The more things change….

Xmas07 
I went back to the early days to see what I was posting in January 2007. I don't know if it's comforting or worrying that much of it could be the same! New parts are in italics and brackets. Do you prefer an unchanging life or an adventurous one? I suppose a life of adventure could continue so and be unchanging? I think my mind just tied itself it knots.*G*

(There are some changes. I put up this picture of the CBKs, plus Christmas Mouse, partying together recently. Yes, the two that have moved away came home for the holidays. For a couple of years our sons came home for Christmas in January, but this year we visited them in October instead. Jobs and distance make an actual Christmas together difficult, and to be honest we don't fancy an Ontario winter. Mind you, this year was so bad here it wouldn't have made any difference!

I also posted the cover of Lady Beware, which I'd just sent off, with the below comments. It's insisting on posting huge. Sorry! I preferred Typepad the way it was 2 years ago.)Lbgoodsm

(At least this year I wasn't writing the book over Christmastide, but I was dealing with the page proofs. There were a few oddities caused in editing. For example, I must have started with "he took her hand and drew her to her feet." What was in the proof was "he drew her hand."

Sorry, Christian doesn't have an artistic talent anywhere as best I know!

I also changed or fuzzed some details that will or may arise in the next book, the one about the Duke of Ithorne.)

My real point is that I sent off my latest book on Wednesday, and I truly need a tranquil break for body and mind. Lady Beware (lovely cover!) was challenging in places – aren’t they all? – but finishing it over Christmastide was really hard, but it doesn’t matter how all that goes, I have to end with an exhausting deep immersion. It’s my process.

(I believe I was just commenting about this process in much the same tone re The Secret Wedding! Onward with the old post.)

I think I’ve mentioned that I don’t pre-plot my books, but this doesn’t mean the plots are simple. Alas. I keep saying the next one, the next one. Raucous laughter from all quarters. (Laughter continues.)

I keep notes, I go over and over as I write, trying to keep all the details straight from continuity (houses, dress, horses, dates etc) but also the flow of emotions, not just of the principals but of any characters of any significance. Then there are the things that happen that they’d remember and the ones they’d forget. Jokes to be referred back to. Word plays to return, if they’re that sort of character, etc etc.

I do my best, but in the end I have to read it through, concentrating ferociously, submerging myself in these people’s lives as if I was there with all senses on high alert. It can’t help but be exhausting. Because it’s intense, I try to do very little else, and I’ll stick at it for 18 hours or so a day.TSWNAL

Then I slowly come back to the world, in a daze.

(And a lingering daze is why I'm late with this post! It's my excuse anyway, and I'm sticking to it. I'm also deep in research for Thorn's book, as I realized he's very involved with politics and such, so I need to brush up on late 1764. Wilkes and General Warrants, anyone? Or the restive Colonials who aren't liking the new taxes necessary to pay for the recent war?)

But I have a nice prize as an apology. My publisher tells me some bound proofs of The Secret Wedding are on the way. I'll send a copy to the person who posts the most interesting comment, completely and subjectively judged by me. 🙂

Doesn't have to be on topic, even, though it if has something to do with the above, including change v tranquility, or how your life was two years ago contrasted with now, you'll get points. Posts commenting in an interesting way on other people's posts will also be favourably received.

Have at it!)

Jo

255 thoughts on “The more things change….”

  1. This blog came up in a couple of places recently (among other things, I’m re-reading some Loretta Chase, after a rest-up-from-Christmas Rogues retrospective and a re-read of 3 Putney contemporaries plus one historical), so I’m going to comment, even though I have little hope of actually being interesting – at least I can break the ice!
    Speaking of plus ca change (bummer – comments don’t take html)- it’s a little dispiriting in the current circumstances to reflect that reluctance to pay taxes is one of America’s most enduring societal motifs. As noble aspirations go, that fails to get my heart thumping.
    However, “Secret Wedding” has a gorgeous cover, and I’m sure you can find some politics of a higher order to have characters become involved in for the book in progress.

    Reply
  2. This blog came up in a couple of places recently (among other things, I’m re-reading some Loretta Chase, after a rest-up-from-Christmas Rogues retrospective and a re-read of 3 Putney contemporaries plus one historical), so I’m going to comment, even though I have little hope of actually being interesting – at least I can break the ice!
    Speaking of plus ca change (bummer – comments don’t take html)- it’s a little dispiriting in the current circumstances to reflect that reluctance to pay taxes is one of America’s most enduring societal motifs. As noble aspirations go, that fails to get my heart thumping.
    However, “Secret Wedding” has a gorgeous cover, and I’m sure you can find some politics of a higher order to have characters become involved in for the book in progress.

    Reply
  3. This blog came up in a couple of places recently (among other things, I’m re-reading some Loretta Chase, after a rest-up-from-Christmas Rogues retrospective and a re-read of 3 Putney contemporaries plus one historical), so I’m going to comment, even though I have little hope of actually being interesting – at least I can break the ice!
    Speaking of plus ca change (bummer – comments don’t take html)- it’s a little dispiriting in the current circumstances to reflect that reluctance to pay taxes is one of America’s most enduring societal motifs. As noble aspirations go, that fails to get my heart thumping.
    However, “Secret Wedding” has a gorgeous cover, and I’m sure you can find some politics of a higher order to have characters become involved in for the book in progress.

    Reply
  4. This blog came up in a couple of places recently (among other things, I’m re-reading some Loretta Chase, after a rest-up-from-Christmas Rogues retrospective and a re-read of 3 Putney contemporaries plus one historical), so I’m going to comment, even though I have little hope of actually being interesting – at least I can break the ice!
    Speaking of plus ca change (bummer – comments don’t take html)- it’s a little dispiriting in the current circumstances to reflect that reluctance to pay taxes is one of America’s most enduring societal motifs. As noble aspirations go, that fails to get my heart thumping.
    However, “Secret Wedding” has a gorgeous cover, and I’m sure you can find some politics of a higher order to have characters become involved in for the book in progress.

    Reply
  5. This blog came up in a couple of places recently (among other things, I’m re-reading some Loretta Chase, after a rest-up-from-Christmas Rogues retrospective and a re-read of 3 Putney contemporaries plus one historical), so I’m going to comment, even though I have little hope of actually being interesting – at least I can break the ice!
    Speaking of plus ca change (bummer – comments don’t take html)- it’s a little dispiriting in the current circumstances to reflect that reluctance to pay taxes is one of America’s most enduring societal motifs. As noble aspirations go, that fails to get my heart thumping.
    However, “Secret Wedding” has a gorgeous cover, and I’m sure you can find some politics of a higher order to have characters become involved in for the book in progress.

    Reply
  6. Been warm (80s) here today with a healthy Santa Anna wind that has stopped blowing. One of our lawnmowers (rabbit) just hopped down from the retaining wall to start mowing.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  7. Been warm (80s) here today with a healthy Santa Anna wind that has stopped blowing. One of our lawnmowers (rabbit) just hopped down from the retaining wall to start mowing.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  8. Been warm (80s) here today with a healthy Santa Anna wind that has stopped blowing. One of our lawnmowers (rabbit) just hopped down from the retaining wall to start mowing.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  9. Been warm (80s) here today with a healthy Santa Anna wind that has stopped blowing. One of our lawnmowers (rabbit) just hopped down from the retaining wall to start mowing.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  10. Been warm (80s) here today with a healthy Santa Anna wind that has stopped blowing. One of our lawnmowers (rabbit) just hopped down from the retaining wall to start mowing.
    Looking forward to “The Secret Wedding”.

    Reply
  11. Well now 2 years ago… wasn’t that just a few weeks back..We were waiting the arrival of 3 new grandbabys. Our 3 sons and wives All were awaiting the births ( they all did the same with their 5 year olds) This Christmas though we did have to go to Ottawa as our Daughter In Law had her Gall bladder removed . The excuse was we could look after the 18 month old. The weather was terrible. we drove from Riverview up New Brunswick through the Province of Quebec, Up to Ottawa we hit a blizzard and an Ice storm got stuck behind two rigs that had jack-knifed. had to drive behind the big snow ploughs. But we got there safe and sound and had a great time in the Countrys Capital City. I hope all is well with all readers and their families. And Thank you Jo for your great novels. Joan W In Riverview New Brunswick Canada

    Reply
  12. Well now 2 years ago… wasn’t that just a few weeks back..We were waiting the arrival of 3 new grandbabys. Our 3 sons and wives All were awaiting the births ( they all did the same with their 5 year olds) This Christmas though we did have to go to Ottawa as our Daughter In Law had her Gall bladder removed . The excuse was we could look after the 18 month old. The weather was terrible. we drove from Riverview up New Brunswick through the Province of Quebec, Up to Ottawa we hit a blizzard and an Ice storm got stuck behind two rigs that had jack-knifed. had to drive behind the big snow ploughs. But we got there safe and sound and had a great time in the Countrys Capital City. I hope all is well with all readers and their families. And Thank you Jo for your great novels. Joan W In Riverview New Brunswick Canada

    Reply
  13. Well now 2 years ago… wasn’t that just a few weeks back..We were waiting the arrival of 3 new grandbabys. Our 3 sons and wives All were awaiting the births ( they all did the same with their 5 year olds) This Christmas though we did have to go to Ottawa as our Daughter In Law had her Gall bladder removed . The excuse was we could look after the 18 month old. The weather was terrible. we drove from Riverview up New Brunswick through the Province of Quebec, Up to Ottawa we hit a blizzard and an Ice storm got stuck behind two rigs that had jack-knifed. had to drive behind the big snow ploughs. But we got there safe and sound and had a great time in the Countrys Capital City. I hope all is well with all readers and their families. And Thank you Jo for your great novels. Joan W In Riverview New Brunswick Canada

    Reply
  14. Well now 2 years ago… wasn’t that just a few weeks back..We were waiting the arrival of 3 new grandbabys. Our 3 sons and wives All were awaiting the births ( they all did the same with their 5 year olds) This Christmas though we did have to go to Ottawa as our Daughter In Law had her Gall bladder removed . The excuse was we could look after the 18 month old. The weather was terrible. we drove from Riverview up New Brunswick through the Province of Quebec, Up to Ottawa we hit a blizzard and an Ice storm got stuck behind two rigs that had jack-knifed. had to drive behind the big snow ploughs. But we got there safe and sound and had a great time in the Countrys Capital City. I hope all is well with all readers and their families. And Thank you Jo for your great novels. Joan W In Riverview New Brunswick Canada

    Reply
  15. Well now 2 years ago… wasn’t that just a few weeks back..We were waiting the arrival of 3 new grandbabys. Our 3 sons and wives All were awaiting the births ( they all did the same with their 5 year olds) This Christmas though we did have to go to Ottawa as our Daughter In Law had her Gall bladder removed . The excuse was we could look after the 18 month old. The weather was terrible. we drove from Riverview up New Brunswick through the Province of Quebec, Up to Ottawa we hit a blizzard and an Ice storm got stuck behind two rigs that had jack-knifed. had to drive behind the big snow ploughs. But we got there safe and sound and had a great time in the Countrys Capital City. I hope all is well with all readers and their families. And Thank you Jo for your great novels. Joan W In Riverview New Brunswick Canada

    Reply
  16. I suppose that it’s not too surprising that the struggle with this January’s book sounds a lot like the struggle with the one two years ago. And I’ll bet that last year’s wasn’t all of that different!
    The details may very, but we seem to be stuck our particular form of creative process. Would that we could plug a new chip into our brains and come up with a better, faster, neater way of creating our stories!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  17. I suppose that it’s not too surprising that the struggle with this January’s book sounds a lot like the struggle with the one two years ago. And I’ll bet that last year’s wasn’t all of that different!
    The details may very, but we seem to be stuck our particular form of creative process. Would that we could plug a new chip into our brains and come up with a better, faster, neater way of creating our stories!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  18. I suppose that it’s not too surprising that the struggle with this January’s book sounds a lot like the struggle with the one two years ago. And I’ll bet that last year’s wasn’t all of that different!
    The details may very, but we seem to be stuck our particular form of creative process. Would that we could plug a new chip into our brains and come up with a better, faster, neater way of creating our stories!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  19. I suppose that it’s not too surprising that the struggle with this January’s book sounds a lot like the struggle with the one two years ago. And I’ll bet that last year’s wasn’t all of that different!
    The details may very, but we seem to be stuck our particular form of creative process. Would that we could plug a new chip into our brains and come up with a better, faster, neater way of creating our stories!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  20. I suppose that it’s not too surprising that the struggle with this January’s book sounds a lot like the struggle with the one two years ago. And I’ll bet that last year’s wasn’t all of that different!
    The details may very, but we seem to be stuck our particular form of creative process. Would that we could plug a new chip into our brains and come up with a better, faster, neater way of creating our stories!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  21. (Obviously, I have had a lot of change. Tranquility? Not so much. On this day last year I posted an entry in my series “Overheard In My Backseat.” 2007)
    The AM version –
    Smidge, to anyone who will listen – “I have soda colored eyes.”
    Spud – “So does mom.”
    Smidge – “No, my daddy got me my soda colored eyes. We went to an eye store – I FOUND the eye store – and we went inside and looked at the eyes and I told daddy I wanted soda colored eyes and he bought them and they put them in and now they look pretty.” (Note for Mommy – please to be removing all sharp sticks from house) Smidge – “C’mon Mom! We have to go to the toy store RIGHT NOW! We are OUT of stickers.”
    The PM version….
    “Mommy!!! Don’ drive! I not wan you to drive! I CRYIN!! DID YOU HEAR ME? I CRYIN!!!!!”
    Which goes with…
    “I not throwing fit, SPUD throwing fit. I BEEIN GOOD!!!” (as she attempts to climb out of cart and smack Spud, who is being perfection, and as she further screams and yells.
    Which came about after….
    “I LIKE hit Spud. It Fun…. DON PUT MY STICKERS BACK!! NONONONONONO MY STICKERS!!! NONONONONONONO!!!”
    Which led to …
    “Ma’am? I have three kids – you’re holding up really well – seriously, you’re doing an excellent job.”
    Which they only say when…..
    One of your children really needs to beaten and they’re afraid you might walk outside and comply.
    (Two days ago I posted a chapter – 2009)
    On the way to school this morning Smidge was singing her latest rock opera in the back seat. I couldn’t follow the story exactly, but Queen Sally Of The Villains was warning some other character to stay out of her lava pit, which to her tasted like water, but would kill them with the evil. The other character was naive in their assumptions that they would be fine, and challenged Queen Sally until she washed her hands of them “Then diiiiiiieeeee….. I am Queen of the Bad World, and the Villains all know my name, I have told yooooooooouuuuuuu it’s deadly, DIE if you want to… in PAIN…..”
    Have a nice day at pre-school, honey.

    Reply
  22. (Obviously, I have had a lot of change. Tranquility? Not so much. On this day last year I posted an entry in my series “Overheard In My Backseat.” 2007)
    The AM version –
    Smidge, to anyone who will listen – “I have soda colored eyes.”
    Spud – “So does mom.”
    Smidge – “No, my daddy got me my soda colored eyes. We went to an eye store – I FOUND the eye store – and we went inside and looked at the eyes and I told daddy I wanted soda colored eyes and he bought them and they put them in and now they look pretty.” (Note for Mommy – please to be removing all sharp sticks from house) Smidge – “C’mon Mom! We have to go to the toy store RIGHT NOW! We are OUT of stickers.”
    The PM version….
    “Mommy!!! Don’ drive! I not wan you to drive! I CRYIN!! DID YOU HEAR ME? I CRYIN!!!!!”
    Which goes with…
    “I not throwing fit, SPUD throwing fit. I BEEIN GOOD!!!” (as she attempts to climb out of cart and smack Spud, who is being perfection, and as she further screams and yells.
    Which came about after….
    “I LIKE hit Spud. It Fun…. DON PUT MY STICKERS BACK!! NONONONONONO MY STICKERS!!! NONONONONONONO!!!”
    Which led to …
    “Ma’am? I have three kids – you’re holding up really well – seriously, you’re doing an excellent job.”
    Which they only say when…..
    One of your children really needs to beaten and they’re afraid you might walk outside and comply.
    (Two days ago I posted a chapter – 2009)
    On the way to school this morning Smidge was singing her latest rock opera in the back seat. I couldn’t follow the story exactly, but Queen Sally Of The Villains was warning some other character to stay out of her lava pit, which to her tasted like water, but would kill them with the evil. The other character was naive in their assumptions that they would be fine, and challenged Queen Sally until she washed her hands of them “Then diiiiiiieeeee….. I am Queen of the Bad World, and the Villains all know my name, I have told yooooooooouuuuuuu it’s deadly, DIE if you want to… in PAIN…..”
    Have a nice day at pre-school, honey.

    Reply
  23. (Obviously, I have had a lot of change. Tranquility? Not so much. On this day last year I posted an entry in my series “Overheard In My Backseat.” 2007)
    The AM version –
    Smidge, to anyone who will listen – “I have soda colored eyes.”
    Spud – “So does mom.”
    Smidge – “No, my daddy got me my soda colored eyes. We went to an eye store – I FOUND the eye store – and we went inside and looked at the eyes and I told daddy I wanted soda colored eyes and he bought them and they put them in and now they look pretty.” (Note for Mommy – please to be removing all sharp sticks from house) Smidge – “C’mon Mom! We have to go to the toy store RIGHT NOW! We are OUT of stickers.”
    The PM version….
    “Mommy!!! Don’ drive! I not wan you to drive! I CRYIN!! DID YOU HEAR ME? I CRYIN!!!!!”
    Which goes with…
    “I not throwing fit, SPUD throwing fit. I BEEIN GOOD!!!” (as she attempts to climb out of cart and smack Spud, who is being perfection, and as she further screams and yells.
    Which came about after….
    “I LIKE hit Spud. It Fun…. DON PUT MY STICKERS BACK!! NONONONONONO MY STICKERS!!! NONONONONONONO!!!”
    Which led to …
    “Ma’am? I have three kids – you’re holding up really well – seriously, you’re doing an excellent job.”
    Which they only say when…..
    One of your children really needs to beaten and they’re afraid you might walk outside and comply.
    (Two days ago I posted a chapter – 2009)
    On the way to school this morning Smidge was singing her latest rock opera in the back seat. I couldn’t follow the story exactly, but Queen Sally Of The Villains was warning some other character to stay out of her lava pit, which to her tasted like water, but would kill them with the evil. The other character was naive in their assumptions that they would be fine, and challenged Queen Sally until she washed her hands of them “Then diiiiiiieeeee….. I am Queen of the Bad World, and the Villains all know my name, I have told yooooooooouuuuuuu it’s deadly, DIE if you want to… in PAIN…..”
    Have a nice day at pre-school, honey.

    Reply
  24. (Obviously, I have had a lot of change. Tranquility? Not so much. On this day last year I posted an entry in my series “Overheard In My Backseat.” 2007)
    The AM version –
    Smidge, to anyone who will listen – “I have soda colored eyes.”
    Spud – “So does mom.”
    Smidge – “No, my daddy got me my soda colored eyes. We went to an eye store – I FOUND the eye store – and we went inside and looked at the eyes and I told daddy I wanted soda colored eyes and he bought them and they put them in and now they look pretty.” (Note for Mommy – please to be removing all sharp sticks from house) Smidge – “C’mon Mom! We have to go to the toy store RIGHT NOW! We are OUT of stickers.”
    The PM version….
    “Mommy!!! Don’ drive! I not wan you to drive! I CRYIN!! DID YOU HEAR ME? I CRYIN!!!!!”
    Which goes with…
    “I not throwing fit, SPUD throwing fit. I BEEIN GOOD!!!” (as she attempts to climb out of cart and smack Spud, who is being perfection, and as she further screams and yells.
    Which came about after….
    “I LIKE hit Spud. It Fun…. DON PUT MY STICKERS BACK!! NONONONONONO MY STICKERS!!! NONONONONONONO!!!”
    Which led to …
    “Ma’am? I have three kids – you’re holding up really well – seriously, you’re doing an excellent job.”
    Which they only say when…..
    One of your children really needs to beaten and they’re afraid you might walk outside and comply.
    (Two days ago I posted a chapter – 2009)
    On the way to school this morning Smidge was singing her latest rock opera in the back seat. I couldn’t follow the story exactly, but Queen Sally Of The Villains was warning some other character to stay out of her lava pit, which to her tasted like water, but would kill them with the evil. The other character was naive in their assumptions that they would be fine, and challenged Queen Sally until she washed her hands of them “Then diiiiiiieeeee….. I am Queen of the Bad World, and the Villains all know my name, I have told yooooooooouuuuuuu it’s deadly, DIE if you want to… in PAIN…..”
    Have a nice day at pre-school, honey.

