback to a place of honor on my shelf.
    I won’t sing this time, just Happy Ninth and many more!

    Reply
  74. My original copy of Gallant Waif was bought at a used bookstore after I read Perfect Kiss. I’d heard so much about GW but could never find a copy. Then one day, on the clearance table of my used bookstore, I found it! Tied together because the pages were falling out, I ended up getting a tug of war with a woman who was just grabbing up books off the table. When I offered the clerk $10 for it, she jumped on in, declared it mine and rang me up before anyone could change their mind. I still have it, I’ve carefully read it a dozen times and now, finally, I have it in eBook form. Though I’m not much on eBooks as a whole, in this case, I’ll have a nice clean copy for a long time and I can retire my paperback to a place of honor on my shelf.
    I won’t sing this time, just Happy Ninth and many more!

    Reply
  75. My original copy of Gallant Waif was bought at a used bookstore after I read Perfect Kiss. I’d heard so much about GW but could never find a copy. Then one day, on the clearance table of my used bookstore, I found it! Tied together because the pages were falling out, I ended up getting a tug of war with a woman who was just grabbing up books off the table. When I offered the clerk $10 for it, she jumped on in, declared it mine and rang me up before anyone could change their mind. I still have it, I’ve carefully read it a dozen times and now, finally, I have it in eBook form. Though I’m not much on eBooks as a whole, in this case, I’ll have a nice clean copy for a long time and I can retire my paperback to a place of honor on my shelf.
    I won’t sing this time, just Happy Ninth and many more!

    Reply
  76. I had SUCH fun reading this one! And, believe it or not, I’ve read every single one of these books.
    Great celebration, ladies.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  77. I had SUCH fun reading this one! And, believe it or not, I’ve read every single one of these books.
    Great celebration, ladies.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  78. I had SUCH fun reading this one! And, believe it or not, I’ve read every single one of these books.
    Great celebration, ladies.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  79. I had SUCH fun reading this one! And, believe it or not, I’ve read every single one of these books.
    Great celebration, ladies.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  80. I had SUCH fun reading this one! And, believe it or not, I’ve read every single one of these books.
    Great celebration, ladies.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  81. “It’s not available in e-book to Australians”
    Argh! As much as I love paperbacks, it drives me CRAZY how an Australian can write a book, and Australians are blocked from accessing it.
    Some day soon, publishers are going to wake up and realise the whole world wants things and that regional restrictions are ridiculous. (For example, Harlequin sends me review books, even though officially they’re not supposed to give them to Australians!). They might find piracy won’t be as much of an issue…
    I WILL get this book, however.

    Reply
  82. “It’s not available in e-book to Australians”
    Argh! As much as I love paperbacks, it drives me CRAZY how an Australian can write a book, and Australians are blocked from accessing it.
    Some day soon, publishers are going to wake up and realise the whole world wants things and that regional restrictions are ridiculous. (For example, Harlequin sends me review books, even though officially they’re not supposed to give them to Australians!). They might find piracy won’t be as much of an issue…
    I WILL get this book, however.

    Reply
  83. “It’s not available in e-book to Australians”
    Argh! As much as I love paperbacks, it drives me CRAZY how an Australian can write a book, and Australians are blocked from accessing it.
    Some day soon, publishers are going to wake up and realise the whole world wants things and that regional restrictions are ridiculous. (For example, Harlequin sends me review books, even though officially they’re not supposed to give them to Australians!). They might find piracy won’t be as much of an issue…
    I WILL get this book, however.

    Reply
  84. “It’s not available in e-book to Australians”
    Argh! As much as I love paperbacks, it drives me CRAZY how an Australian can write a book, and Australians are blocked from accessing it.
    Some day soon, publishers are going to wake up and realise the whole world wants things and that regional restrictions are ridiculous. (For example, Harlequin sends me review books, even though officially they’re not supposed to give them to Australians!). They might find piracy won’t be as much of an issue…
    I WILL get this book, however.

