The Impulsive Marriage

Friday's childNicola here, thinking about those impulsive marriages contracted both in novels and also in real life.

“I’ll marry the first female I see!” Rejected by the Incomparable Isabella, finished with love but urgently needing to obtain his inheritance, Sherry, Viscount Sheringham makes a reckless decision and ends up married to his childhood friend Hero Wantage. Friday’s Child is one of Georgette Heyer’s most charming novels (although at times I want to smack a bit of sense into Sherry and tell Hero to find someone more deserving of her.) It also acted as an inspiration for any number of Regency historicals where young men intent on gaining control of their fortune marry an unlikely heroine. Possibly these days there are books where heiresses marry unsuitable men for the same reason and perhaps someone can recommend one to me.

This always seemed to me an unlikely if entertaining trope in historical romance. I say unlikely because I had an image of the world of aristocratic marriages tightly controlled by parents or guardians. Advantageous marriages, money in return for a title, carefully chaperoned young ladies… It didn’t seem to leave much space for the impulsive marriage.  Then I came across Lady Diana Spencer.

I found Lady Diana by a slightly circuitous route, via Lydiard Park, a beautiful 18th century house only a Lydiardfew miles from where I live. Lydiard isn’t particularly well known on the heritage trail and it deserves to be better known because it is a stunningly beautiful house with a fascinating history. It has a room called the “Blue Closet” which is devoted to Lady Diana Spencer and her work as an artist for Wedgwood.

Lady Diana was the daughter of the 3rd Duke of Marlborough. By 1757 she had been on the marriage market for a number of years and had had quite a few offers, none of which she had chosen to accept. She was twenty-two and so not entirely on the shelf and her parents were not pressuring her into marriage. She had a reputation for being a bit on the flighty side but nothing damaging.

220px-Frederick-st-johnAnd then, as Mrs Delany wrote to her sister, this happened: “Lady Dana Spencer and Lord Bolingbroke… They were together at a party at Vauxhall… The company was teasing Lord Bolingbroke to marry and he turned quick to Lady Diana and said will you have me? Yes, to be sure, she replied.”

At the age of twenty-four, Bolingbroke already had the reputation of being a difficult young man, a rake, a drinker and a gambler with an addiction to spending money. Fortunately for him, Lady Diana had a large fortune. But this marriage, made in haste, did not have the romantic outcome that Heyer would have written. Both Bolingbroke and Lady Diana were unfaithful; she walked out on her unhappy marriage, had an affair with Topham Beauclerk and married him after Bolingbroke divorced her in 1768. That marriage, unfortunately, was no happier than her first.

To my mind the most unusual thing about Lady Diana was that she was one of a circle of aristocratic Lady Diana design women whose drawings were commissioned by Josiah Wedgwood to decorate his tableware. Drawing and painting was of course admired as a female accomplishment in the Georgian period but for aristocratic female artists to be paid for their designs by a businessman such as Wedgwood was remarkable. For Wedgwood the benefit of using the drawings of Lady Diana and her colleagues was that they were popular amongst the upper classes although some critics dismissed them as imitative rather than imaginative. I think they are gorgeous!

The glorious painted window in the blue closet at Lydiard Park, originally the dressing room for the main bedchamber, provided much inspiration for Lady Diana’s work. Today the room also holds examples of the designs she did for Wedgwood as well as lovely painted wall panels featuring her children. You can read more about Lydiard Park here and should you be passing, it is well worth a visit!

ImproperLady Diana Beauclerk's story is told in "Improper Pursuits" by Carola Hicks. I’m glad that in our stories if not always in life, the “impulsive marriage” so often turns out well. One of my favourites books in this style is Marry In Haste by Jane Aiken Hodge. Do you have a favourite to recommend?

155 thoughts on “The Impulsive Marriage”

  1. THE IDEAL WIFE by Mary Balogh is the first one that came to my mind. Not my favorite book by her, but I’m such a fan. I love everything she writes.
    As for “true romance” not being the likely outcome from such situation – you are right. But I don’t read HR for reality (smile).
    I really like this website. You ladies rock! I’ve learned some really interesting things here.

    Reply
  2. THE IDEAL WIFE by Mary Balogh is the first one that came to my mind. Not my favorite book by her, but I’m such a fan. I love everything she writes.
    As for “true romance” not being the likely outcome from such situation – you are right. But I don’t read HR for reality (smile).
    I really like this website. You ladies rock! I’ve learned some really interesting things here.

    Reply
  3. THE IDEAL WIFE by Mary Balogh is the first one that came to my mind. Not my favorite book by her, but I’m such a fan. I love everything she writes.
    As for “true romance” not being the likely outcome from such situation – you are right. But I don’t read HR for reality (smile).
    I really like this website. You ladies rock! I’ve learned some really interesting things here.

    Reply
  4. THE IDEAL WIFE by Mary Balogh is the first one that came to my mind. Not my favorite book by her, but I’m such a fan. I love everything she writes.
    As for “true romance” not being the likely outcome from such situation – you are right. But I don’t read HR for reality (smile).
    I really like this website. You ladies rock! I’ve learned some really interesting things here.

    Reply
  5. THE IDEAL WIFE by Mary Balogh is the first one that came to my mind. Not my favorite book by her, but I’m such a fan. I love everything she writes.
    As for “true romance” not being the likely outcome from such situation – you are right. But I don’t read HR for reality (smile).
    I really like this website. You ladies rock! I’ve learned some really interesting things here.

    Reply
  6. What a fun blog, Nicola! I’d never heard of this Lady Diana Spencer and she sounds fascinating. I wish she’d had a happy ending, of course! My own heiress marrying to secure an inheritance story is THE BARGAIN, (Originally published as The Would Be Widow.) In which she marries a dying officer in order to secure her fortune, and then he hasn’t the grace to die for her. *G* Naturally it has a happy ending. It’s a fun variation of the marriage of convenience trope.

    Reply
  7. What a fun blog, Nicola! I’d never heard of this Lady Diana Spencer and she sounds fascinating. I wish she’d had a happy ending, of course! My own heiress marrying to secure an inheritance story is THE BARGAIN, (Originally published as The Would Be Widow.) In which she marries a dying officer in order to secure her fortune, and then he hasn’t the grace to die for her. *G* Naturally it has a happy ending. It’s a fun variation of the marriage of convenience trope.