    Reply
  25. (Obviously, I have had a lot of change. Tranquility? Not so much. On this day last year I posted an entry in my series “Overheard In My Backseat.” 2007)
    The AM version –
    Smidge, to anyone who will listen – “I have soda colored eyes.”
    Spud – “So does mom.”
    Smidge – “No, my daddy got me my soda colored eyes. We went to an eye store – I FOUND the eye store – and we went inside and looked at the eyes and I told daddy I wanted soda colored eyes and he bought them and they put them in and now they look pretty.” (Note for Mommy – please to be removing all sharp sticks from house) Smidge – “C’mon Mom! We have to go to the toy store RIGHT NOW! We are OUT of stickers.”
    The PM version….
    “Mommy!!! Don’ drive! I not wan you to drive! I CRYIN!! DID YOU HEAR ME? I CRYIN!!!!!”
    Which goes with…
    “I not throwing fit, SPUD throwing fit. I BEEIN GOOD!!!” (as she attempts to climb out of cart and smack Spud, who is being perfection, and as she further screams and yells.
    Which came about after….
    “I LIKE hit Spud. It Fun…. DON PUT MY STICKERS BACK!! NONONONONONO MY STICKERS!!! NONONONONONONO!!!”
    Which led to …
    “Ma’am? I have three kids – you’re holding up really well – seriously, you’re doing an excellent job.”
    Which they only say when…..
    One of your children really needs to beaten and they’re afraid you might walk outside and comply.
    (Two days ago I posted a chapter – 2009)
    On the way to school this morning Smidge was singing her latest rock opera in the back seat. I couldn’t follow the story exactly, but Queen Sally Of The Villains was warning some other character to stay out of her lava pit, which to her tasted like water, but would kill them with the evil. The other character was naive in their assumptions that they would be fine, and challenged Queen Sally until she washed her hands of them “Then diiiiiiieeeee….. I am Queen of the Bad World, and the Villains all know my name, I have told yooooooooouuuuuuu it’s deadly, DIE if you want to… in PAIN…..”
    Have a nice day at pre-school, honey.

    Reply
  26. Also, like that wasn’t long enough –
    Diane (TT) – I JUST got around to reading the last Loretta Chase book – oh my gosh, that was astonishingly good. I don’t know why it was on the bottom of the TBR for so long, but it kept getting passed over (Venice, maybe?) Wow. If anyone missed Your Scandalous Ways, order it right away. Great book. Don’t start it at 11 like I did or you’ll be up all night.

    Reply
  27. Also, like that wasn’t long enough –
    Diane (TT) – I JUST got around to reading the last Loretta Chase book – oh my gosh, that was astonishingly good. I don’t know why it was on the bottom of the TBR for so long, but it kept getting passed over (Venice, maybe?) Wow. If anyone missed Your Scandalous Ways, order it right away. Great book. Don’t start it at 11 like I did or you’ll be up all night.

    Reply
  28. Also, like that wasn’t long enough –
    Diane (TT) – I JUST got around to reading the last Loretta Chase book – oh my gosh, that was astonishingly good. I don’t know why it was on the bottom of the TBR for so long, but it kept getting passed over (Venice, maybe?) Wow. If anyone missed Your Scandalous Ways, order it right away. Great book. Don’t start it at 11 like I did or you’ll be up all night.

    Reply
  29. Also, like that wasn’t long enough –
    Diane (TT) – I JUST got around to reading the last Loretta Chase book – oh my gosh, that was astonishingly good. I don’t know why it was on the bottom of the TBR for so long, but it kept getting passed over (Venice, maybe?) Wow. If anyone missed Your Scandalous Ways, order it right away. Great book. Don’t start it at 11 like I did or you’ll be up all night.

    Reply
  30. Also, like that wasn’t long enough –
    Diane (TT) – I JUST got around to reading the last Loretta Chase book – oh my gosh, that was astonishingly good. I don’t know why it was on the bottom of the TBR for so long, but it kept getting passed over (Venice, maybe?) Wow. If anyone missed Your Scandalous Ways, order it right away. Great book. Don’t start it at 11 like I did or you’ll be up all night.

    Reply
  31. Interesting posts!
    Liz, you have fascinating kids. Joan, I feel for you having to drive through that weather.
    What good moms we all are. 🙂
    I’m just taking credit for many past achievements. There must have been some.
    I suppose I should have put a deadline on the comments for the prize. I’ll make it midnight, pacific time on Friday the 16th.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  32. Interesting posts!
    Liz, you have fascinating kids. Joan, I feel for you having to drive through that weather.
    What good moms we all are. 🙂
    I’m just taking credit for many past achievements. There must have been some.
    I suppose I should have put a deadline on the comments for the prize. I’ll make it midnight, pacific time on Friday the 16th.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  33. Interesting posts!
    Liz, you have fascinating kids. Joan, I feel for you having to drive through that weather.
    What good moms we all are. 🙂
    I’m just taking credit for many past achievements. There must have been some.
    I suppose I should have put a deadline on the comments for the prize. I’ll make it midnight, pacific time on Friday the 16th.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  34. Interesting posts!
    Liz, you have fascinating kids. Joan, I feel for you having to drive through that weather.
    What good moms we all are. 🙂
    I’m just taking credit for many past achievements. There must have been some.
    I suppose I should have put a deadline on the comments for the prize. I’ll make it midnight, pacific time on Friday the 16th.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  35. Interesting posts!
    Liz, you have fascinating kids. Joan, I feel for you having to drive through that weather.
    What good moms we all are. 🙂
    I’m just taking credit for many past achievements. There must have been some.
    I suppose I should have put a deadline on the comments for the prize. I’ll make it midnight, pacific time on Friday the 16th.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  36. +JMJ+
    Jo, not precisely two years ago, but early in 2006, I discovered you for the first time. =)
    Coincidentally, “Lady Beware” was the first of your novels that I tried, a bit later that year. I can’t say that I fell in love with it–to be perfectly honest. =P It was the magic of your novella “The Wise Virgin” that really hooked me.
    What else? A few months shy of closing my first schoolyear as a high school Literature teacher, I was rereading J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”, which I didn’t like the first time around, and trying to make it engaging–to both my students and myself. It actually worked!
    I haven’t thought about Holden Caulfield in a while. What do you suppose he’d have to say about Romance novels? I doubt he’d be a fan, as he hates movies and anything stylised. He’d probably make an interesting Romance hero once he gets everything straightened out. Perhaps someday a Romance author will reveal that one of her heroes was inspired by the idea of Holden all grown up. Oh, my!

    Reply
  37. +JMJ+
    Jo, not precisely two years ago, but early in 2006, I discovered you for the first time. =)
    Coincidentally, “Lady Beware” was the first of your novels that I tried, a bit later that year. I can’t say that I fell in love with it–to be perfectly honest. =P It was the magic of your novella “The Wise Virgin” that really hooked me.
    What else? A few months shy of closing my first schoolyear as a high school Literature teacher, I was rereading J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”, which I didn’t like the first time around, and trying to make it engaging–to both my students and myself. It actually worked!
    I haven’t thought about Holden Caulfield in a while. What do you suppose he’d have to say about Romance novels? I doubt he’d be a fan, as he hates movies and anything stylised. He’d probably make an interesting Romance hero once he gets everything straightened out. Perhaps someday a Romance author will reveal that one of her heroes was inspired by the idea of Holden all grown up. Oh, my!

    Reply
  38. +JMJ+
    Jo, not precisely two years ago, but early in 2006, I discovered you for the first time. =)
    Coincidentally, “Lady Beware” was the first of your novels that I tried, a bit later that year. I can’t say that I fell in love with it–to be perfectly honest. =P It was the magic of your novella “The Wise Virgin” that really hooked me.
    What else? A few months shy of closing my first schoolyear as a high school Literature teacher, I was rereading J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”, which I didn’t like the first time around, and trying to make it engaging–to both my students and myself. It actually worked!
    I haven’t thought about Holden Caulfield in a while. What do you suppose he’d have to say about Romance novels? I doubt he’d be a fan, as he hates movies and anything stylised. He’d probably make an interesting Romance hero once he gets everything straightened out. Perhaps someday a Romance author will reveal that one of her heroes was inspired by the idea of Holden all grown up. Oh, my!

    Reply
  39. +JMJ+
    Jo, not precisely two years ago, but early in 2006, I discovered you for the first time. =)
    Coincidentally, “Lady Beware” was the first of your novels that I tried, a bit later that year. I can’t say that I fell in love with it–to be perfectly honest. =P It was the magic of your novella “The Wise Virgin” that really hooked me.
    What else? A few months shy of closing my first schoolyear as a high school Literature teacher, I was rereading J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”, which I didn’t like the first time around, and trying to make it engaging–to both my students and myself. It actually worked!
    I haven’t thought about Holden Caulfield in a while. What do you suppose he’d have to say about Romance novels? I doubt he’d be a fan, as he hates movies and anything stylised. He’d probably make an interesting Romance hero once he gets everything straightened out. Perhaps someday a Romance author will reveal that one of her heroes was inspired by the idea of Holden all grown up. Oh, my!

    Reply
  40. +JMJ+
    Jo, not precisely two years ago, but early in 2006, I discovered you for the first time. =)
    Coincidentally, “Lady Beware” was the first of your novels that I tried, a bit later that year. I can’t say that I fell in love with it–to be perfectly honest. =P It was the magic of your novella “The Wise Virgin” that really hooked me.
    What else? A few months shy of closing my first schoolyear as a high school Literature teacher, I was rereading J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye”, which I didn’t like the first time around, and trying to make it engaging–to both my students and myself. It actually worked!
    I haven’t thought about Holden Caulfield in a while. What do you suppose he’d have to say about Romance novels? I doubt he’d be a fan, as he hates movies and anything stylised. He’d probably make an interesting Romance hero once he gets everything straightened out. Perhaps someday a Romance author will reveal that one of her heroes was inspired by the idea of Holden all grown up. Oh, my!

    Reply
  41. I look back to last year at this time. Finding instead of reading 3-4 books a week, I’m listening to audio books on my mp3. My granson is with us every two weeks at least. No more time to sit and read. (sigh…) lol I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

    Reply
  42. I look back to last year at this time. Finding instead of reading 3-4 books a week, I’m listening to audio books on my mp3. My granson is with us every two weeks at least. No more time to sit and read. (sigh…) lol I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

    Reply
  43. I look back to last year at this time. Finding instead of reading 3-4 books a week, I’m listening to audio books on my mp3. My granson is with us every two weeks at least. No more time to sit and read. (sigh…) lol I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

    Reply
  44. I look back to last year at this time. Finding instead of reading 3-4 books a week, I’m listening to audio books on my mp3. My granson is with us every two weeks at least. No more time to sit and read. (sigh…) lol I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

    Reply
  45. I look back to last year at this time. Finding instead of reading 3-4 books a week, I’m listening to audio books on my mp3. My granson is with us every two weeks at least. No more time to sit and read. (sigh…) lol I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

    Reply
  46. Two years ago? Are you kidding? I haven’t the slightest idea. I suppose that’s an example of life staying too much the same. In trying to think of what could be different, I immediately thought of my four cats. Did I have them two years ago? Yes I did, so considering that I’ve had the same job for 13 years, lived in the same house for 11, haven’t dated for longer than I’m going to admit to here, and don’t have a family to share Christmas with, I guess it would be the same, wouldn’t it? The things that separate the years for me are the big events, like losing my kitty of 16 years. (Which is why I kept going back to the shelter for another cat to take her place until I forced myself to stop at four! Moral of that story is that you can’t replace the one you love. You can fill up your days and create new memories, but there’s no *replacing* that which was lost.)
    BTW, that reminds me. I could not believe you killed off that kitty in Dangerous Joy! I had to stop reading the book right there. And that made me mad, since you’re my favorite author and finding a book of yours that I haven’t read is hard enough. (I’m down to two, which aren’t in print, but I’ll never give up.) Right after that, I read your blog where you said you were including pets in a series of books. That will be lovely and I’ll look forward to it, as long as you don’t KILL them! (Really, I’m serious. If you’re going to kill them, please plant a Spoiler somewhere for those of us who can’t take it.)
    But here’s what I’m wishing for. That this time next year I’ll be able to look back to now, and I’ll have an answer that immediately springs to mind because a big event happened. Not a big BAD event but a big GOOD one. It wouldn’t have to be an adventure, but I’ll admit that the ones I’m thinking of just might be that. Like making a wonderful new friend, dating a great guy, getting published. As long as I’m wishing…

    Reply
  47. Two years ago? Are you kidding? I haven’t the slightest idea. I suppose that’s an example of life staying too much the same. In trying to think of what could be different, I immediately thought of my four cats. Did I have them two years ago? Yes I did, so considering that I’ve had the same job for 13 years, lived in the same house for 11, haven’t dated for longer than I’m going to admit to here, and don’t have a family to share Christmas with, I guess it would be the same, wouldn’t it? The things that separate the years for me are the big events, like losing my kitty of 16 years. (Which is why I kept going back to the shelter for another cat to take her place until I forced myself to stop at four! Moral of that story is that you can’t replace the one you love. You can fill up your days and create new memories, but there’s no *replacing* that which was lost.)
    BTW, that reminds me. I could not believe you killed off that kitty in Dangerous Joy! I had to stop reading the book right there. And that made me mad, since you’re my favorite author and finding a book of yours that I haven’t read is hard enough. (I’m down to two, which aren’t in print, but I’ll never give up.) Right after that, I read your blog where you said you were including pets in a series of books. That will be lovely and I’ll look forward to it, as long as you don’t KILL them! (Really, I’m serious. If you’re going to kill them, please plant a Spoiler somewhere for those of us who can’t take it.)
    But here’s what I’m wishing for. That this time next year I’ll be able to look back to now, and I’ll have an answer that immediately springs to mind because a big event happened. Not a big BAD event but a big GOOD one. It wouldn’t have to be an adventure, but I’ll admit that the ones I’m thinking of just might be that. Like making a wonderful new friend, dating a great guy, getting published. As long as I’m wishing…

    Reply
  48. Two years ago? Are you kidding? I haven’t the slightest idea. I suppose that’s an example of life staying too much the same. In trying to think of what could be different, I immediately thought of my four cats. Did I have them two years ago? Yes I did, so considering that I’ve had the same job for 13 years, lived in the same house for 11, haven’t dated for longer than I’m going to admit to here, and don’t have a family to share Christmas with, I guess it would be the same, wouldn’t it? The things that separate the years for me are the big events, like losing my kitty of 16 years. (Which is why I kept going back to the shelter for another cat to take her place until I forced myself to stop at four! Moral of that story is that you can’t replace the one you love. You can fill up your days and create new memories, but there’s no *replacing* that which was lost.)
    BTW, that reminds me. I could not believe you killed off that kitty in Dangerous Joy! I had to stop reading the book right there. And that made me mad, since you’re my favorite author and finding a book of yours that I haven’t read is hard enough. (I’m down to two, which aren’t in print, but I’ll never give up.) Right after that, I read your blog where you said you were including pets in a series of books. That will be lovely and I’ll look forward to it, as long as you don’t KILL them! (Really, I’m serious. If you’re going to kill them, please plant a Spoiler somewhere for those of us who can’t take it.)
    But here’s what I’m wishing for. That this time next year I’ll be able to look back to now, and I’ll have an answer that immediately springs to mind because a big event happened. Not a big BAD event but a big GOOD one. It wouldn’t have to be an adventure, but I’ll admit that the ones I’m thinking of just might be that. Like making a wonderful new friend, dating a great guy, getting published. As long as I’m wishing…

    Reply
  49. Two years ago? Are you kidding? I haven’t the slightest idea. I suppose that’s an example of life staying too much the same. In trying to think of what could be different, I immediately thought of my four cats. Did I have them two years ago? Yes I did, so considering that I’ve had the same job for 13 years, lived in the same house for 11, haven’t dated for longer than I’m going to admit to here, and don’t have a family to share Christmas with, I guess it would be the same, wouldn’t it? The things that separate the years for me are the big events, like losing my kitty of 16 years. (Which is why I kept going back to the shelter for another cat to take her place until I forced myself to stop at four! Moral of that story is that you can’t replace the one you love. You can fill up your days and create new memories, but there’s no *replacing* that which was lost.)
    BTW, that reminds me. I could not believe you killed off that kitty in Dangerous Joy! I had to stop reading the book right there. And that made me mad, since you’re my favorite author and finding a book of yours that I haven’t read is hard enough. (I’m down to two, which aren’t in print, but I’ll never give up.) Right after that, I read your blog where you said you were including pets in a series of books. That will be lovely and I’ll look forward to it, as long as you don’t KILL them! (Really, I’m serious. If you’re going to kill them, please plant a Spoiler somewhere for those of us who can’t take it.)
    But here’s what I’m wishing for. That this time next year I’ll be able to look back to now, and I’ll have an answer that immediately springs to mind because a big event happened. Not a big BAD event but a big GOOD one. It wouldn’t have to be an adventure, but I’ll admit that the ones I’m thinking of just might be that. Like making a wonderful new friend, dating a great guy, getting published. As long as I’m wishing…

    Reply
  50. Two years ago? Are you kidding? I haven’t the slightest idea. I suppose that’s an example of life staying too much the same. In trying to think of what could be different, I immediately thought of my four cats. Did I have them two years ago? Yes I did, so considering that I’ve had the same job for 13 years, lived in the same house for 11, haven’t dated for longer than I’m going to admit to here, and don’t have a family to share Christmas with, I guess it would be the same, wouldn’t it? The things that separate the years for me are the big events, like losing my kitty of 16 years. (Which is why I kept going back to the shelter for another cat to take her place until I forced myself to stop at four! Moral of that story is that you can’t replace the one you love. You can fill up your days and create new memories, but there’s no *replacing* that which was lost.)
    BTW, that reminds me. I could not believe you killed off that kitty in Dangerous Joy! I had to stop reading the book right there. And that made me mad, since you’re my favorite author and finding a book of yours that I haven’t read is hard enough. (I’m down to two, which aren’t in print, but I’ll never give up.) Right after that, I read your blog where you said you were including pets in a series of books. That will be lovely and I’ll look forward to it, as long as you don’t KILL them! (Really, I’m serious. If you’re going to kill them, please plant a Spoiler somewhere for those of us who can’t take it.)
    But here’s what I’m wishing for. That this time next year I’ll be able to look back to now, and I’ll have an answer that immediately springs to mind because a big event happened. Not a big BAD event but a big GOOD one. It wouldn’t have to be an adventure, but I’ll admit that the ones I’m thinking of just might be that. Like making a wonderful new friend, dating a great guy, getting published. As long as I’m wishing…

    Reply
  51. I’m sure that I read Dangerous Joy but I don’t remember the kitty. Now I’ve got to re-read the book looking…..
    Two years ago to now, well you know, the more things change… I’m still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my every growing pile. The only big changes are that I discovered book reading challenges. Can you believe it, people say “hey, let’s read such and such” and other people sign up and blog about it? h, and my daughter is getting married this summer (plus side: bookcases in her bedroom!)
    The cover for Secret Wedding looks fantastic, that’s a beautiful dress! I’m going to put this on my birthday list. ahhh, I can’t believe I missed A Lady’s Secret???