    Reply
  85. “It’s not available in e-book to Australians”
    Argh! As much as I love paperbacks, it drives me CRAZY how an Australian can write a book, and Australians are blocked from accessing it.
    Some day soon, publishers are going to wake up and realise the whole world wants things and that regional restrictions are ridiculous. (For example, Harlequin sends me review books, even though officially they’re not supposed to give them to Australians!). They might find piracy won’t be as much of an issue…
    I WILL get this book, however.

    Reply
  86. I will add that there have been times when I have tried to buy an ebook from pretty much every site, and was blocked. I tried to buy a paperback, and was blocked. I tried to buy a second-hand copy, and was blocked. I reached a point where I wondered if getting an illegal book was so bad if it meant I couldn’t ever read it otherwise…
    This isn’t good enough! I think people in charge still think we’re living in the Regency era!

    Reply
  87. I will add that there have been times when I have tried to buy an ebook from pretty much every site, and was blocked. I tried to buy a paperback, and was blocked. I tried to buy a second-hand copy, and was blocked. I reached a point where I wondered if getting an illegal book was so bad if it meant I couldn’t ever read it otherwise…
    This isn’t good enough! I think people in charge still think we’re living in the Regency era!

    Reply
  88. I will add that there have been times when I have tried to buy an ebook from pretty much every site, and was blocked. I tried to buy a paperback, and was blocked. I tried to buy a second-hand copy, and was blocked. I reached a point where I wondered if getting an illegal book was so bad if it meant I couldn’t ever read it otherwise…
    This isn’t good enough! I think people in charge still think we’re living in the Regency era!

    Reply
  89. I will add that there have been times when I have tried to buy an ebook from pretty much every site, and was blocked. I tried to buy a paperback, and was blocked. I tried to buy a second-hand copy, and was blocked. I reached a point where I wondered if getting an illegal book was so bad if it meant I couldn’t ever read it otherwise…
    This isn’t good enough! I think people in charge still think we’re living in the Regency era!

    Reply
  90. I will add that there have been times when I have tried to buy an ebook from pretty much every site, and was blocked. I tried to buy a paperback, and was blocked. I tried to buy a second-hand copy, and was blocked. I reached a point where I wondered if getting an illegal book was so bad if it meant I couldn’t ever read it otherwise…
    This isn’t good enough! I think people in charge still think we’re living in the Regency era!

    Reply
  91. I try to keep a TBR list on Goodreads, but then I always forget to check it.
    “I was trying to answer your question”
    Heh. I got so worked up I forgot about the question… I guess waking up one day at eighteen and deciding I’d move to London (from Australia) on my own a couple of weeks later was taking the plunge…

    Reply
  92. I try to keep a TBR list on Goodreads, but then I always forget to check it.
    “I was trying to answer your question”
    Heh. I got so worked up I forgot about the question… I guess waking up one day at eighteen and deciding I’d move to London (from Australia) on my own a couple of weeks later was taking the plunge…

    Reply
  93. I try to keep a TBR list on Goodreads, but then I always forget to check it.
    “I was trying to answer your question”
    Heh. I got so worked up I forgot about the question… I guess waking up one day at eighteen and deciding I’d move to London (from Australia) on my own a couple of weeks later was taking the plunge…

    Reply
  94. I try to keep a TBR list on Goodreads, but then I always forget to check it.
    “I was trying to answer your question”
    Heh. I got so worked up I forgot about the question… I guess waking up one day at eighteen and deciding I’d move to London (from Australia) on my own a couple of weeks later was taking the plunge…

    Reply
  95. I try to keep a TBR list on Goodreads, but then I always forget to check it.
    “I was trying to answer your question”
    Heh. I got so worked up I forgot about the question… I guess waking up one day at eighteen and deciding I’d move to London (from Australia) on my own a couple of weeks later was taking the plunge…

