The Magic of Standing Stones

FirstChristina here. There are certain places that feel timeless and really evoke the past, and stone circles, standing stones and cairns always have that effect on me. What is it about them that draws us in and has fascinated people for so long? Perhaps it’s the sheer mystery of the how and why? Because we can’t be sure exactly what they were used for, they make our imagination run riot. It’s easy to picture ceremonies honouring the sun, moon or stars, perhaps featuring druids in flowing white robes, chanting and dancing. Who knows if that ever actually happened, but it’s a nice fantasy.

FourIn the past couple of weeks, I’ve been lucky enough to come across two places featuring such ancient monuments, and each time I found myself spellbound. They have a certain aura and just being among them gives us a feeling of awe and of stepping back in time. Most such monuments were built thousands of years ago, but they are so well constructed they’ve survived and stood the test of time. It’s mind-boggling when you consider the enormous amounts of work and manpower that must have been required, and the primitive tools in use back then. I never tire of watching programmes with theories as to how it was accomplished.

Stonehenge Sumit Surai  CC BY-SA 4.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby-sa4.0  via Wikimedia Commons

Sumit Surai, Wikimedia Commons

The most famous one is probably Stonehenge, and I was fortunate enough to visit that back in the early 1980s when you were still allowed to wander among the stones and touch them. It was a wonderful experience! For obvious reasons, that’s no longer possible, but they are still a majestic sight when you view them from slightly further away. It’s easy to see why this has always been such a special place; magical even. And I find it really interesting that our ancestors paid such detailed attention to the sun’s movements that they could align the stones so precisely.

I also used to regularly visit the stone circle at Avebury in Wiltshire, as I lived not too far from there. It is the largest megalithic one in the world and originally it had about 100 stones. The circle is so big it encompasses part of the village, and each stone is gigantic. They make you feel small and insignificant, perhaps the way ancient people felt about the skies above them and the natural phenomena they couldn’t explain?

K oneThen there are sites like the Carnac stones in Brittany, France, and the Ring of Brodgar on the Orkney Islands. I haven’t visited either but would really love to.

They don't have to be huge to be impressive though. Recently, a friend took me to a slightly smaller site, Nether Largie standing stones at Kilmartin in Argyll, Scotland. These consist of five large stones – two sets almost like goal posts and one placed in the middle to roughly form the shape of an X. They might be marking where “the moon rises and sets at key points in its cycle”, according to the sign at the entrance of the site. They could have been raised as long ago as 3,200 years, which is amazing. The sign went on to say that someone “… believed these stones offered protection to those who camped nearby but inflicted bad fortune on anyone who touched them.” Being superstitious, of course I made sure I didn’t touch them at all!

K twoNearby was also a large cairn (Nether Largie South Cairn), which was built as a tomb even earlier between 5,600 and 5,500 years ago, then reused by later generations. There are apparently four more in this area but I only saw this one. Luckily it is now empty and I was able to wriggle inside it to look out. It felt a bit eerie being down there, but fascinating at the same time. It was giving me inspiration for future stories – but I need to mull it over a bit more before writing anything down. That’s usually how my mind works, with a tiny seed of an idea germinating over time into something more substantial. Being able to experience something like this in person really helps.

EttThis month I’m in Sweden visiting my relatives after two years of Covid separation, and while out driving through the nearby landscape I came across an old burial site covered in both standing stones, stone circles and a cairn. It’s called Fagertofta Gravfält (Fagertofta graveyard/grave field in the county of Småland), but is way older than the name would suggest (Iron Age). I had vague memories of being taken there on a school outing as a child. The place is situated a few kilometres outside the town where I lived. I remember my whole school class cycling out there with one teacher in the lead and one at the rear, and us kids (about 25) in between in a long snake of bicycles. It seems very dangerous now, thinking back on it, as the route lies along a main road where cars drive quite fast, but back then no one seems to have minded.

