The Importance of Covers

Anne here and today I'm musing on the importance of covers. MarryInScandal_cover
Most of us, firmly believe that we "don't judge a book by its cover" and yet, a lot of the time I suspect we do.  People make instant, often subconscious, judgements about what they will or will not pick up. Maybe we don't judge the book itself, but the kind of cover it has will influence us — incline us in favor of finding out more, or deciding us against it without even opening a page. 

PerfectRake45kbA good book cover should achieve a number of things. First and foremost it should attract readers, intrigue them, make them want to pick up the book and examine it. It shouldn't be too "busy" — the title and the author's name should stand out and be read at a glance — and in these days of purchasing books on line, they need to be readable on a screen in tiny thumb-nail size.

It needs to give the reader an idea of what the book is about, what genre — romance, a crime novel, fantasy or whatever — and referencing the plot in some way. is it set in a medieval castle, are the characters at war, is it a road trip? Are there vampires? Dragons? A murder? 

Certain genres have particular looks: Crime tends to have darker, or starker images, romance will have lighter, softer often "pinker" colors, Paranormal romance will be dark, moody, bold with perhaps an image of a wolf or a bloodshot moon.  BloodKissed

A romance will often have a couple on the cover. If it's predominantly told from the heroine's point of view, it might only have a woman on the cover. If the hero is the focus, it will have a man. A very sexy read might have the clothes-falling-off look we're all familiar with. Or no clothes at all. 

But if a romance cover is too obvious or lurid, a lot of readers will take the trouble to hide the cover of the book they are reading, wrapping it in brown paper, or specially made covers in pretty fabrics, so they won't be embarrassed reading the book in public.

For an author, a good or bad cover can make or break a book. I've generally been lucky with my covers, but I've had a few less-than-successful ones. 

WaifWith my first book out in the USA I was really lucky in that I'd entered the UK edition in the RITA (the big Romance Writers of America competition) the year before, so when it came out in the USA it had a little "RITA finalist" banner (just under my name) which most finalists never get, because the book is already out.

My early books with Berkley were beautiful — very classy and pretty. See The Perfect Rake above. No people, no falling off clothes, just period images that related to the story. 

The covers of my next series, however, were less successful in my opinion.
On the right is my least favorite cover. It doesn't tell you much about the book, does it? A cover like this signals "generic romance — nothing special". But this is my chick-in-pants heroine in a Regency-era Egypt setting, and there are slavers, crocodiles, cats, pirates, and more. And although it received some lovely reviews and was listed in Library Journal's (USA) Best Books of 2009, it has the lowest sales of all my books. Because covers matter. CatchABride

BUT then, the cover I got for the next book — The Accidental Wedding — was one of my most beautiful ever. That's it below left. I was thrilled to bits when I saw it. You can't see it but you can feel the texture of that beautiful dress. Readers agreed — my sales bounced right back up, and my career was saved. And I'm evermore grateful for it. 

AccidentalWeddingEver since, I've had beautiful covers. At the top of this post is the cover of my new book, out in early April. Isn't it so pretty? I'm feeling very blessed with covers these days. 

So what about you — what attracts you or puts you off about some covers? Do you ever hide the cover of a book you're reading under brown paper or in a special cover? Or have e-book readers done away with that necessity? And that makes me wonder — with e-books, do covers still matter or are they more important than ever? What do you think?

210 thoughts on “The Importance of Covers”

  1. Love the new cover. I’d definitely take a closer look if I saw it in a bookstore. With ebooks, I’m often frustrated because the author’s name is too small to read. You’re right about that being important. Most covers do a good job of signaling subgenre, but I sometimes wish they weren’t quite so generic. When I was writing Tudor era historical novels (as Kate Emerson) and mysteries (as myself), I got headless women covers for both, although one of the mysteries did give her an enormous dagger to hold. My cozy mysteries w/a Kaitlyn Dunnett have been all over the place but the ones with cats or dogs on the covers seem to sell best . . . even when the animals don’t play much of a role in the book.