    Reply
  8. What a fun blog, Nicola! I’d never heard of this Lady Diana Spencer and she sounds fascinating. I wish she’d had a happy ending, of course! My own heiress marrying to secure an inheritance story is THE BARGAIN, (Originally published as The Would Be Widow.) In which she marries a dying officer in order to secure her fortune, and then he hasn’t the grace to die for her. *G* Naturally it has a happy ending. It’s a fun variation of the marriage of convenience trope.

    Reply
  9. What a fun blog, Nicola! I’d never heard of this Lady Diana Spencer and she sounds fascinating. I wish she’d had a happy ending, of course! My own heiress marrying to secure an inheritance story is THE BARGAIN, (Originally published as The Would Be Widow.) In which she marries a dying officer in order to secure her fortune, and then he hasn’t the grace to die for her. *G* Naturally it has a happy ending. It’s a fun variation of the marriage of convenience trope.

    Reply
  10. What a fun blog, Nicola! I’d never heard of this Lady Diana Spencer and she sounds fascinating. I wish she’d had a happy ending, of course! My own heiress marrying to secure an inheritance story is THE BARGAIN, (Originally published as The Would Be Widow.) In which she marries a dying officer in order to secure her fortune, and then he hasn’t the grace to die for her. *G* Naturally it has a happy ending. It’s a fun variation of the marriage of convenience trope.

    Reply
  11. Absolutely, Mary. We want these characters to find a way to make an impulsive marriage work. And I think it can work in real life too but maybe not as much as in books!
    Thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the blog!

    Reply
  12. Absolutely, Mary. We want these characters to find a way to make an impulsive marriage work. And I think it can work in real life too but maybe not as much as in books!
    Thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the blog!

    Reply
  13. Absolutely, Mary. We want these characters to find a way to make an impulsive marriage work. And I think it can work in real life too but maybe not as much as in books!
    Thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the blog!

    Reply
  14. Absolutely, Mary. We want these characters to find a way to make an impulsive marriage work. And I think it can work in real life too but maybe not as much as in books!
    Thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the blog!

    Reply
  15. Absolutely, Mary. We want these characters to find a way to make an impulsive marriage work. And I think it can work in real life too but maybe not as much as in books!
    Thank you so much – we’re thrilled you love the blog!

    Reply
  16. Thank you, Mary Jo. Yes, there were quite a few interesting Lady Diana Spencers! This one seems to have had very poor taste in men but to have been talented and charming. An interesting character.
    As you know, I love The Bargain, but at first thought wouldn’t have characterised it as an impulsive marriage story. But actually it is and I love that your heiress is the sort of person who makes plans and likes being in control and then the plan goes awry… Lovely, lovely book!

    Reply
  17. Thank you, Mary Jo. Yes, there were quite a few interesting Lady Diana Spencers! This one seems to have had very poor taste in men but to have been talented and charming. An interesting character.
    As you know, I love The Bargain, but at first thought wouldn’t have characterised it as an impulsive marriage story. But actually it is and I love that your heiress is the sort of person who makes plans and likes being in control and then the plan goes awry… Lovely, lovely book!

    Reply
  18. Thank you, Mary Jo. Yes, there were quite a few interesting Lady Diana Spencers! This one seems to have had very poor taste in men but to have been talented and charming. An interesting character.
    As you know, I love The Bargain, but at first thought wouldn’t have characterised it as an impulsive marriage story. But actually it is and I love that your heiress is the sort of person who makes plans and likes being in control and then the plan goes awry… Lovely, lovely book!

    Reply
  19. Thank you, Mary Jo. Yes, there were quite a few interesting Lady Diana Spencers! This one seems to have had very poor taste in men but to have been talented and charming. An interesting character.
    As you know, I love The Bargain, but at first thought wouldn’t have characterised it as an impulsive marriage story. But actually it is and I love that your heiress is the sort of person who makes plans and likes being in control and then the plan goes awry… Lovely, lovely book!

    Reply
  20. Thank you, Mary Jo. Yes, there were quite a few interesting Lady Diana Spencers! This one seems to have had very poor taste in men but to have been talented and charming. An interesting character.
    As you know, I love The Bargain, but at first thought wouldn’t have characterised it as an impulsive marriage story. But actually it is and I love that your heiress is the sort of person who makes plans and likes being in control and then the plan goes awry… Lovely, lovely book!

    Reply
  21. Lady Diana is fascinating, Nicola. Thanks for sharing that story, but I have to wonder if there was a bit of backstory that made it less impulsive, though no less rash. Perahps that’s just the author in me.
    I love marriage of convenience/forced marriage stories, and I’ve written quite a few, but there’s always a reason, so I can’t call them impulsive. In fact in Friday’s Child, the choice of bride is impulsive, but the need to marry is imperative. I use a similar “need to marry quick for inheritance” plot in Forbidden Magic.
    In my next book it’s strictly sensible convenience for both of them, which I like. If it starts out too oddly it can be hard to rescue the characters from being TSTL, especially if one or both parties bring obvious problems.
    I can’t think of a truly impulsive marriage in a historical romance. I hope someone here can suggest one.

    Reply
  22. Lady Diana is fascinating, Nicola. Thanks for sharing that story, but I have to wonder if there was a bit of backstory that made it less impulsive, though no less rash. Perahps that’s just the author in me.
    I love marriage of convenience/forced marriage stories, and I’ve written quite a few, but there’s always a reason, so I can’t call them impulsive. In fact in Friday’s Child, the choice of bride is impulsive, but the need to marry is imperative. I use a similar “need to marry quick for inheritance” plot in Forbidden Magic.
    In my next book it’s strictly sensible convenience for both of them, which I like. If it starts out too oddly it can be hard to rescue the characters from being TSTL, especially if one or both parties bring obvious problems.
    I can’t think of a truly impulsive marriage in a historical romance. I hope someone here can suggest one.