FemAnyway, I decided to take a quick peek and was amazed at what I found. I had completely forgotten what a treasure this place is! Situated on a slope, in a field deep inside a Swedish forest, there isn’t just one, but 24 little stone circles! There is also a massive cairn, one circle made up of smaller stone constructions, and in the middle of the site there is a triangular shape laid out with stones. The sides of this measure about 30 meters each. These were all graves apart from the triangle, which might have simply been for cult or ceremonial purposes. In the past, the locals believed that all the stone circles had been used by “judges” for the ting (primitive court of justice), and they called it “Domarsätet” (“the Judges’ Seat”). But that is not the case as they have all been confirmed as burials. (And why would they have needed 24 of them anyway?!) Even so, I couldn’t help but imagine people sitting on all the stones, coming together for yearly events perhaps and discussing important matters or maybe just venerating their buried ancestors. My classmates and I certainly sat on them to eat our picnic lunches, which I think we had definitely deserved after cycling so far!

K threeApparently, people also used to think that trolls lived here, as well as dragons! They believed that on sunny days the dragons would bring out their hoard of gold and allow the sunlight to make it glitter and shine. The dragons were thought to live inside the cairns and lights were said to have been seen from inside them on dark nights. I love old folk tales like that and the deep, dark forests all around the site make it easy to imagine that all manner of creatures lurk there. (Incidentally, the belief that the place was special in some way may have helped to preserve it for posterity, so it was a good thing).

Near the ancient site I also came across a sacred spring, but that is a theme for another day.

Currently, the most famous use of standing stones in books has to be in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series, which makes me wary of using anything similar in my stories. But walking around a place like that, you can’t help but use your imagination to conjure up all sorts of scenarios. And for someone like me, who writes timeslips and time travel, it is very tempting to have these ancient monuments play a part. I do mention a small cairn in WHISPERS OF THE RUNES, but it has nothing to do with magic in that instance. I will have to give it some more thought as it seems a shame not to put this in a book.

Do you have any favourite novels that feature stone circles or standing stones? And do you enjoy visiting such sites?

110 thoughts on “The Magic of Standing Stones”

  1. We should get together Christina! I am about to embark on a series of novels based in and around the magical and mysterious stones and stories of north Wiltshire, the Marlborough Downs the people who lived and worked there in the fifteenth century. I’ll DM you.

    Reply
  2. We should get together Christina! I am about to embark on a series of novels based in and around the magical and mysterious stones and stories of north Wiltshire, the Marlborough Downs the people who lived and worked there in the fifteenth century. I’ll DM you.

    Reply
  3. We should get together Christina! I am about to embark on a series of novels based in and around the magical and mysterious stones and stories of north Wiltshire, the Marlborough Downs the people who lived and worked there in the fifteenth century. I’ll DM you.

    Reply
  4. We should get together Christina! I am about to embark on a series of novels based in and around the magical and mysterious stones and stories of north Wiltshire, the Marlborough Downs the people who lived and worked there in the fifteenth century. I’ll DM you.

    Reply
  5. We should get together Christina! I am about to embark on a series of novels based in and around the magical and mysterious stones and stories of north Wiltshire, the Marlborough Downs the people who lived and worked there in the fifteenth century. I’ll DM you.

    Reply
  6. I have seen Stonehenge. Unfortunately for me I was having an allergy attack and wasn’t well enough to take part in the move closer to the stones visit. I stayed at the base area while my husband and daughter did the closer bit. (This was 1997, so it was after contact had become forbidden).
    On the other hand, while they were visiting the stones, I became the first of the three of use to experience scones with clotthed cream. (I know — off topic — but what is travwling without food?)

    Reply
  7. I have seen Stonehenge. Unfortunately for me I was having an allergy attack and wasn’t well enough to take part in the move closer to the stones visit. I stayed at the base area while my husband and daughter did the closer bit. (This was 1997, so it was after contact had become forbidden).
    On the other hand, while they were visiting the stones, I became the first of the three of use to experience scones with clotthed cream. (I know — off topic — but what is travwling without food?)