    Reply
  52. I’m sure that I read Dangerous Joy but I don’t remember the kitty. Now I’ve got to re-read the book looking…..
    Two years ago to now, well you know, the more things change… I’m still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my every growing pile. The only big changes are that I discovered book reading challenges. Can you believe it, people say “hey, let’s read such and such” and other people sign up and blog about it? h, and my daughter is getting married this summer (plus side: bookcases in her bedroom!)
    The cover for Secret Wedding looks fantastic, that’s a beautiful dress! I’m going to put this on my birthday list. ahhh, I can’t believe I missed A Lady’s Secret???

    Reply
  53. I’m sure that I read Dangerous Joy but I don’t remember the kitty. Now I’ve got to re-read the book looking…..
    Two years ago to now, well you know, the more things change… I’m still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my every growing pile. The only big changes are that I discovered book reading challenges. Can you believe it, people say “hey, let’s read such and such” and other people sign up and blog about it? h, and my daughter is getting married this summer (plus side: bookcases in her bedroom!)
    The cover for Secret Wedding looks fantastic, that’s a beautiful dress! I’m going to put this on my birthday list. ahhh, I can’t believe I missed A Lady’s Secret???

    Reply
  54. I’m sure that I read Dangerous Joy but I don’t remember the kitty. Now I’ve got to re-read the book looking…..
    Two years ago to now, well you know, the more things change… I’m still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my every growing pile. The only big changes are that I discovered book reading challenges. Can you believe it, people say “hey, let’s read such and such” and other people sign up and blog about it? h, and my daughter is getting married this summer (plus side: bookcases in her bedroom!)
    The cover for Secret Wedding looks fantastic, that’s a beautiful dress! I’m going to put this on my birthday list. ahhh, I can’t believe I missed A Lady’s Secret???

    Reply
  55. I’m sure that I read Dangerous Joy but I don’t remember the kitty. Now I’ve got to re-read the book looking…..
    Two years ago to now, well you know, the more things change… I’m still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my every growing pile. The only big changes are that I discovered book reading challenges. Can you believe it, people say “hey, let’s read such and such” and other people sign up and blog about it? h, and my daughter is getting married this summer (plus side: bookcases in her bedroom!)
    The cover for Secret Wedding looks fantastic, that’s a beautiful dress! I’m going to put this on my birthday list. ahhh, I can’t believe I missed A Lady’s Secret???

    Reply
  56. Two years ago, life brought major changes to my family. I had a one-year-old son, and was still adjusting to motherhood. We bought a new house and moved in three days before Christmas-still got the tree up in time! And my job moved to a new building and I got a fabulous new office!
    Also about that time I rediscovered reading-romance novels in particular. My quiet time during my son’s nap and in the evenings involved TV, now it involves reading and I couldn’t be happier!
    PS- the new cover looks beautiful, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  57. Two years ago, life brought major changes to my family. I had a one-year-old son, and was still adjusting to motherhood. We bought a new house and moved in three days before Christmas-still got the tree up in time! And my job moved to a new building and I got a fabulous new office!
    Also about that time I rediscovered reading-romance novels in particular. My quiet time during my son’s nap and in the evenings involved TV, now it involves reading and I couldn’t be happier!
    PS- the new cover looks beautiful, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  58. Two years ago, life brought major changes to my family. I had a one-year-old son, and was still adjusting to motherhood. We bought a new house and moved in three days before Christmas-still got the tree up in time! And my job moved to a new building and I got a fabulous new office!
    Also about that time I rediscovered reading-romance novels in particular. My quiet time during my son’s nap and in the evenings involved TV, now it involves reading and I couldn’t be happier!
    PS- the new cover looks beautiful, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  59. Two years ago, life brought major changes to my family. I had a one-year-old son, and was still adjusting to motherhood. We bought a new house and moved in three days before Christmas-still got the tree up in time! And my job moved to a new building and I got a fabulous new office!
    Also about that time I rediscovered reading-romance novels in particular. My quiet time during my son’s nap and in the evenings involved TV, now it involves reading and I couldn’t be happier!
    PS- the new cover looks beautiful, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  60. Two years ago, life brought major changes to my family. I had a one-year-old son, and was still adjusting to motherhood. We bought a new house and moved in three days before Christmas-still got the tree up in time! And my job moved to a new building and I got a fabulous new office!
    Also about that time I rediscovered reading-romance novels in particular. My quiet time during my son’s nap and in the evenings involved TV, now it involves reading and I couldn’t be happier!
    PS- the new cover looks beautiful, can’t wait to read it!

    Reply
  61. Well, 2 years ago I still had both kids living at home, so that’s my big change. In March of 2007, my son moved to an apartment – and he got married this summer. In August 2007, my daughter went to college. I hear so many people talking about how they can’t wait for their kids to move out, but it made me kind of sad. I felt that I’d gone through all the tough times, when they fought with each other and were mad at the world, and then they were people I really wanted to hang out with — and they were leaving. The empty nest thing has been a little hard, but both excited and scared for them. There is so much possibility in front of them, but the economy right now is so hard.
    As for me personally, Gina pretty much said it all – “still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my ever growing pile.” And right now I’m knitting again. After all, I need something to keep warm – it’s -23 out there right now. Coldest winter we’ve had in a long time.
    Really looking forward to Secret Wedding, and yes, must go back to re-read Dangerous Joy.

    Reply
  62. Well, 2 years ago I still had both kids living at home, so that’s my big change. In March of 2007, my son moved to an apartment – and he got married this summer. In August 2007, my daughter went to college. I hear so many people talking about how they can’t wait for their kids to move out, but it made me kind of sad. I felt that I’d gone through all the tough times, when they fought with each other and were mad at the world, and then they were people I really wanted to hang out with — and they were leaving. The empty nest thing has been a little hard, but both excited and scared for them. There is so much possibility in front of them, but the economy right now is so hard.
    As for me personally, Gina pretty much said it all – “still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my ever growing pile.” And right now I’m knitting again. After all, I need something to keep warm – it’s -23 out there right now. Coldest winter we’ve had in a long time.
    Really looking forward to Secret Wedding, and yes, must go back to re-read Dangerous Joy.

    Reply
  63. Well, 2 years ago I still had both kids living at home, so that’s my big change. In March of 2007, my son moved to an apartment – and he got married this summer. In August 2007, my daughter went to college. I hear so many people talking about how they can’t wait for their kids to move out, but it made me kind of sad. I felt that I’d gone through all the tough times, when they fought with each other and were mad at the world, and then they were people I really wanted to hang out with — and they were leaving. The empty nest thing has been a little hard, but both excited and scared for them. There is so much possibility in front of them, but the economy right now is so hard.
    As for me personally, Gina pretty much said it all – “still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my ever growing pile.” And right now I’m knitting again. After all, I need something to keep warm – it’s -23 out there right now. Coldest winter we’ve had in a long time.
    Really looking forward to Secret Wedding, and yes, must go back to re-read Dangerous Joy.

    Reply
  64. Well, 2 years ago I still had both kids living at home, so that’s my big change. In March of 2007, my son moved to an apartment – and he got married this summer. In August 2007, my daughter went to college. I hear so many people talking about how they can’t wait for their kids to move out, but it made me kind of sad. I felt that I’d gone through all the tough times, when they fought with each other and were mad at the world, and then they were people I really wanted to hang out with — and they were leaving. The empty nest thing has been a little hard, but both excited and scared for them. There is so much possibility in front of them, but the economy right now is so hard.
    As for me personally, Gina pretty much said it all – “still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my ever growing pile.” And right now I’m knitting again. After all, I need something to keep warm – it’s -23 out there right now. Coldest winter we’ve had in a long time.
    Really looking forward to Secret Wedding, and yes, must go back to re-read Dangerous Joy.

    Reply
  65. Well, 2 years ago I still had both kids living at home, so that’s my big change. In March of 2007, my son moved to an apartment – and he got married this summer. In August 2007, my daughter went to college. I hear so many people talking about how they can’t wait for their kids to move out, but it made me kind of sad. I felt that I’d gone through all the tough times, when they fought with each other and were mad at the world, and then they were people I really wanted to hang out with — and they were leaving. The empty nest thing has been a little hard, but both excited and scared for them. There is so much possibility in front of them, but the economy right now is so hard.
    As for me personally, Gina pretty much said it all – “still doing way more reading than housework, still trying to lose weight, still finding more books to add to my ever growing pile.” And right now I’m knitting again. After all, I need something to keep warm – it’s -23 out there right now. Coldest winter we’ve had in a long time.
    Really looking forward to Secret Wedding, and yes, must go back to re-read Dangerous Joy.

    Reply
  66. Change…I suppose the biggest changes have come through my daughters. I have two. The oldest is my gift from God, the younger is Satan’s spawn. There’s just no other way to describe her.
    Over the past three years, my oldest has worked a minimum of 20 hours a week and taken between 17 and 20 credit hours per semester in college, working toward her BSN. My younger has gone from a child who was always a bit rebellious to one who knows everything, quit college, moved in with “that boy” at the age of 19, moved out two months later after being arrested for domestic violence (if she’d just shut up, they would never have taken her in, but hey! After the sixth time the cop says ‘be quiet’ and she’s still ranting, well, they tend to get a bit testy at that point), has broken my heart in a thousand different ways and still, when she really needs something, calls me ‘mommy’.
    Through it all, my changes have come because I’ve grown, adapted, let go, accepted, continued to love both my girls, even though there were times I couldn’t stand either one of them, and surprised myself with the fact that I could do that. I survived the teenage years, a little worse for wear, but survived. And so did my husband. We wondered for awhile if we would.
    And that’s probably TMI on a grand scale, but that’s the biggest change I can think of.

    Reply
  67. Change…I suppose the biggest changes have come through my daughters. I have two. The oldest is my gift from God, the younger is Satan’s spawn. There’s just no other way to describe her.
    Over the past three years, my oldest has worked a minimum of 20 hours a week and taken between 17 and 20 credit hours per semester in college, working toward her BSN. My younger has gone from a child who was always a bit rebellious to one who knows everything, quit college, moved in with “that boy” at the age of 19, moved out two months later after being arrested for domestic violence (if she’d just shut up, they would never have taken her in, but hey! After the sixth time the cop says ‘be quiet’ and she’s still ranting, well, they tend to get a bit testy at that point), has broken my heart in a thousand different ways and still, when she really needs something, calls me ‘mommy’.
    Through it all, my changes have come because I’ve grown, adapted, let go, accepted, continued to love both my girls, even though there were times I couldn’t stand either one of them, and surprised myself with the fact that I could do that. I survived the teenage years, a little worse for wear, but survived. And so did my husband. We wondered for awhile if we would.
    And that’s probably TMI on a grand scale, but that’s the biggest change I can think of.

    Reply
  68. Change…I suppose the biggest changes have come through my daughters. I have two. The oldest is my gift from God, the younger is Satan’s spawn. There’s just no other way to describe her.
    Over the past three years, my oldest has worked a minimum of 20 hours a week and taken between 17 and 20 credit hours per semester in college, working toward her BSN. My younger has gone from a child who was always a bit rebellious to one who knows everything, quit college, moved in with “that boy” at the age of 19, moved out two months later after being arrested for domestic violence (if she’d just shut up, they would never have taken her in, but hey! After the sixth time the cop says ‘be quiet’ and she’s still ranting, well, they tend to get a bit testy at that point), has broken my heart in a thousand different ways and still, when she really needs something, calls me ‘mommy’.
    Through it all, my changes have come because I’ve grown, adapted, let go, accepted, continued to love both my girls, even though there were times I couldn’t stand either one of them, and surprised myself with the fact that I could do that. I survived the teenage years, a little worse for wear, but survived. And so did my husband. We wondered for awhile if we would.
    And that’s probably TMI on a grand scale, but that’s the biggest change I can think of.

    Reply
  69. Change…I suppose the biggest changes have come through my daughters. I have two. The oldest is my gift from God, the younger is Satan’s spawn. There’s just no other way to describe her.
    Over the past three years, my oldest has worked a minimum of 20 hours a week and taken between 17 and 20 credit hours per semester in college, working toward her BSN. My younger has gone from a child who was always a bit rebellious to one who knows everything, quit college, moved in with “that boy” at the age of 19, moved out two months later after being arrested for domestic violence (if she’d just shut up, they would never have taken her in, but hey! After the sixth time the cop says ‘be quiet’ and she’s still ranting, well, they tend to get a bit testy at that point), has broken my heart in a thousand different ways and still, when she really needs something, calls me ‘mommy’.
    Through it all, my changes have come because I’ve grown, adapted, let go, accepted, continued to love both my girls, even though there were times I couldn’t stand either one of them, and surprised myself with the fact that I could do that. I survived the teenage years, a little worse for wear, but survived. And so did my husband. We wondered for awhile if we would.
    And that’s probably TMI on a grand scale, but that’s the biggest change I can think of.

    Reply
  70. Change…I suppose the biggest changes have come through my daughters. I have two. The oldest is my gift from God, the younger is Satan’s spawn. There’s just no other way to describe her.
    Over the past three years, my oldest has worked a minimum of 20 hours a week and taken between 17 and 20 credit hours per semester in college, working toward her BSN. My younger has gone from a child who was always a bit rebellious to one who knows everything, quit college, moved in with “that boy” at the age of 19, moved out two months later after being arrested for domestic violence (if she’d just shut up, they would never have taken her in, but hey! After the sixth time the cop says ‘be quiet’ and she’s still ranting, well, they tend to get a bit testy at that point), has broken my heart in a thousand different ways and still, when she really needs something, calls me ‘mommy’.
    Through it all, my changes have come because I’ve grown, adapted, let go, accepted, continued to love both my girls, even though there were times I couldn’t stand either one of them, and surprised myself with the fact that I could do that. I survived the teenage years, a little worse for wear, but survived. And so did my husband. We wondered for awhile if we would.
    And that’s probably TMI on a grand scale, but that’s the biggest change I can think of.

    Reply
  71. It seems to me that everything it’s always the same….2 years ago or 4 years ago…but it’ s not true…many things changed, I learned english, that was always my dream, I accepted myself for what I am and I can found my happyness in little things as Jo’s books (sorry Jo, for defining “little things” your great books, but you know what I mean..)and having a job…
    Having an adventurous life would be wonderful, but I agree with Jo, it’s impossible to have an “everyday adventurous” life and to be not bored or tired….
    Anyway, an adventure every now and then…
    Nicely..Laura

    Reply
  72. It seems to me that everything it’s always the same….2 years ago or 4 years ago…but it’ s not true…many things changed, I learned english, that was always my dream, I accepted myself for what I am and I can found my happyness in little things as Jo’s books (sorry Jo, for defining “little things” your great books, but you know what I mean..)and having a job…
    Having an adventurous life would be wonderful, but I agree with Jo, it’s impossible to have an “everyday adventurous” life and to be not bored or tired….
    Anyway, an adventure every now and then…
    Nicely..Laura

    Reply
  73. It seems to me that everything it’s always the same….2 years ago or 4 years ago…but it’ s not true…many things changed, I learned english, that was always my dream, I accepted myself for what I am and I can found my happyness in little things as Jo’s books (sorry Jo, for defining “little things” your great books, but you know what I mean..)and having a job…
    Having an adventurous life would be wonderful, but I agree with Jo, it’s impossible to have an “everyday adventurous” life and to be not bored or tired….
    Anyway, an adventure every now and then…
    Nicely..Laura

    Reply
  74. It seems to me that everything it’s always the same….2 years ago or 4 years ago…but it’ s not true…many things changed, I learned english, that was always my dream, I accepted myself for what I am and I can found my happyness in little things as Jo’s books (sorry Jo, for defining “little things” your great books, but you know what I mean..)and having a job…
    Having an adventurous life would be wonderful, but I agree with Jo, it’s impossible to have an “everyday adventurous” life and to be not bored or tired….
    Anyway, an adventure every now and then…
    Nicely..Laura

    Reply
  75. It seems to me that everything it’s always the same….2 years ago or 4 years ago…but it’ s not true…many things changed, I learned english, that was always my dream, I accepted myself for what I am and I can found my happyness in little things as Jo’s books (sorry Jo, for defining “little things” your great books, but you know what I mean..)and having a job…
    Having an adventurous life would be wonderful, but I agree with Jo, it’s impossible to have an “everyday adventurous” life and to be not bored or tired….
    Anyway, an adventure every now and then…
    Nicely..Laura

    Reply
  76. Same job, same house, same life- but I find as I get older that I treasure the sameness. My first grade students are now third graders, the former fourth grade is now the sixth, and there are new kindergarteners, many the younger brothers and sisters of students I have had before. Each year brings new faces and I lose some old ones- as art teacher I have these kids for 9 years before they move on to high school, so I get to watch them grow up. I still have my old lesson plan books- some of the lessons are repeats from the previous years, but many are new because I do like to change a little bit…on the whole, I have the best of both worlds- I have a routine but I can change things within it at my own discretion. Most of the time I get my adventures out of books. Thanks, wenches, for all the excitement and adventure with none of the discomfort or inconvenience!

    Reply
  77. Same job, same house, same life- but I find as I get older that I treasure the sameness. My first grade students are now third graders, the former fourth grade is now the sixth, and there are new kindergarteners, many the younger brothers and sisters of students I have had before. Each year brings new faces and I lose some old ones- as art teacher I have these kids for 9 years before they move on to high school, so I get to watch them grow up. I still have my old lesson plan books- some of the lessons are repeats from the previous years, but many are new because I do like to change a little bit…on the whole, I have the best of both worlds- I have a routine but I can change things within it at my own discretion. Most of the time I get my adventures out of books. Thanks, wenches, for all the excitement and adventure with none of the discomfort or inconvenience!

    Reply
  78. Same job, same house, same life- but I find as I get older that I treasure the sameness. My first grade students are now third graders, the former fourth grade is now the sixth, and there are new kindergarteners, many the younger brothers and sisters of students I have had before. Each year brings new faces and I lose some old ones- as art teacher I have these kids for 9 years before they move on to high school, so I get to watch them grow up. I still have my old lesson plan books- some of the lessons are repeats from the previous years, but many are new because I do like to change a little bit…on the whole, I have the best of both worlds- I have a routine but I can change things within it at my own discretion. Most of the time I get my adventures out of books. Thanks, wenches, for all the excitement and adventure with none of the discomfort or inconvenience!

    Reply
  79. Same job, same house, same life- but I find as I get older that I treasure the sameness. My first grade students are now third graders, the former fourth grade is now the sixth, and there are new kindergarteners, many the younger brothers and sisters of students I have had before. Each year brings new faces and I lose some old ones- as art teacher I have these kids for 9 years before they move on to high school, so I get to watch them grow up. I still have my old lesson plan books- some of the lessons are repeats from the previous years, but many are new because I do like to change a little bit…on the whole, I have the best of both worlds- I have a routine but I can change things within it at my own discretion. Most of the time I get my adventures out of books. Thanks, wenches, for all the excitement and adventure with none of the discomfort or inconvenience!

    Reply
  80. Same job, same house, same life- but I find as I get older that I treasure the sameness. My first grade students are now third graders, the former fourth grade is now the sixth, and there are new kindergarteners, many the younger brothers and sisters of students I have had before. Each year brings new faces and I lose some old ones- as art teacher I have these kids for 9 years before they move on to high school, so I get to watch them grow up. I still have my old lesson plan books- some of the lessons are repeats from the previous years, but many are new because I do like to change a little bit…on the whole, I have the best of both worlds- I have a routine but I can change things within it at my own discretion. Most of the time I get my adventures out of books. Thanks, wenches, for all the excitement and adventure with none of the discomfort or inconvenience!