    Reply
  96. I wrote features for weekly newspapers, but am inept with fiction.
    But, you asked for daring and out of character – yes – did that.
    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita happened, I got very upset at what was happening to innocent people. I called the reporter who wrote an article about an office opening in Austin,he got me a fax number and I applied for a job with FEMA. I went for an interview the day a President was coming to the building where they were setting up the office. The interview was not exactly what I expected and it was quick, I had to get out of the building because they did not know me and the Secret Service was picky about who could be there. But, I was hired for a temporary position. Shortly after I was working there, I was asked if I wanted to become permanent. That meant traveling to disasters all over the country. I said yes. I did get to travel to disasters and I met wonderful people, saw wonderful places and had the knowledge that in life, I got to really help people. Some of the adventures were interesting and I have absolutely no question in my mind that everything happened the way it did because God had a plan.

    Reply
  97. I wrote features for weekly newspapers, but am inept with fiction.
    But, you asked for daring and out of character – yes – did that.
    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita happened, I got very upset at what was happening to innocent people. I called the reporter who wrote an article about an office opening in Austin,he got me a fax number and I applied for a job with FEMA. I went for an interview the day a President was coming to the building where they were setting up the office. The interview was not exactly what I expected and it was quick, I had to get out of the building because they did not know me and the Secret Service was picky about who could be there. But, I was hired for a temporary position. Shortly after I was working there, I was asked if I wanted to become permanent. That meant traveling to disasters all over the country. I said yes. I did get to travel to disasters and I met wonderful people, saw wonderful places and had the knowledge that in life, I got to really help people. Some of the adventures were interesting and I have absolutely no question in my mind that everything happened the way it did because God had a plan.

    Reply
  98. I wrote features for weekly newspapers, but am inept with fiction.
    But, you asked for daring and out of character – yes – did that.
    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita happened, I got very upset at what was happening to innocent people. I called the reporter who wrote an article about an office opening in Austin,he got me a fax number and I applied for a job with FEMA. I went for an interview the day a President was coming to the building where they were setting up the office. The interview was not exactly what I expected and it was quick, I had to get out of the building because they did not know me and the Secret Service was picky about who could be there. But, I was hired for a temporary position. Shortly after I was working there, I was asked if I wanted to become permanent. That meant traveling to disasters all over the country. I said yes. I did get to travel to disasters and I met wonderful people, saw wonderful places and had the knowledge that in life, I got to really help people. Some of the adventures were interesting and I have absolutely no question in my mind that everything happened the way it did because God had a plan.

    Reply
  99. I wrote features for weekly newspapers, but am inept with fiction.
    But, you asked for daring and out of character – yes – did that.
    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita happened, I got very upset at what was happening to innocent people. I called the reporter who wrote an article about an office opening in Austin,he got me a fax number and I applied for a job with FEMA. I went for an interview the day a President was coming to the building where they were setting up the office. The interview was not exactly what I expected and it was quick, I had to get out of the building because they did not know me and the Secret Service was picky about who could be there. But, I was hired for a temporary position. Shortly after I was working there, I was asked if I wanted to become permanent. That meant traveling to disasters all over the country. I said yes. I did get to travel to disasters and I met wonderful people, saw wonderful places and had the knowledge that in life, I got to really help people. Some of the adventures were interesting and I have absolutely no question in my mind that everything happened the way it did because God had a plan.

    Reply
  100. I wrote features for weekly newspapers, but am inept with fiction.
    But, you asked for daring and out of character – yes – did that.
    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita happened, I got very upset at what was happening to innocent people. I called the reporter who wrote an article about an office opening in Austin,he got me a fax number and I applied for a job with FEMA. I went for an interview the day a President was coming to the building where they were setting up the office. The interview was not exactly what I expected and it was quick, I had to get out of the building because they did not know me and the Secret Service was picky about who could be there. But, I was hired for a temporary position. Shortly after I was working there, I was asked if I wanted to become permanent. That meant traveling to disasters all over the country. I said yes. I did get to travel to disasters and I met wonderful people, saw wonderful places and had the knowledge that in life, I got to really help people. Some of the adventures were interesting and I have absolutely no question in my mind that everything happened the way it did because God had a plan.