    Reply
  8. I have seen Stonehenge. Unfortunately for me I was having an allergy attack and wasn’t well enough to take part in the move closer to the stones visit. I stayed at the base area while my husband and daughter did the closer bit. (This was 1997, so it was after contact had become forbidden).
    On the other hand, while they were visiting the stones, I became the first of the three of use to experience scones with clotthed cream. (I know — off topic — but what is travwling without food?)

    Reply
  9. I have seen Stonehenge. Unfortunately for me I was having an allergy attack and wasn’t well enough to take part in the move closer to the stones visit. I stayed at the base area while my husband and daughter did the closer bit. (This was 1997, so it was after contact had become forbidden).
    On the other hand, while they were visiting the stones, I became the first of the three of use to experience scones with clotthed cream. (I know — off topic — but what is travwling without food?)

    Reply
  10. I have seen Stonehenge. Unfortunately for me I was having an allergy attack and wasn’t well enough to take part in the move closer to the stones visit. I stayed at the base area while my husband and daughter did the closer bit. (This was 1997, so it was after contact had become forbidden).
    On the other hand, while they were visiting the stones, I became the first of the three of use to experience scones with clotthed cream. (I know — off topic — but what is travwling without food?)

    Reply
  11. Sarum by Edward Rutherford is a favorite, a wonderful story of the building of the Salisbury Cathedral with Stonehenge as a principle element.
    I have visited New Grange in Ireland and many dolman throughout the island. I always get an anxious feeling as I approach the burial sites and could not touch the dolman or go into New Grange. Same reaction when we visit other prehistoric burial sites, the Ancients are reaching out to me I guess but I am too uncomfortable to respond.
    Thanks for the interesting post.

    Reply
  12. Sarum by Edward Rutherford is a favorite, a wonderful story of the building of the Salisbury Cathedral with Stonehenge as a principle element.
    I have visited New Grange in Ireland and many dolman throughout the island. I always get an anxious feeling as I approach the burial sites and could not touch the dolman or go into New Grange. Same reaction when we visit other prehistoric burial sites, the Ancients are reaching out to me I guess but I am too uncomfortable to respond.
    Thanks for the interesting post.

    Reply
  13. Sarum by Edward Rutherford is a favorite, a wonderful story of the building of the Salisbury Cathedral with Stonehenge as a principle element.
    I have visited New Grange in Ireland and many dolman throughout the island. I always get an anxious feeling as I approach the burial sites and could not touch the dolman or go into New Grange. Same reaction when we visit other prehistoric burial sites, the Ancients are reaching out to me I guess but I am too uncomfortable to respond.
    Thanks for the interesting post.

    Reply
  14. Sarum by Edward Rutherford is a favorite, a wonderful story of the building of the Salisbury Cathedral with Stonehenge as a principle element.
    I have visited New Grange in Ireland and many dolman throughout the island. I always get an anxious feeling as I approach the burial sites and could not touch the dolman or go into New Grange. Same reaction when we visit other prehistoric burial sites, the Ancients are reaching out to me I guess but I am too uncomfortable to respond.
    Thanks for the interesting post.

    Reply
  15. Sarum by Edward Rutherford is a favorite, a wonderful story of the building of the Salisbury Cathedral with Stonehenge as a principle element.
    I have visited New Grange in Ireland and many dolman throughout the island. I always get an anxious feeling as I approach the burial sites and could not touch the dolman or go into New Grange. Same reaction when we visit other prehistoric burial sites, the Ancients are reaching out to me I guess but I am too uncomfortable to respond.
    Thanks for the interesting post.

    Reply
  16. What a shame about the allergy attack, Sue, but I’m glad you at least got to have the scones and clotted cream! That is definitely a highlight any time!

    Reply
  17. What a shame about the allergy attack, Sue, but I’m glad you at least got to have the scones and clotted cream! That is definitely a highlight any time!

    Reply
  18. What a shame about the allergy attack, Sue, but I’m glad you at least got to have the scones and clotted cream! That is definitely a highlight any time!

    Reply
  19. What a shame about the allergy attack, Sue, but I’m glad you at least got to have the scones and clotted cream! That is definitely a highlight any time!