    Reply
  81. Hello Jo!
    I met you at the Ottawa Romance Writers conference last fall – really enjoyed your talk, and I bought some of your books, including ‘A Lady’s Secret.’ It was the papillon dog that lured me to that one, and I just loved him (and the cat in Dangerous Joy too, by the way — I’m still reading that one, but note to Stephie above — keep reading — (spoiler alert) he comes back!). I have a very naughty Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Shamus, which I mentioned at the time – I’d like to make a pitch to get one of those little fellows into one of your books, Jo. Didn’t Mary Queen of Scots go to her execution with her favorite spaniel hidden amongst her skirts? I read that somewhere and don’t know if it’s true.
    So since last fall I have gone through all of the Malloren novels (I must say, Rothgar’s story, ‘Devilish’ is my favorite), and am half way through the Rogues. I love your writing – the stories are engrossing (that’s kind of a yukky word but I can’t think of another) and the historical details fascinating. I just bought a book by a fellow named Black on the Hanoverian Monarchs, as my interest has been piqued. I probably won’t get to it anytime soon though, as romances are so much more fun!:-)
    I would love to have a copy of the Secret Wedding (but don’t worry, I will buy it anyway if I don’t get the bound proof), and, in a shameless pitch to edge out the competition, I can even pick it up in Victoria, as I have to go there for work in early February…
    It is a severely clear day here in Ottawa, but so cold that the old Chaudiere bridge was completely enveloped in mist – from the falls I presume – as I crossed it to get to my job in Hull/Gatineau. It was blue and quite opaque and felt like we were driving into a void. But as you can see, I did make it to work, and I’d better get back to it! I hope that it is warmer where everyone else is, especially J.D. Salinger, who I’ve been thinking about too lately, he’s such a mythical figure (just glad he’s still alive!).
    Cheers to all,
    Maria

    Reply
  82. Hello Jo!
    I met you at the Ottawa Romance Writers conference last fall – really enjoyed your talk, and I bought some of your books, including ‘A Lady’s Secret.’ It was the papillon dog that lured me to that one, and I just loved him (and the cat in Dangerous Joy too, by the way — I’m still reading that one, but note to Stephie above — keep reading — (spoiler alert) he comes back!). I have a very naughty Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Shamus, which I mentioned at the time – I’d like to make a pitch to get one of those little fellows into one of your books, Jo. Didn’t Mary Queen of Scots go to her execution with her favorite spaniel hidden amongst her skirts? I read that somewhere and don’t know if it’s true.
    So since last fall I have gone through all of the Malloren novels (I must say, Rothgar’s story, ‘Devilish’ is my favorite), and am half way through the Rogues. I love your writing – the stories are engrossing (that’s kind of a yukky word but I can’t think of another) and the historical details fascinating. I just bought a book by a fellow named Black on the Hanoverian Monarchs, as my interest has been piqued. I probably won’t get to it anytime soon though, as romances are so much more fun!:-)
    I would love to have a copy of the Secret Wedding (but don’t worry, I will buy it anyway if I don’t get the bound proof), and, in a shameless pitch to edge out the competition, I can even pick it up in Victoria, as I have to go there for work in early February…
    It is a severely clear day here in Ottawa, but so cold that the old Chaudiere bridge was completely enveloped in mist – from the falls I presume – as I crossed it to get to my job in Hull/Gatineau. It was blue and quite opaque and felt like we were driving into a void. But as you can see, I did make it to work, and I’d better get back to it! I hope that it is warmer where everyone else is, especially J.D. Salinger, who I’ve been thinking about too lately, he’s such a mythical figure (just glad he’s still alive!).
    Cheers to all,
    Maria

    Reply
  83. Hello Jo!
    I met you at the Ottawa Romance Writers conference last fall – really enjoyed your talk, and I bought some of your books, including ‘A Lady’s Secret.’ It was the papillon dog that lured me to that one, and I just loved him (and the cat in Dangerous Joy too, by the way — I’m still reading that one, but note to Stephie above — keep reading — (spoiler alert) he comes back!). I have a very naughty Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Shamus, which I mentioned at the time – I’d like to make a pitch to get one of those little fellows into one of your books, Jo. Didn’t Mary Queen of Scots go to her execution with her favorite spaniel hidden amongst her skirts? I read that somewhere and don’t know if it’s true.
    So since last fall I have gone through all of the Malloren novels (I must say, Rothgar’s story, ‘Devilish’ is my favorite), and am half way through the Rogues. I love your writing – the stories are engrossing (that’s kind of a yukky word but I can’t think of another) and the historical details fascinating. I just bought a book by a fellow named Black on the Hanoverian Monarchs, as my interest has been piqued. I probably won’t get to it anytime soon though, as romances are so much more fun!:-)
    I would love to have a copy of the Secret Wedding (but don’t worry, I will buy it anyway if I don’t get the bound proof), and, in a shameless pitch to edge out the competition, I can even pick it up in Victoria, as I have to go there for work in early February…
    It is a severely clear day here in Ottawa, but so cold that the old Chaudiere bridge was completely enveloped in mist – from the falls I presume – as I crossed it to get to my job in Hull/Gatineau. It was blue and quite opaque and felt like we were driving into a void. But as you can see, I did make it to work, and I’d better get back to it! I hope that it is warmer where everyone else is, especially J.D. Salinger, who I’ve been thinking about too lately, he’s such a mythical figure (just glad he’s still alive!).
    Cheers to all,
    Maria

    Reply
  84. Hello Jo!
    I met you at the Ottawa Romance Writers conference last fall – really enjoyed your talk, and I bought some of your books, including ‘A Lady’s Secret.’ It was the papillon dog that lured me to that one, and I just loved him (and the cat in Dangerous Joy too, by the way — I’m still reading that one, but note to Stephie above — keep reading — (spoiler alert) he comes back!). I have a very naughty Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Shamus, which I mentioned at the time – I’d like to make a pitch to get one of those little fellows into one of your books, Jo. Didn’t Mary Queen of Scots go to her execution with her favorite spaniel hidden amongst her skirts? I read that somewhere and don’t know if it’s true.
    So since last fall I have gone through all of the Malloren novels (I must say, Rothgar’s story, ‘Devilish’ is my favorite), and am half way through the Rogues. I love your writing – the stories are engrossing (that’s kind of a yukky word but I can’t think of another) and the historical details fascinating. I just bought a book by a fellow named Black on the Hanoverian Monarchs, as my interest has been piqued. I probably won’t get to it anytime soon though, as romances are so much more fun!:-)
    I would love to have a copy of the Secret Wedding (but don’t worry, I will buy it anyway if I don’t get the bound proof), and, in a shameless pitch to edge out the competition, I can even pick it up in Victoria, as I have to go there for work in early February…
    It is a severely clear day here in Ottawa, but so cold that the old Chaudiere bridge was completely enveloped in mist – from the falls I presume – as I crossed it to get to my job in Hull/Gatineau. It was blue and quite opaque and felt like we were driving into a void. But as you can see, I did make it to work, and I’d better get back to it! I hope that it is warmer where everyone else is, especially J.D. Salinger, who I’ve been thinking about too lately, he’s such a mythical figure (just glad he’s still alive!).
    Cheers to all,
    Maria

    Reply
  85. Hello Jo!
    I met you at the Ottawa Romance Writers conference last fall – really enjoyed your talk, and I bought some of your books, including ‘A Lady’s Secret.’ It was the papillon dog that lured me to that one, and I just loved him (and the cat in Dangerous Joy too, by the way — I’m still reading that one, but note to Stephie above — keep reading — (spoiler alert) he comes back!). I have a very naughty Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Shamus, which I mentioned at the time – I’d like to make a pitch to get one of those little fellows into one of your books, Jo. Didn’t Mary Queen of Scots go to her execution with her favorite spaniel hidden amongst her skirts? I read that somewhere and don’t know if it’s true.
    So since last fall I have gone through all of the Malloren novels (I must say, Rothgar’s story, ‘Devilish’ is my favorite), and am half way through the Rogues. I love your writing – the stories are engrossing (that’s kind of a yukky word but I can’t think of another) and the historical details fascinating. I just bought a book by a fellow named Black on the Hanoverian Monarchs, as my interest has been piqued. I probably won’t get to it anytime soon though, as romances are so much more fun!:-)
    I would love to have a copy of the Secret Wedding (but don’t worry, I will buy it anyway if I don’t get the bound proof), and, in a shameless pitch to edge out the competition, I can even pick it up in Victoria, as I have to go there for work in early February…
    It is a severely clear day here in Ottawa, but so cold that the old Chaudiere bridge was completely enveloped in mist – from the falls I presume – as I crossed it to get to my job in Hull/Gatineau. It was blue and quite opaque and felt like we were driving into a void. But as you can see, I did make it to work, and I’d better get back to it! I hope that it is warmer where everyone else is, especially J.D. Salinger, who I’ve been thinking about too lately, he’s such a mythical figure (just glad he’s still alive!).
    Cheers to all,
    Maria

    Reply
  86. My only comment, Jo, is that you are one of the lucky ones — those who work hard and do get to the payoff. I NEVER miss any one of your books and get it as soon as it comes out!

    Reply
  87. My only comment, Jo, is that you are one of the lucky ones — those who work hard and do get to the payoff. I NEVER miss any one of your books and get it as soon as it comes out!

    Reply
  88. My only comment, Jo, is that you are one of the lucky ones — those who work hard and do get to the payoff. I NEVER miss any one of your books and get it as soon as it comes out!

    Reply
  89. My only comment, Jo, is that you are one of the lucky ones — those who work hard and do get to the payoff. I NEVER miss any one of your books and get it as soon as it comes out!

    Reply
  90. My only comment, Jo, is that you are one of the lucky ones — those who work hard and do get to the payoff. I NEVER miss any one of your books and get it as soon as it comes out!

    Reply
  91. Theo -when I was a kid I believed strongly that while nurture was important, nature trumped all. People are who they are and they change as they desire, not as others desire them to. As I’ve grown that view just becomes stronger each year.
    For reasons I don’t understand, some will always choose the hardest path possible to walk, no matter what other options they have. some will always feel unloved no matter how much love surrounds them. It makes me see where the belief systems based in reincarnation, karma and the like may have evolved from. There’s no explaining it sometimes.
    I don’t think it’s TMI – there’s nothing wrong with presenting life’s challenges openly. If we all did, maybe we’d understand each other more.

    Reply
  92. Theo -when I was a kid I believed strongly that while nurture was important, nature trumped all. People are who they are and they change as they desire, not as others desire them to. As I’ve grown that view just becomes stronger each year.
    For reasons I don’t understand, some will always choose the hardest path possible to walk, no matter what other options they have. some will always feel unloved no matter how much love surrounds them. It makes me see where the belief systems based in reincarnation, karma and the like may have evolved from. There’s no explaining it sometimes.
    I don’t think it’s TMI – there’s nothing wrong with presenting life’s challenges openly. If we all did, maybe we’d understand each other more.

    Reply
  93. Theo -when I was a kid I believed strongly that while nurture was important, nature trumped all. People are who they are and they change as they desire, not as others desire them to. As I’ve grown that view just becomes stronger each year.
    For reasons I don’t understand, some will always choose the hardest path possible to walk, no matter what other options they have. some will always feel unloved no matter how much love surrounds them. It makes me see where the belief systems based in reincarnation, karma and the like may have evolved from. There’s no explaining it sometimes.
    I don’t think it’s TMI – there’s nothing wrong with presenting life’s challenges openly. If we all did, maybe we’d understand each other more.

    Reply
  94. Theo -when I was a kid I believed strongly that while nurture was important, nature trumped all. People are who they are and they change as they desire, not as others desire them to. As I’ve grown that view just becomes stronger each year.
    For reasons I don’t understand, some will always choose the hardest path possible to walk, no matter what other options they have. some will always feel unloved no matter how much love surrounds them. It makes me see where the belief systems based in reincarnation, karma and the like may have evolved from. There’s no explaining it sometimes.
    I don’t think it’s TMI – there’s nothing wrong with presenting life’s challenges openly. If we all did, maybe we’d understand each other more.

    Reply
  95. Theo -when I was a kid I believed strongly that while nurture was important, nature trumped all. People are who they are and they change as they desire, not as others desire them to. As I’ve grown that view just becomes stronger each year.
    For reasons I don’t understand, some will always choose the hardest path possible to walk, no matter what other options they have. some will always feel unloved no matter how much love surrounds them. It makes me see where the belief systems based in reincarnation, karma and the like may have evolved from. There’s no explaining it sometimes.
    I don’t think it’s TMI – there’s nothing wrong with presenting life’s challenges openly. If we all did, maybe we’d understand each other more.

    Reply
  96. Two years I was in the middle of writing a book. I had high hopes for it and they turned out to be justified. A year later I sold it and now I’m awaiting its release and I am terrified. If this sounds like a plug for NEVER RESIST TEMPTATION you are absolutely correct.
    But seriously, your description of the writing process is spot on – and helpful too because you so clearly have it down.
    One thing never changes: every nine months or so I am off to the store to buy the latest Jo Beverley and she never disappoints. I particularly enjoy the Malloren world. I was actually introduced to your books by my teenage daughter who adores the rogues. Nick! Lucien! She will go on for hours.

    Reply
  97. Two years I was in the middle of writing a book. I had high hopes for it and they turned out to be justified. A year later I sold it and now I’m awaiting its release and I am terrified. If this sounds like a plug for NEVER RESIST TEMPTATION you are absolutely correct.
    But seriously, your description of the writing process is spot on – and helpful too because you so clearly have it down.
    One thing never changes: every nine months or so I am off to the store to buy the latest Jo Beverley and she never disappoints. I particularly enjoy the Malloren world. I was actually introduced to your books by my teenage daughter who adores the rogues. Nick! Lucien! She will go on for hours.

    Reply
  98. Two years I was in the middle of writing a book. I had high hopes for it and they turned out to be justified. A year later I sold it and now I’m awaiting its release and I am terrified. If this sounds like a plug for NEVER RESIST TEMPTATION you are absolutely correct.
    But seriously, your description of the writing process is spot on – and helpful too because you so clearly have it down.
    One thing never changes: every nine months or so I am off to the store to buy the latest Jo Beverley and she never disappoints. I particularly enjoy the Malloren world. I was actually introduced to your books by my teenage daughter who adores the rogues. Nick! Lucien! She will go on for hours.

    Reply
  99. Two years I was in the middle of writing a book. I had high hopes for it and they turned out to be justified. A year later I sold it and now I’m awaiting its release and I am terrified. If this sounds like a plug for NEVER RESIST TEMPTATION you are absolutely correct.
    But seriously, your description of the writing process is spot on – and helpful too because you so clearly have it down.
    One thing never changes: every nine months or so I am off to the store to buy the latest Jo Beverley and she never disappoints. I particularly enjoy the Malloren world. I was actually introduced to your books by my teenage daughter who adores the rogues. Nick! Lucien! She will go on for hours.

    Reply
  100. Two years I was in the middle of writing a book. I had high hopes for it and they turned out to be justified. A year later I sold it and now I’m awaiting its release and I am terrified. If this sounds like a plug for NEVER RESIST TEMPTATION you are absolutely correct.
    But seriously, your description of the writing process is spot on – and helpful too because you so clearly have it down.
    One thing never changes: every nine months or so I am off to the store to buy the latest Jo Beverley and she never disappoints. I particularly enjoy the Malloren world. I was actually introduced to your books by my teenage daughter who adores the rogues. Nick! Lucien! She will go on for hours.

    Reply
  101. Jo, we do appreciate all the time and trouble you take to make everything fit together. I love all those details, and they can make or break a story for me. Having the heroine wear a blue dress then suddenly she has a red dress on without saying she changed her dress really irritates me.

    Reply
  102. Jo, we do appreciate all the time and trouble you take to make everything fit together. I love all those details, and they can make or break a story for me. Having the heroine wear a blue dress then suddenly she has a red dress on without saying she changed her dress really irritates me.

    Reply
  103. Jo, we do appreciate all the time and trouble you take to make everything fit together. I love all those details, and they can make or break a story for me. Having the heroine wear a blue dress then suddenly she has a red dress on without saying she changed her dress really irritates me.

    Reply
  104. Jo, we do appreciate all the time and trouble you take to make everything fit together. I love all those details, and they can make or break a story for me. Having the heroine wear a blue dress then suddenly she has a red dress on without saying she changed her dress really irritates me.

    Reply
  105. Jo, we do appreciate all the time and trouble you take to make everything fit together. I love all those details, and they can make or break a story for me. Having the heroine wear a blue dress then suddenly she has a red dress on without saying she changed her dress really irritates me.

    Reply
  106. The older I get, the more I go for tranquility. However, I got a very nice change this time 2 years ago when my first grandson was born — a changed I wouldn’t mind seeing repeated! Another nice change has come through the Wenches introducing me to some great new authors, though my TBR stack just keeps getting higher and higher. One of the nicest “same” things is looking forward to new books by you, Jo, as well as the other Wenches. Consistent quality is something to look forward to in each of your books, even though the adventures change the lovely writing and satisfying stories are always there. Something new to look forward to while enjoying the peace of returning to a “friend”. Thank you to each of you for your had work and contributions to my peaceful evenings of reading.

    Reply
  107. The older I get, the more I go for tranquility. However, I got a very nice change this time 2 years ago when my first grandson was born — a changed I wouldn’t mind seeing repeated! Another nice change has come through the Wenches introducing me to some great new authors, though my TBR stack just keeps getting higher and higher. One of the nicest “same” things is looking forward to new books by you, Jo, as well as the other Wenches. Consistent quality is something to look forward to in each of your books, even though the adventures change the lovely writing and satisfying stories are always there. Something new to look forward to while enjoying the peace of returning to a “friend”. Thank you to each of you for your had work and contributions to my peaceful evenings of reading.

    Reply
  108. The older I get, the more I go for tranquility. However, I got a very nice change this time 2 years ago when my first grandson was born — a changed I wouldn’t mind seeing repeated! Another nice change has come through the Wenches introducing me to some great new authors, though my TBR stack just keeps getting higher and higher. One of the nicest “same” things is looking forward to new books by you, Jo, as well as the other Wenches. Consistent quality is something to look forward to in each of your books, even though the adventures change the lovely writing and satisfying stories are always there. Something new to look forward to while enjoying the peace of returning to a “friend”. Thank you to each of you for your had work and contributions to my peaceful evenings of reading.

    Reply
  109. The older I get, the more I go for tranquility. However, I got a very nice change this time 2 years ago when my first grandson was born — a changed I wouldn’t mind seeing repeated! Another nice change has come through the Wenches introducing me to some great new authors, though my TBR stack just keeps getting higher and higher. One of the nicest “same” things is looking forward to new books by you, Jo, as well as the other Wenches. Consistent quality is something to look forward to in each of your books, even though the adventures change the lovely writing and satisfying stories are always there. Something new to look forward to while enjoying the peace of returning to a “friend”. Thank you to each of you for your had work and contributions to my peaceful evenings of reading.

    Reply
  110. The older I get, the more I go for tranquility. However, I got a very nice change this time 2 years ago when my first grandson was born — a changed I wouldn’t mind seeing repeated! Another nice change has come through the Wenches introducing me to some great new authors, though my TBR stack just keeps getting higher and higher. One of the nicest “same” things is looking forward to new books by you, Jo, as well as the other Wenches. Consistent quality is something to look forward to in each of your books, even though the adventures change the lovely writing and satisfying stories are always there. Something new to look forward to while enjoying the peace of returning to a “friend”. Thank you to each of you for your had work and contributions to my peaceful evenings of reading.

