The Living is Easy

Librariangraphic
Pat Rice here

It’s summer, the temps are in the 90’s, so is the
humidity, and my brain is fried. While I’m sitting here scribbling away on the
next historical and tossing ideas around about the next contemporary, most of
NYC is off playing in the mountains or attending conferences or otherwise
gallivanting about. In other words, nobody is working up there. So I have no
one breathing down my neck for pages, no frantic last minute phone calls
telling me the title has already been used and we have to come up withFdrinksunspecsma136720690012
another
one right now, before the sales catalog goes to print. I
ought to look on this as a lovely vacation, but I’m a writer. I need FEEDBACK
or I don’t exist. 

So wenchly readers, you’re my next line of support. Roll
the dialog please! 

I just perused the list of questions we amassed earlier
from readers, searching for a blog topic my fried brain could handle, but the
poor molten mass couldn’t remember which ones had been answered and Wdesklady5ma137574990001
which ones
hadn’t. But a great number of your questions had to do with how a writer works,
in one manner or another, from pitching books to booksignings. 

I know I’m going to regret this, but I’d like to
experiment by keeping a daily log of my writing progress. There are seven of us wenches, and we only
write every other day, so daily progress reports won’t work here. But I’ll try to keep it up on my
(patriciarice.blogspot.com) blogger page. For a
while, just to see what happens. (and since I’m heading out on a last minute trip, hotel internet will figure into how quickly  anything gets posted!)
 

As a sample of what I’m thinking about doing, I’ll set up
the beginning here:
 

The first of my new Mystic Isle series, MYSTIC GUARDIAN,
was released at the beginning of July, and I’mMysticguardian tracking sales because I’m hoping this fantasy historical combo will sell well enough to allow me to dabble much longer in my mystical world.
Watching sales can be torturous, and I’m not into suffering and pain (which is why I don’t
normally read reviews—I never remember the good ones, only the bad ones). The
book has hit the top 100 Bookscan list the first two weeks of sales,which is supposed to be a Good
Thing. If readers keep buying it, it will be even Better, ’cause that means it has legs. (so does my mermaid, but that’s beside the point. )

My first review on Amazon was a two and obviously demonstrated the reader’s lack
of insight. Things are looking much more intelligent over there lately, not that I’m looking, mind you. I’m a wee bit jaded by this new release business. Reviews and numbers give me cold shudders. Aside from creating books, I prefer getting my jollies by talking to readers. That, and I get to wear
PJs to work. 

Horse_rider
I turned in the manuscript for the second book of the
series, MYSTIC RIDER, at the beginning of July. My editor won’t have time to
read it and get back to me before mid- August, which is one of the reason I’m
blathering now.
 

Lacking anything more productive to do, and with a fresh
story burning up my fingertips, I started on the third in the series, MYSTIC
WARRIOR while the characters and plot arcs of RIDER are still fresh in my mind.
I’ve even carved out a 3-page summary and a 13-page summary for it, one for
publicity and sales and the other for my editor. Not that I’ll abide by it.
I’ve already veered off the beaten path. But it gives character arcs and
whatnot and is sound enough to make back cover copy. (I don’t know a good graphic to illustrate pages piling up, but how about a cute picture of my son diving down?) Scuba_dinwater
 

Monday—on patriciarice.blogspot.com—I’ll go into what’s
happening with the contemporaries—including the dreaded pitch–provided the hotel cooperates. I don’t do technology well.

 The set up is longer and less detailed than a daily diary
will be, but are the boring details of my writing life something that will
interest you as readers? Are there other boring details you might like to hear?
<G> Any questions? Just knowing there are real
people out there beyond this computer screen keeps me grounded, so please let
me hear from you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

75 thoughts on “The Living is Easy”

  1. I’ll check out the boring details! I took MG on vacation with me, and to my everlasting regret, the book literally melted in my hand (temps were over 110 degrees all week and the binding did not hold. Perhaps sunblock and margaritas might have been a factor, too. *G*). But I kept reading chunk by chunk! I just couldn’t bring it home to put on my keeper shelf. I bet you advise me to buy another; it is likely that I will. Enjoyed the different setting, loved the premise. I’m all for mystic and magic!

    Reply
  2. I’ll check out the boring details! I took MG on vacation with me, and to my everlasting regret, the book literally melted in my hand (temps were over 110 degrees all week and the binding did not hold. Perhaps sunblock and margaritas might have been a factor, too. *G*). But I kept reading chunk by chunk! I just couldn’t bring it home to put on my keeper shelf. I bet you advise me to buy another; it is likely that I will. Enjoyed the different setting, loved the premise. I’m all for mystic and magic!

    Reply
  3. I’ll check out the boring details! I took MG on vacation with me, and to my everlasting regret, the book literally melted in my hand (temps were over 110 degrees all week and the binding did not hold. Perhaps sunblock and margaritas might have been a factor, too. *G*). But I kept reading chunk by chunk! I just couldn’t bring it home to put on my keeper shelf. I bet you advise me to buy another; it is likely that I will. Enjoyed the different setting, loved the premise. I’m all for mystic and magic!

    Reply
  4. I’ll check out the boring details! I took MG on vacation with me, and to my everlasting regret, the book literally melted in my hand (temps were over 110 degrees all week and the binding did not hold. Perhaps sunblock and margaritas might have been a factor, too. *G*). But I kept reading chunk by chunk! I just couldn’t bring it home to put on my keeper shelf. I bet you advise me to buy another; it is likely that I will. Enjoyed the different setting, loved the premise. I’m all for mystic and magic!

    Reply
  5. I’ll check out the boring details! I took MG on vacation with me, and to my everlasting regret, the book literally melted in my hand (temps were over 110 degrees all week and the binding did not hold. Perhaps sunblock and margaritas might have been a factor, too. *G*). But I kept reading chunk by chunk! I just couldn’t bring it home to put on my keeper shelf. I bet you advise me to buy another; it is likely that I will. Enjoyed the different setting, loved the premise. I’m all for mystic and magic!