    Reply
  20. What a shame about the allergy attack, Sue, but I’m glad you at least got to have the scones and clotted cream! That is definitely a highlight any time!

    Reply
  21. Thank you an that’s fascinating, Denise! A friend of mine has that kind of reaction to churches – there must be something strange there. I’d love to visit New Grange too. I did read a book about it but can’t remember the title. Such an interesting place!

    Reply
  22. Thank you an that’s fascinating, Denise! A friend of mine has that kind of reaction to churches – there must be something strange there. I’d love to visit New Grange too. I did read a book about it but can’t remember the title. Such an interesting place!

    Reply
  23. Thank you an that’s fascinating, Denise! A friend of mine has that kind of reaction to churches – there must be something strange there. I’d love to visit New Grange too. I did read a book about it but can’t remember the title. Such an interesting place!

    Reply
  24. Thank you an that’s fascinating, Denise! A friend of mine has that kind of reaction to churches – there must be something strange there. I’d love to visit New Grange too. I did read a book about it but can’t remember the title. Such an interesting place!

    Reply
  25. Thank you an that’s fascinating, Denise! A friend of mine has that kind of reaction to churches – there must be something strange there. I’d love to visit New Grange too. I did read a book about it but can’t remember the title. Such an interesting place!

    Reply
  26. Christina, I’ve also visited Avebury and Stonehenge in the unrestricted days. THe last time was winter and so bitterly cold that the guard stayed in his cubicle and gave us permission to wander as we would.
    THE Swedish site sounds wonderful–and I’m glad that none of you bicycling school kids were turned into a hood ornament!
    Yes, Gabaldon used a stone circle, but I used one years before in my one and only medieval so I refused to stop using them! I’d say go ahead if they suit your stories–and I’m sure they would!

    Reply
  27. Christina, I’ve also visited Avebury and Stonehenge in the unrestricted days. THe last time was winter and so bitterly cold that the guard stayed in his cubicle and gave us permission to wander as we would.
    THE Swedish site sounds wonderful–and I’m glad that none of you bicycling school kids were turned into a hood ornament!
    Yes, Gabaldon used a stone circle, but I used one years before in my one and only medieval so I refused to stop using them! I’d say go ahead if they suit your stories–and I’m sure they would!

    Reply
  28. Christina, I’ve also visited Avebury and Stonehenge in the unrestricted days. THe last time was winter and so bitterly cold that the guard stayed in his cubicle and gave us permission to wander as we would.
    THE Swedish site sounds wonderful–and I’m glad that none of you bicycling school kids were turned into a hood ornament!
    Yes, Gabaldon used a stone circle, but I used one years before in my one and only medieval so I refused to stop using them! I’d say go ahead if they suit your stories–and I’m sure they would!

    Reply
  29. Christina, I’ve also visited Avebury and Stonehenge in the unrestricted days. THe last time was winter and so bitterly cold that the guard stayed in his cubicle and gave us permission to wander as we would.
    THE Swedish site sounds wonderful–and I’m glad that none of you bicycling school kids were turned into a hood ornament!
    Yes, Gabaldon used a stone circle, but I used one years before in my one and only medieval so I refused to stop using them! I’d say go ahead if they suit your stories–and I’m sure they would!

    Reply
  30. Christina, I’ve also visited Avebury and Stonehenge in the unrestricted days. THe last time was winter and so bitterly cold that the guard stayed in his cubicle and gave us permission to wander as we would.
    THE Swedish site sounds wonderful–and I’m glad that none of you bicycling school kids were turned into a hood ornament!
    Yes, Gabaldon used a stone circle, but I used one years before in my one and only medieval so I refused to stop using them! I’d say go ahead if they suit your stories–and I’m sure they would!