    Reply
  2. Love the new cover. I’d definitely take a closer look if I saw it in a bookstore. With ebooks, I’m often frustrated because the author’s name is too small to read. You’re right about that being important. Most covers do a good job of signaling subgenre, but I sometimes wish they weren’t quite so generic. When I was writing Tudor era historical novels (as Kate Emerson) and mysteries (as myself), I got headless women covers for both, although one of the mysteries did give her an enormous dagger to hold. My cozy mysteries w/a Kaitlyn Dunnett have been all over the place but the ones with cats or dogs on the covers seem to sell best . . . even when the animals don’t play much of a role in the book.

    Reply
  3. Love the new cover. I’d definitely take a closer look if I saw it in a bookstore. With ebooks, I’m often frustrated because the author’s name is too small to read. You’re right about that being important. Most covers do a good job of signaling subgenre, but I sometimes wish they weren’t quite so generic. When I was writing Tudor era historical novels (as Kate Emerson) and mysteries (as myself), I got headless women covers for both, although one of the mysteries did give her an enormous dagger to hold. My cozy mysteries w/a Kaitlyn Dunnett have been all over the place but the ones with cats or dogs on the covers seem to sell best . . . even when the animals don’t play much of a role in the book.

    Reply
  4. Love the new cover. I’d definitely take a closer look if I saw it in a bookstore. With ebooks, I’m often frustrated because the author’s name is too small to read. You’re right about that being important. Most covers do a good job of signaling subgenre, but I sometimes wish they weren’t quite so generic. When I was writing Tudor era historical novels (as Kate Emerson) and mysteries (as myself), I got headless women covers for both, although one of the mysteries did give her an enormous dagger to hold. My cozy mysteries w/a Kaitlyn Dunnett have been all over the place but the ones with cats or dogs on the covers seem to sell best . . . even when the animals don’t play much of a role in the book.

    Reply
  5. Love the new cover. I’d definitely take a closer look if I saw it in a bookstore. With ebooks, I’m often frustrated because the author’s name is too small to read. You’re right about that being important. Most covers do a good job of signaling subgenre, but I sometimes wish they weren’t quite so generic. When I was writing Tudor era historical novels (as Kate Emerson) and mysteries (as myself), I got headless women covers for both, although one of the mysteries did give her an enormous dagger to hold. My cozy mysteries w/a Kaitlyn Dunnett have been all over the place but the ones with cats or dogs on the covers seem to sell best . . . even when the animals don’t play much of a role in the book.

    Reply
  6. The influence of book covers are interesting now that we have turned to the electronic age because a lot of us no longer browse through a book aisle. Having said that we are still exposed electronically to a cover. I think we are strongly influenced by covers, even though I think we like to think we aren’t. We are visual creatures, things catch are eyes, and I think a very good cover is the first thing we see. I have my auto-buy authors and their book covers may not be so important, but I have in the past found myself reading a new author because their cover made me take a second glance.
    There are also some covers that sometimes elicit the reverse reaction from me. Covers which are badly drawn make me look the other way. I’m also not too keen with the males partially clothed body if the female is fully clothed – don’t know why. Maybe because I think they look silly, one clothed, one not. I’m also starting to become a little irritated by self-published books in which the model is obviously wearing a modern wedding dress when she should be wearing a bustle, Regency dress, hoops, etc.
    A good cover is very important, it catches the eye.

    Reply
  7. The influence of book covers are interesting now that we have turned to the electronic age because a lot of us no longer browse through a book aisle. Having said that we are still exposed electronically to a cover. I think we are strongly influenced by covers, even though I think we like to think we aren’t. We are visual creatures, things catch are eyes, and I think a very good cover is the first thing we see. I have my auto-buy authors and their book covers may not be so important, but I have in the past found myself reading a new author because their cover made me take a second glance.
    There are also some covers that sometimes elicit the reverse reaction from me. Covers which are badly drawn make me look the other way. I’m also not too keen with the males partially clothed body if the female is fully clothed – don’t know why. Maybe because I think they look silly, one clothed, one not. I’m also starting to become a little irritated by self-published books in which the model is obviously wearing a modern wedding dress when she should be wearing a bustle, Regency dress, hoops, etc.
    A good cover is very important, it catches the eye.

