The Magic of the Ladew Topiary Gardens

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

Chinese Proverb: "If you want to be happy for a week, take a wife, if you want to be happy for a month kill your pig, but if you would be happy all your life, plant a garden."

I think that undervalues the wife and perhaps overvalues the pig <G>, but there is no question that gardens create happiness.  Which is how the Ladew Topiary Gardens came into being in Monkton, Maryland, about half an hour north of Baltimore.

Overview of the gardens

Harvey S. Ladew, creator of the gardens, was born in 1887 to a New York family rich enough to allow him to indulge his passions: fox hunting and topiary, which is the art of shaping live shrubs into ornamental shapes.  Unlike carving wood or stone, though, shrubs keep on growing so maintaining a topiary is a constant effort, even more than most gardens.  (See the fellow pruning on the right.) Pruning at Ladew

Harvey Ladew studied art, served in the US Army in WWI, and spent many happy winters fox hunting in the UK. But though he lived to nearly 90, knew many famous people, and lived a full, rich life, his lasting legacy is his topiary garden.  

Since we had an out of town visitor a week ago, we took her to Ladew and were able to enjoy the garden in its autumn glory.  There is a very European feel, not surprising given how much time Ladew spent in Europe.  He wanted two alleys to create long views, and they cross at the Great Bowl, where concerts are held by Ladew's oval swimming pool.  

Autumn in the gardenThere are fifteen garden "rooms" with themes such as the Rose Garden, the Keyhole Garden, and the Water Lily Garden.  There is also a café that was built in Harvey Ladew's old horse stables.  (The farm he bought to create his garden just happens to be right next to the local hunt club.  Yes, Maryland has them.)

Autumn hydrangea

Most of the pictures here were taken by me, except for the grand overview above, which was taken from the website.  I've visited Ladew a number of times over the years, including for such delights as the concert by a Scottish bagpipe band.  

Because topiary fascinates me, I borrowed from Ladew in my gardening book, The Wild Child. My heroine, Lady Meriel Grahame, is considered mad because of traumatic childhood experiences.  She doesn't talk and she spends her life creating gardens at the family estate she inherited. (Until the hero comes along, of course!)

Her gardens included topiary sculptures I'd seen at Ladew, including the famous fox hunting scene below.  (Like most Americans, I'm on the side of the fox and he seems to be gleefully escaping in the lower picture.  

The green hunt 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy fox escaping

 

Strolling through the gardens is delightful on a pleasant day.  There are small sculptures and benches where visitors can sit and commune with nature.  And this being a garden, the surroundings are constantly changing as old blossoms fade and new ones bloom.

 

 

 

Cherub rejoicing
Have you seen topiary gardens?  Even tried to create topiary yourself yourself?  Do you enjoy looking at topiary sculptures?  I'll give a copy of The Wild Child to someone who leaves a comment here about gardens you've loved in general, or about topiary in particular!

Brilliant berries at LadewMary Jo

 

 

 

 

115 thoughts on “The Magic of the Ladew Topiary Gardens”

  1. I love topiary gardens and just gardens in general. Years ago I went to Longwood Gardens about 30 miles from Philadelphia and saw lovely geometric shapes, animals and even a table and chair set from which I wanted to have tea and cookies.
    When I saw Blenheim, I enjoyed seeing the maze carved out of shrubs. It’s so beautifully uniform and perfect.
    Thanks for displaying photos of Ladew. I hope to see that one, too.

    Reply
  2. I love topiary gardens and just gardens in general. Years ago I went to Longwood Gardens about 30 miles from Philadelphia and saw lovely geometric shapes, animals and even a table and chair set from which I wanted to have tea and cookies.
    When I saw Blenheim, I enjoyed seeing the maze carved out of shrubs. It’s so beautifully uniform and perfect.
    Thanks for displaying photos of Ladew. I hope to see that one, too.

    Reply
  3. I love topiary gardens and just gardens in general. Years ago I went to Longwood Gardens about 30 miles from Philadelphia and saw lovely geometric shapes, animals and even a table and chair set from which I wanted to have tea and cookies.
    When I saw Blenheim, I enjoyed seeing the maze carved out of shrubs. It’s so beautifully uniform and perfect.
    Thanks for displaying photos of Ladew. I hope to see that one, too.

    Reply
  4. I love topiary gardens and just gardens in general. Years ago I went to Longwood Gardens about 30 miles from Philadelphia and saw lovely geometric shapes, animals and even a table and chair set from which I wanted to have tea and cookies.
    When I saw Blenheim, I enjoyed seeing the maze carved out of shrubs. It’s so beautifully uniform and perfect.
    Thanks for displaying photos of Ladew. I hope to see that one, too.

    Reply
  5. I love topiary gardens and just gardens in general. Years ago I went to Longwood Gardens about 30 miles from Philadelphia and saw lovely geometric shapes, animals and even a table and chair set from which I wanted to have tea and cookies.
    When I saw Blenheim, I enjoyed seeing the maze carved out of shrubs. It’s so beautifully uniform and perfect.
    Thanks for displaying photos of Ladew. I hope to see that one, too.