    Reply
  23. Lady Diana is fascinating, Nicola. Thanks for sharing that story, but I have to wonder if there was a bit of backstory that made it less impulsive, though no less rash. Perahps that’s just the author in me.
    I love marriage of convenience/forced marriage stories, and I’ve written quite a few, but there’s always a reason, so I can’t call them impulsive. In fact in Friday’s Child, the choice of bride is impulsive, but the need to marry is imperative. I use a similar “need to marry quick for inheritance” plot in Forbidden Magic.
    In my next book it’s strictly sensible convenience for both of them, which I like. If it starts out too oddly it can be hard to rescue the characters from being TSTL, especially if one or both parties bring obvious problems.
    I can’t think of a truly impulsive marriage in a historical romance. I hope someone here can suggest one.

    Reply
  24. Lady Diana is fascinating, Nicola. Thanks for sharing that story, but I have to wonder if there was a bit of backstory that made it less impulsive, though no less rash. Perahps that’s just the author in me.
    I love marriage of convenience/forced marriage stories, and I’ve written quite a few, but there’s always a reason, so I can’t call them impulsive. In fact in Friday’s Child, the choice of bride is impulsive, but the need to marry is imperative. I use a similar “need to marry quick for inheritance” plot in Forbidden Magic.
    In my next book it’s strictly sensible convenience for both of them, which I like. If it starts out too oddly it can be hard to rescue the characters from being TSTL, especially if one or both parties bring obvious problems.
    I can’t think of a truly impulsive marriage in a historical romance. I hope someone here can suggest one.

    Reply
  25. Lady Diana is fascinating, Nicola. Thanks for sharing that story, but I have to wonder if there was a bit of backstory that made it less impulsive, though no less rash. Perahps that’s just the author in me.
    I love marriage of convenience/forced marriage stories, and I’ve written quite a few, but there’s always a reason, so I can’t call them impulsive. In fact in Friday’s Child, the choice of bride is impulsive, but the need to marry is imperative. I use a similar “need to marry quick for inheritance” plot in Forbidden Magic.
    In my next book it’s strictly sensible convenience for both of them, which I like. If it starts out too oddly it can be hard to rescue the characters from being TSTL, especially if one or both parties bring obvious problems.
    I can’t think of a truly impulsive marriage in a historical romance. I hope someone here can suggest one.

    Reply
  26. Certainly there were reasons why Bolingbroke wanted to marry, Jo. He needed money and the respectability of a wife to extricate him from a tricky situation with a mistress! I’m not sure why Diana acted so impulsively. Although they knew each other through the ties of family and society I can’t see what would make him an appealing suitor, especially as her parents weren’t pressuring her into marriage.
    You’re right though. There are few truly impulsive marriages but sometimes impulsive choices of partner. Usually there is a good reason why the marriage is necessary!

    Reply
  27. Certainly there were reasons why Bolingbroke wanted to marry, Jo. He needed money and the respectability of a wife to extricate him from a tricky situation with a mistress! I’m not sure why Diana acted so impulsively. Although they knew each other through the ties of family and society I can’t see what would make him an appealing suitor, especially as her parents weren’t pressuring her into marriage.
    You’re right though. There are few truly impulsive marriages but sometimes impulsive choices of partner. Usually there is a good reason why the marriage is necessary!

    Reply
  28. Certainly there were reasons why Bolingbroke wanted to marry, Jo. He needed money and the respectability of a wife to extricate him from a tricky situation with a mistress! I’m not sure why Diana acted so impulsively. Although they knew each other through the ties of family and society I can’t see what would make him an appealing suitor, especially as her parents weren’t pressuring her into marriage.
    You’re right though. There are few truly impulsive marriages but sometimes impulsive choices of partner. Usually there is a good reason why the marriage is necessary!

    Reply
  29. Certainly there were reasons why Bolingbroke wanted to marry, Jo. He needed money and the respectability of a wife to extricate him from a tricky situation with a mistress! I’m not sure why Diana acted so impulsively. Although they knew each other through the ties of family and society I can’t see what would make him an appealing suitor, especially as her parents weren’t pressuring her into marriage.
    You’re right though. There are few truly impulsive marriages but sometimes impulsive choices of partner. Usually there is a good reason why the marriage is necessary!

    Reply
  30. Certainly there were reasons why Bolingbroke wanted to marry, Jo. He needed money and the respectability of a wife to extricate him from a tricky situation with a mistress! I’m not sure why Diana acted so impulsively. Although they knew each other through the ties of family and society I can’t see what would make him an appealing suitor, especially as her parents weren’t pressuring her into marriage.
    You’re right though. There are few truly impulsive marriages but sometimes impulsive choices of partner. Usually there is a good reason why the marriage is necessary!

    Reply
  31. I’m so glad you enjoy the story, but it was pretty impulsive. Lady Jocelyn goes to the hospital to visit an injured friend, tells him her troubles, he says that his dying friend might be able to help, so she goes into the room and proposes to him. Then, as you say, all goes awry!

    Reply
  32. I’m so glad you enjoy the story, but it was pretty impulsive. Lady Jocelyn goes to the hospital to visit an injured friend, tells him her troubles, he says that his dying friend might be able to help, so she goes into the room and proposes to him. Then, as you say, all goes awry!

    Reply
  33. I’m so glad you enjoy the story, but it was pretty impulsive. Lady Jocelyn goes to the hospital to visit an injured friend, tells him her troubles, he says that his dying friend might be able to help, so she goes into the room and proposes to him. Then, as you say, all goes awry!

    Reply
  34. I’m so glad you enjoy the story, but it was pretty impulsive. Lady Jocelyn goes to the hospital to visit an injured friend, tells him her troubles, he says that his dying friend might be able to help, so she goes into the room and proposes to him. Then, as you say, all goes awry!

    Reply
  35. I’m so glad you enjoy the story, but it was pretty impulsive. Lady Jocelyn goes to the hospital to visit an injured friend, tells him her troubles, he says that his dying friend might be able to help, so she goes into the room and proposes to him. Then, as you say, all goes awry!

    Reply
  36. Nicola–when I read about Lady Diana accepting Bolingbroke on the way home from Vauxhall, my first thought was that she might have had a little too much to drink. As Jo said, there was probably more to it; maybe she’d been quietly pining for him. We could all make up stories for that situation.