    Reply
  8. The influence of book covers are interesting now that we have turned to the electronic age because a lot of us no longer browse through a book aisle. Having said that we are still exposed electronically to a cover. I think we are strongly influenced by covers, even though I think we like to think we aren’t. We are visual creatures, things catch are eyes, and I think a very good cover is the first thing we see. I have my auto-buy authors and their book covers may not be so important, but I have in the past found myself reading a new author because their cover made me take a second glance.
    There are also some covers that sometimes elicit the reverse reaction from me. Covers which are badly drawn make me look the other way. I’m also not too keen with the males partially clothed body if the female is fully clothed – don’t know why. Maybe because I think they look silly, one clothed, one not. I’m also starting to become a little irritated by self-published books in which the model is obviously wearing a modern wedding dress when she should be wearing a bustle, Regency dress, hoops, etc.
    A good cover is very important, it catches the eye.

    Reply
  9. The influence of book covers are interesting now that we have turned to the electronic age because a lot of us no longer browse through a book aisle. Having said that we are still exposed electronically to a cover. I think we are strongly influenced by covers, even though I think we like to think we aren’t. We are visual creatures, things catch are eyes, and I think a very good cover is the first thing we see. I have my auto-buy authors and their book covers may not be so important, but I have in the past found myself reading a new author because their cover made me take a second glance.
    There are also some covers that sometimes elicit the reverse reaction from me. Covers which are badly drawn make me look the other way. I’m also not too keen with the males partially clothed body if the female is fully clothed – don’t know why. Maybe because I think they look silly, one clothed, one not. I’m also starting to become a little irritated by self-published books in which the model is obviously wearing a modern wedding dress when she should be wearing a bustle, Regency dress, hoops, etc.
    A good cover is very important, it catches the eye.

    Reply
  10. The influence of book covers are interesting now that we have turned to the electronic age because a lot of us no longer browse through a book aisle. Having said that we are still exposed electronically to a cover. I think we are strongly influenced by covers, even though I think we like to think we aren’t. We are visual creatures, things catch are eyes, and I think a very good cover is the first thing we see. I have my auto-buy authors and their book covers may not be so important, but I have in the past found myself reading a new author because their cover made me take a second glance.
    There are also some covers that sometimes elicit the reverse reaction from me. Covers which are badly drawn make me look the other way. I’m also not too keen with the males partially clothed body if the female is fully clothed – don’t know why. Maybe because I think they look silly, one clothed, one not. I’m also starting to become a little irritated by self-published books in which the model is obviously wearing a modern wedding dress when she should be wearing a bustle, Regency dress, hoops, etc.
    A good cover is very important, it catches the eye.

    Reply
  11. I don’t think I have ever hid a cover, although there are some that I probably should have. I remember a few years back when my little 4 year old great niece pointed to my book and asked me why “that lady was taking her clothes off?” It was a back shot of a woman with her dress half undone. I think it is because of the extremely sexy covers on some books that a lot of people still dismiss romance books as just being “bodice rippers.” Then again, I think some of them actually are (smile).
    I think covers are important for all of the reasons you mention above. If I know the author, it doesn’t matter what the cover looks like. But if you are not familiar with the author, the cover is what first draws your eye, and makes you want to pick it up and check it out.
    One of my favorite books by you is HIS CAPTIVE LADY which has a cover similar to one above. It is a tasteful cover, but what drew me to the book was that I already knew you as an author.
    Great post Anne.