    Reply
  6. Patricia, Longwood Gardens is really lovely for sure. I love British mazes as well as topiary. If you live around Philadelphia, it’s not impossibly far down to Ladew. Worth scheduling some lovely day. By this time of the year, that probably wouldn’t be before spring. *G*

    Reply
  7. Patricia, Longwood Gardens is really lovely for sure. I love British mazes as well as topiary. If you live around Philadelphia, it’s not impossibly far down to Ladew. Worth scheduling some lovely day. By this time of the year, that probably wouldn’t be before spring. *G*

    Reply
  8. Patricia, Longwood Gardens is really lovely for sure. I love British mazes as well as topiary. If you live around Philadelphia, it’s not impossibly far down to Ladew. Worth scheduling some lovely day. By this time of the year, that probably wouldn’t be before spring. *G*

    Reply
  9. Patricia, Longwood Gardens is really lovely for sure. I love British mazes as well as topiary. If you live around Philadelphia, it’s not impossibly far down to Ladew. Worth scheduling some lovely day. By this time of the year, that probably wouldn’t be before spring. *G*

    Reply
  10. Patricia, Longwood Gardens is really lovely for sure. I love British mazes as well as topiary. If you live around Philadelphia, it’s not impossibly far down to Ladew. Worth scheduling some lovely day. By this time of the year, that probably wouldn’t be before spring. *G*

    Reply
  11. I have seen topiary and appreciated it, but I am not sure where.(?)
    I have mentioned “my” public gardens at other times on this site. I am fairly sure that the Missouri Botanical gardens don’t have a topiary display. They do have many formal gardens, many regional displays; hot house displays and outdoor displays at Shaw’s Garden. My own favorite appears to be a “wilderness.”
    Columbia, Missouri, where I now live, also has a public garden. Shelter Gardens (entirely outdoors) is on a much smaller scale than Shaw’s garden; it has several display areas, two carp pools—one with a waterfall , a rose garden, and a scented garden, but no topiary. Again, my favorite parts are the wilderness areas.

    Reply
  12. I have seen topiary and appreciated it, but I am not sure where.(?)
    I have mentioned “my” public gardens at other times on this site. I am fairly sure that the Missouri Botanical gardens don’t have a topiary display. They do have many formal gardens, many regional displays; hot house displays and outdoor displays at Shaw’s Garden. My own favorite appears to be a “wilderness.”
    Columbia, Missouri, where I now live, also has a public garden. Shelter Gardens (entirely outdoors) is on a much smaller scale than Shaw’s garden; it has several display areas, two carp pools—one with a waterfall , a rose garden, and a scented garden, but no topiary. Again, my favorite parts are the wilderness areas.

    Reply
  13. I have seen topiary and appreciated it, but I am not sure where.(?)
    I have mentioned “my” public gardens at other times on this site. I am fairly sure that the Missouri Botanical gardens don’t have a topiary display. They do have many formal gardens, many regional displays; hot house displays and outdoor displays at Shaw’s Garden. My own favorite appears to be a “wilderness.”
    Columbia, Missouri, where I now live, also has a public garden. Shelter Gardens (entirely outdoors) is on a much smaller scale than Shaw’s garden; it has several display areas, two carp pools—one with a waterfall , a rose garden, and a scented garden, but no topiary. Again, my favorite parts are the wilderness areas.

    Reply
  14. I have seen topiary and appreciated it, but I am not sure where.(?)
    I have mentioned “my” public gardens at other times on this site. I am fairly sure that the Missouri Botanical gardens don’t have a topiary display. They do have many formal gardens, many regional displays; hot house displays and outdoor displays at Shaw’s Garden. My own favorite appears to be a “wilderness.”
    Columbia, Missouri, where I now live, also has a public garden. Shelter Gardens (entirely outdoors) is on a much smaller scale than Shaw’s garden; it has several display areas, two carp pools—one with a waterfall , a rose garden, and a scented garden, but no topiary. Again, my favorite parts are the wilderness areas.

    Reply
  15. I have seen topiary and appreciated it, but I am not sure where.(?)
    I have mentioned “my” public gardens at other times on this site. I am fairly sure that the Missouri Botanical gardens don’t have a topiary display. They do have many formal gardens, many regional displays; hot house displays and outdoor displays at Shaw’s Garden. My own favorite appears to be a “wilderness.”
    Columbia, Missouri, where I now live, also has a public garden. Shelter Gardens (entirely outdoors) is on a much smaller scale than Shaw’s garden; it has several display areas, two carp pools—one with a waterfall , a rose garden, and a scented garden, but no topiary. Again, my favorite parts are the wilderness areas.

    Reply
  16. Lovely post, Mary Jo. I’m not a huge fan of topiary, but I do find it fun. I love hedges and mazes though, but like Sue above, my favorite kind of garden is a wilderness, or maybe a cottage-style garden. Next time I visit the UK and Europe I plan to see some of the famous gardens there — I’ve never been to Sissinghurst, for instance, and if I go to France I want to visit Monet’s garden.