    Reply
  37. Nicola–when I read about Lady Diana accepting Bolingbroke on the way home from Vauxhall, my first thought was that she might have had a little too much to drink. As Jo said, there was probably more to it; maybe she’d been quietly pining for him. We could all make up stories for that situation.

    Reply
  38. Nicola–when I read about Lady Diana accepting Bolingbroke on the way home from Vauxhall, my first thought was that she might have had a little too much to drink. As Jo said, there was probably more to it; maybe she’d been quietly pining for him. We could all make up stories for that situation.

    Reply
  39. Nicola–when I read about Lady Diana accepting Bolingbroke on the way home from Vauxhall, my first thought was that she might have had a little too much to drink. As Jo said, there was probably more to it; maybe she’d been quietly pining for him. We could all make up stories for that situation.

    Reply
  40. Nicola–when I read about Lady Diana accepting Bolingbroke on the way home from Vauxhall, my first thought was that she might have had a little too much to drink. As Jo said, there was probably more to it; maybe she’d been quietly pining for him. We could all make up stories for that situation.

    Reply
  41. My favorite is, of course, Friday’s Child, by Georgette Heyer, and I love Mary Jo’s The bargain, too. I wrote a twist on that set-up for my story in Mischief and Mistletoe and it was fun to write, and I also wrote a short Scottish story that was a “I’ll marry the first woman I see” plot—and that was fun too.
    But I’m thinking there are probably a lot more real life stories of impulsive marriages. Plenty of war-time marriages, for instance, of which some even worked out well afterwards. And surely there are plenty of impulsive Los Vegas marriages that worked out.
    A wonderful fictional war-time story is Eva Ibbotson’s The Morning Gift.

    Reply
  42. My favorite is, of course, Friday’s Child, by Georgette Heyer, and I love Mary Jo’s The bargain, too. I wrote a twist on that set-up for my story in Mischief and Mistletoe and it was fun to write, and I also wrote a short Scottish story that was a “I’ll marry the first woman I see” plot—and that was fun too.
    But I’m thinking there are probably a lot more real life stories of impulsive marriages. Plenty of war-time marriages, for instance, of which some even worked out well afterwards. And surely there are plenty of impulsive Los Vegas marriages that worked out.
    A wonderful fictional war-time story is Eva Ibbotson’s The Morning Gift.

    Reply
  43. My favorite is, of course, Friday’s Child, by Georgette Heyer, and I love Mary Jo’s The bargain, too. I wrote a twist on that set-up for my story in Mischief and Mistletoe and it was fun to write, and I also wrote a short Scottish story that was a “I’ll marry the first woman I see” plot—and that was fun too.
    But I’m thinking there are probably a lot more real life stories of impulsive marriages. Plenty of war-time marriages, for instance, of which some even worked out well afterwards. And surely there are plenty of impulsive Los Vegas marriages that worked out.
    A wonderful fictional war-time story is Eva Ibbotson’s The Morning Gift.

    Reply
  44. My favorite is, of course, Friday’s Child, by Georgette Heyer, and I love Mary Jo’s The bargain, too. I wrote a twist on that set-up for my story in Mischief and Mistletoe and it was fun to write, and I also wrote a short Scottish story that was a “I’ll marry the first woman I see” plot—and that was fun too.
    But I’m thinking there are probably a lot more real life stories of impulsive marriages. Plenty of war-time marriages, for instance, of which some even worked out well afterwards. And surely there are plenty of impulsive Los Vegas marriages that worked out.
    A wonderful fictional war-time story is Eva Ibbotson’s The Morning Gift.

    Reply
  45. My favorite is, of course, Friday’s Child, by Georgette Heyer, and I love Mary Jo’s The bargain, too. I wrote a twist on that set-up for my story in Mischief and Mistletoe and it was fun to write, and I also wrote a short Scottish story that was a “I’ll marry the first woman I see” plot—and that was fun too.
    But I’m thinking there are probably a lot more real life stories of impulsive marriages. Plenty of war-time marriages, for instance, of which some even worked out well afterwards. And surely there are plenty of impulsive Los Vegas marriages that worked out.
    A wonderful fictional war-time story is Eva Ibbotson’s The Morning Gift.

    Reply
  46. Just one small correction if I may. The hero’s nickname in Friday’s Child is Sherry. Ferdy is the Hon. Ferdinand Fakenham who, along with Gil and George, is one of Sherry’s friends. I’ve always loved the secondary characters in that book who are charming and funny and very protective of Hero.

    Reply
  47. Just one small correction if I may. The hero’s nickname in Friday’s Child is Sherry. Ferdy is the Hon. Ferdinand Fakenham who, along with Gil and George, is one of Sherry’s friends. I’ve always loved the secondary characters in that book who are charming and funny and very protective of Hero.

    Reply
  48. Just one small correction if I may. The hero’s nickname in Friday’s Child is Sherry. Ferdy is the Hon. Ferdinand Fakenham who, along with Gil and George, is one of Sherry’s friends. I’ve always loved the secondary characters in that book who are charming and funny and very protective of Hero.

    Reply
  49. Just one small correction if I may. The hero’s nickname in Friday’s Child is Sherry. Ferdy is the Hon. Ferdinand Fakenham who, along with Gil and George, is one of Sherry’s friends. I’ve always loved the secondary characters in that book who are charming and funny and very protective of Hero.

    Reply
  50. Just one small correction if I may. The hero’s nickname in Friday’s Child is Sherry. Ferdy is the Hon. Ferdinand Fakenham who, along with Gil and George, is one of Sherry’s friends. I’ve always loved the secondary characters in that book who are charming and funny and very protective of Hero.

    Reply
  51. Absolutely fascinating post, Nicola! And I had never heard of this Lady Diana’s artistic talent.Putting this house on my bucket list. I love The Bargain and The Ideal Wife.
    Another I love is the first book in Mary Balogh’s Slightly series, name escapes me now. They marry so she can keep custody of some children.

    Reply
  52. Absolutely fascinating post, Nicola! And I had never heard of this Lady Diana’s artistic talent.Putting this house on my bucket list. I love The Bargain and The Ideal Wife.
    Another I love is the first book in Mary Balogh’s Slightly series, name escapes me now. They marry so she can keep custody of some children.