    Reply
  111. More interesting moving, and charming comments. I might end up just picking a winner from a bag of names after all!
    I’m having a bit of trouble keeping up here because I’m having computer problems. Not my writing computer. That’s a 486 and I write in a DOS program. Like al fossils, it’s a rock. Touch wood!
    My newish internet computer developed video card problems a little while ago. We’ve been trying various things. One reason I had trouble getting the pic size right above was that I’m using an ancient video card to test the system.
    I generally write in the morning and do e-mail and internet in the afternoon. When I went to the internet computer it had not the blue screen of death but a black screen with crisp white lines. I turned it off and on again, it began to come back again but then stalled.
    So my tech advisor — ie husband — and I are off to get a new mother board soon. If that doesn’t work, we’ll cut through the fiddling and get a new computer. Ick.
    Currently working on my Mac Air, which I love for traveling purposes, but I do like a desk top most of the time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  112. More interesting moving, and charming comments. I might end up just picking a winner from a bag of names after all!
    I’m having a bit of trouble keeping up here because I’m having computer problems. Not my writing computer. That’s a 486 and I write in a DOS program. Like al fossils, it’s a rock. Touch wood!
    My newish internet computer developed video card problems a little while ago. We’ve been trying various things. One reason I had trouble getting the pic size right above was that I’m using an ancient video card to test the system.
    I generally write in the morning and do e-mail and internet in the afternoon. When I went to the internet computer it had not the blue screen of death but a black screen with crisp white lines. I turned it off and on again, it began to come back again but then stalled.
    So my tech advisor — ie husband — and I are off to get a new mother board soon. If that doesn’t work, we’ll cut through the fiddling and get a new computer. Ick.
    Currently working on my Mac Air, which I love for traveling purposes, but I do like a desk top most of the time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  113. More interesting moving, and charming comments. I might end up just picking a winner from a bag of names after all!
    I’m having a bit of trouble keeping up here because I’m having computer problems. Not my writing computer. That’s a 486 and I write in a DOS program. Like al fossils, it’s a rock. Touch wood!
    My newish internet computer developed video card problems a little while ago. We’ve been trying various things. One reason I had trouble getting the pic size right above was that I’m using an ancient video card to test the system.
    I generally write in the morning and do e-mail and internet in the afternoon. When I went to the internet computer it had not the blue screen of death but a black screen with crisp white lines. I turned it off and on again, it began to come back again but then stalled.
    So my tech advisor — ie husband — and I are off to get a new mother board soon. If that doesn’t work, we’ll cut through the fiddling and get a new computer. Ick.
    Currently working on my Mac Air, which I love for traveling purposes, but I do like a desk top most of the time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  114. More interesting moving, and charming comments. I might end up just picking a winner from a bag of names after all!
    I’m having a bit of trouble keeping up here because I’m having computer problems. Not my writing computer. That’s a 486 and I write in a DOS program. Like al fossils, it’s a rock. Touch wood!
    My newish internet computer developed video card problems a little while ago. We’ve been trying various things. One reason I had trouble getting the pic size right above was that I’m using an ancient video card to test the system.
    I generally write in the morning and do e-mail and internet in the afternoon. When I went to the internet computer it had not the blue screen of death but a black screen with crisp white lines. I turned it off and on again, it began to come back again but then stalled.
    So my tech advisor — ie husband — and I are off to get a new mother board soon. If that doesn’t work, we’ll cut through the fiddling and get a new computer. Ick.
    Currently working on my Mac Air, which I love for traveling purposes, but I do like a desk top most of the time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  115. More interesting moving, and charming comments. I might end up just picking a winner from a bag of names after all!
    I’m having a bit of trouble keeping up here because I’m having computer problems. Not my writing computer. That’s a 486 and I write in a DOS program. Like al fossils, it’s a rock. Touch wood!
    My newish internet computer developed video card problems a little while ago. We’ve been trying various things. One reason I had trouble getting the pic size right above was that I’m using an ancient video card to test the system.
    I generally write in the morning and do e-mail and internet in the afternoon. When I went to the internet computer it had not the blue screen of death but a black screen with crisp white lines. I turned it off and on again, it began to come back again but then stalled.
    So my tech advisor — ie husband — and I are off to get a new mother board soon. If that doesn’t work, we’ll cut through the fiddling and get a new computer. Ick.
    Currently working on my Mac Air, which I love for traveling purposes, but I do like a desk top most of the time.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  116. Two years ago we were blissfully unaware that our youngest had autism. Now we’re aware and blissfully doing something about it (blissful thanks to his amazing teachers). Our eldest was an eensy, little first grader (and now, in just third grade, stands taller than my shoulder). My husband and I continue on in the same way we always have — making each other laugh — which is why I’m still so crazy in love all these years later.
    And two years ago I was voraciously devouring every Jo Bev novel I could get my hands on. Used books, abused books, trade PBs, I scrounged and found them all. 😀
    Very looking forward to the new one — Happy New Year!!

    Reply
  117. Two years ago we were blissfully unaware that our youngest had autism. Now we’re aware and blissfully doing something about it (blissful thanks to his amazing teachers). Our eldest was an eensy, little first grader (and now, in just third grade, stands taller than my shoulder). My husband and I continue on in the same way we always have — making each other laugh — which is why I’m still so crazy in love all these years later.
    And two years ago I was voraciously devouring every Jo Bev novel I could get my hands on. Used books, abused books, trade PBs, I scrounged and found them all. 😀
    Very looking forward to the new one — Happy New Year!!

    Reply
  118. Two years ago we were blissfully unaware that our youngest had autism. Now we’re aware and blissfully doing something about it (blissful thanks to his amazing teachers). Our eldest was an eensy, little first grader (and now, in just third grade, stands taller than my shoulder). My husband and I continue on in the same way we always have — making each other laugh — which is why I’m still so crazy in love all these years later.
    And two years ago I was voraciously devouring every Jo Bev novel I could get my hands on. Used books, abused books, trade PBs, I scrounged and found them all. 😀
    Very looking forward to the new one — Happy New Year!!

    Reply
  119. Two years ago we were blissfully unaware that our youngest had autism. Now we’re aware and blissfully doing something about it (blissful thanks to his amazing teachers). Our eldest was an eensy, little first grader (and now, in just third grade, stands taller than my shoulder). My husband and I continue on in the same way we always have — making each other laugh — which is why I’m still so crazy in love all these years later.
    And two years ago I was voraciously devouring every Jo Bev novel I could get my hands on. Used books, abused books, trade PBs, I scrounged and found them all. 😀
    Very looking forward to the new one — Happy New Year!!

    Reply
  120. Two years ago we were blissfully unaware that our youngest had autism. Now we’re aware and blissfully doing something about it (blissful thanks to his amazing teachers). Our eldest was an eensy, little first grader (and now, in just third grade, stands taller than my shoulder). My husband and I continue on in the same way we always have — making each other laugh — which is why I’m still so crazy in love all these years later.
    And two years ago I was voraciously devouring every Jo Bev novel I could get my hands on. Used books, abused books, trade PBs, I scrounged and found them all. 😀
    Very looking forward to the new one — Happy New Year!!

    Reply
  121. What a lovely cover on THE SECRET WEDDING! I’m looking forward to adding to my JoBev collection.
    Two years ago Smokey (my then 12 yr old lab) and I were still grieving the loss of our precious 6 yr old black lab, Velvet. She was an amazing dog who loved everyone, lived each day to the fullest and lost a battle with cancer much too young. I swore I wasn’t going to go through that heartbreak again. I consoled myself with lots of romance novels and plenty of quality time with Smokey.
    Today, Smokey and I are delighted to have 2 yr old Cassy ( a rescued black lab/german shepherd mix) in our lives. She found me in Feb. ’07 (I wasn’t looking) and immediately stole my heart. She’s brought so much joy, laughter and fun into our lives.
    I’m still reading lots of romances but now I’m reviewing them too and I can’t begin to tell you how much fun that is!
    It seems the older I get the more I embrace change and adventure. It took some heart-wrenching experiences (the deaths of my husband and both parents) but I now look for new and exciting adventures and do my best to live each day I’m given to the fullest, doing my best to give back to others as often as I can along the way.

    Reply
  122. What a lovely cover on THE SECRET WEDDING! I’m looking forward to adding to my JoBev collection.
    Two years ago Smokey (my then 12 yr old lab) and I were still grieving the loss of our precious 6 yr old black lab, Velvet. She was an amazing dog who loved everyone, lived each day to the fullest and lost a battle with cancer much too young. I swore I wasn’t going to go through that heartbreak again. I consoled myself with lots of romance novels and plenty of quality time with Smokey.
    Today, Smokey and I are delighted to have 2 yr old Cassy ( a rescued black lab/german shepherd mix) in our lives. She found me in Feb. ’07 (I wasn’t looking) and immediately stole my heart. She’s brought so much joy, laughter and fun into our lives.
    I’m still reading lots of romances but now I’m reviewing them too and I can’t begin to tell you how much fun that is!
    It seems the older I get the more I embrace change and adventure. It took some heart-wrenching experiences (the deaths of my husband and both parents) but I now look for new and exciting adventures and do my best to live each day I’m given to the fullest, doing my best to give back to others as often as I can along the way.

    Reply
  123. What a lovely cover on THE SECRET WEDDING! I’m looking forward to adding to my JoBev collection.
    Two years ago Smokey (my then 12 yr old lab) and I were still grieving the loss of our precious 6 yr old black lab, Velvet. She was an amazing dog who loved everyone, lived each day to the fullest and lost a battle with cancer much too young. I swore I wasn’t going to go through that heartbreak again. I consoled myself with lots of romance novels and plenty of quality time with Smokey.
    Today, Smokey and I are delighted to have 2 yr old Cassy ( a rescued black lab/german shepherd mix) in our lives. She found me in Feb. ’07 (I wasn’t looking) and immediately stole my heart. She’s brought so much joy, laughter and fun into our lives.
    I’m still reading lots of romances but now I’m reviewing them too and I can’t begin to tell you how much fun that is!
    It seems the older I get the more I embrace change and adventure. It took some heart-wrenching experiences (the deaths of my husband and both parents) but I now look for new and exciting adventures and do my best to live each day I’m given to the fullest, doing my best to give back to others as often as I can along the way.

    Reply
  124. What a lovely cover on THE SECRET WEDDING! I’m looking forward to adding to my JoBev collection.
    Two years ago Smokey (my then 12 yr old lab) and I were still grieving the loss of our precious 6 yr old black lab, Velvet. She was an amazing dog who loved everyone, lived each day to the fullest and lost a battle with cancer much too young. I swore I wasn’t going to go through that heartbreak again. I consoled myself with lots of romance novels and plenty of quality time with Smokey.
    Today, Smokey and I are delighted to have 2 yr old Cassy ( a rescued black lab/german shepherd mix) in our lives. She found me in Feb. ’07 (I wasn’t looking) and immediately stole my heart. She’s brought so much joy, laughter and fun into our lives.
    I’m still reading lots of romances but now I’m reviewing them too and I can’t begin to tell you how much fun that is!
    It seems the older I get the more I embrace change and adventure. It took some heart-wrenching experiences (the deaths of my husband and both parents) but I now look for new and exciting adventures and do my best to live each day I’m given to the fullest, doing my best to give back to others as often as I can along the way.

    Reply
  125. What a lovely cover on THE SECRET WEDDING! I’m looking forward to adding to my JoBev collection.
    Two years ago Smokey (my then 12 yr old lab) and I were still grieving the loss of our precious 6 yr old black lab, Velvet. She was an amazing dog who loved everyone, lived each day to the fullest and lost a battle with cancer much too young. I swore I wasn’t going to go through that heartbreak again. I consoled myself with lots of romance novels and plenty of quality time with Smokey.
    Today, Smokey and I are delighted to have 2 yr old Cassy ( a rescued black lab/german shepherd mix) in our lives. She found me in Feb. ’07 (I wasn’t looking) and immediately stole my heart. She’s brought so much joy, laughter and fun into our lives.
    I’m still reading lots of romances but now I’m reviewing them too and I can’t begin to tell you how much fun that is!
    It seems the older I get the more I embrace change and adventure. It took some heart-wrenching experiences (the deaths of my husband and both parents) but I now look for new and exciting adventures and do my best to live each day I’m given to the fullest, doing my best to give back to others as often as I can along the way.

    Reply
  126. Thanks, Jo, for all the wonderful books. They’ve been my companions through many years and lots of changes.
    2 years ago I was in Maryland nursing flu/pneumonia and reading Jo Beverley books. This January I’m in Colorado, nursing flu/pneumonia, re-reading Jo Beverley books. Somehow staying in bed with a cup of tea [or a hot toddy] is much better with a Jo Beverley book! Might even work better to speed along healing than antibiotics. Please keep them coming! Can’t wait for the next one but I’ll keep re-reading the old ones until then. Just finished ‘Christmas Angel’ again this morning. Hope I stay healthy next January! Blessings to you, Jo!

    Reply
  127. Thanks, Jo, for all the wonderful books. They’ve been my companions through many years and lots of changes.
    2 years ago I was in Maryland nursing flu/pneumonia and reading Jo Beverley books. This January I’m in Colorado, nursing flu/pneumonia, re-reading Jo Beverley books. Somehow staying in bed with a cup of tea [or a hot toddy] is much better with a Jo Beverley book! Might even work better to speed along healing than antibiotics. Please keep them coming! Can’t wait for the next one but I’ll keep re-reading the old ones until then. Just finished ‘Christmas Angel’ again this morning. Hope I stay healthy next January! Blessings to you, Jo!

    Reply
  128. Thanks, Jo, for all the wonderful books. They’ve been my companions through many years and lots of changes.
    2 years ago I was in Maryland nursing flu/pneumonia and reading Jo Beverley books. This January I’m in Colorado, nursing flu/pneumonia, re-reading Jo Beverley books. Somehow staying in bed with a cup of tea [or a hot toddy] is much better with a Jo Beverley book! Might even work better to speed along healing than antibiotics. Please keep them coming! Can’t wait for the next one but I’ll keep re-reading the old ones until then. Just finished ‘Christmas Angel’ again this morning. Hope I stay healthy next January! Blessings to you, Jo!

    Reply
  129. Thanks, Jo, for all the wonderful books. They’ve been my companions through many years and lots of changes.
    2 years ago I was in Maryland nursing flu/pneumonia and reading Jo Beverley books. This January I’m in Colorado, nursing flu/pneumonia, re-reading Jo Beverley books. Somehow staying in bed with a cup of tea [or a hot toddy] is much better with a Jo Beverley book! Might even work better to speed along healing than antibiotics. Please keep them coming! Can’t wait for the next one but I’ll keep re-reading the old ones until then. Just finished ‘Christmas Angel’ again this morning. Hope I stay healthy next January! Blessings to you, Jo!

    Reply
  130. Thanks, Jo, for all the wonderful books. They’ve been my companions through many years and lots of changes.
    2 years ago I was in Maryland nursing flu/pneumonia and reading Jo Beverley books. This January I’m in Colorado, nursing flu/pneumonia, re-reading Jo Beverley books. Somehow staying in bed with a cup of tea [or a hot toddy] is much better with a Jo Beverley book! Might even work better to speed along healing than antibiotics. Please keep them coming! Can’t wait for the next one but I’ll keep re-reading the old ones until then. Just finished ‘Christmas Angel’ again this morning. Hope I stay healthy next January! Blessings to you, Jo!

    Reply
  131. I was amazed that the dress on the cover of My Secret Wedding is the same as my sister in law wore to her wedding in 1993! I’m intruiged to hear Jo’s reaction to such historical inaccuracy in the cover art, after all brides didn’t wear white until around Victoria’s time. I actually hate the “bodice ripper” style covers, I think they belittle the genre. I honestly thought that we had moved away from the Fabio look with some very nice elegant art work, it appears I was wrong!
    As for two years ago; my daughter turned 18 and I had to leave the romance novels for a while realizing that this “kid” was now the age of most of the heroines I was reading about. It shook me I must say, especially as in the novels they are all so self possessed and self aware not at all like my Sarah or any of her friends! I had a spell with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody in Egypt and enjoyed them immensely but have drifted back to my first love, Historical Romance. I do love Jo’s books and now realise that the attention to detail is no fluke. Thank you Jo for getting all the small continuity and historical stuff right, I really do appreciate the attention to detail in your books and am looking forward to reading The Secret Wedding.
    BTW My favourite book of yours is Elf’s story in Something Wicked. I find the Georgian world a nice change from Regency. I have all your published books thanks to a determined effort on E Bay. I also have a prized copy of Devilish signed by you on a wet night in Ottawa many years ago.
    Happy New Year!

    Reply
  132. I was amazed that the dress on the cover of My Secret Wedding is the same as my sister in law wore to her wedding in 1993! I’m intruiged to hear Jo’s reaction to such historical inaccuracy in the cover art, after all brides didn’t wear white until around Victoria’s time. I actually hate the “bodice ripper” style covers, I think they belittle the genre. I honestly thought that we had moved away from the Fabio look with some very nice elegant art work, it appears I was wrong!
    As for two years ago; my daughter turned 18 and I had to leave the romance novels for a while realizing that this “kid” was now the age of most of the heroines I was reading about. It shook me I must say, especially as in the novels they are all so self possessed and self aware not at all like my Sarah or any of her friends! I had a spell with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody in Egypt and enjoyed them immensely but have drifted back to my first love, Historical Romance. I do love Jo’s books and now realise that the attention to detail is no fluke. Thank you Jo for getting all the small continuity and historical stuff right, I really do appreciate the attention to detail in your books and am looking forward to reading The Secret Wedding.
    BTW My favourite book of yours is Elf’s story in Something Wicked. I find the Georgian world a nice change from Regency. I have all your published books thanks to a determined effort on E Bay. I also have a prized copy of Devilish signed by you on a wet night in Ottawa many years ago.
    Happy New Year!

    Reply
  133. I was amazed that the dress on the cover of My Secret Wedding is the same as my sister in law wore to her wedding in 1993! I’m intruiged to hear Jo’s reaction to such historical inaccuracy in the cover art, after all brides didn’t wear white until around Victoria’s time. I actually hate the “bodice ripper” style covers, I think they belittle the genre. I honestly thought that we had moved away from the Fabio look with some very nice elegant art work, it appears I was wrong!
    As for two years ago; my daughter turned 18 and I had to leave the romance novels for a while realizing that this “kid” was now the age of most of the heroines I was reading about. It shook me I must say, especially as in the novels they are all so self possessed and self aware not at all like my Sarah or any of her friends! I had a spell with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody in Egypt and enjoyed them immensely but have drifted back to my first love, Historical Romance. I do love Jo’s books and now realise that the attention to detail is no fluke. Thank you Jo for getting all the small continuity and historical stuff right, I really do appreciate the attention to detail in your books and am looking forward to reading The Secret Wedding.
    BTW My favourite book of yours is Elf’s story in Something Wicked. I find the Georgian world a nice change from Regency. I have all your published books thanks to a determined effort on E Bay. I also have a prized copy of Devilish signed by you on a wet night in Ottawa many years ago.
    Happy New Year!