    Reply
  17. Lovely post, Mary Jo. I’m not a huge fan of topiary, but I do find it fun. I love hedges and mazes though, but like Sue above, my favorite kind of garden is a wilderness, or maybe a cottage-style garden. Next time I visit the UK and Europe I plan to see some of the famous gardens there — I’ve never been to Sissinghurst, for instance, and if I go to France I want to visit Monet’s garden.

    Reply
  18. Lovely post, Mary Jo. I’m not a huge fan of topiary, but I do find it fun. I love hedges and mazes though, but like Sue above, my favorite kind of garden is a wilderness, or maybe a cottage-style garden. Next time I visit the UK and Europe I plan to see some of the famous gardens there — I’ve never been to Sissinghurst, for instance, and if I go to France I want to visit Monet’s garden.

    Reply
  19. Lovely post, Mary Jo. I’m not a huge fan of topiary, but I do find it fun. I love hedges and mazes though, but like Sue above, my favorite kind of garden is a wilderness, or maybe a cottage-style garden. Next time I visit the UK and Europe I plan to see some of the famous gardens there — I’ve never been to Sissinghurst, for instance, and if I go to France I want to visit Monet’s garden.

    Reply
  20. Lovely post, Mary Jo. I’m not a huge fan of topiary, but I do find it fun. I love hedges and mazes though, but like Sue above, my favorite kind of garden is a wilderness, or maybe a cottage-style garden. Next time I visit the UK and Europe I plan to see some of the famous gardens there — I’ve never been to Sissinghurst, for instance, and if I go to France I want to visit Monet’s garden.

    Reply
  21. I live in an area that is largely rural with small towns and villages scattered here and there. Topiary is not generally a “thing” here, but when I would travel to see family I would routinely pass a home with a pair of unique “gate posts”. They consisted of a pair of square brick bases about 4 feet tall each topped with a globe shaped finial created from a small shrub. These were always perfectly groomed every time I passed, which I found impressive.

    Reply
  22. I live in an area that is largely rural with small towns and villages scattered here and there. Topiary is not generally a “thing” here, but when I would travel to see family I would routinely pass a home with a pair of unique “gate posts”. They consisted of a pair of square brick bases about 4 feet tall each topped with a globe shaped finial created from a small shrub. These were always perfectly groomed every time I passed, which I found impressive.

    Reply
  23. I live in an area that is largely rural with small towns and villages scattered here and there. Topiary is not generally a “thing” here, but when I would travel to see family I would routinely pass a home with a pair of unique “gate posts”. They consisted of a pair of square brick bases about 4 feet tall each topped with a globe shaped finial created from a small shrub. These were always perfectly groomed every time I passed, which I found impressive.

    Reply
  24. I live in an area that is largely rural with small towns and villages scattered here and there. Topiary is not generally a “thing” here, but when I would travel to see family I would routinely pass a home with a pair of unique “gate posts”. They consisted of a pair of square brick bases about 4 feet tall each topped with a globe shaped finial created from a small shrub. These were always perfectly groomed every time I passed, which I found impressive.

    Reply
  25. I live in an area that is largely rural with small towns and villages scattered here and there. Topiary is not generally a “thing” here, but when I would travel to see family I would routinely pass a home with a pair of unique “gate posts”. They consisted of a pair of square brick bases about 4 feet tall each topped with a globe shaped finial created from a small shrub. These were always perfectly groomed every time I passed, which I found impressive.

    Reply
  26. Sue McCormick, I’ve visited the Missouri Botanical gardens and they’re magnificent, but I don’t recall seeing any topiary. I think it’s more a European thing, so relatively rare here. I agree with you that a well run wilderness is a delight to visit. *G*

    Reply
  27. Sue McCormick, I’ve visited the Missouri Botanical gardens and they’re magnificent, but I don’t recall seeing any topiary. I think it’s more a European thing, so relatively rare here. I agree with you that a well run wilderness is a delight to visit. *G*

    Reply
  28. Sue McCormick, I’ve visited the Missouri Botanical gardens and they’re magnificent, but I don’t recall seeing any topiary. I think it’s more a European thing, so relatively rare here. I agree with you that a well run wilderness is a delight to visit. *G*

    Reply
  29. Sue McCormick, I’ve visited the Missouri Botanical gardens and they’re magnificent, but I don’t recall seeing any topiary. I think it’s more a European thing, so relatively rare here. I agree with you that a well run wilderness is a delight to visit. *G*

    Reply
  30. Sue McCormick, I’ve visited the Missouri Botanical gardens and they’re magnificent, but I don’t recall seeing any topiary. I think it’s more a European thing, so relatively rare here. I agree with you that a well run wilderness is a delight to visit. *G*

    Reply
  31. Claire, keeping topiary under control requires major effort, especially in the spring growing season when they fling out shoots overnight. In an area where topiary is rare, I can imagine how striking those “gate posts” are.

    Reply
  32. Claire, keeping topiary under control requires major effort, especially in the spring growing season when they fling out shoots overnight. In an area where topiary is rare, I can imagine how striking those “gate posts” are.