    Reply
  12. I don’t think I have ever hid a cover, although there are some that I probably should have. I remember a few years back when my little 4 year old great niece pointed to my book and asked me why “that lady was taking her clothes off?” It was a back shot of a woman with her dress half undone. I think it is because of the extremely sexy covers on some books that a lot of people still dismiss romance books as just being “bodice rippers.” Then again, I think some of them actually are (smile).
    I think covers are important for all of the reasons you mention above. If I know the author, it doesn’t matter what the cover looks like. But if you are not familiar with the author, the cover is what first draws your eye, and makes you want to pick it up and check it out.
    One of my favorite books by you is HIS CAPTIVE LADY which has a cover similar to one above. It is a tasteful cover, but what drew me to the book was that I already knew you as an author.
    Great post Anne.

    Reply
  13. I don’t think I have ever hid a cover, although there are some that I probably should have. I remember a few years back when my little 4 year old great niece pointed to my book and asked me why “that lady was taking her clothes off?” It was a back shot of a woman with her dress half undone. I think it is because of the extremely sexy covers on some books that a lot of people still dismiss romance books as just being “bodice rippers.” Then again, I think some of them actually are (smile).
    I think covers are important for all of the reasons you mention above. If I know the author, it doesn’t matter what the cover looks like. But if you are not familiar with the author, the cover is what first draws your eye, and makes you want to pick it up and check it out.
    One of my favorite books by you is HIS CAPTIVE LADY which has a cover similar to one above. It is a tasteful cover, but what drew me to the book was that I already knew you as an author.
    Great post Anne.

    Reply
  14. I don’t think I have ever hid a cover, although there are some that I probably should have. I remember a few years back when my little 4 year old great niece pointed to my book and asked me why “that lady was taking her clothes off?” It was a back shot of a woman with her dress half undone. I think it is because of the extremely sexy covers on some books that a lot of people still dismiss romance books as just being “bodice rippers.” Then again, I think some of them actually are (smile).
    I think covers are important for all of the reasons you mention above. If I know the author, it doesn’t matter what the cover looks like. But if you are not familiar with the author, the cover is what first draws your eye, and makes you want to pick it up and check it out.
    One of my favorite books by you is HIS CAPTIVE LADY which has a cover similar to one above. It is a tasteful cover, but what drew me to the book was that I already knew you as an author.
    Great post Anne.

    Reply
  15. I don’t think I have ever hid a cover, although there are some that I probably should have. I remember a few years back when my little 4 year old great niece pointed to my book and asked me why “that lady was taking her clothes off?” It was a back shot of a woman with her dress half undone. I think it is because of the extremely sexy covers on some books that a lot of people still dismiss romance books as just being “bodice rippers.” Then again, I think some of them actually are (smile).
    I think covers are important for all of the reasons you mention above. If I know the author, it doesn’t matter what the cover looks like. But if you are not familiar with the author, the cover is what first draws your eye, and makes you want to pick it up and check it out.
    One of my favorite books by you is HIS CAPTIVE LADY which has a cover similar to one above. It is a tasteful cover, but what drew me to the book was that I already knew you as an author.
    Great post Anne.

    Reply
  16. I definitely choose books by the cover these days – at least the historical romance ones. I loathe the half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots that some publishers shove at us. Neither do I like the tarty looking females who are supposedly young innocents just up from the country according to the story. Also the dresses which are more like 21st century Oscar catwalk gowns. I like covers to be at least a bit tasteful, and to reflect the story. I’m sure I’ve missed some excellent stories because the book cover makes me shudder.

    Reply
  17. I definitely choose books by the cover these days – at least the historical romance ones. I loathe the half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots that some publishers shove at us. Neither do I like the tarty looking females who are supposedly young innocents just up from the country according to the story. Also the dresses which are more like 21st century Oscar catwalk gowns. I like covers to be at least a bit tasteful, and to reflect the story. I’m sure I’ve missed some excellent stories because the book cover makes me shudder.

    Reply
  18. I definitely choose books by the cover these days – at least the historical romance ones. I loathe the half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots that some publishers shove at us. Neither do I like the tarty looking females who are supposedly young innocents just up from the country according to the story. Also the dresses which are more like 21st century Oscar catwalk gowns. I like covers to be at least a bit tasteful, and to reflect the story. I’m sure I’ve missed some excellent stories because the book cover makes me shudder.