    Reply
  101. Sonya, the problem is that the big publishers and agents are tied to an old system. Until the lawyers all work out how “foreign” rights are handled, every contract and every book is different. Those of us who indie-publish don’t have those ancient rules hanging over us and are free to publish anywhere. But we’re still the minority.

    Reply
  102. Sonya, the problem is that the big publishers and agents are tied to an old system. Until the lawyers all work out how “foreign” rights are handled, every contract and every book is different. Those of us who indie-publish don’t have those ancient rules hanging over us and are free to publish anywhere. But we’re still the minority.

    Reply
  103. Sonya, the problem is that the big publishers and agents are tied to an old system. Until the lawyers all work out how “foreign” rights are handled, every contract and every book is different. Those of us who indie-publish don’t have those ancient rules hanging over us and are free to publish anywhere. But we’re still the minority.

    Reply
  104. Sonya, the problem is that the big publishers and agents are tied to an old system. Until the lawyers all work out how “foreign” rights are handled, every contract and every book is different. Those of us who indie-publish don’t have those ancient rules hanging over us and are free to publish anywhere. But we’re still the minority.

    Reply
  105. Sonya, the problem is that the big publishers and agents are tied to an old system. Until the lawyers all work out how “foreign” rights are handled, every contract and every book is different. Those of us who indie-publish don’t have those ancient rules hanging over us and are free to publish anywhere. But we’re still the minority.

    Reply
  106. That’s a fabulous story,Annette. I wish more people could take their lives in their hands and go forth to fix the world! And yes, I do believe God/the Universe/the Great Whatever connects us all in some way, and it’s up to us to reach out and grab those connections.

    Reply
  107. That’s a fabulous story,Annette. I wish more people could take their lives in their hands and go forth to fix the world! And yes, I do believe God/the Universe/the Great Whatever connects us all in some way, and it’s up to us to reach out and grab those connections.

    Reply
  108. That’s a fabulous story,Annette. I wish more people could take their lives in their hands and go forth to fix the world! And yes, I do believe God/the Universe/the Great Whatever connects us all in some way, and it’s up to us to reach out and grab those connections.

    Reply
  109. That’s a fabulous story,Annette. I wish more people could take their lives in their hands and go forth to fix the world! And yes, I do believe God/the Universe/the Great Whatever connects us all in some way, and it’s up to us to reach out and grab those connections.

    Reply
  110. That’s a fabulous story,Annette. I wish more people could take their lives in their hands and go forth to fix the world! And yes, I do believe God/the Universe/the Great Whatever connects us all in some way, and it’s up to us to reach out and grab those connections.

    Reply
  111. It’s really a walk down Memory Lane, isn’t it. I have to admit I haven’t read all of these first books myself. Now that they’re more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will.
    It’d be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.

    Reply
  112. It’s really a walk down Memory Lane, isn’t it. I have to admit I haven’t read all of these first books myself. Now that they’re more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will.
    It’d be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.

    Reply
  113. It’s really a walk down Memory Lane, isn’t it. I have to admit I haven’t read all of these first books myself. Now that they’re more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will.
    It’d be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.

    Reply
  114. It’s really a walk down Memory Lane, isn’t it. I have to admit I haven’t read all of these first books myself. Now that they’re more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will.
    It’d be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.

    Reply
  115. It’s really a walk down Memory Lane, isn’t it. I have to admit I haven’t read all of these first books myself. Now that they’re more and more likely to be available in e-version, I will.
    It’d be interesting to read the first book and then go directly to the most recent release. See if I could recognize both as the work of the same author.