    Reply
  33. Claire, keeping topiary under control requires major effort, especially in the spring growing season when they fling out shoots overnight. In an area where topiary is rare, I can imagine how striking those “gate posts” are.

    Reply
  34. Claire, keeping topiary under control requires major effort, especially in the spring growing season when they fling out shoots overnight. In an area where topiary is rare, I can imagine how striking those “gate posts” are.

    Reply
  35. Claire, keeping topiary under control requires major effort, especially in the spring growing season when they fling out shoots overnight. In an area where topiary is rare, I can imagine how striking those “gate posts” are.

    Reply
  36. When I was in Victoria, BC, last year, we passed on the mammoth Butchart Gardens in favor of the varied smaller gardens that complement historic homes. Terrific choices, from old-fashioned roses to formal beds to wilderness. Yes, there was topiary, too. Nice experience spread out over several days.

    Reply
  37. When I was in Victoria, BC, last year, we passed on the mammoth Butchart Gardens in favor of the varied smaller gardens that complement historic homes. Terrific choices, from old-fashioned roses to formal beds to wilderness. Yes, there was topiary, too. Nice experience spread out over several days.

    Reply
  38. When I was in Victoria, BC, last year, we passed on the mammoth Butchart Gardens in favor of the varied smaller gardens that complement historic homes. Terrific choices, from old-fashioned roses to formal beds to wilderness. Yes, there was topiary, too. Nice experience spread out over several days.

    Reply
  39. When I was in Victoria, BC, last year, we passed on the mammoth Butchart Gardens in favor of the varied smaller gardens that complement historic homes. Terrific choices, from old-fashioned roses to formal beds to wilderness. Yes, there was topiary, too. Nice experience spread out over several days.

    Reply
  40. When I was in Victoria, BC, last year, we passed on the mammoth Butchart Gardens in favor of the varied smaller gardens that complement historic homes. Terrific choices, from old-fashioned roses to formal beds to wilderness. Yes, there was topiary, too. Nice experience spread out over several days.

    Reply
  41. I love topiary gardens but wouldn’t like to have one myself – as you said, so much work! I think one of the most famous in the UK is Levens Hall, although I haven’t been there myself ( http://www.levenshall.co.uk/ ). Wonderful to see the fox and hounds in your photos (and yes, I’m glad the fox is getting away). I would like to have a knot garden, at least then it’s mostly just straight edges so not quite so difficult to create.

    Reply
  42. I love topiary gardens but wouldn’t like to have one myself – as you said, so much work! I think one of the most famous in the UK is Levens Hall, although I haven’t been there myself ( http://www.levenshall.co.uk/ ). Wonderful to see the fox and hounds in your photos (and yes, I’m glad the fox is getting away). I would like to have a knot garden, at least then it’s mostly just straight edges so not quite so difficult to create.

    Reply
  43. I love topiary gardens but wouldn’t like to have one myself – as you said, so much work! I think one of the most famous in the UK is Levens Hall, although I haven’t been there myself ( http://www.levenshall.co.uk/ ). Wonderful to see the fox and hounds in your photos (and yes, I’m glad the fox is getting away). I would like to have a knot garden, at least then it’s mostly just straight edges so not quite so difficult to create.

    Reply
  44. I love topiary gardens but wouldn’t like to have one myself – as you said, so much work! I think one of the most famous in the UK is Levens Hall, although I haven’t been there myself ( http://www.levenshall.co.uk/ ). Wonderful to see the fox and hounds in your photos (and yes, I’m glad the fox is getting away). I would like to have a knot garden, at least then it’s mostly just straight edges so not quite so difficult to create.

    Reply
  45. I love topiary gardens but wouldn’t like to have one myself – as you said, so much work! I think one of the most famous in the UK is Levens Hall, although I haven’t been there myself ( http://www.levenshall.co.uk/ ). Wonderful to see the fox and hounds in your photos (and yes, I’m glad the fox is getting away). I would like to have a knot garden, at least then it’s mostly just straight edges so not quite so difficult to create.

    Reply
  46. I think I like the topiary best when its getting away from the gardeners, like your fluffy fox. He seems to be escaping the clippers as much as the hounds. Close shaving of plant life doesn’t really do it for me. Except, of course, in this case, where the whole collection is a work of art adding up to much more than a few tortured bushes.
    I love the idea of ‘rooms’ in a garden, too. Did you go to Hidcote when you were in England, Mary Jo? That is entirely designed as a series of individual but coherent spaces – with one eye on the distant vista of course. It was created by Lawrence Johnson, a Paris-born American, in the last century. He made it his life’s work. It is very special, even magical. (Come to England and I’ll take you there, she tempted.)
    The Wild Child somehow hasn’t come my way before. Sounds just my cup of tea. Lovely.