    Reply
  53. Absolutely fascinating post, Nicola! And I had never heard of this Lady Diana’s artistic talent.Putting this house on my bucket list. I love The Bargain and The Ideal Wife.
    Another I love is the first book in Mary Balogh’s Slightly series, name escapes me now. They marry so she can keep custody of some children.

    Reply
  54. Absolutely fascinating post, Nicola! And I had never heard of this Lady Diana’s artistic talent.Putting this house on my bucket list. I love The Bargain and The Ideal Wife.
    Another I love is the first book in Mary Balogh’s Slightly series, name escapes me now. They marry so she can keep custody of some children.

    Reply
  55. Absolutely fascinating post, Nicola! And I had never heard of this Lady Diana’s artistic talent.Putting this house on my bucket list. I love The Bargain and The Ideal Wife.
    Another I love is the first book in Mary Balogh’s Slightly series, name escapes me now. They marry so she can keep custody of some children.

    Reply
  56. I loved that book. must have read it 3 times, at least and it’s a keeper. but I love all your historical books. I also enjoyed your YA trilogy.
    I love g heyer’s novels although Friday’s child is not my favorite.

    Reply
  57. I loved that book. must have read it 3 times, at least and it’s a keeper. but I love all your historical books. I also enjoyed your YA trilogy.
    I love g heyer’s novels although Friday’s child is not my favorite.

    Reply
  58. I loved that book. must have read it 3 times, at least and it’s a keeper. but I love all your historical books. I also enjoyed your YA trilogy.
    I love g heyer’s novels although Friday’s child is not my favorite.

    Reply
  59. I loved that book. must have read it 3 times, at least and it’s a keeper. but I love all your historical books. I also enjoyed your YA trilogy.
    I love g heyer’s novels although Friday’s child is not my favorite.

    Reply
  60. I loved that book. must have read it 3 times, at least and it’s a keeper. but I love all your historical books. I also enjoyed your YA trilogy.
    I love g heyer’s novels although Friday’s child is not my favorite.

    Reply
  61. Poor Lady Diana! A bit squiffy on drink! I definitely think the whole raffish atmosphere of Vauxhall must have had something to do with it. How I wish we could re-write their story with a happy ending!

    Reply
  62. Poor Lady Diana! A bit squiffy on drink! I definitely think the whole raffish atmosphere of Vauxhall must have had something to do with it. How I wish we could re-write their story with a happy ending!

    Reply
  63. Poor Lady Diana! A bit squiffy on drink! I definitely think the whole raffish atmosphere of Vauxhall must have had something to do with it. How I wish we could re-write their story with a happy ending!

    Reply
  64. Poor Lady Diana! A bit squiffy on drink! I definitely think the whole raffish atmosphere of Vauxhall must have had something to do with it. How I wish we could re-write their story with a happy ending!

    Reply
  65. Poor Lady Diana! A bit squiffy on drink! I definitely think the whole raffish atmosphere of Vauxhall must have had something to do with it. How I wish we could re-write their story with a happy ending!

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Louisa! Lydiard is such a wonderful place to visit. The house is gorgeous, especially the blue closet, and the grounds have been restored with the 18th century ice house, lake and plunge pool! (Not that anyone except the swans would want to plunge into it.) There’s also a medieval church with a tomb called the golden cavalier, life size and – yes – gold!

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Louisa! Lydiard is such a wonderful place to visit. The house is gorgeous, especially the blue closet, and the grounds have been restored with the 18th century ice house, lake and plunge pool! (Not that anyone except the swans would want to plunge into it.) There’s also a medieval church with a tomb called the golden cavalier, life size and – yes – gold!

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Louisa! Lydiard is such a wonderful place to visit. The house is gorgeous, especially the blue closet, and the grounds have been restored with the 18th century ice house, lake and plunge pool! (Not that anyone except the swans would want to plunge into it.) There’s also a medieval church with a tomb called the golden cavalier, life size and – yes – gold!

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Louisa! Lydiard is such a wonderful place to visit. The house is gorgeous, especially the blue closet, and the grounds have been restored with the 18th century ice house, lake and plunge pool! (Not that anyone except the swans would want to plunge into it.) There’s also a medieval church with a tomb called the golden cavalier, life size and – yes – gold!

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Louisa! Lydiard is such a wonderful place to visit. The house is gorgeous, especially the blue closet, and the grounds have been restored with the 18th century ice house, lake and plunge pool! (Not that anyone except the swans would want to plunge into it.) There’s also a medieval church with a tomb called the golden cavalier, life size and – yes – gold!

    Reply
  71. This is one of my favorite tropes, so I’ve probably read dozens of books with this theme! Of course, MJP’s The Would Be Widow(haven’t read it in the new release version yet),and Jo Beverly’s An Arranged Marriage, A Little Bit Wild by Victoria Dahl, The Arrangement, Slightly Married and First Comes Marriage by Mary Balogh, In For a Penny by Rose Lerner, Nothing Venture by Patricia Wentworth(actually a mystery with an impulsive marriage subplot), The Accidental Abduction by Darcie Wilde, To Seduce a Sinner by Elizabeth Hoyt, The Abduction of Julia by Karen Hawkins(a very funny book), Meet Me at Midnight by Suzanne Enoch, The Admiral’s Penniless Bride by Carla Kelly, Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas, Suddenly by Candace Camp, I could go on and on! Edith Layton also wrote a few, including The Cad.
    However I have not read Friday’s Child, it’s now going on my to-be-read list.

    Reply
  72. This is one of my favorite tropes, so I’ve probably read dozens of books with this theme! Of course, MJP’s The Would Be Widow(haven’t read it in the new release version yet),and Jo Beverly’s An Arranged Marriage, A Little Bit Wild by Victoria Dahl, The Arrangement, Slightly Married and First Comes Marriage by Mary Balogh, In For a Penny by Rose Lerner, Nothing Venture by Patricia Wentworth(actually a mystery with an impulsive marriage subplot), The Accidental Abduction by Darcie Wilde, To Seduce a Sinner by Elizabeth Hoyt, The Abduction of Julia by Karen Hawkins(a very funny book), Meet Me at Midnight by Suzanne Enoch, The Admiral’s Penniless Bride by Carla Kelly, Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas, Suddenly by Candace Camp, I could go on and on! Edith Layton also wrote a few, including The Cad.
    However I have not read Friday’s Child, it’s now going on my to-be-read list.