    Reply
  116. Thanks, Karin. I know when I’ve written a tear-jerker scene when I find myself with tears writing it — just like in Romancing the Stone. 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

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  117. Thanks, Karin. I know when I’ve written a tear-jerker scene when I find myself with tears writing it — just like in Romancing the Stone. 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  118. Thanks, Karin. I know when I’ve written a tear-jerker scene when I find myself with tears writing it — just like in Romancing the Stone. 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  119. Thanks, Karin. I know when I’ve written a tear-jerker scene when I find myself with tears writing it — just like in Romancing the Stone. 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  120. Thanks, Karin. I know when I’ve written a tear-jerker scene when I find myself with tears writing it — just like in Romancing the Stone. 🙂 Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  121. Sonya, the regional restrictions drive me crazy, too. And yes, I do think it’s encouraging people to go to the pirate sites.
    Harlequin Australia are going to republish my four harlequin historicals in August — Gallant Waif, Tallie’s Knight, An Honourable Thief and The Virtuous Widow novella — in two two-in-one editions, large paperback format.
    When I heard this news, I also asked would they please make the e-books available also, and they said they’d look into it. So stay tuned. When I hear, I’ll send out a newsletter.

    Reply
  122. Sonya, the regional restrictions drive me crazy, too. And yes, I do think it’s encouraging people to go to the pirate sites.
    Harlequin Australia are going to republish my four harlequin historicals in August — Gallant Waif, Tallie’s Knight, An Honourable Thief and The Virtuous Widow novella — in two two-in-one editions, large paperback format.
    When I heard this news, I also asked would they please make the e-books available also, and they said they’d look into it. So stay tuned. When I hear, I’ll send out a newsletter.

    Reply
  123. Sonya, the regional restrictions drive me crazy, too. And yes, I do think it’s encouraging people to go to the pirate sites.
    Harlequin Australia are going to republish my four harlequin historicals in August — Gallant Waif, Tallie’s Knight, An Honourable Thief and The Virtuous Widow novella — in two two-in-one editions, large paperback format.
    When I heard this news, I also asked would they please make the e-books available also, and they said they’d look into it. So stay tuned. When I hear, I’ll send out a newsletter.

    Reply
  124. Sonya, the regional restrictions drive me crazy, too. And yes, I do think it’s encouraging people to go to the pirate sites.
    Harlequin Australia are going to republish my four harlequin historicals in August — Gallant Waif, Tallie’s Knight, An Honourable Thief and The Virtuous Widow novella — in two two-in-one editions, large paperback format.
    When I heard this news, I also asked would they please make the e-books available also, and they said they’d look into it. So stay tuned. When I hear, I’ll send out a newsletter.

    Reply
  125. Sonya, the regional restrictions drive me crazy, too. And yes, I do think it’s encouraging people to go to the pirate sites.
    Harlequin Australia are going to republish my four harlequin historicals in August — Gallant Waif, Tallie’s Knight, An Honourable Thief and The Virtuous Widow novella — in two two-in-one editions, large paperback format.
    When I heard this news, I also asked would they please make the e-books available also, and they said they’d look into it. So stay tuned. When I hear, I’ll send out a newsletter.

    Reply
  126. Vicki, I hope you’re enjoying all those books. In my case they span decades, so I suppose my style has changed a lot.

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  127. Vicki, I hope you’re enjoying all those books. In my case they span decades, so I suppose my style has changed a lot.

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  128. Vicki, I hope you’re enjoying all those books. In my case they span decades, so I suppose my style has changed a lot.

    Reply
  129. Vicki, I hope you’re enjoying all those books. In my case they span decades, so I suppose my style has changed a lot.

    Reply
  130. Vicki, I hope you’re enjoying all those books. In my case they span decades, so I suppose my style has changed a lot.