    Reply
  47. I think I like the topiary best when its getting away from the gardeners, like your fluffy fox. He seems to be escaping the clippers as much as the hounds. Close shaving of plant life doesn’t really do it for me. Except, of course, in this case, where the whole collection is a work of art adding up to much more than a few tortured bushes.
    I love the idea of ‘rooms’ in a garden, too. Did you go to Hidcote when you were in England, Mary Jo? That is entirely designed as a series of individual but coherent spaces – with one eye on the distant vista of course. It was created by Lawrence Johnson, a Paris-born American, in the last century. He made it his life’s work. It is very special, even magical. (Come to England and I’ll take you there, she tempted.)
    The Wild Child somehow hasn’t come my way before. Sounds just my cup of tea. Lovely.

    Reply
  48. I think I like the topiary best when its getting away from the gardeners, like your fluffy fox. He seems to be escaping the clippers as much as the hounds. Close shaving of plant life doesn’t really do it for me. Except, of course, in this case, where the whole collection is a work of art adding up to much more than a few tortured bushes.
    I love the idea of ‘rooms’ in a garden, too. Did you go to Hidcote when you were in England, Mary Jo? That is entirely designed as a series of individual but coherent spaces – with one eye on the distant vista of course. It was created by Lawrence Johnson, a Paris-born American, in the last century. He made it his life’s work. It is very special, even magical. (Come to England and I’ll take you there, she tempted.)
    The Wild Child somehow hasn’t come my way before. Sounds just my cup of tea. Lovely.

    Reply
  49. I think I like the topiary best when its getting away from the gardeners, like your fluffy fox. He seems to be escaping the clippers as much as the hounds. Close shaving of plant life doesn’t really do it for me. Except, of course, in this case, where the whole collection is a work of art adding up to much more than a few tortured bushes.
    I love the idea of ‘rooms’ in a garden, too. Did you go to Hidcote when you were in England, Mary Jo? That is entirely designed as a series of individual but coherent spaces – with one eye on the distant vista of course. It was created by Lawrence Johnson, a Paris-born American, in the last century. He made it his life’s work. It is very special, even magical. (Come to England and I’ll take you there, she tempted.)
    The Wild Child somehow hasn’t come my way before. Sounds just my cup of tea. Lovely.

    Reply
  50. I think I like the topiary best when its getting away from the gardeners, like your fluffy fox. He seems to be escaping the clippers as much as the hounds. Close shaving of plant life doesn’t really do it for me. Except, of course, in this case, where the whole collection is a work of art adding up to much more than a few tortured bushes.
    I love the idea of ‘rooms’ in a garden, too. Did you go to Hidcote when you were in England, Mary Jo? That is entirely designed as a series of individual but coherent spaces – with one eye on the distant vista of course. It was created by Lawrence Johnson, a Paris-born American, in the last century. He made it his life’s work. It is very special, even magical. (Come to England and I’ll take you there, she tempted.)
    The Wild Child somehow hasn’t come my way before. Sounds just my cup of tea. Lovely.

    Reply
  51. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Ladew, since I do visit a lot of gardens, and it’s not that far from where I live. I’m definitely going to visit. I’ve never done topiary but I enjoy looking at it. I’ve enjoyed Longwood Gardens, and one of my favorites is the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens in Westchester County, NY. No topiary, but great art as well as lovely gardens.

    Reply
  52. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Ladew, since I do visit a lot of gardens, and it’s not that far from where I live. I’m definitely going to visit. I’ve never done topiary but I enjoy looking at it. I’ve enjoyed Longwood Gardens, and one of my favorites is the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens in Westchester County, NY. No topiary, but great art as well as lovely gardens.

    Reply
  53. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Ladew, since I do visit a lot of gardens, and it’s not that far from where I live. I’m definitely going to visit. I’ve never done topiary but I enjoy looking at it. I’ve enjoyed Longwood Gardens, and one of my favorites is the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens in Westchester County, NY. No topiary, but great art as well as lovely gardens.

    Reply
  54. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Ladew, since I do visit a lot of gardens, and it’s not that far from where I live. I’m definitely going to visit. I’ve never done topiary but I enjoy looking at it. I’ve enjoyed Longwood Gardens, and one of my favorites is the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens in Westchester County, NY. No topiary, but great art as well as lovely gardens.

    Reply
  55. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of Ladew, since I do visit a lot of gardens, and it’s not that far from where I live. I’m definitely going to visit. I’ve never done topiary but I enjoy looking at it. I’ve enjoyed Longwood Gardens, and one of my favorites is the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens in Westchester County, NY. No topiary, but great art as well as lovely gardens.

    Reply
  56. Ladew sound wonderful, and it is probably close enough for me to do a trip sometime. I think the garden that most fascinated me was Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden. He collected seeds from all over (mainly by exchanging his seeds for someone else’s). The guide said that he had figured out how to plant lettuce in February in hot beds (mini-greenhouses) and then continue to plant various varieties until late October or early November, each variety suited to the changes from spring to summer to fall.

    Reply
  57. Ladew sound wonderful, and it is probably close enough for me to do a trip sometime. I think the garden that most fascinated me was Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden. He collected seeds from all over (mainly by exchanging his seeds for someone else’s). The guide said that he had figured out how to plant lettuce in February in hot beds (mini-greenhouses) and then continue to plant various varieties until late October or early November, each variety suited to the changes from spring to summer to fall.