    Reply
  31. I’ve read a number of books that used standing circles as a vehicle for time travel, Christina, so I say ‘go for it!’.
    Your post made me look up stones that I remember from my time in Guam. It turns out that those, called latte stones, have nothing to do with astronomy. They were evidently building supports. I might have known that 45 years ago! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latte_stone

    Reply
  32. I’ve read a number of books that used standing circles as a vehicle for time travel, Christina, so I say ‘go for it!’.
    Your post made me look up stones that I remember from my time in Guam. It turns out that those, called latte stones, have nothing to do with astronomy. They were evidently building supports. I might have known that 45 years ago! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latte_stone

    Reply
  33. I’ve read a number of books that used standing circles as a vehicle for time travel, Christina, so I say ‘go for it!’.
    Your post made me look up stones that I remember from my time in Guam. It turns out that those, called latte stones, have nothing to do with astronomy. They were evidently building supports. I might have known that 45 years ago! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latte_stone

    Reply
  34. I’ve read a number of books that used standing circles as a vehicle for time travel, Christina, so I say ‘go for it!’.
    Your post made me look up stones that I remember from my time in Guam. It turns out that those, called latte stones, have nothing to do with astronomy. They were evidently building supports. I might have known that 45 years ago! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latte_stone

    Reply
  35. I’ve read a number of books that used standing circles as a vehicle for time travel, Christina, so I say ‘go for it!’.
    Your post made me look up stones that I remember from my time in Guam. It turns out that those, called latte stones, have nothing to do with astronomy. They were evidently building supports. I might have known that 45 years ago! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latte_stone

    Reply
  36. Lynn Kurland writes a series of books with time travel portals contained within standing stone circles. They are great stories with modern men or women going back to medieval time or the other way round. Really good detail and lovely romances.

    Reply
  37. Lynn Kurland writes a series of books with time travel portals contained within standing stone circles. They are great stories with modern men or women going back to medieval time or the other way round. Really good detail and lovely romances.

    Reply
  38. Lynn Kurland writes a series of books with time travel portals contained within standing stone circles. They are great stories with modern men or women going back to medieval time or the other way round. Really good detail and lovely romances.

    Reply
  39. Lynn Kurland writes a series of books with time travel portals contained within standing stone circles. They are great stories with modern men or women going back to medieval time or the other way round. Really good detail and lovely romances.

    Reply
  40. Lynn Kurland writes a series of books with time travel portals contained within standing stone circles. They are great stories with modern men or women going back to medieval time or the other way round. Really good detail and lovely romances.

    Reply
  41. The standing stones in The Fellowship of the Ring which Frodo and his hobbit companions encountered still creep me out, even after all these years. Ware the barrow wights 🙂

    Reply
  42. The standing stones in The Fellowship of the Ring which Frodo and his hobbit companions encountered still creep me out, even after all these years. Ware the barrow wights 🙂

    Reply
  43. The standing stones in The Fellowship of the Ring which Frodo and his hobbit companions encountered still creep me out, even after all these years. Ware the barrow wights 🙂

    Reply
  44. The standing stones in The Fellowship of the Ring which Frodo and his hobbit companions encountered still creep me out, even after all these years. Ware the barrow wights 🙂

    Reply
  45. The standing stones in The Fellowship of the Ring which Frodo and his hobbit companions encountered still creep me out, even after all these years. Ware the barrow wights 🙂

    Reply
  46. Thank you Mary Jo, that’s good to know! I’ll just have to put my own twist on it. I’ll give it some more thought.

    Reply
  47. Thank you Mary Jo, that’s good to know! I’ll just have to put my own twist on it. I’ll give it some more thought.

    Reply
  48. Thank you Mary Jo, that’s good to know! I’ll just have to put my own twist on it. I’ll give it some more thought.

    Reply
  49. Thank you Mary Jo, that’s good to know! I’ll just have to put my own twist on it. I’ll give it some more thought.

    Reply
  50. Thank you Mary Jo, that’s good to know! I’ll just have to put my own twist on it. I’ll give it some more thought.

    Reply
  51. Well, the site just ate my comments, so I’ll start over. Thanks for sharing your magical journeys — I love these stones, and I envy you getting to touch them (my trip came too late for that). Go for the timeslip story!

    Reply
  52. Well, the site just ate my comments, so I’ll start over. Thanks for sharing your magical journeys — I love these stones, and I envy you getting to touch them (my trip came too late for that). Go for the timeslip story!