    Reply
  6. Oh questions, questions, yes! I have been reading through the Crusie-Mayer blog/Writing Workshop and they are touting such agonies as Outlining, and… well… outlining. But they speak as if the things they put into the frame are simply plucked off a tree! So… hard question… where do you go (within yourself is a given) to find the perfect twist, the brilliant scene, the litchpin? Do you have any mantra/ trick/ path that gets you to the grilled window at the end of the labyrinth where the Girls Downstairs whisper their secrets to you? I have been there, but I can’t remember quite how I found it.
    I am going to tune into your blogspot and follow your experience with great interest. Thanks!

    Reply
  7. Oh questions, questions, yes! I have been reading through the Crusie-Mayer blog/Writing Workshop and they are touting such agonies as Outlining, and… well… outlining. But they speak as if the things they put into the frame are simply plucked off a tree! So… hard question… where do you go (within yourself is a given) to find the perfect twist, the brilliant scene, the litchpin? Do you have any mantra/ trick/ path that gets you to the grilled window at the end of the labyrinth where the Girls Downstairs whisper their secrets to you? I have been there, but I can’t remember quite how I found it.
    I am going to tune into your blogspot and follow your experience with great interest. Thanks!

    Reply
  8. Oh questions, questions, yes! I have been reading through the Crusie-Mayer blog/Writing Workshop and they are touting such agonies as Outlining, and… well… outlining. But they speak as if the things they put into the frame are simply plucked off a tree! So… hard question… where do you go (within yourself is a given) to find the perfect twist, the brilliant scene, the litchpin? Do you have any mantra/ trick/ path that gets you to the grilled window at the end of the labyrinth where the Girls Downstairs whisper their secrets to you? I have been there, but I can’t remember quite how I found it.
    I am going to tune into your blogspot and follow your experience with great interest. Thanks!

    Reply
  9. Oh questions, questions, yes! I have been reading through the Crusie-Mayer blog/Writing Workshop and they are touting such agonies as Outlining, and… well… outlining. But they speak as if the things they put into the frame are simply plucked off a tree! So… hard question… where do you go (within yourself is a given) to find the perfect twist, the brilliant scene, the litchpin? Do you have any mantra/ trick/ path that gets you to the grilled window at the end of the labyrinth where the Girls Downstairs whisper their secrets to you? I have been there, but I can’t remember quite how I found it.
    I am going to tune into your blogspot and follow your experience with great interest. Thanks!

    Reply
  10. Oh questions, questions, yes! I have been reading through the Crusie-Mayer blog/Writing Workshop and they are touting such agonies as Outlining, and… well… outlining. But they speak as if the things they put into the frame are simply plucked off a tree! So… hard question… where do you go (within yourself is a given) to find the perfect twist, the brilliant scene, the litchpin? Do you have any mantra/ trick/ path that gets you to the grilled window at the end of the labyrinth where the Girls Downstairs whisper their secrets to you? I have been there, but I can’t remember quite how I found it.
    I am going to tune into your blogspot and follow your experience with great interest. Thanks!

    Reply
  11. Oh, Maggie, I’m so sorry! I’ll be keeping an ear out to find out of if anyone else is having this problem or if it was just the margaritas. “G” I guess I need to hold a contest so you have a chance at a new one.
    Elaine, I haven’t been over to Crusie’s blog lately, so I don’t know if they’re plucking gems off a treasure tree to feed into their outlines, but I can attest I’m not. I do not do Plot Outlines. Just the thought makes me shiver in my shoes. My summaries are mostly about the characters, and the closest guide I can give you to developing those is to pound your head against the wall. Frequently. What bits of plot I pluck from their characters I may twist to give an emotional arc with a touch of plot maybe–“Mariel’s flaw is that she can’t live long without the sea, so when she becomes deathly ill on their quest, Trystan must admit he’s her match and save her.” Of course, I drag it out more than that to look like I know what I’m talking about. “G”
    The real gems are dug out of my research and writing, examined, checked for clarity (always poor “G”), cut, polished, sometimes cut and polished some more, and then illumined in the best possible light to look like they’re valuable. You know those lovely display windows in the crystal store? Don’t they look like precious gems? Sometimes, it’s all in the setting.
    Oh cute, typepad just forgot who I am. Really, I’m a master of disguise!

    Reply
  12. Oh, Maggie, I’m so sorry! I’ll be keeping an ear out to find out of if anyone else is having this problem or if it was just the margaritas. “G” I guess I need to hold a contest so you have a chance at a new one.
    Elaine, I haven’t been over to Crusie’s blog lately, so I don’t know if they’re plucking gems off a treasure tree to feed into their outlines, but I can attest I’m not. I do not do Plot Outlines. Just the thought makes me shiver in my shoes. My summaries are mostly about the characters, and the closest guide I can give you to developing those is to pound your head against the wall. Frequently. What bits of plot I pluck from their characters I may twist to give an emotional arc with a touch of plot maybe–“Mariel’s flaw is that she can’t live long without the sea, so when she becomes deathly ill on their quest, Trystan must admit he’s her match and save her.” Of course, I drag it out more than that to look like I know what I’m talking about. “G”
    The real gems are dug out of my research and writing, examined, checked for clarity (always poor “G”), cut, polished, sometimes cut and polished some more, and then illumined in the best possible light to look like they’re valuable. You know those lovely display windows in the crystal store? Don’t they look like precious gems? Sometimes, it’s all in the setting.
    Oh cute, typepad just forgot who I am. Really, I’m a master of disguise!