    Reply
  58. Ladew sound wonderful, and it is probably close enough for me to do a trip sometime. I think the garden that most fascinated me was Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden. He collected seeds from all over (mainly by exchanging his seeds for someone else’s). The guide said that he had figured out how to plant lettuce in February in hot beds (mini-greenhouses) and then continue to plant various varieties until late October or early November, each variety suited to the changes from spring to summer to fall.

    Reply
  59. Ladew sound wonderful, and it is probably close enough for me to do a trip sometime. I think the garden that most fascinated me was Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden. He collected seeds from all over (mainly by exchanging his seeds for someone else’s). The guide said that he had figured out how to plant lettuce in February in hot beds (mini-greenhouses) and then continue to plant various varieties until late October or early November, each variety suited to the changes from spring to summer to fall.

    Reply
  60. Ladew sound wonderful, and it is probably close enough for me to do a trip sometime. I think the garden that most fascinated me was Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden. He collected seeds from all over (mainly by exchanging his seeds for someone else’s). The guide said that he had figured out how to plant lettuce in February in hot beds (mini-greenhouses) and then continue to plant various varieties until late October or early November, each variety suited to the changes from spring to summer to fall.

    Reply
  61. I heard of the Ladew Gardens only about a month ago and am planning on visiting, though probably not until spring now. Monet’s Garden was wonderful. I saw it, about this time 2 years ago, and was amazed at all the colorful flowers still in bloom. It must be beautiful in the spring.
    Topiary intrigues me. Like in any carved sculpture, I am in awe at the ability to get the proportions right on a large scale.

    Reply
  62. I heard of the Ladew Gardens only about a month ago and am planning on visiting, though probably not until spring now. Monet’s Garden was wonderful. I saw it, about this time 2 years ago, and was amazed at all the colorful flowers still in bloom. It must be beautiful in the spring.
    Topiary intrigues me. Like in any carved sculpture, I am in awe at the ability to get the proportions right on a large scale.

    Reply
  63. I heard of the Ladew Gardens only about a month ago and am planning on visiting, though probably not until spring now. Monet’s Garden was wonderful. I saw it, about this time 2 years ago, and was amazed at all the colorful flowers still in bloom. It must be beautiful in the spring.
    Topiary intrigues me. Like in any carved sculpture, I am in awe at the ability to get the proportions right on a large scale.

    Reply
  64. I heard of the Ladew Gardens only about a month ago and am planning on visiting, though probably not until spring now. Monet’s Garden was wonderful. I saw it, about this time 2 years ago, and was amazed at all the colorful flowers still in bloom. It must be beautiful in the spring.
    Topiary intrigues me. Like in any carved sculpture, I am in awe at the ability to get the proportions right on a large scale.

    Reply
  65. I heard of the Ladew Gardens only about a month ago and am planning on visiting, though probably not until spring now. Monet’s Garden was wonderful. I saw it, about this time 2 years ago, and was amazed at all the colorful flowers still in bloom. It must be beautiful in the spring.
    Topiary intrigues me. Like in any carved sculpture, I am in awe at the ability to get the proportions right on a large scale.

    Reply
  66. Sounds gorgeous, Mary M! I’ve been to Victoria several times, but there has never been enough time to get to the famous Butchart Gardens. Like you, I’d probably love the gardens of the historic homes. More human scale.

    Reply
  67. Sounds gorgeous, Mary M! I’ve been to Victoria several times, but there has never been enough time to get to the famous Butchart Gardens. Like you, I’d probably love the gardens of the historic homes. More human scale.

    Reply
  68. Sounds gorgeous, Mary M! I’ve been to Victoria several times, but there has never been enough time to get to the famous Butchart Gardens. Like you, I’d probably love the gardens of the historic homes. More human scale.

    Reply
  69. Sounds gorgeous, Mary M! I’ve been to Victoria several times, but there has never been enough time to get to the famous Butchart Gardens. Like you, I’d probably love the gardens of the historic homes. More human scale.

    Reply
  70. Sounds gorgeous, Mary M! I’ve been to Victoria several times, but there has never been enough time to get to the famous Butchart Gardens. Like you, I’d probably love the gardens of the historic homes. More human scale.

    Reply
  71. Levens Hall looks AMAZING! I’ve never heard of it, but clearly I need to visit next time I’m near the Lake District. My own personal preference run to a natural garden style, but I am a very good appreciator of those who create splendid works like topiary and knot gardens.

    Reply
  72. Levens Hall looks AMAZING! I’ve never heard of it, but clearly I need to visit next time I’m near the Lake District. My own personal preference run to a natural garden style, but I am a very good appreciator of those who create splendid works like topiary and knot gardens.

    Reply
  73. Levens Hall looks AMAZING! I’ve never heard of it, but clearly I need to visit next time I’m near the Lake District. My own personal preference run to a natural garden style, but I am a very good appreciator of those who create splendid works like topiary and knot gardens.