    Reply
  134. I was amazed that the dress on the cover of My Secret Wedding is the same as my sister in law wore to her wedding in 1993! I’m intruiged to hear Jo’s reaction to such historical inaccuracy in the cover art, after all brides didn’t wear white until around Victoria’s time. I actually hate the “bodice ripper” style covers, I think they belittle the genre. I honestly thought that we had moved away from the Fabio look with some very nice elegant art work, it appears I was wrong!
    As for two years ago; my daughter turned 18 and I had to leave the romance novels for a while realizing that this “kid” was now the age of most of the heroines I was reading about. It shook me I must say, especially as in the novels they are all so self possessed and self aware not at all like my Sarah or any of her friends! I had a spell with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody in Egypt and enjoyed them immensely but have drifted back to my first love, Historical Romance. I do love Jo’s books and now realise that the attention to detail is no fluke. Thank you Jo for getting all the small continuity and historical stuff right, I really do appreciate the attention to detail in your books and am looking forward to reading The Secret Wedding.
    BTW My favourite book of yours is Elf’s story in Something Wicked. I find the Georgian world a nice change from Regency. I have all your published books thanks to a determined effort on E Bay. I also have a prized copy of Devilish signed by you on a wet night in Ottawa many years ago.
    Happy New Year!

    Reply
  135. I was amazed that the dress on the cover of My Secret Wedding is the same as my sister in law wore to her wedding in 1993! I’m intruiged to hear Jo’s reaction to such historical inaccuracy in the cover art, after all brides didn’t wear white until around Victoria’s time. I actually hate the “bodice ripper” style covers, I think they belittle the genre. I honestly thought that we had moved away from the Fabio look with some very nice elegant art work, it appears I was wrong!
    As for two years ago; my daughter turned 18 and I had to leave the romance novels for a while realizing that this “kid” was now the age of most of the heroines I was reading about. It shook me I must say, especially as in the novels they are all so self possessed and self aware not at all like my Sarah or any of her friends! I had a spell with Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody in Egypt and enjoyed them immensely but have drifted back to my first love, Historical Romance. I do love Jo’s books and now realise that the attention to detail is no fluke. Thank you Jo for getting all the small continuity and historical stuff right, I really do appreciate the attention to detail in your books and am looking forward to reading The Secret Wedding.
    BTW My favourite book of yours is Elf’s story in Something Wicked. I find the Georgian world a nice change from Regency. I have all your published books thanks to a determined effort on E Bay. I also have a prized copy of Devilish signed by you on a wet night in Ottawa many years ago.
    Happy New Year!

    Reply
  136. Actually, Princess Caroline wore a white wedding gown in 1790 and the first remembered/recorded white wedding gown was worn in 1499. Victoria established the tradition of wearing only white, but she was by far not the first to wear white.
    Also, the waistline, or lack thereof, rose and fell depending on the country in which one lived especially between 1790 and about 18…15 I want to say, though I might be off on how long it lasted. It had much to do with Boney’s decrees regarding problems with materials, manufacturing, etc.
    So technically, that dress is perfectly suited to the time period. Which is a good thing, because it’s gorgeous!
    As far as the 1992 dress, Jessica McClintock and a variety of other designers have been doing refreshing repros for 30 years or more. Which goes back to the old saying…everything old is new again…
    Sorry, Jo. Didn’t mean to hijack here, just wanted to make sure that it was clear that the dress really is historically accurate.
    😀

    Reply
  137. Actually, Princess Caroline wore a white wedding gown in 1790 and the first remembered/recorded white wedding gown was worn in 1499. Victoria established the tradition of wearing only white, but she was by far not the first to wear white.
    Also, the waistline, or lack thereof, rose and fell depending on the country in which one lived especially between 1790 and about 18…15 I want to say, though I might be off on how long it lasted. It had much to do with Boney’s decrees regarding problems with materials, manufacturing, etc.
    So technically, that dress is perfectly suited to the time period. Which is a good thing, because it’s gorgeous!
    As far as the 1992 dress, Jessica McClintock and a variety of other designers have been doing refreshing repros for 30 years or more. Which goes back to the old saying…everything old is new again…
    Sorry, Jo. Didn’t mean to hijack here, just wanted to make sure that it was clear that the dress really is historically accurate.
    😀

    Reply
  138. Actually, Princess Caroline wore a white wedding gown in 1790 and the first remembered/recorded white wedding gown was worn in 1499. Victoria established the tradition of wearing only white, but she was by far not the first to wear white.
    Also, the waistline, or lack thereof, rose and fell depending on the country in which one lived especially between 1790 and about 18…15 I want to say, though I might be off on how long it lasted. It had much to do with Boney’s decrees regarding problems with materials, manufacturing, etc.
    So technically, that dress is perfectly suited to the time period. Which is a good thing, because it’s gorgeous!
    As far as the 1992 dress, Jessica McClintock and a variety of other designers have been doing refreshing repros for 30 years or more. Which goes back to the old saying…everything old is new again…
    Sorry, Jo. Didn’t mean to hijack here, just wanted to make sure that it was clear that the dress really is historically accurate.
    😀

    Reply
  139. Actually, Princess Caroline wore a white wedding gown in 1790 and the first remembered/recorded white wedding gown was worn in 1499. Victoria established the tradition of wearing only white, but she was by far not the first to wear white.
    Also, the waistline, or lack thereof, rose and fell depending on the country in which one lived especially between 1790 and about 18…15 I want to say, though I might be off on how long it lasted. It had much to do with Boney’s decrees regarding problems with materials, manufacturing, etc.
    So technically, that dress is perfectly suited to the time period. Which is a good thing, because it’s gorgeous!
    As far as the 1992 dress, Jessica McClintock and a variety of other designers have been doing refreshing repros for 30 years or more. Which goes back to the old saying…everything old is new again…
    Sorry, Jo. Didn’t mean to hijack here, just wanted to make sure that it was clear that the dress really is historically accurate.
    😀

    Reply
  140. Actually, Princess Caroline wore a white wedding gown in 1790 and the first remembered/recorded white wedding gown was worn in 1499. Victoria established the tradition of wearing only white, but she was by far not the first to wear white.
    Also, the waistline, or lack thereof, rose and fell depending on the country in which one lived especially between 1790 and about 18…15 I want to say, though I might be off on how long it lasted. It had much to do with Boney’s decrees regarding problems with materials, manufacturing, etc.
    So technically, that dress is perfectly suited to the time period. Which is a good thing, because it’s gorgeous!
    As far as the 1992 dress, Jessica McClintock and a variety of other designers have been doing refreshing repros for 30 years or more. Which goes back to the old saying…everything old is new again…
    Sorry, Jo. Didn’t mean to hijack here, just wanted to make sure that it was clear that the dress really is historically accurate.
    😀

    Reply
  141. Theo: Actually, Princess Caroline’s dress was silver tissue and lace. Very heavy and I’m sure uncomfortable to wear. My area of specialty is textiles and it is my biggest nitpick to find mistakes in fiction. (I’m sure we all have our quirks). I know that there were some brides married in white especially as they had almost exclusively white dresses prior to marriage. The better off the family the more colourful the wedding gown, probably to show that it was indeed new. Most girls were sick of wearing white and were very glad to wear colour for the first time at their wedding! True white was a difficult colour to achieve outside of muslin and so heavy lace fabric or white silk as satin or velvet was very expensive. A white dress would not be worn again after marriage so, as in the royal’s case, it was a sign of their great wealth. It was also the canvas for the gold or silver thread embroidery that further elevated their status. I am talking about England here, I’m not sure about the textiles being used in America at the time.
    Now I’ll get down from my hobby (or is it high?) horse!

    Reply
  142. Theo: Actually, Princess Caroline’s dress was silver tissue and lace. Very heavy and I’m sure uncomfortable to wear. My area of specialty is textiles and it is my biggest nitpick to find mistakes in fiction. (I’m sure we all have our quirks). I know that there were some brides married in white especially as they had almost exclusively white dresses prior to marriage. The better off the family the more colourful the wedding gown, probably to show that it was indeed new. Most girls were sick of wearing white and were very glad to wear colour for the first time at their wedding! True white was a difficult colour to achieve outside of muslin and so heavy lace fabric or white silk as satin or velvet was very expensive. A white dress would not be worn again after marriage so, as in the royal’s case, it was a sign of their great wealth. It was also the canvas for the gold or silver thread embroidery that further elevated their status. I am talking about England here, I’m not sure about the textiles being used in America at the time.
    Now I’ll get down from my hobby (or is it high?) horse!

    Reply
  143. Theo: Actually, Princess Caroline’s dress was silver tissue and lace. Very heavy and I’m sure uncomfortable to wear. My area of specialty is textiles and it is my biggest nitpick to find mistakes in fiction. (I’m sure we all have our quirks). I know that there were some brides married in white especially as they had almost exclusively white dresses prior to marriage. The better off the family the more colourful the wedding gown, probably to show that it was indeed new. Most girls were sick of wearing white and were very glad to wear colour for the first time at their wedding! True white was a difficult colour to achieve outside of muslin and so heavy lace fabric or white silk as satin or velvet was very expensive. A white dress would not be worn again after marriage so, as in the royal’s case, it was a sign of their great wealth. It was also the canvas for the gold or silver thread embroidery that further elevated their status. I am talking about England here, I’m not sure about the textiles being used in America at the time.
    Now I’ll get down from my hobby (or is it high?) horse!

    Reply
  144. Theo: Actually, Princess Caroline’s dress was silver tissue and lace. Very heavy and I’m sure uncomfortable to wear. My area of specialty is textiles and it is my biggest nitpick to find mistakes in fiction. (I’m sure we all have our quirks). I know that there were some brides married in white especially as they had almost exclusively white dresses prior to marriage. The better off the family the more colourful the wedding gown, probably to show that it was indeed new. Most girls were sick of wearing white and were very glad to wear colour for the first time at their wedding! True white was a difficult colour to achieve outside of muslin and so heavy lace fabric or white silk as satin or velvet was very expensive. A white dress would not be worn again after marriage so, as in the royal’s case, it was a sign of their great wealth. It was also the canvas for the gold or silver thread embroidery that further elevated their status. I am talking about England here, I’m not sure about the textiles being used in America at the time.
    Now I’ll get down from my hobby (or is it high?) horse!

    Reply
  145. Theo: Actually, Princess Caroline’s dress was silver tissue and lace. Very heavy and I’m sure uncomfortable to wear. My area of specialty is textiles and it is my biggest nitpick to find mistakes in fiction. (I’m sure we all have our quirks). I know that there were some brides married in white especially as they had almost exclusively white dresses prior to marriage. The better off the family the more colourful the wedding gown, probably to show that it was indeed new. Most girls were sick of wearing white and were very glad to wear colour for the first time at their wedding! True white was a difficult colour to achieve outside of muslin and so heavy lace fabric or white silk as satin or velvet was very expensive. A white dress would not be worn again after marriage so, as in the royal’s case, it was a sign of their great wealth. It was also the canvas for the gold or silver thread embroidery that further elevated their status. I am talking about England here, I’m not sure about the textiles being used in America at the time.
    Now I’ll get down from my hobby (or is it high?) horse!

    Reply
  146. I bow to Princess Caroline, my mistake. However, as far back as 1700 and before, many very wealthy families had weddings immortalized in oils in which the brides clearly appear in white, often shown as heavy satin with lace trims. Many girls however were often also married in whatever their ‘best dress’ was, and quite often, it wasn’t white.
    I don’t discount your specialty at all. However,throughout the artwork, fashion plates, and various historical papers I’ve studied, the dress shown on the cover, the style of the dress shown, the color, is quite correct for the era. The textile itself I can’t speak to because it’s difficult to tell if it’s satin or bleached cotton muslin with lace inserts.
    Your statement was that brides didn’t wear white until Victoria’s time. But they did. For several hundred years prior.

    Reply
  147. I bow to Princess Caroline, my mistake. However, as far back as 1700 and before, many very wealthy families had weddings immortalized in oils in which the brides clearly appear in white, often shown as heavy satin with lace trims. Many girls however were often also married in whatever their ‘best dress’ was, and quite often, it wasn’t white.
    I don’t discount your specialty at all. However,throughout the artwork, fashion plates, and various historical papers I’ve studied, the dress shown on the cover, the style of the dress shown, the color, is quite correct for the era. The textile itself I can’t speak to because it’s difficult to tell if it’s satin or bleached cotton muslin with lace inserts.
    Your statement was that brides didn’t wear white until Victoria’s time. But they did. For several hundred years prior.

    Reply
  148. I bow to Princess Caroline, my mistake. However, as far back as 1700 and before, many very wealthy families had weddings immortalized in oils in which the brides clearly appear in white, often shown as heavy satin with lace trims. Many girls however were often also married in whatever their ‘best dress’ was, and quite often, it wasn’t white.
    I don’t discount your specialty at all. However,throughout the artwork, fashion plates, and various historical papers I’ve studied, the dress shown on the cover, the style of the dress shown, the color, is quite correct for the era. The textile itself I can’t speak to because it’s difficult to tell if it’s satin or bleached cotton muslin with lace inserts.
    Your statement was that brides didn’t wear white until Victoria’s time. But they did. For several hundred years prior.

    Reply
  149. I bow to Princess Caroline, my mistake. However, as far back as 1700 and before, many very wealthy families had weddings immortalized in oils in which the brides clearly appear in white, often shown as heavy satin with lace trims. Many girls however were often also married in whatever their ‘best dress’ was, and quite often, it wasn’t white.
    I don’t discount your specialty at all. However,throughout the artwork, fashion plates, and various historical papers I’ve studied, the dress shown on the cover, the style of the dress shown, the color, is quite correct for the era. The textile itself I can’t speak to because it’s difficult to tell if it’s satin or bleached cotton muslin with lace inserts.
    Your statement was that brides didn’t wear white until Victoria’s time. But they did. For several hundred years prior.

    Reply
  150. I bow to Princess Caroline, my mistake. However, as far back as 1700 and before, many very wealthy families had weddings immortalized in oils in which the brides clearly appear in white, often shown as heavy satin with lace trims. Many girls however were often also married in whatever their ‘best dress’ was, and quite often, it wasn’t white.
    I don’t discount your specialty at all. However,throughout the artwork, fashion plates, and various historical papers I’ve studied, the dress shown on the cover, the style of the dress shown, the color, is quite correct for the era. The textile itself I can’t speak to because it’s difficult to tell if it’s satin or bleached cotton muslin with lace inserts.
    Your statement was that brides didn’t wear white until Victoria’s time. But they did. For several hundred years prior.

    Reply
  151. Such interesting comments. I feel awe in the face of such knowlege.
    I love the comments on parenting which I know more about. Thank God the two younger ones live in their college town and “what happens in Lawrence stays in Lawrence.” I don’t even want to know. Don’t encourage your children to save money and live at home….consider it an investment in your mental health to have them live with their “friends” in a big house or apartment. Mine have never loved me more.
    On another note, I am always excited when a new Jo Beverley comes out. I can’t decide to take the anticipation route or shut myself away with the phone off all weekend.
    Jo, you are always so wonderful. The story lines make sense, the writing is articulate and accurate. You do set difficult standards for other authors.
    My favorites are the Georgians. I just can’t help my love affair with beautiful fabric, duels with swords, high heeled shoes sprinkled with diamond chips, a well-turned ankle, french quips and clever riposte… I used to dream that I could time travel to that era. Hard to choose between Bryght and Rothgar…
    I am looking forward to The Secret Wedding and another delicious escape.
    Suzy

    Reply
  152. Such interesting comments. I feel awe in the face of such knowlege.
    I love the comments on parenting which I know more about. Thank God the two younger ones live in their college town and “what happens in Lawrence stays in Lawrence.” I don’t even want to know. Don’t encourage your children to save money and live at home….consider it an investment in your mental health to have them live with their “friends” in a big house or apartment. Mine have never loved me more.
    On another note, I am always excited when a new Jo Beverley comes out. I can’t decide to take the anticipation route or shut myself away with the phone off all weekend.
    Jo, you are always so wonderful. The story lines make sense, the writing is articulate and accurate. You do set difficult standards for other authors.
    My favorites are the Georgians. I just can’t help my love affair with beautiful fabric, duels with swords, high heeled shoes sprinkled with diamond chips, a well-turned ankle, french quips and clever riposte… I used to dream that I could time travel to that era. Hard to choose between Bryght and Rothgar…
    I am looking forward to The Secret Wedding and another delicious escape.
    Suzy

    Reply
  153. Such interesting comments. I feel awe in the face of such knowlege.
    I love the comments on parenting which I know more about. Thank God the two younger ones live in their college town and “what happens in Lawrence stays in Lawrence.” I don’t even want to know. Don’t encourage your children to save money and live at home….consider it an investment in your mental health to have them live with their “friends” in a big house or apartment. Mine have never loved me more.
    On another note, I am always excited when a new Jo Beverley comes out. I can’t decide to take the anticipation route or shut myself away with the phone off all weekend.
    Jo, you are always so wonderful. The story lines make sense, the writing is articulate and accurate. You do set difficult standards for other authors.
    My favorites are the Georgians. I just can’t help my love affair with beautiful fabric, duels with swords, high heeled shoes sprinkled with diamond chips, a well-turned ankle, french quips and clever riposte… I used to dream that I could time travel to that era. Hard to choose between Bryght and Rothgar…
    I am looking forward to The Secret Wedding and another delicious escape.
    Suzy

    Reply
  154. Such interesting comments. I feel awe in the face of such knowlege.
    I love the comments on parenting which I know more about. Thank God the two younger ones live in their college town and “what happens in Lawrence stays in Lawrence.” I don’t even want to know. Don’t encourage your children to save money and live at home….consider it an investment in your mental health to have them live with their “friends” in a big house or apartment. Mine have never loved me more.
    On another note, I am always excited when a new Jo Beverley comes out. I can’t decide to take the anticipation route or shut myself away with the phone off all weekend.
    Jo, you are always so wonderful. The story lines make sense, the writing is articulate and accurate. You do set difficult standards for other authors.
    My favorites are the Georgians. I just can’t help my love affair with beautiful fabric, duels with swords, high heeled shoes sprinkled with diamond chips, a well-turned ankle, french quips and clever riposte… I used to dream that I could time travel to that era. Hard to choose between Bryght and Rothgar…
    I am looking forward to The Secret Wedding and another delicious escape.
    Suzy

    Reply
  155. Such interesting comments. I feel awe in the face of such knowlege.
    I love the comments on parenting which I know more about. Thank God the two younger ones live in their college town and “what happens in Lawrence stays in Lawrence.” I don’t even want to know. Don’t encourage your children to save money and live at home….consider it an investment in your mental health to have them live with their “friends” in a big house or apartment. Mine have never loved me more.
    On another note, I am always excited when a new Jo Beverley comes out. I can’t decide to take the anticipation route or shut myself away with the phone off all weekend.
    Jo, you are always so wonderful. The story lines make sense, the writing is articulate and accurate. You do set difficult standards for other authors.
    My favorites are the Georgians. I just can’t help my love affair with beautiful fabric, duels with swords, high heeled shoes sprinkled with diamond chips, a well-turned ankle, french quips and clever riposte… I used to dream that I could time travel to that era. Hard to choose between Bryght and Rothgar…
    I am looking forward to The Secret Wedding and another delicious escape.
    Suzy

    Reply
  156. Two years ago I had just had breast cancer surgery and a port put on for chemotheraphy. I then went through chemo and radiation treatment. All seems to be well now.
    This scare showed me that I needed to spend more time with my husband and two grown children. I took early retirement from my job of over 28 years and have been enjoying life ever since. We went on a cruise to Alaska and spent a week at Disneyworld so I could see how they decorated for the holidays.
    Retirement also gave me the opportunity to start catching up on reading. I try to read about a book a day. It is a wonderful release from everyday worries. I don’t understand how people don’t like to read. I have discovered so many authors that I enjoy. I have a big stash of unread books but continue to buy new ones of my favorite authors. Jo Beverly is on my must buy. Thank you so much for many hours of pleasure.