    Reply
  19. I definitely choose books by the cover these days – at least the historical romance ones. I loathe the half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots that some publishers shove at us. Neither do I like the tarty looking females who are supposedly young innocents just up from the country according to the story. Also the dresses which are more like 21st century Oscar catwalk gowns. I like covers to be at least a bit tasteful, and to reflect the story. I’m sure I’ve missed some excellent stories because the book cover makes me shudder.

    Reply
  20. I definitely choose books by the cover these days – at least the historical romance ones. I loathe the half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots that some publishers shove at us. Neither do I like the tarty looking females who are supposedly young innocents just up from the country according to the story. Also the dresses which are more like 21st century Oscar catwalk gowns. I like covers to be at least a bit tasteful, and to reflect the story. I’m sure I’ve missed some excellent stories because the book cover makes me shudder.

    Reply
  21. As a professional designer, I’ve always cared a lot about covers. If an author was recommended to me, I would still pick it up and read a few pages, but if the author was unknown, I’d blow right past it. And a great cover would encourage me to pick the book up and read a few pages. Ultimately the story line writing style trump the cover–but the cover is hugely important in picking the book up in the first place.
    I love the covers that Berkley has been giving you lately–beautiful, thoughtful, intriguing. As a reader and writer, I like having people on the cover rather than abstract object or houses. But the people have to be -good!-

    Reply
  22. As a professional designer, I’ve always cared a lot about covers. If an author was recommended to me, I would still pick it up and read a few pages, but if the author was unknown, I’d blow right past it. And a great cover would encourage me to pick the book up and read a few pages. Ultimately the story line writing style trump the cover–but the cover is hugely important in picking the book up in the first place.
    I love the covers that Berkley has been giving you lately–beautiful, thoughtful, intriguing. As a reader and writer, I like having people on the cover rather than abstract object or houses. But the people have to be -good!-

    Reply
  23. As a professional designer, I’ve always cared a lot about covers. If an author was recommended to me, I would still pick it up and read a few pages, but if the author was unknown, I’d blow right past it. And a great cover would encourage me to pick the book up and read a few pages. Ultimately the story line writing style trump the cover–but the cover is hugely important in picking the book up in the first place.
    I love the covers that Berkley has been giving you lately–beautiful, thoughtful, intriguing. As a reader and writer, I like having people on the cover rather than abstract object or houses. But the people have to be -good!-

    Reply
  24. As a professional designer, I’ve always cared a lot about covers. If an author was recommended to me, I would still pick it up and read a few pages, but if the author was unknown, I’d blow right past it. And a great cover would encourage me to pick the book up and read a few pages. Ultimately the story line writing style trump the cover–but the cover is hugely important in picking the book up in the first place.
    I love the covers that Berkley has been giving you lately–beautiful, thoughtful, intriguing. As a reader and writer, I like having people on the cover rather than abstract object or houses. But the people have to be -good!-

    Reply
  25. As a professional designer, I’ve always cared a lot about covers. If an author was recommended to me, I would still pick it up and read a few pages, but if the author was unknown, I’d blow right past it. And a great cover would encourage me to pick the book up and read a few pages. Ultimately the story line writing style trump the cover–but the cover is hugely important in picking the book up in the first place.
    I love the covers that Berkley has been giving you lately–beautiful, thoughtful, intriguing. As a reader and writer, I like having people on the cover rather than abstract object or houses. But the people have to be -good!-

    Reply
  26. The point you make about you “unsuccessful” cover is important. It’s not just that the cover needs to be attractive. It needs to match the book inside. I objected strongly to one of my covers—the dress was the wrong period, the woman wearing it was too old and sophisticated for my heroine, even her hair was the wrong color, and the whole mood was too sexy-teasing for my swashbuckling romp. My editor said the only thing that mattered was having a long skirt to show it was historical. Sigh.
    The covers on all of the Word Wenches’ books are generally lovely. The only real oddity was the Eiffel Tower turning up in Paris decades before it was built.