    Reply
  131. Janga, you certainly have been a supporter from the blog from early on, and your comments have always been appreciated. Wonder what the reading world will be like in another 9!

    Reply
  132. Janga, you certainly have been a supporter from the blog from early on, and your comments have always been appreciated. Wonder what the reading world will be like in another 9!

    Reply
  133. Janga, you certainly have been a supporter from the blog from early on, and your comments have always been appreciated. Wonder what the reading world will be like in another 9!

    Reply
  134. Janga, you certainly have been a supporter from the blog from early on, and your comments have always been appreciated. Wonder what the reading world will be like in another 9!

    Reply
  135. Janga, you certainly have been a supporter from the blog from early on, and your comments have always been appreciated. Wonder what the reading world will be like in another 9!

    Reply
  136. Yes on Heyer and Cartland, but in England we had a number of other Regency authors on the library shelves back in the sixties, which was lovely.
    E-readers are great for font size, even for younger readers.

    Reply
  137. Yes on Heyer and Cartland, but in England we had a number of other Regency authors on the library shelves back in the sixties, which was lovely.
    E-readers are great for font size, even for younger readers.

    Reply
  138. Yes on Heyer and Cartland, but in England we had a number of other Regency authors on the library shelves back in the sixties, which was lovely.
    E-readers are great for font size, even for younger readers.

    Reply
  139. Yes on Heyer and Cartland, but in England we had a number of other Regency authors on the library shelves back in the sixties, which was lovely.
    E-readers are great for font size, even for younger readers.

    Reply
  140. Yes on Heyer and Cartland, but in England we had a number of other Regency authors on the library shelves back in the sixties, which was lovely.
    E-readers are great for font size, even for younger readers.

    Reply
  141. There’s nothing wrong with a conventional life, Bona. Adventures always have downsides as well as upsides. Now I find it hard to read more than one fiction book at a time. I get invested in one set of characters.

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  142. There’s nothing wrong with a conventional life, Bona. Adventures always have downsides as well as upsides. Now I find it hard to read more than one fiction book at a time. I get invested in one set of characters.

    Reply
  143. There’s nothing wrong with a conventional life, Bona. Adventures always have downsides as well as upsides. Now I find it hard to read more than one fiction book at a time. I get invested in one set of characters.

    Reply
  144. There’s nothing wrong with a conventional life, Bona. Adventures always have downsides as well as upsides. Now I find it hard to read more than one fiction book at a time. I get invested in one set of characters.

    Reply
  145. There’s nothing wrong with a conventional life, Bona. Adventures always have downsides as well as upsides. Now I find it hard to read more than one fiction book at a time. I get invested in one set of characters.

    Reply
  146. There’s probably a lot of me in Jane, Karin, so I’m cautious about my plunges and try to be sensible. I’m glad you enjoy Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed.

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  147. There’s probably a lot of me in Jane, Karin, so I’m cautious about my plunges and try to be sensible. I’m glad you enjoy Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed.

    Reply
  148. There’s probably a lot of me in Jane, Karin, so I’m cautious about my plunges and try to be sensible. I’m glad you enjoy Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed.

    Reply
  149. There’s probably a lot of me in Jane, Karin, so I’m cautious about my plunges and try to be sensible. I’m glad you enjoy Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed.

    Reply
  150. There’s probably a lot of me in Jane, Karin, so I’m cautious about my plunges and try to be sensible. I’m glad you enjoy Lord Wraybourne’s Betrothed.

    Reply
  151. Let us know, Joanna. I’ve re-read some of my early books as I prepared them for e-publishing and I don’t detect a lot of difference, but I know there must be.

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  152. Let us know, Joanna. I’ve re-read some of my early books as I prepared them for e-publishing and I don’t detect a lot of difference, but I know there must be.

    Reply
  153. Let us know, Joanna. I’ve re-read some of my early books as I prepared them for e-publishing and I don’t detect a lot of difference, but I know there must be.