    Reply
  13. Oh, Maggie, I’m so sorry! I’ll be keeping an ear out to find out of if anyone else is having this problem or if it was just the margaritas. “G” I guess I need to hold a contest so you have a chance at a new one.
    Elaine, I haven’t been over to Crusie’s blog lately, so I don’t know if they’re plucking gems off a treasure tree to feed into their outlines, but I can attest I’m not. I do not do Plot Outlines. Just the thought makes me shiver in my shoes. My summaries are mostly about the characters, and the closest guide I can give you to developing those is to pound your head against the wall. Frequently. What bits of plot I pluck from their characters I may twist to give an emotional arc with a touch of plot maybe–“Mariel’s flaw is that she can’t live long without the sea, so when she becomes deathly ill on their quest, Trystan must admit he’s her match and save her.” Of course, I drag it out more than that to look like I know what I’m talking about. “G”
    The real gems are dug out of my research and writing, examined, checked for clarity (always poor “G”), cut, polished, sometimes cut and polished some more, and then illumined in the best possible light to look like they’re valuable. You know those lovely display windows in the crystal store? Don’t they look like precious gems? Sometimes, it’s all in the setting.
    Oh cute, typepad just forgot who I am. Really, I’m a master of disguise!

    Reply
  14. Oh, Maggie, I’m so sorry! I’ll be keeping an ear out to find out of if anyone else is having this problem or if it was just the margaritas. “G” I guess I need to hold a contest so you have a chance at a new one.
    Elaine, I haven’t been over to Crusie’s blog lately, so I don’t know if they’re plucking gems off a treasure tree to feed into their outlines, but I can attest I’m not. I do not do Plot Outlines. Just the thought makes me shiver in my shoes. My summaries are mostly about the characters, and the closest guide I can give you to developing those is to pound your head against the wall. Frequently. What bits of plot I pluck from their characters I may twist to give an emotional arc with a touch of plot maybe–“Mariel’s flaw is that she can’t live long without the sea, so when she becomes deathly ill on their quest, Trystan must admit he’s her match and save her.” Of course, I drag it out more than that to look like I know what I’m talking about. “G”
    The real gems are dug out of my research and writing, examined, checked for clarity (always poor “G”), cut, polished, sometimes cut and polished some more, and then illumined in the best possible light to look like they’re valuable. You know those lovely display windows in the crystal store? Don’t they look like precious gems? Sometimes, it’s all in the setting.
    Oh cute, typepad just forgot who I am. Really, I’m a master of disguise!

    Reply
  15. Oh, Maggie, I’m so sorry! I’ll be keeping an ear out to find out of if anyone else is having this problem or if it was just the margaritas. “G” I guess I need to hold a contest so you have a chance at a new one.
    Elaine, I haven’t been over to Crusie’s blog lately, so I don’t know if they’re plucking gems off a treasure tree to feed into their outlines, but I can attest I’m not. I do not do Plot Outlines. Just the thought makes me shiver in my shoes. My summaries are mostly about the characters, and the closest guide I can give you to developing those is to pound your head against the wall. Frequently. What bits of plot I pluck from their characters I may twist to give an emotional arc with a touch of plot maybe–“Mariel’s flaw is that she can’t live long without the sea, so when she becomes deathly ill on their quest, Trystan must admit he’s her match and save her.” Of course, I drag it out more than that to look like I know what I’m talking about. “G”
    The real gems are dug out of my research and writing, examined, checked for clarity (always poor “G”), cut, polished, sometimes cut and polished some more, and then illumined in the best possible light to look like they’re valuable. You know those lovely display windows in the crystal store? Don’t they look like precious gems? Sometimes, it’s all in the setting.
    Oh cute, typepad just forgot who I am. Really, I’m a master of disguise!

    Reply
  16. From Sherrie:
    Pat, as a writer myself, the details of your writing life would be anything but boring to me. I love knowing how other writers do their thang.
    My question to you is, how do you carry on after the first rush of beginning a new story has faded? Do you ever get saggingmiddleitis, and if so, how do you handle it?
    Writing is seriously hard on your body. What do you do to counteract the hours of sitting? I have a wonderfully comfy chair, but wish I could afford one of those hideously expensive Herman Miller Aeron chairs, http://tinyurl.com/fi5l
    I seldom sit lit a normal person. Usually, my feet are propped up on an oversized footstool with two pillows so that my legs are supported from knee to foot. My chair allows me to recline almost horizontally with my head supported by the low back of the chair and a pillow under my back, and legs on the footstool. Very comfy, and it sure beats the misery of sitting in a chair for hours.
    Do you have a special chair, or exercises you do, or do you take frequent breaks and walk around?

    Reply
  17. From Sherrie:
    Pat, as a writer myself, the details of your writing life would be anything but boring to me. I love knowing how other writers do their thang.
    My question to you is, how do you carry on after the first rush of beginning a new story has faded? Do you ever get saggingmiddleitis, and if so, how do you handle it?
    Writing is seriously hard on your body. What do you do to counteract the hours of sitting? I have a wonderfully comfy chair, but wish I could afford one of those hideously expensive Herman Miller Aeron chairs, http://tinyurl.com/fi5l
    I seldom sit lit a normal person. Usually, my feet are propped up on an oversized footstool with two pillows so that my legs are supported from knee to foot. My chair allows me to recline almost horizontally with my head supported by the low back of the chair and a pillow under my back, and legs on the footstool. Very comfy, and it sure beats the misery of sitting in a chair for hours.
    Do you have a special chair, or exercises you do, or do you take frequent breaks and walk around?

    Reply
  18. From Sherrie:
    Pat, as a writer myself, the details of your writing life would be anything but boring to me. I love knowing how other writers do their thang.
    My question to you is, how do you carry on after the first rush of beginning a new story has faded? Do you ever get saggingmiddleitis, and if so, how do you handle it?
    Writing is seriously hard on your body. What do you do to counteract the hours of sitting? I have a wonderfully comfy chair, but wish I could afford one of those hideously expensive Herman Miller Aeron chairs, http://tinyurl.com/fi5l
    I seldom sit lit a normal person. Usually, my feet are propped up on an oversized footstool with two pillows so that my legs are supported from knee to foot. My chair allows me to recline almost horizontally with my head supported by the low back of the chair and a pillow under my back, and legs on the footstool. Very comfy, and it sure beats the misery of sitting in a chair for hours.
    Do you have a special chair, or exercises you do, or do you take frequent breaks and walk around?