    Reply
  27. The point you make about you “unsuccessful” cover is important. It’s not just that the cover needs to be attractive. It needs to match the book inside. I objected strongly to one of my covers—the dress was the wrong period, the woman wearing it was too old and sophisticated for my heroine, even her hair was the wrong color, and the whole mood was too sexy-teasing for my swashbuckling romp. My editor said the only thing that mattered was having a long skirt to show it was historical. Sigh.
    The covers on all of the Word Wenches’ books are generally lovely. The only real oddity was the Eiffel Tower turning up in Paris decades before it was built.

    Reply
  28. The point you make about you “unsuccessful” cover is important. It’s not just that the cover needs to be attractive. It needs to match the book inside. I objected strongly to one of my covers—the dress was the wrong period, the woman wearing it was too old and sophisticated for my heroine, even her hair was the wrong color, and the whole mood was too sexy-teasing for my swashbuckling romp. My editor said the only thing that mattered was having a long skirt to show it was historical. Sigh.
    The covers on all of the Word Wenches’ books are generally lovely. The only real oddity was the Eiffel Tower turning up in Paris decades before it was built.

    Reply
  29. The point you make about you “unsuccessful” cover is important. It’s not just that the cover needs to be attractive. It needs to match the book inside. I objected strongly to one of my covers—the dress was the wrong period, the woman wearing it was too old and sophisticated for my heroine, even her hair was the wrong color, and the whole mood was too sexy-teasing for my swashbuckling romp. My editor said the only thing that mattered was having a long skirt to show it was historical. Sigh.
    The covers on all of the Word Wenches’ books are generally lovely. The only real oddity was the Eiffel Tower turning up in Paris decades before it was built.

    Reply
  30. The point you make about you “unsuccessful” cover is important. It’s not just that the cover needs to be attractive. It needs to match the book inside. I objected strongly to one of my covers—the dress was the wrong period, the woman wearing it was too old and sophisticated for my heroine, even her hair was the wrong color, and the whole mood was too sexy-teasing for my swashbuckling romp. My editor said the only thing that mattered was having a long skirt to show it was historical. Sigh.
    The covers on all of the Word Wenches’ books are generally lovely. The only real oddity was the Eiffel Tower turning up in Paris decades before it was built.

    Reply
  31. I agree on the importance if covers. They even matter in textbooks (where the ultimate user has no choice).
    But for me, personally: I’m a book-aholic living on a fixed income. I try very, very hard to stem my purchases. I have a long list of “buy anything by this author” authors. I explore new recommendations mostly at the library (because if I like the author, the list grows longer!).
    So (because we like to eat also) I pay more attention to author name than to anything else.

    Reply
  32. I agree on the importance if covers. They even matter in textbooks (where the ultimate user has no choice).
    But for me, personally: I’m a book-aholic living on a fixed income. I try very, very hard to stem my purchases. I have a long list of “buy anything by this author” authors. I explore new recommendations mostly at the library (because if I like the author, the list grows longer!).
    So (because we like to eat also) I pay more attention to author name than to anything else.

    Reply
  33. I agree on the importance if covers. They even matter in textbooks (where the ultimate user has no choice).
    But for me, personally: I’m a book-aholic living on a fixed income. I try very, very hard to stem my purchases. I have a long list of “buy anything by this author” authors. I explore new recommendations mostly at the library (because if I like the author, the list grows longer!).
    So (because we like to eat also) I pay more attention to author name than to anything else.

    Reply
  34. I agree on the importance if covers. They even matter in textbooks (where the ultimate user has no choice).
    But for me, personally: I’m a book-aholic living on a fixed income. I try very, very hard to stem my purchases. I have a long list of “buy anything by this author” authors. I explore new recommendations mostly at the library (because if I like the author, the list grows longer!).
    So (because we like to eat also) I pay more attention to author name than to anything else.

    Reply
  35. I agree on the importance if covers. They even matter in textbooks (where the ultimate user has no choice).
    But for me, personally: I’m a book-aholic living on a fixed income. I try very, very hard to stem my purchases. I have a long list of “buy anything by this author” authors. I explore new recommendations mostly at the library (because if I like the author, the list grows longer!).
    So (because we like to eat also) I pay more attention to author name than to anything else.