    Reply
  73. This is one of my favorite tropes, so I’ve probably read dozens of books with this theme! Of course, MJP’s The Would Be Widow(haven’t read it in the new release version yet),and Jo Beverly’s An Arranged Marriage, A Little Bit Wild by Victoria Dahl, The Arrangement, Slightly Married and First Comes Marriage by Mary Balogh, In For a Penny by Rose Lerner, Nothing Venture by Patricia Wentworth(actually a mystery with an impulsive marriage subplot), The Accidental Abduction by Darcie Wilde, To Seduce a Sinner by Elizabeth Hoyt, The Abduction of Julia by Karen Hawkins(a very funny book), Meet Me at Midnight by Suzanne Enoch, The Admiral’s Penniless Bride by Carla Kelly, Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas, Suddenly by Candace Camp, I could go on and on! Edith Layton also wrote a few, including The Cad.
    However I have not read Friday’s Child, it’s now going on my to-be-read list.

    Reply
  74. This is one of my favorite tropes, so I’ve probably read dozens of books with this theme! Of course, MJP’s The Would Be Widow(haven’t read it in the new release version yet),and Jo Beverly’s An Arranged Marriage, A Little Bit Wild by Victoria Dahl, The Arrangement, Slightly Married and First Comes Marriage by Mary Balogh, In For a Penny by Rose Lerner, Nothing Venture by Patricia Wentworth(actually a mystery with an impulsive marriage subplot), The Accidental Abduction by Darcie Wilde, To Seduce a Sinner by Elizabeth Hoyt, The Abduction of Julia by Karen Hawkins(a very funny book), Meet Me at Midnight by Suzanne Enoch, The Admiral’s Penniless Bride by Carla Kelly, Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas, Suddenly by Candace Camp, I could go on and on! Edith Layton also wrote a few, including The Cad.
    However I have not read Friday’s Child, it’s now going on my to-be-read list.

    Reply
  75. This is one of my favorite tropes, so I’ve probably read dozens of books with this theme! Of course, MJP’s The Would Be Widow(haven’t read it in the new release version yet),and Jo Beverly’s An Arranged Marriage, A Little Bit Wild by Victoria Dahl, The Arrangement, Slightly Married and First Comes Marriage by Mary Balogh, In For a Penny by Rose Lerner, Nothing Venture by Patricia Wentworth(actually a mystery with an impulsive marriage subplot), The Accidental Abduction by Darcie Wilde, To Seduce a Sinner by Elizabeth Hoyt, The Abduction of Julia by Karen Hawkins(a very funny book), Meet Me at Midnight by Suzanne Enoch, The Admiral’s Penniless Bride by Carla Kelly, Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas, Suddenly by Candace Camp, I could go on and on! Edith Layton also wrote a few, including The Cad.
    However I have not read Friday’s Child, it’s now going on my to-be-read list.

    Reply
  76. Thanks, Karin! I’ve read a number of those and in addition to the Wench books my favourites are The Devil in Winter and The Abduction of Julia. It’s definitely a fun trope that gives lots of space for the imagination to play!

    Reply
  77. Thanks, Karin! I’ve read a number of those and in addition to the Wench books my favourites are The Devil in Winter and The Abduction of Julia. It’s definitely a fun trope that gives lots of space for the imagination to play!

    Reply
  78. Thanks, Karin! I’ve read a number of those and in addition to the Wench books my favourites are The Devil in Winter and The Abduction of Julia. It’s definitely a fun trope that gives lots of space for the imagination to play!

    Reply
  79. Thanks, Karin! I’ve read a number of those and in addition to the Wench books my favourites are The Devil in Winter and The Abduction of Julia. It’s definitely a fun trope that gives lots of space for the imagination to play!

    Reply
  80. Thanks, Karin! I’ve read a number of those and in addition to the Wench books my favourites are The Devil in Winter and The Abduction of Julia. It’s definitely a fun trope that gives lots of space for the imagination to play!

    Reply
  81. Would love to find out why Friday’s Child was not your favorite, if it is the same reason it’s not mine either. Really difficult to recommend to anyone. I so hate saying I didn’t like one of Heyer’s books, when there are so many I’d love to read every year for the rest of my life 🙂

    Reply
  82. Would love to find out why Friday’s Child was not your favorite, if it is the same reason it’s not mine either. Really difficult to recommend to anyone. I so hate saying I didn’t like one of Heyer’s books, when there are so many I’d love to read every year for the rest of my life 🙂

    Reply
  83. Would love to find out why Friday’s Child was not your favorite, if it is the same reason it’s not mine either. Really difficult to recommend to anyone. I so hate saying I didn’t like one of Heyer’s books, when there are so many I’d love to read every year for the rest of my life 🙂

    Reply
  84. Would love to find out why Friday’s Child was not your favorite, if it is the same reason it’s not mine either. Really difficult to recommend to anyone. I so hate saying I didn’t like one of Heyer’s books, when there are so many I’d love to read every year for the rest of my life 🙂

    Reply
  85. Would love to find out why Friday’s Child was not your favorite, if it is the same reason it’s not mine either. Really difficult to recommend to anyone. I so hate saying I didn’t like one of Heyer’s books, when there are so many I’d love to read every year for the rest of my life 🙂

    Reply
  86. Oh Ms Beverley I think you put it in a nutshell, how I’d been trying to describe how difficult Friday’s Child is to like. Ha! TSTL. I guess Heyer was still great at what she did anyway, because I hung in there till the end with my heart in my throat and my tummy clenched the entire book expecting major disaster to strike these two TSTL characters.

    Reply
  87. Oh Ms Beverley I think you put it in a nutshell, how I’d been trying to describe how difficult Friday’s Child is to like. Ha! TSTL. I guess Heyer was still great at what she did anyway, because I hung in there till the end with my heart in my throat and my tummy clenched the entire book expecting major disaster to strike these two TSTL characters.