    Reply
  74. Levens Hall looks AMAZING! I’ve never heard of it, but clearly I need to visit next time I’m near the Lake District. My own personal preference run to a natural garden style, but I am a very good appreciator of those who create splendid works like topiary and knot gardens.

    Reply
  75. Levens Hall looks AMAZING! I’ve never heard of it, but clearly I need to visit next time I’m near the Lake District. My own personal preference run to a natural garden style, but I am a very good appreciator of those who create splendid works like topiary and knot gardens.

    Reply
  76. Jenny–LOL about the fox escaping the clippers. *G* He seems to be laughing to me. Garden rooms are charming as they open into different kinds of spaces. My heroine in The Wild Child had a moon garden, among other things, and she bonsai-ed some of her hedges. Tempt away! Hidcote sounds lovely. When I lived in Oxford, I visited a number of great house gardens, but the UK has so MANY of them!

    Reply
  77. Jenny–LOL about the fox escaping the clippers. *G* He seems to be laughing to me. Garden rooms are charming as they open into different kinds of spaces. My heroine in The Wild Child had a moon garden, among other things, and she bonsai-ed some of her hedges. Tempt away! Hidcote sounds lovely. When I lived in Oxford, I visited a number of great house gardens, but the UK has so MANY of them!

    Reply
  78. Jenny–LOL about the fox escaping the clippers. *G* He seems to be laughing to me. Garden rooms are charming as they open into different kinds of spaces. My heroine in The Wild Child had a moon garden, among other things, and she bonsai-ed some of her hedges. Tempt away! Hidcote sounds lovely. When I lived in Oxford, I visited a number of great house gardens, but the UK has so MANY of them!

    Reply
  79. Jenny–LOL about the fox escaping the clippers. *G* He seems to be laughing to me. Garden rooms are charming as they open into different kinds of spaces. My heroine in The Wild Child had a moon garden, among other things, and she bonsai-ed some of her hedges. Tempt away! Hidcote sounds lovely. When I lived in Oxford, I visited a number of great house gardens, but the UK has so MANY of them!

    Reply
  80. Jenny–LOL about the fox escaping the clippers. *G* He seems to be laughing to me. Garden rooms are charming as they open into different kinds of spaces. My heroine in The Wild Child had a moon garden, among other things, and she bonsai-ed some of her hedges. Tempt away! Hidcote sounds lovely. When I lived in Oxford, I visited a number of great house gardens, but the UK has so MANY of them!

    Reply
  81. Karin–
    Gardens are one the great opportunities for personal creativity, I think. I’ve seen Longwood but not not the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens. Sculpture and greenery go so well together.

    Reply
  82. Karin–
    Gardens are one the great opportunities for personal creativity, I think. I’ve seen Longwood but not not the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens. Sculpture and greenery go so well together.

    Reply
  83. Karin–
    Gardens are one the great opportunities for personal creativity, I think. I’ve seen Longwood but not not the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens. Sculpture and greenery go so well together.

    Reply
  84. Karin–
    Gardens are one the great opportunities for personal creativity, I think. I’ve seen Longwood but not not the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens. Sculpture and greenery go so well together.

    Reply
  85. Karin–
    Gardens are one the great opportunities for personal creativity, I think. I’ve seen Longwood but not not the Donald Kendall Sculpture Gardens. Sculpture and greenery go so well together.

    Reply
  86. Shannon–Thomas Jefferson was your basic Renaissance genius, so it doesn’t surprise me to hear about his lettuces! A lot of the British great house have greenhouses, and it makes sense he’d have them at Monticello for experimenting and salads both. *G*

    Reply
  87. Shannon–Thomas Jefferson was your basic Renaissance genius, so it doesn’t surprise me to hear about his lettuces! A lot of the British great house have greenhouses, and it makes sense he’d have them at Monticello for experimenting and salads both. *G*

    Reply
  88. Shannon–Thomas Jefferson was your basic Renaissance genius, so it doesn’t surprise me to hear about his lettuces! A lot of the British great house have greenhouses, and it makes sense he’d have them at Monticello for experimenting and salads both. *G*

    Reply
  89. Shannon–Thomas Jefferson was your basic Renaissance genius, so it doesn’t surprise me to hear about his lettuces! A lot of the British great house have greenhouses, and it makes sense he’d have them at Monticello for experimenting and salads both. *G*

    Reply
  90. Shannon–Thomas Jefferson was your basic Renaissance genius, so it doesn’t surprise me to hear about his lettuces! A lot of the British great house have greenhouses, and it makes sense he’d have them at Monticello for experimenting and salads both. *G*

    Reply
  91. Monet’s garden! That is definitely one I intend to see some day, Alison Y. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the Ladew Gardens. I think shaping is done with various techniques such as rope lines fastened in place to show how far to cut. Once the shape is well established, which surely takes years, maintenance is probably simpler. But still challenging!