    Reply
  36. I think covers are *very* important. I’ve had my share of terrible ones, and the sales reflected it. I was very lucky with covers for my PNR series, all of which hit bestseller lists with Book 1 (as no one knew anything about the books, and I wasn’t a big name author, it had to be the cover!). Now that so much of buying is done online, it’s important to have a cover that grabs attention at a small size. That means not too much text (which can’t always be read anyway), eye-catching colors and objects, a well-balanced design, good (and readable) fonts that reflect the sub-genre. For my self-published books, I hire a designer and spend a lot of time picking the photo and other elements that will go on the cover. I’m also lucky that the designer I use is very good at color, balance, and making a “look” for each series. Covers are of huge importance, imho.

    Reply
  37. I think covers are *very* important. I’ve had my share of terrible ones, and the sales reflected it. I was very lucky with covers for my PNR series, all of which hit bestseller lists with Book 1 (as no one knew anything about the books, and I wasn’t a big name author, it had to be the cover!). Now that so much of buying is done online, it’s important to have a cover that grabs attention at a small size. That means not too much text (which can’t always be read anyway), eye-catching colors and objects, a well-balanced design, good (and readable) fonts that reflect the sub-genre. For my self-published books, I hire a designer and spend a lot of time picking the photo and other elements that will go on the cover. I’m also lucky that the designer I use is very good at color, balance, and making a “look” for each series. Covers are of huge importance, imho.

    Reply
  38. I think covers are *very* important. I’ve had my share of terrible ones, and the sales reflected it. I was very lucky with covers for my PNR series, all of which hit bestseller lists with Book 1 (as no one knew anything about the books, and I wasn’t a big name author, it had to be the cover!). Now that so much of buying is done online, it’s important to have a cover that grabs attention at a small size. That means not too much text (which can’t always be read anyway), eye-catching colors and objects, a well-balanced design, good (and readable) fonts that reflect the sub-genre. For my self-published books, I hire a designer and spend a lot of time picking the photo and other elements that will go on the cover. I’m also lucky that the designer I use is very good at color, balance, and making a “look” for each series. Covers are of huge importance, imho.

    Reply
  39. I think covers are *very* important. I’ve had my share of terrible ones, and the sales reflected it. I was very lucky with covers for my PNR series, all of which hit bestseller lists with Book 1 (as no one knew anything about the books, and I wasn’t a big name author, it had to be the cover!). Now that so much of buying is done online, it’s important to have a cover that grabs attention at a small size. That means not too much text (which can’t always be read anyway), eye-catching colors and objects, a well-balanced design, good (and readable) fonts that reflect the sub-genre. For my self-published books, I hire a designer and spend a lot of time picking the photo and other elements that will go on the cover. I’m also lucky that the designer I use is very good at color, balance, and making a “look” for each series. Covers are of huge importance, imho.

    Reply
  40. I think covers are *very* important. I’ve had my share of terrible ones, and the sales reflected it. I was very lucky with covers for my PNR series, all of which hit bestseller lists with Book 1 (as no one knew anything about the books, and I wasn’t a big name author, it had to be the cover!). Now that so much of buying is done online, it’s important to have a cover that grabs attention at a small size. That means not too much text (which can’t always be read anyway), eye-catching colors and objects, a well-balanced design, good (and readable) fonts that reflect the sub-genre. For my self-published books, I hire a designer and spend a lot of time picking the photo and other elements that will go on the cover. I’m also lucky that the designer I use is very good at color, balance, and making a “look” for each series. Covers are of huge importance, imho.

    Reply
  41. I’m an atypical reader when it comes to covers. Although I can appreciate a beautiful cover or one that really connects to the story inside, I have never bought a book based on the cover. Back in the day when I browsed bookshops, I may have checked some out because of an appealing cover, but now I buy ebooks almost exclusively. And I buy mostly by author. A provocative, evocative title is much more likely to tempt me to make an unplanned purchase.