    Reply
  19. From Sherrie:
    Pat, as a writer myself, the details of your writing life would be anything but boring to me. I love knowing how other writers do their thang.
    My question to you is, how do you carry on after the first rush of beginning a new story has faded? Do you ever get saggingmiddleitis, and if so, how do you handle it?
    Writing is seriously hard on your body. What do you do to counteract the hours of sitting? I have a wonderfully comfy chair, but wish I could afford one of those hideously expensive Herman Miller Aeron chairs, http://tinyurl.com/fi5l
    I seldom sit lit a normal person. Usually, my feet are propped up on an oversized footstool with two pillows so that my legs are supported from knee to foot. My chair allows me to recline almost horizontally with my head supported by the low back of the chair and a pillow under my back, and legs on the footstool. Very comfy, and it sure beats the misery of sitting in a chair for hours.
    Do you have a special chair, or exercises you do, or do you take frequent breaks and walk around?

    Reply
  20. From Sherrie:
    Pat, as a writer myself, the details of your writing life would be anything but boring to me. I love knowing how other writers do their thang.
    My question to you is, how do you carry on after the first rush of beginning a new story has faded? Do you ever get saggingmiddleitis, and if so, how do you handle it?
    Writing is seriously hard on your body. What do you do to counteract the hours of sitting? I have a wonderfully comfy chair, but wish I could afford one of those hideously expensive Herman Miller Aeron chairs, http://tinyurl.com/fi5l
    I seldom sit lit a normal person. Usually, my feet are propped up on an oversized footstool with two pillows so that my legs are supported from knee to foot. My chair allows me to recline almost horizontally with my head supported by the low back of the chair and a pillow under my back, and legs on the footstool. Very comfy, and it sure beats the misery of sitting in a chair for hours.
    Do you have a special chair, or exercises you do, or do you take frequent breaks and walk around?

    Reply
  21. As I’m fresh from the Nationals overload, I’d love to know about your blurb/premise/title construction. I enjoyed the workshop I went to discussing this, and it seemed like a great many people get their “catch phrases” and titles in line while their stories are still quite vague. Just curious! 🙂

    Reply
  22. As I’m fresh from the Nationals overload, I’d love to know about your blurb/premise/title construction. I enjoyed the workshop I went to discussing this, and it seemed like a great many people get their “catch phrases” and titles in line while their stories are still quite vague. Just curious! 🙂

    Reply
  23. As I’m fresh from the Nationals overload, I’d love to know about your blurb/premise/title construction. I enjoyed the workshop I went to discussing this, and it seemed like a great many people get their “catch phrases” and titles in line while their stories are still quite vague. Just curious! 🙂

    Reply
  24. As I’m fresh from the Nationals overload, I’d love to know about your blurb/premise/title construction. I enjoyed the workshop I went to discussing this, and it seemed like a great many people get their “catch phrases” and titles in line while their stories are still quite vague. Just curious! 🙂

    Reply
  25. As I’m fresh from the Nationals overload, I’d love to know about your blurb/premise/title construction. I enjoyed the workshop I went to discussing this, and it seemed like a great many people get their “catch phrases” and titles in line while their stories are still quite vague. Just curious! 🙂

    Reply
  26. Pat, this book disintegration always happens to me on vaca. It happened to everything else I brought with me (4 other books, different publishers, so it’s not a fault of yours) except, amazingly, The Seduction of an English Beauty, which successfully made the trip back home. I think I’m just too wet to read by the pool, but it is my favorite thing to do!
    My question: I seem to always get stuck around 60,000 words and want in the worst way to be writing something else. Do you have a usual sticking point? And if you do, do you let yourself wander away for a while?

    Reply
  27. Pat, this book disintegration always happens to me on vaca. It happened to everything else I brought with me (4 other books, different publishers, so it’s not a fault of yours) except, amazingly, The Seduction of an English Beauty, which successfully made the trip back home. I think I’m just too wet to read by the pool, but it is my favorite thing to do!
    My question: I seem to always get stuck around 60,000 words and want in the worst way to be writing something else. Do you have a usual sticking point? And if you do, do you let yourself wander away for a while?

    Reply
  28. Pat, this book disintegration always happens to me on vaca. It happened to everything else I brought with me (4 other books, different publishers, so it’s not a fault of yours) except, amazingly, The Seduction of an English Beauty, which successfully made the trip back home. I think I’m just too wet to read by the pool, but it is my favorite thing to do!
    My question: I seem to always get stuck around 60,000 words and want in the worst way to be writing something else. Do you have a usual sticking point? And if you do, do you let yourself wander away for a while?

    Reply
  29. Pat, this book disintegration always happens to me on vaca. It happened to everything else I brought with me (4 other books, different publishers, so it’s not a fault of yours) except, amazingly, The Seduction of an English Beauty, which successfully made the trip back home. I think I’m just too wet to read by the pool, but it is my favorite thing to do!
    My question: I seem to always get stuck around 60,000 words and want in the worst way to be writing something else. Do you have a usual sticking point? And if you do, do you let yourself wander away for a while?

    Reply
  30. Pat, this book disintegration always happens to me on vaca. It happened to everything else I brought with me (4 other books, different publishers, so it’s not a fault of yours) except, amazingly, The Seduction of an English Beauty, which successfully made the trip back home. I think I’m just too wet to read by the pool, but it is my favorite thing to do!
    My question: I seem to always get stuck around 60,000 words and want in the worst way to be writing something else. Do you have a usual sticking point? And if you do, do you let yourself wander away for a while?