    Reply
  157. Two years ago I had just had breast cancer surgery and a port put on for chemotheraphy. I then went through chemo and radiation treatment. All seems to be well now.
    This scare showed me that I needed to spend more time with my husband and two grown children. I took early retirement from my job of over 28 years and have been enjoying life ever since. We went on a cruise to Alaska and spent a week at Disneyworld so I could see how they decorated for the holidays.
    Retirement also gave me the opportunity to start catching up on reading. I try to read about a book a day. It is a wonderful release from everyday worries. I don’t understand how people don’t like to read. I have discovered so many authors that I enjoy. I have a big stash of unread books but continue to buy new ones of my favorite authors. Jo Beverly is on my must buy. Thank you so much for many hours of pleasure.

    Reply
  158. Two years ago I had just had breast cancer surgery and a port put on for chemotheraphy. I then went through chemo and radiation treatment. All seems to be well now.
    This scare showed me that I needed to spend more time with my husband and two grown children. I took early retirement from my job of over 28 years and have been enjoying life ever since. We went on a cruise to Alaska and spent a week at Disneyworld so I could see how they decorated for the holidays.
    Retirement also gave me the opportunity to start catching up on reading. I try to read about a book a day. It is a wonderful release from everyday worries. I don’t understand how people don’t like to read. I have discovered so many authors that I enjoy. I have a big stash of unread books but continue to buy new ones of my favorite authors. Jo Beverly is on my must buy. Thank you so much for many hours of pleasure.

    Reply
  159. Two years ago I had just had breast cancer surgery and a port put on for chemotheraphy. I then went through chemo and radiation treatment. All seems to be well now.
    This scare showed me that I needed to spend more time with my husband and two grown children. I took early retirement from my job of over 28 years and have been enjoying life ever since. We went on a cruise to Alaska and spent a week at Disneyworld so I could see how they decorated for the holidays.
    Retirement also gave me the opportunity to start catching up on reading. I try to read about a book a day. It is a wonderful release from everyday worries. I don’t understand how people don’t like to read. I have discovered so many authors that I enjoy. I have a big stash of unread books but continue to buy new ones of my favorite authors. Jo Beverly is on my must buy. Thank you so much for many hours of pleasure.

    Reply
  160. Two years ago I had just had breast cancer surgery and a port put on for chemotheraphy. I then went through chemo and radiation treatment. All seems to be well now.
    This scare showed me that I needed to spend more time with my husband and two grown children. I took early retirement from my job of over 28 years and have been enjoying life ever since. We went on a cruise to Alaska and spent a week at Disneyworld so I could see how they decorated for the holidays.
    Retirement also gave me the opportunity to start catching up on reading. I try to read about a book a day. It is a wonderful release from everyday worries. I don’t understand how people don’t like to read. I have discovered so many authors that I enjoy. I have a big stash of unread books but continue to buy new ones of my favorite authors. Jo Beverly is on my must buy. Thank you so much for many hours of pleasure.

    Reply
  161. I really enjoyed reading about your immersion process. I’d probably be a brain-dead zombie after going through that. (Or could you have a zombie that’s only brain-dead?)
    But primarily, as the Adventurous Wench, I had to comment on your opening! I feel that any adventure must have an element of the unknown. Therefore, if it was unchanging, it would soon cease to be an adventure.
    That’s my take on it. (-:

    Reply
  162. I really enjoyed reading about your immersion process. I’d probably be a brain-dead zombie after going through that. (Or could you have a zombie that’s only brain-dead?)
    But primarily, as the Adventurous Wench, I had to comment on your opening! I feel that any adventure must have an element of the unknown. Therefore, if it was unchanging, it would soon cease to be an adventure.
    That’s my take on it. (-:

    Reply
  163. I really enjoyed reading about your immersion process. I’d probably be a brain-dead zombie after going through that. (Or could you have a zombie that’s only brain-dead?)
    But primarily, as the Adventurous Wench, I had to comment on your opening! I feel that any adventure must have an element of the unknown. Therefore, if it was unchanging, it would soon cease to be an adventure.
    That’s my take on it. (-:

    Reply
  164. I really enjoyed reading about your immersion process. I’d probably be a brain-dead zombie after going through that. (Or could you have a zombie that’s only brain-dead?)
    But primarily, as the Adventurous Wench, I had to comment on your opening! I feel that any adventure must have an element of the unknown. Therefore, if it was unchanging, it would soon cease to be an adventure.
    That’s my take on it. (-:

    Reply
  165. I really enjoyed reading about your immersion process. I’d probably be a brain-dead zombie after going through that. (Or could you have a zombie that’s only brain-dead?)
    But primarily, as the Adventurous Wench, I had to comment on your opening! I feel that any adventure must have an element of the unknown. Therefore, if it was unchanging, it would soon cease to be an adventure.
    That’s my take on it. (-:

    Reply
  166. Suzy, the Georgians are my favorites, too. It’s a great change from Regency (which I also enjoy, but is so much more common). And the Malloren world characters are so complex and unique.
    I love when they get all dressed for court. It’s so over-the-top. LOL.

    Reply
  167. Suzy, the Georgians are my favorites, too. It’s a great change from Regency (which I also enjoy, but is so much more common). And the Malloren world characters are so complex and unique.
    I love when they get all dressed for court. It’s so over-the-top. LOL.

    Reply
  168. Suzy, the Georgians are my favorites, too. It’s a great change from Regency (which I also enjoy, but is so much more common). And the Malloren world characters are so complex and unique.
    I love when they get all dressed for court. It’s so over-the-top. LOL.

    Reply
  169. Suzy, the Georgians are my favorites, too. It’s a great change from Regency (which I also enjoy, but is so much more common). And the Malloren world characters are so complex and unique.
    I love when they get all dressed for court. It’s so over-the-top. LOL.

    Reply
  170. Suzy, the Georgians are my favorites, too. It’s a great change from Regency (which I also enjoy, but is so much more common). And the Malloren world characters are so complex and unique.
    I love when they get all dressed for court. It’s so over-the-top. LOL.

    Reply
  171. It would be interesting to see a character side with those “restive colonials”.
    It is one of the mysteries of history to me that the British so woefully misunderstood the psychology of the American colonies. Examining 1764 as the genesis of the American Revolution, seen through sympathetic and understanding British eyes, would make a fascinating background for any book. How about it?

    Reply
  172. It would be interesting to see a character side with those “restive colonials”.
    It is one of the mysteries of history to me that the British so woefully misunderstood the psychology of the American colonies. Examining 1764 as the genesis of the American Revolution, seen through sympathetic and understanding British eyes, would make a fascinating background for any book. How about it?

    Reply
  173. It would be interesting to see a character side with those “restive colonials”.
    It is one of the mysteries of history to me that the British so woefully misunderstood the psychology of the American colonies. Examining 1764 as the genesis of the American Revolution, seen through sympathetic and understanding British eyes, would make a fascinating background for any book. How about it?

    Reply
  174. It would be interesting to see a character side with those “restive colonials”.
    It is one of the mysteries of history to me that the British so woefully misunderstood the psychology of the American colonies. Examining 1764 as the genesis of the American Revolution, seen through sympathetic and understanding British eyes, would make a fascinating background for any book. How about it?

    Reply
  175. It would be interesting to see a character side with those “restive colonials”.
    It is one of the mysteries of history to me that the British so woefully misunderstood the psychology of the American colonies. Examining 1764 as the genesis of the American Revolution, seen through sympathetic and understanding British eyes, would make a fascinating background for any book. How about it?

    Reply
  176. Jo – I still wait impatiently by the book store’s front door – staring in the window – waiting for the newest Jobev to walk thru the door! LOL Well, not quite . . . I still go inside and get lots and lots of books to tide me over until your newest one comes in. I am trying to cut back on my reading – I can no longer afford to buy over 50 books per month – boo hoo! And yes I do read them all eventually.
    However, I am now trying to get some balance in my life and spend a little less time with my children – the books and more time with my self. I have been watching the Oprah webcasts concerning Our Best Life and decided it was time to work on me instead of hiding the pages of a romance. Of course that will not last – I will be back to reading 1 book a day before long!!!!!

    Reply
  177. Jo – I still wait impatiently by the book store’s front door – staring in the window – waiting for the newest Jobev to walk thru the door! LOL Well, not quite . . . I still go inside and get lots and lots of books to tide me over until your newest one comes in. I am trying to cut back on my reading – I can no longer afford to buy over 50 books per month – boo hoo! And yes I do read them all eventually.
    However, I am now trying to get some balance in my life and spend a little less time with my children – the books and more time with my self. I have been watching the Oprah webcasts concerning Our Best Life and decided it was time to work on me instead of hiding the pages of a romance. Of course that will not last – I will be back to reading 1 book a day before long!!!!!

    Reply
  178. Jo – I still wait impatiently by the book store’s front door – staring in the window – waiting for the newest Jobev to walk thru the door! LOL Well, not quite . . . I still go inside and get lots and lots of books to tide me over until your newest one comes in. I am trying to cut back on my reading – I can no longer afford to buy over 50 books per month – boo hoo! And yes I do read them all eventually.
    However, I am now trying to get some balance in my life and spend a little less time with my children – the books and more time with my self. I have been watching the Oprah webcasts concerning Our Best Life and decided it was time to work on me instead of hiding the pages of a romance. Of course that will not last – I will be back to reading 1 book a day before long!!!!!

    Reply
  179. Jo – I still wait impatiently by the book store’s front door – staring in the window – waiting for the newest Jobev to walk thru the door! LOL Well, not quite . . . I still go inside and get lots and lots of books to tide me over until your newest one comes in. I am trying to cut back on my reading – I can no longer afford to buy over 50 books per month – boo hoo! And yes I do read them all eventually.
    However, I am now trying to get some balance in my life and spend a little less time with my children – the books and more time with my self. I have been watching the Oprah webcasts concerning Our Best Life and decided it was time to work on me instead of hiding the pages of a romance. Of course that will not last – I will be back to reading 1 book a day before long!!!!!

    Reply
  180. Jo – I still wait impatiently by the book store’s front door – staring in the window – waiting for the newest Jobev to walk thru the door! LOL Well, not quite . . . I still go inside and get lots and lots of books to tide me over until your newest one comes in. I am trying to cut back on my reading – I can no longer afford to buy over 50 books per month – boo hoo! And yes I do read them all eventually.
    However, I am now trying to get some balance in my life and spend a little less time with my children – the books and more time with my self. I have been watching the Oprah webcasts concerning Our Best Life and decided it was time to work on me instead of hiding the pages of a romance. Of course that will not last – I will be back to reading 1 book a day before long!!!!!

    Reply
  181. Too many posts to comment on all, but Sue, do you really think that’s a bodice ripper cover? I think of those as the half-naked writing-in-passion ones.
    No, the dress isn’t quite accurate, but having had a modern bridal dress complete with zip down the back on Dragon’s Bride, this seems a good compromise to me! I sent them a picture of Pompadour as a strong hint.
    Jackie, I think paying attention to the here and now and making it good is very important, but I hope you keep reading, too. For purely selfish reasons, though I do think putting ourselves in a happy book now and then really helps with reality’s joys.
    As I like to remind everyone, if we smile, we really do become happier, and I always hope to leave my readers with a smiles.
    Computer eratic, but currently working.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  182. Too many posts to comment on all, but Sue, do you really think that’s a bodice ripper cover? I think of those as the half-naked writing-in-passion ones.
    No, the dress isn’t quite accurate, but having had a modern bridal dress complete with zip down the back on Dragon’s Bride, this seems a good compromise to me! I sent them a picture of Pompadour as a strong hint.
    Jackie, I think paying attention to the here and now and making it good is very important, but I hope you keep reading, too. For purely selfish reasons, though I do think putting ourselves in a happy book now and then really helps with reality’s joys.
    As I like to remind everyone, if we smile, we really do become happier, and I always hope to leave my readers with a smiles.
    Computer eratic, but currently working.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  183. Too many posts to comment on all, but Sue, do you really think that’s a bodice ripper cover? I think of those as the half-naked writing-in-passion ones.
    No, the dress isn’t quite accurate, but having had a modern bridal dress complete with zip down the back on Dragon’s Bride, this seems a good compromise to me! I sent them a picture of Pompadour as a strong hint.
    Jackie, I think paying attention to the here and now and making it good is very important, but I hope you keep reading, too. For purely selfish reasons, though I do think putting ourselves in a happy book now and then really helps with reality’s joys.
    As I like to remind everyone, if we smile, we really do become happier, and I always hope to leave my readers with a smiles.
    Computer eratic, but currently working.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  184. Too many posts to comment on all, but Sue, do you really think that’s a bodice ripper cover? I think of those as the half-naked writing-in-passion ones.
    No, the dress isn’t quite accurate, but having had a modern bridal dress complete with zip down the back on Dragon’s Bride, this seems a good compromise to me! I sent them a picture of Pompadour as a strong hint.
    Jackie, I think paying attention to the here and now and making it good is very important, but I hope you keep reading, too. For purely selfish reasons, though I do think putting ourselves in a happy book now and then really helps with reality’s joys.
    As I like to remind everyone, if we smile, we really do become happier, and I always hope to leave my readers with a smiles.
    Computer eratic, but currently working.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  185. Too many posts to comment on all, but Sue, do you really think that’s a bodice ripper cover? I think of those as the half-naked writing-in-passion ones.
    No, the dress isn’t quite accurate, but having had a modern bridal dress complete with zip down the back on Dragon’s Bride, this seems a good compromise to me! I sent them a picture of Pompadour as a strong hint.
    Jackie, I think paying attention to the here and now and making it good is very important, but I hope you keep reading, too. For purely selfish reasons, though I do think putting ourselves in a happy book now and then really helps with reality’s joys.
    As I like to remind everyone, if we smile, we really do become happier, and I always hope to leave my readers with a smiles.
    Computer eratic, but currently working.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  186. Two years ago I had just lost the person I loved most in the world, I had lost my job because my back went out on me, and I was in general going through a really bad patch physically and emotionally — still putting one foot in front of another, trudging up an endless gray highway, without hope or purpose.
    Things got better slowly, though. I found I didn’t want to go back to that job anyway even if it were possible, the enforced rest did me good, and I had lots of time to read and putter and catch up on life.
    I can’t change the losses of the past, but I am in a much better place today than I was then — and very grateful for the improvement.

    Reply
  187. Two years ago I had just lost the person I loved most in the world, I had lost my job because my back went out on me, and I was in general going through a really bad patch physically and emotionally — still putting one foot in front of another, trudging up an endless gray highway, without hope or purpose.
    Things got better slowly, though. I found I didn’t want to go back to that job anyway even if it were possible, the enforced rest did me good, and I had lots of time to read and putter and catch up on life.
    I can’t change the losses of the past, but I am in a much better place today than I was then — and very grateful for the improvement.

    Reply
  188. Two years ago I had just lost the person I loved most in the world, I had lost my job because my back went out on me, and I was in general going through a really bad patch physically and emotionally — still putting one foot in front of another, trudging up an endless gray highway, without hope or purpose.
    Things got better slowly, though. I found I didn’t want to go back to that job anyway even if it were possible, the enforced rest did me good, and I had lots of time to read and putter and catch up on life.
    I can’t change the losses of the past, but I am in a much better place today than I was then — and very grateful for the improvement.

    Reply
  189. Two years ago I had just lost the person I loved most in the world, I had lost my job because my back went out on me, and I was in general going through a really bad patch physically and emotionally — still putting one foot in front of another, trudging up an endless gray highway, without hope or purpose.
    Things got better slowly, though. I found I didn’t want to go back to that job anyway even if it were possible, the enforced rest did me good, and I had lots of time to read and putter and catch up on life.
    I can’t change the losses of the past, but I am in a much better place today than I was then — and very grateful for the improvement.

    Reply
  190. Two years ago I had just lost the person I loved most in the world, I had lost my job because my back went out on me, and I was in general going through a really bad patch physically and emotionally — still putting one foot in front of another, trudging up an endless gray highway, without hope or purpose.
    Things got better slowly, though. I found I didn’t want to go back to that job anyway even if it were possible, the enforced rest did me good, and I had lots of time to read and putter and catch up on life.
    I can’t change the losses of the past, but I am in a much better place today than I was then — and very grateful for the improvement.

    Reply
  191. Jo: I just don’t like the partially clad, seething passion covers, I much prefer the elegant, understated ones. My yardstick is what will be OK to pull out on a bus and not get sneered at! You are right, this isn’t technically a “bodice ripper”. I laughed when you mentioned the Dragon’s Bride I was shocked that that got through.
    I’m interested if anyone else had that moment when a daughter is the age of a heroine and the heroine marries an older man. I read books where an 18 or 17 year old falls in love with a 30+ rake and now think eww. It never bothered me before. In many of Georgette Heyer’s novels the girls are 15 and 16, The Convenient Marriage comes to mind. My own reality has intruded into the enjoyment of the fiction and I don’t like it!

    Reply
  192. Jo: I just don’t like the partially clad, seething passion covers, I much prefer the elegant, understated ones. My yardstick is what will be OK to pull out on a bus and not get sneered at! You are right, this isn’t technically a “bodice ripper”. I laughed when you mentioned the Dragon’s Bride I was shocked that that got through.
    I’m interested if anyone else had that moment when a daughter is the age of a heroine and the heroine marries an older man. I read books where an 18 or 17 year old falls in love with a 30+ rake and now think eww. It never bothered me before. In many of Georgette Heyer’s novels the girls are 15 and 16, The Convenient Marriage comes to mind. My own reality has intruded into the enjoyment of the fiction and I don’t like it!

    Reply
  193. Jo: I just don’t like the partially clad, seething passion covers, I much prefer the elegant, understated ones. My yardstick is what will be OK to pull out on a bus and not get sneered at! You are right, this isn’t technically a “bodice ripper”. I laughed when you mentioned the Dragon’s Bride I was shocked that that got through.
    I’m interested if anyone else had that moment when a daughter is the age of a heroine and the heroine marries an older man. I read books where an 18 or 17 year old falls in love with a 30+ rake and now think eww. It never bothered me before. In many of Georgette Heyer’s novels the girls are 15 and 16, The Convenient Marriage comes to mind. My own reality has intruded into the enjoyment of the fiction and I don’t like it!

    Reply
  194. Jo: I just don’t like the partially clad, seething passion covers, I much prefer the elegant, understated ones. My yardstick is what will be OK to pull out on a bus and not get sneered at! You are right, this isn’t technically a “bodice ripper”. I laughed when you mentioned the Dragon’s Bride I was shocked that that got through.
    I’m interested if anyone else had that moment when a daughter is the age of a heroine and the heroine marries an older man. I read books where an 18 or 17 year old falls in love with a 30+ rake and now think eww. It never bothered me before. In many of Georgette Heyer’s novels the girls are 15 and 16, The Convenient Marriage comes to mind. My own reality has intruded into the enjoyment of the fiction and I don’t like it!

    Reply
  195. Jo: I just don’t like the partially clad, seething passion covers, I much prefer the elegant, understated ones. My yardstick is what will be OK to pull out on a bus and not get sneered at! You are right, this isn’t technically a “bodice ripper”. I laughed when you mentioned the Dragon’s Bride I was shocked that that got through.
    I’m interested if anyone else had that moment when a daughter is the age of a heroine and the heroine marries an older man. I read books where an 18 or 17 year old falls in love with a 30+ rake and now think eww. It never bothered me before. In many of Georgette Heyer’s novels the girls are 15 and 16, The Convenient Marriage comes to mind. My own reality has intruded into the enjoyment of the fiction and I don’t like it!

    Reply
  196. Change. Most novels start with some great change in a person’s life. Usually this is the death of a father or the necessity to marry.We can control the changes in stories though we can’t control them in our own lives.
    Though my life has not changed greatly in the last two years, my life is not at all the same this year as it was in 2006 or 2007.
    My life would be beter organized if it were a novel.

    Reply
  197. Change. Most novels start with some great change in a person’s life. Usually this is the death of a father or the necessity to marry.We can control the changes in stories though we can’t control them in our own lives.
    Though my life has not changed greatly in the last two years, my life is not at all the same this year as it was in 2006 or 2007.
    My life would be beter organized if it were a novel.