    Reply
  88. Oh Ms Beverley I think you put it in a nutshell, how I’d been trying to describe how difficult Friday’s Child is to like. Ha! TSTL. I guess Heyer was still great at what she did anyway, because I hung in there till the end with my heart in my throat and my tummy clenched the entire book expecting major disaster to strike these two TSTL characters.

    Reply
  89. Oh Ms Beverley I think you put it in a nutshell, how I’d been trying to describe how difficult Friday’s Child is to like. Ha! TSTL. I guess Heyer was still great at what she did anyway, because I hung in there till the end with my heart in my throat and my tummy clenched the entire book expecting major disaster to strike these two TSTL characters.

    Reply
  90. Oh Ms Beverley I think you put it in a nutshell, how I’d been trying to describe how difficult Friday’s Child is to like. Ha! TSTL. I guess Heyer was still great at what she did anyway, because I hung in there till the end with my heart in my throat and my tummy clenched the entire book expecting major disaster to strike these two TSTL characters.

    Reply
  91. Great article, Nicola. I learned so much from this posting AND the replies. Thanks to you for making me see Friday’s Child in a different light too. The website info and the books referenced about Lady Diana…..just fascinating. Reading about real historical figures sometimes makes fiction seem more realistic. But then, I think my favorite authors are real sticklers in their research and it shows. Thank you.
    I was so glad MJP replied to remind us of her book ‘The Bargain’ which is one of my favorites. When you posed the question I was pretty much in ‘deer in the headlights’ mode thinking “Huh…I know I’ve read tons of them but can’t remember any of them right now.” Sorry, that’s A.G.E. for you.
    This continues to be one of my favorite websites. Thanks to all the Wenches.

    Reply
  92. Great article, Nicola. I learned so much from this posting AND the replies. Thanks to you for making me see Friday’s Child in a different light too. The website info and the books referenced about Lady Diana…..just fascinating. Reading about real historical figures sometimes makes fiction seem more realistic. But then, I think my favorite authors are real sticklers in their research and it shows. Thank you.
    I was so glad MJP replied to remind us of her book ‘The Bargain’ which is one of my favorites. When you posed the question I was pretty much in ‘deer in the headlights’ mode thinking “Huh…I know I’ve read tons of them but can’t remember any of them right now.” Sorry, that’s A.G.E. for you.
    This continues to be one of my favorite websites. Thanks to all the Wenches.

    Reply
  93. Great article, Nicola. I learned so much from this posting AND the replies. Thanks to you for making me see Friday’s Child in a different light too. The website info and the books referenced about Lady Diana…..just fascinating. Reading about real historical figures sometimes makes fiction seem more realistic. But then, I think my favorite authors are real sticklers in their research and it shows. Thank you.
    I was so glad MJP replied to remind us of her book ‘The Bargain’ which is one of my favorites. When you posed the question I was pretty much in ‘deer in the headlights’ mode thinking “Huh…I know I’ve read tons of them but can’t remember any of them right now.” Sorry, that’s A.G.E. for you.
    This continues to be one of my favorite websites. Thanks to all the Wenches.

    Reply
  94. Great article, Nicola. I learned so much from this posting AND the replies. Thanks to you for making me see Friday’s Child in a different light too. The website info and the books referenced about Lady Diana…..just fascinating. Reading about real historical figures sometimes makes fiction seem more realistic. But then, I think my favorite authors are real sticklers in their research and it shows. Thank you.
    I was so glad MJP replied to remind us of her book ‘The Bargain’ which is one of my favorites. When you posed the question I was pretty much in ‘deer in the headlights’ mode thinking “Huh…I know I’ve read tons of them but can’t remember any of them right now.” Sorry, that’s A.G.E. for you.
    This continues to be one of my favorite websites. Thanks to all the Wenches.

    Reply
  95. Great article, Nicola. I learned so much from this posting AND the replies. Thanks to you for making me see Friday’s Child in a different light too. The website info and the books referenced about Lady Diana…..just fascinating. Reading about real historical figures sometimes makes fiction seem more realistic. But then, I think my favorite authors are real sticklers in their research and it shows. Thank you.
    I was so glad MJP replied to remind us of her book ‘The Bargain’ which is one of my favorites. When you posed the question I was pretty much in ‘deer in the headlights’ mode thinking “Huh…I know I’ve read tons of them but can’t remember any of them right now.” Sorry, that’s A.G.E. for you.
    This continues to be one of my favorite websites. Thanks to all the Wenches.

    Reply
  96. Thanks for the list Karin.
    Recently bought Edith Layton’s ‘The Cad.’ For some reason, I sort of read that whole series from the middle to the end and then completely out of order…and just now getting around to the first one, ‘The Cad.’ Great excuse to reread them all now. 🙂

    Reply
  97. Thanks for the list Karin.
    Recently bought Edith Layton’s ‘The Cad.’ For some reason, I sort of read that whole series from the middle to the end and then completely out of order…and just now getting around to the first one, ‘The Cad.’ Great excuse to reread them all now. 🙂

    Reply
  98. Thanks for the list Karin.
    Recently bought Edith Layton’s ‘The Cad.’ For some reason, I sort of read that whole series from the middle to the end and then completely out of order…and just now getting around to the first one, ‘The Cad.’ Great excuse to reread them all now. 🙂

    Reply
  99. Thanks for the list Karin.
    Recently bought Edith Layton’s ‘The Cad.’ For some reason, I sort of read that whole series from the middle to the end and then completely out of order…and just now getting around to the first one, ‘The Cad.’ Great excuse to reread them all now. 🙂

    Reply
  100. Thanks for the list Karin.
    Recently bought Edith Layton’s ‘The Cad.’ For some reason, I sort of read that whole series from the middle to the end and then completely out of order…and just now getting around to the first one, ‘The Cad.’ Great excuse to reread them all now. 🙂

    Reply
  101. The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn is a marry-in-haste novel, although not for reasons of inheritance. Sir Richard would have like to have married for money, but he had other more pressing concerns. I shall say no more otherwise I will have to issue a spoiler alert.