    Reply
  31. Ohhh, great questions! I may need to save these for the blogger site since just the one about saggingmiddleitis is part of a twenty minute speech I’m working on right now. You’d go cross-eyed digging it out of these notes. I better get myself over there and start practicing how to use it again.
    The Chair Question is a real writer question and one that proves you’ve been doing your homework, Sherrie! I probably have half a dozen office chairs and I hate them all. I used to have one of those giant orange “executive chairs” from the 60’s with real springs in the cushion, but I stupidly thought it would be easy to replace and gave it away when I moved. And haven’t found another since. Like you, I want my feet up, and I can’t sit still. I’m always wiggling around. I got so mad at my chair the other day, that I threw it out of the room and dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice. I had to make all the writing on my screen bigger, but what the heck. I have a wireless keyboard and wireless mouse, so I just cruise. Not highly recommended for everyone, but I haven’t used my laptop since I switched chairs.

    Reply
  32. Ohhh, great questions! I may need to save these for the blogger site since just the one about saggingmiddleitis is part of a twenty minute speech I’m working on right now. You’d go cross-eyed digging it out of these notes. I better get myself over there and start practicing how to use it again.
    The Chair Question is a real writer question and one that proves you’ve been doing your homework, Sherrie! I probably have half a dozen office chairs and I hate them all. I used to have one of those giant orange “executive chairs” from the 60’s with real springs in the cushion, but I stupidly thought it would be easy to replace and gave it away when I moved. And haven’t found another since. Like you, I want my feet up, and I can’t sit still. I’m always wiggling around. I got so mad at my chair the other day, that I threw it out of the room and dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice. I had to make all the writing on my screen bigger, but what the heck. I have a wireless keyboard and wireless mouse, so I just cruise. Not highly recommended for everyone, but I haven’t used my laptop since I switched chairs.

    Reply
  33. Ohhh, great questions! I may need to save these for the blogger site since just the one about saggingmiddleitis is part of a twenty minute speech I’m working on right now. You’d go cross-eyed digging it out of these notes. I better get myself over there and start practicing how to use it again.
    The Chair Question is a real writer question and one that proves you’ve been doing your homework, Sherrie! I probably have half a dozen office chairs and I hate them all. I used to have one of those giant orange “executive chairs” from the 60’s with real springs in the cushion, but I stupidly thought it would be easy to replace and gave it away when I moved. And haven’t found another since. Like you, I want my feet up, and I can’t sit still. I’m always wiggling around. I got so mad at my chair the other day, that I threw it out of the room and dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice. I had to make all the writing on my screen bigger, but what the heck. I have a wireless keyboard and wireless mouse, so I just cruise. Not highly recommended for everyone, but I haven’t used my laptop since I switched chairs.

    Reply
  34. Ohhh, great questions! I may need to save these for the blogger site since just the one about saggingmiddleitis is part of a twenty minute speech I’m working on right now. You’d go cross-eyed digging it out of these notes. I better get myself over there and start practicing how to use it again.
    The Chair Question is a real writer question and one that proves you’ve been doing your homework, Sherrie! I probably have half a dozen office chairs and I hate them all. I used to have one of those giant orange “executive chairs” from the 60’s with real springs in the cushion, but I stupidly thought it would be easy to replace and gave it away when I moved. And haven’t found another since. Like you, I want my feet up, and I can’t sit still. I’m always wiggling around. I got so mad at my chair the other day, that I threw it out of the room and dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice. I had to make all the writing on my screen bigger, but what the heck. I have a wireless keyboard and wireless mouse, so I just cruise. Not highly recommended for everyone, but I haven’t used my laptop since I switched chairs.

    Reply
  35. Ohhh, great questions! I may need to save these for the blogger site since just the one about saggingmiddleitis is part of a twenty minute speech I’m working on right now. You’d go cross-eyed digging it out of these notes. I better get myself over there and start practicing how to use it again.
    The Chair Question is a real writer question and one that proves you’ve been doing your homework, Sherrie! I probably have half a dozen office chairs and I hate them all. I used to have one of those giant orange “executive chairs” from the 60’s with real springs in the cushion, but I stupidly thought it would be easy to replace and gave it away when I moved. And haven’t found another since. Like you, I want my feet up, and I can’t sit still. I’m always wiggling around. I got so mad at my chair the other day, that I threw it out of the room and dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice. I had to make all the writing on my screen bigger, but what the heck. I have a wireless keyboard and wireless mouse, so I just cruise. Not highly recommended for everyone, but I haven’t used my laptop since I switched chairs.

    Reply
  36. Maggie, I think your question probably comes under saggingmiddleitis. If my laptop will work at the hotel, I’ll try to answer next week, while lounging by the pool. “G” But yes, I do get stuck. Those first chapters fly from my fingers I’m so enthralled with the story. And then the stupid thing starts making demands on me, and I go bang up against a wall. I do have tricks, though. We’ll chat next week, see where we can take this.
    Gillian, same here. Blurbs, premises, and wretched titles ought to be a longer discussion, so I’ll add it to my notes next week. But I’ll tell you right now, my agent called last week, laughing, telling me she had good news and bad news. The good news is that she loves my new proposals. The bad news is that I’m the world’s worst title writer! She didn’t like Boo’s House of Illusion. Can you imagine?

    Reply
  37. Maggie, I think your question probably comes under saggingmiddleitis. If my laptop will work at the hotel, I’ll try to answer next week, while lounging by the pool. “G” But yes, I do get stuck. Those first chapters fly from my fingers I’m so enthralled with the story. And then the stupid thing starts making demands on me, and I go bang up against a wall. I do have tricks, though. We’ll chat next week, see where we can take this.
    Gillian, same here. Blurbs, premises, and wretched titles ought to be a longer discussion, so I’ll add it to my notes next week. But I’ll tell you right now, my agent called last week, laughing, telling me she had good news and bad news. The good news is that she loves my new proposals. The bad news is that I’m the world’s worst title writer! She didn’t like Boo’s House of Illusion. Can you imagine?