    Reply
  198. Change. Most novels start with some great change in a person’s life. Usually this is the death of a father or the necessity to marry.We can control the changes in stories though we can’t control them in our own lives.
    Though my life has not changed greatly in the last two years, my life is not at all the same this year as it was in 2006 or 2007.
    My life would be beter organized if it were a novel.

    Reply
  199. Change. Most novels start with some great change in a person’s life. Usually this is the death of a father or the necessity to marry.We can control the changes in stories though we can’t control them in our own lives.
    Though my life has not changed greatly in the last two years, my life is not at all the same this year as it was in 2006 or 2007.
    My life would be beter organized if it were a novel.

    Reply
  200. Change. Most novels start with some great change in a person’s life. Usually this is the death of a father or the necessity to marry.We can control the changes in stories though we can’t control them in our own lives.
    Though my life has not changed greatly in the last two years, my life is not at all the same this year as it was in 2006 or 2007.
    My life would be beter organized if it were a novel.

    Reply
  201. I don’t care for “seething passion” covers either. For one thing, they’ve become a terrible cliche. For another, they don’t seem to me to catch the spirit, wit or emotion of the story. About all they really catch is the strange nature of the regency climate – simultaneously cold enough for boots and snow on the ground yet warm enough for the hero (and often the heroine as well) to go topless. It must have been like Los Angeles when we have Santa Ana winter winds – the ground is still freezing, but the air is hot. I see this mostly on Avon covers and I wonder if they have a thing about it there.

    Reply
  202. I don’t care for “seething passion” covers either. For one thing, they’ve become a terrible cliche. For another, they don’t seem to me to catch the spirit, wit or emotion of the story. About all they really catch is the strange nature of the regency climate – simultaneously cold enough for boots and snow on the ground yet warm enough for the hero (and often the heroine as well) to go topless. It must have been like Los Angeles when we have Santa Ana winter winds – the ground is still freezing, but the air is hot. I see this mostly on Avon covers and I wonder if they have a thing about it there.

    Reply
  203. I don’t care for “seething passion” covers either. For one thing, they’ve become a terrible cliche. For another, they don’t seem to me to catch the spirit, wit or emotion of the story. About all they really catch is the strange nature of the regency climate – simultaneously cold enough for boots and snow on the ground yet warm enough for the hero (and often the heroine as well) to go topless. It must have been like Los Angeles when we have Santa Ana winter winds – the ground is still freezing, but the air is hot. I see this mostly on Avon covers and I wonder if they have a thing about it there.

    Reply
  204. I don’t care for “seething passion” covers either. For one thing, they’ve become a terrible cliche. For another, they don’t seem to me to catch the spirit, wit or emotion of the story. About all they really catch is the strange nature of the regency climate – simultaneously cold enough for boots and snow on the ground yet warm enough for the hero (and often the heroine as well) to go topless. It must have been like Los Angeles when we have Santa Ana winter winds – the ground is still freezing, but the air is hot. I see this mostly on Avon covers and I wonder if they have a thing about it there.

    Reply
  205. I don’t care for “seething passion” covers either. For one thing, they’ve become a terrible cliche. For another, they don’t seem to me to catch the spirit, wit or emotion of the story. About all they really catch is the strange nature of the regency climate – simultaneously cold enough for boots and snow on the ground yet warm enough for the hero (and often the heroine as well) to go topless. It must have been like Los Angeles when we have Santa Ana winter winds – the ground is still freezing, but the air is hot. I see this mostly on Avon covers and I wonder if they have a thing about it there.

    Reply
  206. “Lady Beware” had a gorgeous cover. It was one of my favorites. Just as I eagerly awaited your new book two years ago, I’m doing the same now.
    Two years ago I was still getting used to Florida living – unhappy with how hot it was. This year we’re having the first cold weather since we moved here three and a half years ago and I’m wearing long pants and sweatshirts I brought from Michigan. I haven’t been very healthy the last two years and, looking back, it seems frivolous to have been upset about the weather. Oh well – it’s never too late to learn new things. 🙂

    Reply
  207. “Lady Beware” had a gorgeous cover. It was one of my favorites. Just as I eagerly awaited your new book two years ago, I’m doing the same now.
    Two years ago I was still getting used to Florida living – unhappy with how hot it was. This year we’re having the first cold weather since we moved here three and a half years ago and I’m wearing long pants and sweatshirts I brought from Michigan. I haven’t been very healthy the last two years and, looking back, it seems frivolous to have been upset about the weather. Oh well – it’s never too late to learn new things. 🙂

    Reply
  208. “Lady Beware” had a gorgeous cover. It was one of my favorites. Just as I eagerly awaited your new book two years ago, I’m doing the same now.
    Two years ago I was still getting used to Florida living – unhappy with how hot it was. This year we’re having the first cold weather since we moved here three and a half years ago and I’m wearing long pants and sweatshirts I brought from Michigan. I haven’t been very healthy the last two years and, looking back, it seems frivolous to have been upset about the weather. Oh well – it’s never too late to learn new things. 🙂

    Reply
  209. “Lady Beware” had a gorgeous cover. It was one of my favorites. Just as I eagerly awaited your new book two years ago, I’m doing the same now.
    Two years ago I was still getting used to Florida living – unhappy with how hot it was. This year we’re having the first cold weather since we moved here three and a half years ago and I’m wearing long pants and sweatshirts I brought from Michigan. I haven’t been very healthy the last two years and, looking back, it seems frivolous to have been upset about the weather. Oh well – it’s never too late to learn new things. 🙂

    Reply
  210. “Lady Beware” had a gorgeous cover. It was one of my favorites. Just as I eagerly awaited your new book two years ago, I’m doing the same now.
    Two years ago I was still getting used to Florida living – unhappy with how hot it was. This year we’re having the first cold weather since we moved here three and a half years ago and I’m wearing long pants and sweatshirts I brought from Michigan. I haven’t been very healthy the last two years and, looking back, it seems frivolous to have been upset about the weather. Oh well – it’s never too late to learn new things. 🙂

    Reply
  211. Ah you see I prefer the Malloren covers without people on them. Good job we are all different! Interesting discussion with a wide range of thinking yet we all love Jo’s books…the power of the written word.

    Reply
  212. Ah you see I prefer the Malloren covers without people on them. Good job we are all different! Interesting discussion with a wide range of thinking yet we all love Jo’s books…the power of the written word.

    Reply
  213. Ah you see I prefer the Malloren covers without people on them. Good job we are all different! Interesting discussion with a wide range of thinking yet we all love Jo’s books…the power of the written word.

    Reply
  214. Ah you see I prefer the Malloren covers without people on them. Good job we are all different! Interesting discussion with a wide range of thinking yet we all love Jo’s books…the power of the written word.

    Reply
  215. Ah you see I prefer the Malloren covers without people on them. Good job we are all different! Interesting discussion with a wide range of thinking yet we all love Jo’s books…the power of the written word.

    Reply
  216. Marieta – thank you for posting your comment – I’ve been in treatment for 18 months and am getting my port out in a few weeks. It’s always good to hear someone else say it gets easier, even though I know it does (and already has)
    We took my kids to Disneyland to see their Halloween displays – Disney needs to have Cancer Mom discounts days!

    Reply
  217. Marieta – thank you for posting your comment – I’ve been in treatment for 18 months and am getting my port out in a few weeks. It’s always good to hear someone else say it gets easier, even though I know it does (and already has)
    We took my kids to Disneyland to see their Halloween displays – Disney needs to have Cancer Mom discounts days!

    Reply
  218. Marieta – thank you for posting your comment – I’ve been in treatment for 18 months and am getting my port out in a few weeks. It’s always good to hear someone else say it gets easier, even though I know it does (and already has)
    We took my kids to Disneyland to see their Halloween displays – Disney needs to have Cancer Mom discounts days!

    Reply
  219. Marieta – thank you for posting your comment – I’ve been in treatment for 18 months and am getting my port out in a few weeks. It’s always good to hear someone else say it gets easier, even though I know it does (and already has)
    We took my kids to Disneyland to see their Halloween displays – Disney needs to have Cancer Mom discounts days!

    Reply
  220. Marieta – thank you for posting your comment – I’ve been in treatment for 18 months and am getting my port out in a few weeks. It’s always good to hear someone else say it gets easier, even though I know it does (and already has)
    We took my kids to Disneyland to see their Halloween displays – Disney needs to have Cancer Mom discounts days!

    Reply
  221. This has been a wonderful discussion. Thank you, everyone!
    I’m off tomorrow to talk the the Greater Vancouver Chapter of RWA, but I’ll try to pick a winner in time for the Sunday announcements.
    It’s going to be hard!
    Jo

    Reply
  222. This has been a wonderful discussion. Thank you, everyone!
    I’m off tomorrow to talk the the Greater Vancouver Chapter of RWA, but I’ll try to pick a winner in time for the Sunday announcements.
    It’s going to be hard!
    Jo

    Reply
  223. This has been a wonderful discussion. Thank you, everyone!
    I’m off tomorrow to talk the the Greater Vancouver Chapter of RWA, but I’ll try to pick a winner in time for the Sunday announcements.
    It’s going to be hard!
    Jo

    Reply
  224. This has been a wonderful discussion. Thank you, everyone!
    I’m off tomorrow to talk the the Greater Vancouver Chapter of RWA, but I’ll try to pick a winner in time for the Sunday announcements.
    It’s going to be hard!
    Jo

    Reply
  225. This has been a wonderful discussion. Thank you, everyone!
    I’m off tomorrow to talk the the Greater Vancouver Chapter of RWA, but I’ll try to pick a winner in time for the Sunday announcements.
    It’s going to be hard!
    Jo

    Reply
  226. The bodice-ripping covers… I LOVE them! To me they are the epitome of historical romance. I always look first at the books with those covers. If an author’s on auto-buy, I hardly notice the cover, but when looking to buy someone new, it’s the first thing I notice. Of course, nothing’s worse than a cover that is nothing like the story–or characters–inside. Thankfully, publishers don’t seem to do that as much these days. But I’ve got many an older historical with characters on the front whose hair colors don’t match the hero and heroine’s at all!

    Reply
  227. The bodice-ripping covers… I LOVE them! To me they are the epitome of historical romance. I always look first at the books with those covers. If an author’s on auto-buy, I hardly notice the cover, but when looking to buy someone new, it’s the first thing I notice. Of course, nothing’s worse than a cover that is nothing like the story–or characters–inside. Thankfully, publishers don’t seem to do that as much these days. But I’ve got many an older historical with characters on the front whose hair colors don’t match the hero and heroine’s at all!

    Reply
  228. The bodice-ripping covers… I LOVE them! To me they are the epitome of historical romance. I always look first at the books with those covers. If an author’s on auto-buy, I hardly notice the cover, but when looking to buy someone new, it’s the first thing I notice. Of course, nothing’s worse than a cover that is nothing like the story–or characters–inside. Thankfully, publishers don’t seem to do that as much these days. But I’ve got many an older historical with characters on the front whose hair colors don’t match the hero and heroine’s at all!

    Reply
  229. The bodice-ripping covers… I LOVE them! To me they are the epitome of historical romance. I always look first at the books with those covers. If an author’s on auto-buy, I hardly notice the cover, but when looking to buy someone new, it’s the first thing I notice. Of course, nothing’s worse than a cover that is nothing like the story–or characters–inside. Thankfully, publishers don’t seem to do that as much these days. But I’ve got many an older historical with characters on the front whose hair colors don’t match the hero and heroine’s at all!

    Reply
  230. The bodice-ripping covers… I LOVE them! To me they are the epitome of historical romance. I always look first at the books with those covers. If an author’s on auto-buy, I hardly notice the cover, but when looking to buy someone new, it’s the first thing I notice. Of course, nothing’s worse than a cover that is nothing like the story–or characters–inside. Thankfully, publishers don’t seem to do that as much these days. But I’ve got many an older historical with characters on the front whose hair colors don’t match the hero and heroine’s at all!

    Reply
  231. Life is always changing, and is always a challenge. One can live in the same country, own the same car, live at the same house, be married to the same person, day after day after day, but that does not mean that “life” remains “unchanged”. Personal growth (or the other way round, unfortunately) is what makes the difference; what makes “that” change possible.
    I would like to share with you some of the last words of RANDY PAUSCH before he passed on; I agree with him , and it would have been impossible for me to put down my thoughts in writing in a better way than he did.
    Here it goes:
    “I think the only advise I can give you on how to live your life well, is first of all remember , it´s a cliché … but I love clichés .. : “It is not the things we do in life that we regret on our deathbed; it is the things we do not”. Find your passion and follow it. And if there is anything I have learned in my life, you will not find that passion in things; and you will not find that passion in money. Because the more things and the more money you have, the more you will just look around and use that as a metric, and there will always be someone with more. That passion would be grounded in people and would be grounded in the relationships you have with people and what they think of you when your time comes.
    And if you can gain the respect of those around you, and the passion and true love – and I have said this before- that I waited to 39 to get married because I had to wait that long to find someone where her happiness was more important than mine. And if nothing else, I hope that all of you can find that kind of passion and that kind of love in your life. Thank you.”
    Best regards!

    Reply
  232. Life is always changing, and is always a challenge. One can live in the same country, own the same car, live at the same house, be married to the same person, day after day after day, but that does not mean that “life” remains “unchanged”. Personal growth (or the other way round, unfortunately) is what makes the difference; what makes “that” change possible.
    I would like to share with you some of the last words of RANDY PAUSCH before he passed on; I agree with him , and it would have been impossible for me to put down my thoughts in writing in a better way than he did.
    Here it goes:
    “I think the only advise I can give you on how to live your life well, is first of all remember , it´s a cliché … but I love clichés .. : “It is not the things we do in life that we regret on our deathbed; it is the things we do not”. Find your passion and follow it. And if there is anything I have learned in my life, you will not find that passion in things; and you will not find that passion in money. Because the more things and the more money you have, the more you will just look around and use that as a metric, and there will always be someone with more. That passion would be grounded in people and would be grounded in the relationships you have with people and what they think of you when your time comes.
    And if you can gain the respect of those around you, and the passion and true love – and I have said this before- that I waited to 39 to get married because I had to wait that long to find someone where her happiness was more important than mine. And if nothing else, I hope that all of you can find that kind of passion and that kind of love in your life. Thank you.”
    Best regards!

    Reply
  233. Life is always changing, and is always a challenge. One can live in the same country, own the same car, live at the same house, be married to the same person, day after day after day, but that does not mean that “life” remains “unchanged”. Personal growth (or the other way round, unfortunately) is what makes the difference; what makes “that” change possible.
    I would like to share with you some of the last words of RANDY PAUSCH before he passed on; I agree with him , and it would have been impossible for me to put down my thoughts in writing in a better way than he did.
    Here it goes:
    “I think the only advise I can give you on how to live your life well, is first of all remember , it´s a cliché … but I love clichés .. : “It is not the things we do in life that we regret on our deathbed; it is the things we do not”. Find your passion and follow it. And if there is anything I have learned in my life, you will not find that passion in things; and you will not find that passion in money. Because the more things and the more money you have, the more you will just look around and use that as a metric, and there will always be someone with more. That passion would be grounded in people and would be grounded in the relationships you have with people and what they think of you when your time comes.
    And if you can gain the respect of those around you, and the passion and true love – and I have said this before- that I waited to 39 to get married because I had to wait that long to find someone where her happiness was more important than mine. And if nothing else, I hope that all of you can find that kind of passion and that kind of love in your life. Thank you.”
    Best regards!

    Reply
  234. Life is always changing, and is always a challenge. One can live in the same country, own the same car, live at the same house, be married to the same person, day after day after day, but that does not mean that “life” remains “unchanged”. Personal growth (or the other way round, unfortunately) is what makes the difference; what makes “that” change possible.
    I would like to share with you some of the last words of RANDY PAUSCH before he passed on; I agree with him , and it would have been impossible for me to put down my thoughts in writing in a better way than he did.
    Here it goes:
    “I think the only advise I can give you on how to live your life well, is first of all remember , it´s a cliché … but I love clichés .. : “It is not the things we do in life that we regret on our deathbed; it is the things we do not”. Find your passion and follow it. And if there is anything I have learned in my life, you will not find that passion in things; and you will not find that passion in money. Because the more things and the more money you have, the more you will just look around and use that as a metric, and there will always be someone with more. That passion would be grounded in people and would be grounded in the relationships you have with people and what they think of you when your time comes.
    And if you can gain the respect of those around you, and the passion and true love – and I have said this before- that I waited to 39 to get married because I had to wait that long to find someone where her happiness was more important than mine. And if nothing else, I hope that all of you can find that kind of passion and that kind of love in your life. Thank you.”
    Best regards!

    Reply
  235. Life is always changing, and is always a challenge. One can live in the same country, own the same car, live at the same house, be married to the same person, day after day after day, but that does not mean that “life” remains “unchanged”. Personal growth (or the other way round, unfortunately) is what makes the difference; what makes “that” change possible.
    I would like to share with you some of the last words of RANDY PAUSCH before he passed on; I agree with him , and it would have been impossible for me to put down my thoughts in writing in a better way than he did.
    Here it goes:
    “I think the only advise I can give you on how to live your life well, is first of all remember , it´s a cliché … but I love clichés .. : “It is not the things we do in life that we regret on our deathbed; it is the things we do not”. Find your passion and follow it. And if there is anything I have learned in my life, you will not find that passion in things; and you will not find that passion in money. Because the more things and the more money you have, the more you will just look around and use that as a metric, and there will always be someone with more. That passion would be grounded in people and would be grounded in the relationships you have with people and what they think of you when your time comes.
    And if you can gain the respect of those around you, and the passion and true love – and I have said this before- that I waited to 39 to get married because I had to wait that long to find someone where her happiness was more important than mine. And if nothing else, I hope that all of you can find that kind of passion and that kind of love in your life. Thank you.”
    Best regards!

    Reply
  236. What a beautiful cover, Jo, but I would expect it to be. I’ve loved all your covers. Reading about your northern winter makes me feel somewhat guilty that here in Southern California it’s almost like the late spring. Days in the 80’s – nights chilly though – and today we are getting a few drops of much needed rain. I grew up in New Jersey and remember those cold winters — don’t think I could do it again.
    Betty

    Reply
  237. What a beautiful cover, Jo, but I would expect it to be. I’ve loved all your covers. Reading about your northern winter makes me feel somewhat guilty that here in Southern California it’s almost like the late spring. Days in the 80’s – nights chilly though – and today we are getting a few drops of much needed rain. I grew up in New Jersey and remember those cold winters — don’t think I could do it again.
    Betty

    Reply
  238. What a beautiful cover, Jo, but I would expect it to be. I’ve loved all your covers. Reading about your northern winter makes me feel somewhat guilty that here in Southern California it’s almost like the late spring. Days in the 80’s – nights chilly though – and today we are getting a few drops of much needed rain. I grew up in New Jersey and remember those cold winters — don’t think I could do it again.
    Betty

    Reply
  239. What a beautiful cover, Jo, but I would expect it to be. I’ve loved all your covers. Reading about your northern winter makes me feel somewhat guilty that here in Southern California it’s almost like the late spring. Days in the 80’s – nights chilly though – and today we are getting a few drops of much needed rain. I grew up in New Jersey and remember those cold winters — don’t think I could do it again.
    Betty

    Reply
  240. What a beautiful cover, Jo, but I would expect it to be. I’ve loved all your covers. Reading about your northern winter makes me feel somewhat guilty that here in Southern California it’s almost like the late spring. Days in the 80’s – nights chilly though – and today we are getting a few drops of much needed rain. I grew up in New Jersey and remember those cold winters — don’t think I could do it again.
    Betty

    Reply

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