    Reply
  102. The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn is a marry-in-haste novel, although not for reasons of inheritance. Sir Richard would have like to have married for money, but he had other more pressing concerns. I shall say no more otherwise I will have to issue a spoiler alert.

    Reply
  103. The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn is a marry-in-haste novel, although not for reasons of inheritance. Sir Richard would have like to have married for money, but he had other more pressing concerns. I shall say no more otherwise I will have to issue a spoiler alert.

    Reply
  104. The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn is a marry-in-haste novel, although not for reasons of inheritance. Sir Richard would have like to have married for money, but he had other more pressing concerns. I shall say no more otherwise I will have to issue a spoiler alert.

    Reply
  105. The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn is a marry-in-haste novel, although not for reasons of inheritance. Sir Richard would have like to have married for money, but he had other more pressing concerns. I shall say no more otherwise I will have to issue a spoiler alert.

    Reply
  106. I’ve remembered an impulsive act that led to marriage — Devil’s Cub. Vidal abducts Mary on an impulse. I think a few Heyers do this. Perhaps the Corinthian and even The Reluctant Widow. Carlyon had a plan, but when it went wrong he acted impulsively.

    Reply
  107. I’ve remembered an impulsive act that led to marriage — Devil’s Cub. Vidal abducts Mary on an impulse. I think a few Heyers do this. Perhaps the Corinthian and even The Reluctant Widow. Carlyon had a plan, but when it went wrong he acted impulsively.

    Reply
  108. I’ve remembered an impulsive act that led to marriage — Devil’s Cub. Vidal abducts Mary on an impulse. I think a few Heyers do this. Perhaps the Corinthian and even The Reluctant Widow. Carlyon had a plan, but when it went wrong he acted impulsively.

    Reply
  109. I’ve remembered an impulsive act that led to marriage — Devil’s Cub. Vidal abducts Mary on an impulse. I think a few Heyers do this. Perhaps the Corinthian and even The Reluctant Widow. Carlyon had a plan, but when it went wrong he acted impulsively.

    Reply
  110. I’ve remembered an impulsive act that led to marriage — Devil’s Cub. Vidal abducts Mary on an impulse. I think a few Heyers do this. Perhaps the Corinthian and even The Reluctant Widow. Carlyon had a plan, but when it went wrong he acted impulsively.

    Reply
  111. In Mary Balogh’s “The Temporary Wife” the hero advertises for a governess but is actually looking for a wife. He’d had no intention to marry but is invited to visit his family, from whom he is estranged, and wants to bring a wife to prevent the match he knows his father has planned for him. I prefer it to her “The Ideal Wife” because for whatever reasons I like the characters better. Balogh is not known as a sexy writer (whatever that means), but in this book she shows how sex can show the development of a relationship even if the characters cannot yet articulate what they feel. It’s one of my favorites by her and one of my most frequent rereads.
    Must also add a shout-out to MJP, as the scene in “The Would-Be Widow” where Jocelyn kisses Rafe and David walks in is one of my favorites as well. When Rafe turns to her and tells her that she’s misread both her husband and the marriage, I cheered and cried.

    Reply
  112. In Mary Balogh’s “The Temporary Wife” the hero advertises for a governess but is actually looking for a wife. He’d had no intention to marry but is invited to visit his family, from whom he is estranged, and wants to bring a wife to prevent the match he knows his father has planned for him. I prefer it to her “The Ideal Wife” because for whatever reasons I like the characters better. Balogh is not known as a sexy writer (whatever that means), but in this book she shows how sex can show the development of a relationship even if the characters cannot yet articulate what they feel. It’s one of my favorites by her and one of my most frequent rereads.
    Must also add a shout-out to MJP, as the scene in “The Would-Be Widow” where Jocelyn kisses Rafe and David walks in is one of my favorites as well. When Rafe turns to her and tells her that she’s misread both her husband and the marriage, I cheered and cried.

    Reply
  113. In Mary Balogh’s “The Temporary Wife” the hero advertises for a governess but is actually looking for a wife. He’d had no intention to marry but is invited to visit his family, from whom he is estranged, and wants to bring a wife to prevent the match he knows his father has planned for him. I prefer it to her “The Ideal Wife” because for whatever reasons I like the characters better. Balogh is not known as a sexy writer (whatever that means), but in this book she shows how sex can show the development of a relationship even if the characters cannot yet articulate what they feel. It’s one of my favorites by her and one of my most frequent rereads.
    Must also add a shout-out to MJP, as the scene in “The Would-Be Widow” where Jocelyn kisses Rafe and David walks in is one of my favorites as well. When Rafe turns to her and tells her that she’s misread both her husband and the marriage, I cheered and cried.

    Reply
  114. In Mary Balogh’s “The Temporary Wife” the hero advertises for a governess but is actually looking for a wife. He’d had no intention to marry but is invited to visit his family, from whom he is estranged, and wants to bring a wife to prevent the match he knows his father has planned for him. I prefer it to her “The Ideal Wife” because for whatever reasons I like the characters better. Balogh is not known as a sexy writer (whatever that means), but in this book she shows how sex can show the development of a relationship even if the characters cannot yet articulate what they feel. It’s one of my favorites by her and one of my most frequent rereads.
    Must also add a shout-out to MJP, as the scene in “The Would-Be Widow” where Jocelyn kisses Rafe and David walks in is one of my favorites as well. When Rafe turns to her and tells her that she’s misread both her husband and the marriage, I cheered and cried.

    Reply
  115. In Mary Balogh’s “The Temporary Wife” the hero advertises for a governess but is actually looking for a wife. He’d had no intention to marry but is invited to visit his family, from whom he is estranged, and wants to bring a wife to prevent the match he knows his father has planned for him. I prefer it to her “The Ideal Wife” because for whatever reasons I like the characters better. Balogh is not known as a sexy writer (whatever that means), but in this book she shows how sex can show the development of a relationship even if the characters cannot yet articulate what they feel. It’s one of my favorites by her and one of my most frequent rereads.
    Must also add a shout-out to MJP, as the scene in “The Would-Be Widow” where Jocelyn kisses Rafe and David walks in is one of my favorites as well. When Rafe turns to her and tells her that she’s misread both her husband and the marriage, I cheered and cried.

    Reply

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