    Reply
  38. Maggie, I think your question probably comes under saggingmiddleitis. If my laptop will work at the hotel, I’ll try to answer next week, while lounging by the pool. “G” But yes, I do get stuck. Those first chapters fly from my fingers I’m so enthralled with the story. And then the stupid thing starts making demands on me, and I go bang up against a wall. I do have tricks, though. We’ll chat next week, see where we can take this.
    Gillian, same here. Blurbs, premises, and wretched titles ought to be a longer discussion, so I’ll add it to my notes next week. But I’ll tell you right now, my agent called last week, laughing, telling me she had good news and bad news. The good news is that she loves my new proposals. The bad news is that I’m the world’s worst title writer! She didn’t like Boo’s House of Illusion. Can you imagine?

    Reply
  39. Maggie, I think your question probably comes under saggingmiddleitis. If my laptop will work at the hotel, I’ll try to answer next week, while lounging by the pool. “G” But yes, I do get stuck. Those first chapters fly from my fingers I’m so enthralled with the story. And then the stupid thing starts making demands on me, and I go bang up against a wall. I do have tricks, though. We’ll chat next week, see where we can take this.
    Gillian, same here. Blurbs, premises, and wretched titles ought to be a longer discussion, so I’ll add it to my notes next week. But I’ll tell you right now, my agent called last week, laughing, telling me she had good news and bad news. The good news is that she loves my new proposals. The bad news is that I’m the world’s worst title writer! She didn’t like Boo’s House of Illusion. Can you imagine?

    Reply
  40. Maggie, I think your question probably comes under saggingmiddleitis. If my laptop will work at the hotel, I’ll try to answer next week, while lounging by the pool. “G” But yes, I do get stuck. Those first chapters fly from my fingers I’m so enthralled with the story. And then the stupid thing starts making demands on me, and I go bang up against a wall. I do have tricks, though. We’ll chat next week, see where we can take this.
    Gillian, same here. Blurbs, premises, and wretched titles ought to be a longer discussion, so I’ll add it to my notes next week. But I’ll tell you right now, my agent called last week, laughing, telling me she had good news and bad news. The good news is that she loves my new proposals. The bad news is that I’m the world’s worst title writer! She didn’t like Boo’s House of Illusion. Can you imagine?

    Reply
  41. “dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice.”
    LOL! I used to haul my humongous overstuffed club chair to my desk. With an ergonomic arrangement of pillows for support as I reclined, and feet propped on the footstool, I was snug as a bug in a boot.
    Like you, I am a wiggle worm, and just can’t sit still. Fortunately, before my office closed, I bought all 6 of their conference room chairs, which are perfect for reclining. But I’m hard on chairs because of all my wriggling and tilting and swiveling, and after a year, they start falling apart.
    I’m down to my last conference chair now, and getting paranoid about not being able to find a reasonable replacement. I wish chair makers would consult with writers, and come up with an affordable, comfortable line of chairs!

    Reply
  42. “dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice.”
    LOL! I used to haul my humongous overstuffed club chair to my desk. With an ergonomic arrangement of pillows for support as I reclined, and feet propped on the footstool, I was snug as a bug in a boot.
    Like you, I am a wiggle worm, and just can’t sit still. Fortunately, before my office closed, I bought all 6 of their conference room chairs, which are perfect for reclining. But I’m hard on chairs because of all my wriggling and tilting and swiveling, and after a year, they start falling apart.
    I’m down to my last conference chair now, and getting paranoid about not being able to find a reasonable replacement. I wish chair makers would consult with writers, and come up with an affordable, comfortable line of chairs!

    Reply
  43. “dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice.”
    LOL! I used to haul my humongous overstuffed club chair to my desk. With an ergonomic arrangement of pillows for support as I reclined, and feet propped on the footstool, I was snug as a bug in a boot.
    Like you, I am a wiggle worm, and just can’t sit still. Fortunately, before my office closed, I bought all 6 of their conference room chairs, which are perfect for reclining. But I’m hard on chairs because of all my wriggling and tilting and swiveling, and after a year, they start falling apart.
    I’m down to my last conference chair now, and getting paranoid about not being able to find a reasonable replacement. I wish chair makers would consult with writers, and come up with an affordable, comfortable line of chairs!

    Reply
  44. “dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice.”
    LOL! I used to haul my humongous overstuffed club chair to my desk. With an ergonomic arrangement of pillows for support as I reclined, and feet propped on the footstool, I was snug as a bug in a boot.
    Like you, I am a wiggle worm, and just can’t sit still. Fortunately, before my office closed, I bought all 6 of their conference room chairs, which are perfect for reclining. But I’m hard on chairs because of all my wriggling and tilting and swiveling, and after a year, they start falling apart.
    I’m down to my last conference chair now, and getting paranoid about not being able to find a reasonable replacement. I wish chair makers would consult with writers, and come up with an affordable, comfortable line of chairs!

    Reply
  45. “dragged in my lovely comfy recliner. Set it right in front of my new big screen monitor. And it’s soooo nice.”
    LOL! I used to haul my humongous overstuffed club chair to my desk. With an ergonomic arrangement of pillows for support as I reclined, and feet propped on the footstool, I was snug as a bug in a boot.
    Like you, I am a wiggle worm, and just can’t sit still. Fortunately, before my office closed, I bought all 6 of their conference room chairs, which are perfect for reclining. But I’m hard on chairs because of all my wriggling and tilting and swiveling, and after a year, they start falling apart.
    I’m down to my last conference chair now, and getting paranoid about not being able to find a reasonable replacement. I wish chair makers would consult with writers, and come up with an affordable, comfortable line of chairs!