    Reply
  53. Well, the site just ate my comments, so I’ll start over. Thanks for sharing your magical journeys — I love these stones, and I envy you getting to touch them (my trip came too late for that). Go for the timeslip story!

    Reply
  54. Well, the site just ate my comments, so I’ll start over. Thanks for sharing your magical journeys — I love these stones, and I envy you getting to touch them (my trip came too late for that). Go for the timeslip story!

    Reply
  55. Well, the site just ate my comments, so I’ll start over. Thanks for sharing your magical journeys — I love these stones, and I envy you getting to touch them (my trip came too late for that). Go for the timeslip story!

    Reply
  56. I love the Stones. Public Television just had a fascinating show on about Stonehenge. The Robin of Sherwood show from years ago featured them in an episode. So mystical.

    Reply
  57. I love the Stones. Public Television just had a fascinating show on about Stonehenge. The Robin of Sherwood show from years ago featured them in an episode. So mystical.

    Reply
  58. I love the Stones. Public Television just had a fascinating show on about Stonehenge. The Robin of Sherwood show from years ago featured them in an episode. So mystical.

    Reply
  59. I love the Stones. Public Television just had a fascinating show on about Stonehenge. The Robin of Sherwood show from years ago featured them in an episode. So mystical.

    Reply
  60. I love the Stones. Public Television just had a fascinating show on about Stonehenge. The Robin of Sherwood show from years ago featured them in an episode. So mystical.

    Reply
  61. I love watching programmes about Stonehenge and any other stones – there always seems to be more for the archaeologists to discover!

    Reply
  62. I love watching programmes about Stonehenge and any other stones – there always seems to be more for the archaeologists to discover!

    Reply
  63. I love watching programmes about Stonehenge and any other stones – there always seems to be more for the archaeologists to discover!

    Reply
  64. I love watching programmes about Stonehenge and any other stones – there always seems to be more for the archaeologists to discover!

    Reply
  65. I love watching programmes about Stonehenge and any other stones – there always seems to be more for the archaeologists to discover!

    Reply
  66. Interesting post. Did you know, there used to be large wooden circles as well, of course they do not stand anymore due to the material used. But I have just been to two sites in Germany, where they rebuilt such circles after intensive excavations of the sites. https://www.himmelswege.de/index.php?id=136
    And I too agree, if the stone circles speak to you then by all means use them in your writings.

    Reply
  67. Interesting post. Did you know, there used to be large wooden circles as well, of course they do not stand anymore due to the material used. But I have just been to two sites in Germany, where they rebuilt such circles after intensive excavations of the sites. https://www.himmelswege.de/index.php?id=136
    And I too agree, if the stone circles speak to you then by all means use them in your writings.

    Reply
  68. Interesting post. Did you know, there used to be large wooden circles as well, of course they do not stand anymore due to the material used. But I have just been to two sites in Germany, where they rebuilt such circles after intensive excavations of the sites. https://www.himmelswege.de/index.php?id=136
    And I too agree, if the stone circles speak to you then by all means use them in your writings.

    Reply
  69. Interesting post. Did you know, there used to be large wooden circles as well, of course they do not stand anymore due to the material used. But I have just been to two sites in Germany, where they rebuilt such circles after intensive excavations of the sites. https://www.himmelswege.de/index.php?id=136
    And I too agree, if the stone circles speak to you then by all means use them in your writings.

    Reply
  70. Interesting post. Did you know, there used to be large wooden circles as well, of course they do not stand anymore due to the material used. But I have just been to two sites in Germany, where they rebuilt such circles after intensive excavations of the sites. https://www.himmelswege.de/index.php?id=136
    And I too agree, if the stone circles speak to you then by all means use them in your writings.