    Reply
  154. Let us know, Joanna. I’ve re-read some of my early books as I prepared them for e-publishing and I don’t detect a lot of difference, but I know there must be.

    Reply
  155. Let us know, Joanna. I’ve re-read some of my early books as I prepared them for e-publishing and I don’t detect a lot of difference, but I know there must be.

    Reply
  156. Sonya, that must be infuriating. Sometimes American published books are more expensive in the UK, but I don’t think I’ve ever been unable to buy one.

    Reply
  157. Sonya, that must be infuriating. Sometimes American published books are more expensive in the UK, but I don’t think I’ve ever been unable to buy one.

    Reply
  158. Sonya, that must be infuriating. Sometimes American published books are more expensive in the UK, but I don’t think I’ve ever been unable to buy one.

    Reply
  159. Sonya, that must be infuriating. Sometimes American published books are more expensive in the UK, but I don’t think I’ve ever been unable to buy one.

    Reply
  160. Sonya, that must be infuriating. Sometimes American published books are more expensive in the UK, but I don’t think I’ve ever been unable to buy one.

    Reply
  161. In answer to the question…. I asked the man I ended up marrying to go to the movies with me. I couldn’t not ask him:) it worked out well for me. How was I to know he was just biding his time? In other areas I tend to do things the safe way. Except I decided to get a bachelors in early modern European history “because I liked the pretty dresses”. I did it against all common sense, but I never regretted it. I went back a year after graduating and became a teacher. I so enjoy the books you ladies have written and enjoy reading your first book stories. I find them inspiring. Who knows maybe one day I won’t be able to not finish writing one of those stories I’ve had simmering!

    Reply
  162. In answer to the question…. I asked the man I ended up marrying to go to the movies with me. I couldn’t not ask him:) it worked out well for me. How was I to know he was just biding his time? In other areas I tend to do things the safe way. Except I decided to get a bachelors in early modern European history “because I liked the pretty dresses”. I did it against all common sense, but I never regretted it. I went back a year after graduating and became a teacher. I so enjoy the books you ladies have written and enjoy reading your first book stories. I find them inspiring. Who knows maybe one day I won’t be able to not finish writing one of those stories I’ve had simmering!

    Reply
  163. In answer to the question…. I asked the man I ended up marrying to go to the movies with me. I couldn’t not ask him:) it worked out well for me. How was I to know he was just biding his time? In other areas I tend to do things the safe way. Except I decided to get a bachelors in early modern European history “because I liked the pretty dresses”. I did it against all common sense, but I never regretted it. I went back a year after graduating and became a teacher. I so enjoy the books you ladies have written and enjoy reading your first book stories. I find them inspiring. Who knows maybe one day I won’t be able to not finish writing one of those stories I’ve had simmering!

    Reply
  164. In answer to the question…. I asked the man I ended up marrying to go to the movies with me. I couldn’t not ask him:) it worked out well for me. How was I to know he was just biding his time? In other areas I tend to do things the safe way. Except I decided to get a bachelors in early modern European history “because I liked the pretty dresses”. I did it against all common sense, but I never regretted it. I went back a year after graduating and became a teacher. I so enjoy the books you ladies have written and enjoy reading your first book stories. I find them inspiring. Who knows maybe one day I won’t be able to not finish writing one of those stories I’ve had simmering!

    Reply
  165. In answer to the question…. I asked the man I ended up marrying to go to the movies with me. I couldn’t not ask him:) it worked out well for me. How was I to know he was just biding his time? In other areas I tend to do things the safe way. Except I decided to get a bachelors in early modern European history “because I liked the pretty dresses”. I did it against all common sense, but I never regretted it. I went back a year after graduating and became a teacher. I so enjoy the books you ladies have written and enjoy reading your first book stories. I find them inspiring. Who knows maybe one day I won’t be able to not finish writing one of those stories I’ve had simmering!

    Reply

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