    Reply
  46. I’ve yet to find the perfect chair . . . but I’m always looking. I usually have to change venues a few times a day anyway (coffee shop, then lunch spot, then coffee shop again, or home to the office). And while I’m driving from one to the other I’m milling over the next scene. A 20 minute drive or a trip to the dog park is great for working out “what comes next”. LOL!

    Reply
  47. I’ve yet to find the perfect chair . . . but I’m always looking. I usually have to change venues a few times a day anyway (coffee shop, then lunch spot, then coffee shop again, or home to the office). And while I’m driving from one to the other I’m milling over the next scene. A 20 minute drive or a trip to the dog park is great for working out “what comes next”. LOL!

    Reply
  48. I’ve yet to find the perfect chair . . . but I’m always looking. I usually have to change venues a few times a day anyway (coffee shop, then lunch spot, then coffee shop again, or home to the office). And while I’m driving from one to the other I’m milling over the next scene. A 20 minute drive or a trip to the dog park is great for working out “what comes next”. LOL!

    Reply
  49. I’ve yet to find the perfect chair . . . but I’m always looking. I usually have to change venues a few times a day anyway (coffee shop, then lunch spot, then coffee shop again, or home to the office). And while I’m driving from one to the other I’m milling over the next scene. A 20 minute drive or a trip to the dog park is great for working out “what comes next”. LOL!

    Reply
  50. I’ve yet to find the perfect chair . . . but I’m always looking. I usually have to change venues a few times a day anyway (coffee shop, then lunch spot, then coffee shop again, or home to the office). And while I’m driving from one to the other I’m milling over the next scene. A 20 minute drive or a trip to the dog park is great for working out “what comes next”. LOL!

    Reply
  51. Oh Pat, I’ll be there!
    Here’s my question. Do you ever “see” the end of the book before the beginning? And if you do, what techniques do you use to work backwards?
    Oh, and here’s another. As a Corporate America workaholic, mom, wife and writer, I’m always on the lookout for new forms of legal, low calorie stimulants. Got any tips?

    Reply
  52. Oh Pat, I’ll be there!
    Here’s my question. Do you ever “see” the end of the book before the beginning? And if you do, what techniques do you use to work backwards?
    Oh, and here’s another. As a Corporate America workaholic, mom, wife and writer, I’m always on the lookout for new forms of legal, low calorie stimulants. Got any tips?

    Reply
  53. Oh Pat, I’ll be there!
    Here’s my question. Do you ever “see” the end of the book before the beginning? And if you do, what techniques do you use to work backwards?
    Oh, and here’s another. As a Corporate America workaholic, mom, wife and writer, I’m always on the lookout for new forms of legal, low calorie stimulants. Got any tips?

    Reply
  54. Oh Pat, I’ll be there!
    Here’s my question. Do you ever “see” the end of the book before the beginning? And if you do, what techniques do you use to work backwards?
    Oh, and here’s another. As a Corporate America workaholic, mom, wife and writer, I’m always on the lookout for new forms of legal, low calorie stimulants. Got any tips?

    Reply
  55. Oh Pat, I’ll be there!
    Here’s my question. Do you ever “see” the end of the book before the beginning? And if you do, what techniques do you use to work backwards?
    Oh, and here’s another. As a Corporate America workaholic, mom, wife and writer, I’m always on the lookout for new forms of legal, low calorie stimulants. Got any tips?

    Reply
  56. Pat, how very generous of you to do this. I’ll own up to be one of those blog readers pestering for these pesky voyeuristic details.
    (Let’s not even talk about how I gushed over JoBev at the Literarcy Autographing.)
    Kalen, thank you for bringing up the chair. I’ll add desk to that, too. No matter what I try, I end up with stiff shoulders and aching arms.
    Do you like desks with keyboard trays or without? Do you like wide chairs with cushy bottoms or hard foam bottoms and a bucket seat-like hard-wired shape? Do you like chairs with support arm or no? Keyboard pad with wrist support or no? Mouse pad with wrist support or no?
    Pat and Sherrie: With writing in a reclined position and pillows surrounding you, how to you, um, prevent the problem of the eyelids cascading down to shut out the world to think in peace and quiet for a couple hours? 🙂

    Reply
  57. Pat, how very generous of you to do this. I’ll own up to be one of those blog readers pestering for these pesky voyeuristic details.
    (Let’s not even talk about how I gushed over JoBev at the Literarcy Autographing.)
    Kalen, thank you for bringing up the chair. I’ll add desk to that, too. No matter what I try, I end up with stiff shoulders and aching arms.
    Do you like desks with keyboard trays or without? Do you like wide chairs with cushy bottoms or hard foam bottoms and a bucket seat-like hard-wired shape? Do you like chairs with support arm or no? Keyboard pad with wrist support or no? Mouse pad with wrist support or no?
    Pat and Sherrie: With writing in a reclined position and pillows surrounding you, how to you, um, prevent the problem of the eyelids cascading down to shut out the world to think in peace and quiet for a couple hours? 🙂

    Reply
  58. Pat, how very generous of you to do this. I’ll own up to be one of those blog readers pestering for these pesky voyeuristic details.
    (Let’s not even talk about how I gushed over JoBev at the Literarcy Autographing.)
    Kalen, thank you for bringing up the chair. I’ll add desk to that, too. No matter what I try, I end up with stiff shoulders and aching arms.
    Do you like desks with keyboard trays or without? Do you like wide chairs with cushy bottoms or hard foam bottoms and a bucket seat-like hard-wired shape? Do you like chairs with support arm or no? Keyboard pad with wrist support or no? Mouse pad with wrist support or no?
    Pat and Sherrie: With writing in a reclined position and pillows surrounding you, how to you, um, prevent the problem of the eyelids cascading down to shut out the world to think in peace and quiet for a couple hours? 🙂