    Reply
  71. I find these monuments fascinating in that they provide a tangible link to the remote past. Hetty Peglar’s tump (Uley Long Barrow), a neolithic burial chamber, was my first experience but Avebury and Stone Henge soon followed. I think it is a great idea to use ancient constructs as the link in a time slip. These monuments will have fascinated people over the centuries so the linked time periods don’t have to involve the stone age!
    May your thoughts and dreams bear fruit. 😊

    Reply
  72. I find these monuments fascinating in that they provide a tangible link to the remote past. Hetty Peglar’s tump (Uley Long Barrow), a neolithic burial chamber, was my first experience but Avebury and Stone Henge soon followed. I think it is a great idea to use ancient constructs as the link in a time slip. These monuments will have fascinated people over the centuries so the linked time periods don’t have to involve the stone age!
    May your thoughts and dreams bear fruit. 😊

    Reply
  73. I find these monuments fascinating in that they provide a tangible link to the remote past. Hetty Peglar’s tump (Uley Long Barrow), a neolithic burial chamber, was my first experience but Avebury and Stone Henge soon followed. I think it is a great idea to use ancient constructs as the link in a time slip. These monuments will have fascinated people over the centuries so the linked time periods don’t have to involve the stone age!
    May your thoughts and dreams bear fruit. 😊

    Reply
  74. I find these monuments fascinating in that they provide a tangible link to the remote past. Hetty Peglar’s tump (Uley Long Barrow), a neolithic burial chamber, was my first experience but Avebury and Stone Henge soon followed. I think it is a great idea to use ancient constructs as the link in a time slip. These monuments will have fascinated people over the centuries so the linked time periods don’t have to involve the stone age!
    May your thoughts and dreams bear fruit. 😊

    Reply
  75. I find these monuments fascinating in that they provide a tangible link to the remote past. Hetty Peglar’s tump (Uley Long Barrow), a neolithic burial chamber, was my first experience but Avebury and Stone Henge soon followed. I think it is a great idea to use ancient constructs as the link in a time slip. These monuments will have fascinated people over the centuries so the linked time periods don’t have to involve the stone age!
    May your thoughts and dreams bear fruit. 😊

    Reply
  76. Thank you! Yes I heard that they found one not too far from Stonehenge but I’ve never seen one reconstructed and I didn’t know they had them in Germany too – that’s great! Would love to go and visit that one day. I’ll definitely put that on my bucket list. Many thanks for the link!

    Reply
  77. Thank you! Yes I heard that they found one not too far from Stonehenge but I’ve never seen one reconstructed and I didn’t know they had them in Germany too – that’s great! Would love to go and visit that one day. I’ll definitely put that on my bucket list. Many thanks for the link!

    Reply
  78. Thank you! Yes I heard that they found one not too far from Stonehenge but I’ve never seen one reconstructed and I didn’t know they had them in Germany too – that’s great! Would love to go and visit that one day. I’ll definitely put that on my bucket list. Many thanks for the link!

    Reply
  79. Thank you! Yes I heard that they found one not too far from Stonehenge but I’ve never seen one reconstructed and I didn’t know they had them in Germany too – that’s great! Would love to go and visit that one day. I’ll definitely put that on my bucket list. Many thanks for the link!

    Reply
  80. Thank you! Yes I heard that they found one not too far from Stonehenge but I’ve never seen one reconstructed and I didn’t know they had them in Germany too – that’s great! Would love to go and visit that one day. I’ll definitely put that on my bucket list. Many thanks for the link!

    Reply
  81. They do indeed and you can really feel it when you are there among the stones! Thank you, I will keep mulling over my ideas and hope that a story takes shape in my mind.

    Reply
  82. They do indeed and you can really feel it when you are there among the stones! Thank you, I will keep mulling over my ideas and hope that a story takes shape in my mind.

    Reply
  83. They do indeed and you can really feel it when you are there among the stones! Thank you, I will keep mulling over my ideas and hope that a story takes shape in my mind.

    Reply
  84. They do indeed and you can really feel it when you are there among the stones! Thank you, I will keep mulling over my ideas and hope that a story takes shape in my mind.

    Reply
  85. They do indeed and you can really feel it when you are there among the stones! Thank you, I will keep mulling over my ideas and hope that a story takes shape in my mind.

    Reply

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