    Reply
  92. Monet’s garden! That is definitely one I intend to see some day, Alison Y. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the Ladew Gardens. I think shaping is done with various techniques such as rope lines fastened in place to show how far to cut. Once the shape is well established, which surely takes years, maintenance is probably simpler. But still challenging!

    Reply
  93. Monet’s garden! That is definitely one I intend to see some day, Alison Y. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the Ladew Gardens. I think shaping is done with various techniques such as rope lines fastened in place to show how far to cut. Once the shape is well established, which surely takes years, maintenance is probably simpler. But still challenging!

    Reply
  94. Monet’s garden! That is definitely one I intend to see some day, Alison Y. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the Ladew Gardens. I think shaping is done with various techniques such as rope lines fastened in place to show how far to cut. Once the shape is well established, which surely takes years, maintenance is probably simpler. But still challenging!

    Reply
  95. Monet’s garden! That is definitely one I intend to see some day, Alison Y. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with the Ladew Gardens. I think shaping is done with various techniques such as rope lines fastened in place to show how far to cut. Once the shape is well established, which surely takes years, maintenance is probably simpler. But still challenging!

    Reply
  96. It’s been closed for renovation for the past couple of years, so I can’t wait to see what they’ve done when it reopens next spring. It’s owned by the Pepsi corporation, and admission is free, but they don’t advertise, so it’s fairly unknown and never crowded.

    Reply
  97. It’s been closed for renovation for the past couple of years, so I can’t wait to see what they’ve done when it reopens next spring. It’s owned by the Pepsi corporation, and admission is free, but they don’t advertise, so it’s fairly unknown and never crowded.

    Reply
  98. It’s been closed for renovation for the past couple of years, so I can’t wait to see what they’ve done when it reopens next spring. It’s owned by the Pepsi corporation, and admission is free, but they don’t advertise, so it’s fairly unknown and never crowded.

    Reply
  99. It’s been closed for renovation for the past couple of years, so I can’t wait to see what they’ve done when it reopens next spring. It’s owned by the Pepsi corporation, and admission is free, but they don’t advertise, so it’s fairly unknown and never crowded.

    Reply
  100. It’s been closed for renovation for the past couple of years, so I can’t wait to see what they’ve done when it reopens next spring. It’s owned by the Pepsi corporation, and admission is free, but they don’t advertise, so it’s fairly unknown and never crowded.

    Reply
  101. A gorgeous blog, Mary Jo, and I love the topiary fox! He does indeed look like he’s having great fun outwitting the hunters. I have to say that on the whole, I’m not a huge fan of topiary shapes. I like nature to be natural, depending on color, texture and the natural form of the planting to capture the eye. The rest of the gardens look magnificent! What a treat to sit there and listen to Scottish bagpipes!

    Reply
  102. A gorgeous blog, Mary Jo, and I love the topiary fox! He does indeed look like he’s having great fun outwitting the hunters. I have to say that on the whole, I’m not a huge fan of topiary shapes. I like nature to be natural, depending on color, texture and the natural form of the planting to capture the eye. The rest of the gardens look magnificent! What a treat to sit there and listen to Scottish bagpipes!

    Reply
  103. A gorgeous blog, Mary Jo, and I love the topiary fox! He does indeed look like he’s having great fun outwitting the hunters. I have to say that on the whole, I’m not a huge fan of topiary shapes. I like nature to be natural, depending on color, texture and the natural form of the planting to capture the eye. The rest of the gardens look magnificent! What a treat to sit there and listen to Scottish bagpipes!

    Reply
  104. A gorgeous blog, Mary Jo, and I love the topiary fox! He does indeed look like he’s having great fun outwitting the hunters. I have to say that on the whole, I’m not a huge fan of topiary shapes. I like nature to be natural, depending on color, texture and the natural form of the planting to capture the eye. The rest of the gardens look magnificent! What a treat to sit there and listen to Scottish bagpipes!

    Reply
  105. A gorgeous blog, Mary Jo, and I love the topiary fox! He does indeed look like he’s having great fun outwitting the hunters. I have to say that on the whole, I’m not a huge fan of topiary shapes. I like nature to be natural, depending on color, texture and the natural form of the planting to capture the eye. The rest of the gardens look magnificent! What a treat to sit there and listen to Scottish bagpipes!

    Reply
  106. I love visiting Butchert Gardens when we visit Vancouver Island. The colors are overwhelming. I like toparies and mazes but I like the more natural cottage gardens best.

    Reply
  107. I love visiting Butchert Gardens when we visit Vancouver Island. The colors are overwhelming. I like toparies and mazes but I like the more natural cottage gardens best.

    Reply
  108. I love visiting Butchert Gardens when we visit Vancouver Island. The colors are overwhelming. I like toparies and mazes but I like the more natural cottage gardens best.

    Reply
  109. I love visiting Butchert Gardens when we visit Vancouver Island. The colors are overwhelming. I like toparies and mazes but I like the more natural cottage gardens best.

    Reply
  110. I love visiting Butchert Gardens when we visit Vancouver Island. The colors are overwhelming. I like toparies and mazes but I like the more natural cottage gardens best.

    Reply

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