    Reply
  59. Pat, how very generous of you to do this. I’ll own up to be one of those blog readers pestering for these pesky voyeuristic details.
    (Let’s not even talk about how I gushed over JoBev at the Literarcy Autographing.)
    Kalen, thank you for bringing up the chair. I’ll add desk to that, too. No matter what I try, I end up with stiff shoulders and aching arms.
    Do you like desks with keyboard trays or without? Do you like wide chairs with cushy bottoms or hard foam bottoms and a bucket seat-like hard-wired shape? Do you like chairs with support arm or no? Keyboard pad with wrist support or no? Mouse pad with wrist support or no?
    Pat and Sherrie: With writing in a reclined position and pillows surrounding you, how to you, um, prevent the problem of the eyelids cascading down to shut out the world to think in peace and quiet for a couple hours? 🙂

    Reply
  60. Pat, how very generous of you to do this. I’ll own up to be one of those blog readers pestering for these pesky voyeuristic details.
    (Let’s not even talk about how I gushed over JoBev at the Literarcy Autographing.)
    Kalen, thank you for bringing up the chair. I’ll add desk to that, too. No matter what I try, I end up with stiff shoulders and aching arms.
    Do you like desks with keyboard trays or without? Do you like wide chairs with cushy bottoms or hard foam bottoms and a bucket seat-like hard-wired shape? Do you like chairs with support arm or no? Keyboard pad with wrist support or no? Mouse pad with wrist support or no?
    Pat and Sherrie: With writing in a reclined position and pillows surrounding you, how to you, um, prevent the problem of the eyelids cascading down to shut out the world to think in peace and quiet for a couple hours? 🙂

    Reply
  61. Keira, I don’t fall asleep when reclining at the computer. I’m usually too involved in what I’m doing. I am, however, adept at snatching a 5-10 minute power nap at the desk if I feel the need, but it’s an intentional thing.

    Reply
  62. Keira, I don’t fall asleep when reclining at the computer. I’m usually too involved in what I’m doing. I am, however, adept at snatching a 5-10 minute power nap at the desk if I feel the need, but it’s an intentional thing.

    Reply
  63. Keira, I don’t fall asleep when reclining at the computer. I’m usually too involved in what I’m doing. I am, however, adept at snatching a 5-10 minute power nap at the desk if I feel the need, but it’s an intentional thing.

    Reply
  64. Keira, I don’t fall asleep when reclining at the computer. I’m usually too involved in what I’m doing. I am, however, adept at snatching a 5-10 minute power nap at the desk if I feel the need, but it’s an intentional thing.

    Reply
  65. Keira, I don’t fall asleep when reclining at the computer. I’m usually too involved in what I’m doing. I am, however, adept at snatching a 5-10 minute power nap at the desk if I feel the need, but it’s an intentional thing.

    Reply
  66. Jo here.
    On chairs, I have an Aeron. Worth every dollar. IMO, to sit in one is to become obsessed by having one.
    On process — aieeeee!
    Pat, I could do with a bit of heat. While I was in Dallas it reached 36 C here, which is really hot for Victoria, but since I came back it’s been cool and often rainy. It’s just not right.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  67. Jo here.
    On chairs, I have an Aeron. Worth every dollar. IMO, to sit in one is to become obsessed by having one.
    On process — aieeeee!
    Pat, I could do with a bit of heat. While I was in Dallas it reached 36 C here, which is really hot for Victoria, but since I came back it’s been cool and often rainy. It’s just not right.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  68. Jo here.
    On chairs, I have an Aeron. Worth every dollar. IMO, to sit in one is to become obsessed by having one.
    On process — aieeeee!
    Pat, I could do with a bit of heat. While I was in Dallas it reached 36 C here, which is really hot for Victoria, but since I came back it’s been cool and often rainy. It’s just not right.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  69. Jo here.
    On chairs, I have an Aeron. Worth every dollar. IMO, to sit in one is to become obsessed by having one.
    On process — aieeeee!
    Pat, I could do with a bit of heat. While I was in Dallas it reached 36 C here, which is really hot for Victoria, but since I came back it’s been cool and often rainy. It’s just not right.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  70. Jo here.
    On chairs, I have an Aeron. Worth every dollar. IMO, to sit in one is to become obsessed by having one.
    On process — aieeeee!
    Pat, I could do with a bit of heat. While I was in Dallas it reached 36 C here, which is really hot for Victoria, but since I came back it’s been cool and often rainy. It’s just not right.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  71. Sorry, Jo, you have to pay for your gorgeous flowers somehow!
    I’ve looked at the Aeron chairs, but even though the description mentions some kind of stool, I’ve never seen one. I cannot work without putting my feet up. Never have. No idea why. I’ve broken more drawers opening them for footrests!

    Reply
  72. Sorry, Jo, you have to pay for your gorgeous flowers somehow!
    I’ve looked at the Aeron chairs, but even though the description mentions some kind of stool, I’ve never seen one. I cannot work without putting my feet up. Never have. No idea why. I’ve broken more drawers opening them for footrests!

    Reply
  73. Sorry, Jo, you have to pay for your gorgeous flowers somehow!
    I’ve looked at the Aeron chairs, but even though the description mentions some kind of stool, I’ve never seen one. I cannot work without putting my feet up. Never have. No idea why. I’ve broken more drawers opening them for footrests!

    Reply
  74. Sorry, Jo, you have to pay for your gorgeous flowers somehow!
    I’ve looked at the Aeron chairs, but even though the description mentions some kind of stool, I’ve never seen one. I cannot work without putting my feet up. Never have. No idea why. I’ve broken more drawers opening them for footrests!

    Reply
  75. Sorry, Jo, you have to pay for your gorgeous flowers somehow!
    I’ve looked at the Aeron chairs, but even though the description mentions some kind of stool, I’ve never seen one. I cannot work without putting my feet up. Never have. No idea why. I’ve broken more drawers opening them for footrests!

    Reply

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