    Reply
  42. I’m an atypical reader when it comes to covers. Although I can appreciate a beautiful cover or one that really connects to the story inside, I have never bought a book based on the cover. Back in the day when I browsed bookshops, I may have checked some out because of an appealing cover, but now I buy ebooks almost exclusively. And I buy mostly by author. A provocative, evocative title is much more likely to tempt me to make an unplanned purchase.

    Reply
  43. I’m an atypical reader when it comes to covers. Although I can appreciate a beautiful cover or one that really connects to the story inside, I have never bought a book based on the cover. Back in the day when I browsed bookshops, I may have checked some out because of an appealing cover, but now I buy ebooks almost exclusively. And I buy mostly by author. A provocative, evocative title is much more likely to tempt me to make an unplanned purchase.

    Reply
  44. I’m an atypical reader when it comes to covers. Although I can appreciate a beautiful cover or one that really connects to the story inside, I have never bought a book based on the cover. Back in the day when I browsed bookshops, I may have checked some out because of an appealing cover, but now I buy ebooks almost exclusively. And I buy mostly by author. A provocative, evocative title is much more likely to tempt me to make an unplanned purchase.

    Reply
  45. I’m an atypical reader when it comes to covers. Although I can appreciate a beautiful cover or one that really connects to the story inside, I have never bought a book based on the cover. Back in the day when I browsed bookshops, I may have checked some out because of an appealing cover, but now I buy ebooks almost exclusively. And I buy mostly by author. A provocative, evocative title is much more likely to tempt me to make an unplanned purchase.

    Reply
  46. I certainly love to look at pretty book covers but I don’t think I’ve ever passed on a book just because of the cover. I have an extensive list of authors that I buy without fail. Although I may pick up a new-to-me author because of the cover, it’s always the blurb of what the story is about that’s the make or break for me. I also look at what authors have done a recommendation.
    I read contemporaries as well. I do not care for the present trend of mostly black & white covers featured a half-naked guy with tats all over. They could have a fabulous story but I pass them by.

    Reply
  47. I certainly love to look at pretty book covers but I don’t think I’ve ever passed on a book just because of the cover. I have an extensive list of authors that I buy without fail. Although I may pick up a new-to-me author because of the cover, it’s always the blurb of what the story is about that’s the make or break for me. I also look at what authors have done a recommendation.
    I read contemporaries as well. I do not care for the present trend of mostly black & white covers featured a half-naked guy with tats all over. They could have a fabulous story but I pass them by.

    Reply
  48. I certainly love to look at pretty book covers but I don’t think I’ve ever passed on a book just because of the cover. I have an extensive list of authors that I buy without fail. Although I may pick up a new-to-me author because of the cover, it’s always the blurb of what the story is about that’s the make or break for me. I also look at what authors have done a recommendation.
    I read contemporaries as well. I do not care for the present trend of mostly black & white covers featured a half-naked guy with tats all over. They could have a fabulous story but I pass them by.

    Reply
  49. I certainly love to look at pretty book covers but I don’t think I’ve ever passed on a book just because of the cover. I have an extensive list of authors that I buy without fail. Although I may pick up a new-to-me author because of the cover, it’s always the blurb of what the story is about that’s the make or break for me. I also look at what authors have done a recommendation.
    I read contemporaries as well. I do not care for the present trend of mostly black & white covers featured a half-naked guy with tats all over. They could have a fabulous story but I pass them by.

    Reply
  50. I certainly love to look at pretty book covers but I don’t think I’ve ever passed on a book just because of the cover. I have an extensive list of authors that I buy without fail. Although I may pick up a new-to-me author because of the cover, it’s always the blurb of what the story is about that’s the make or break for me. I also look at what authors have done a recommendation.
    I read contemporaries as well. I do not care for the present trend of mostly black & white covers featured a half-naked guy with tats all over. They could have a fabulous story but I pass them by.

    Reply
  51. I am put off by romance covers with headless heroines, just bodies with (or sometimes without) pretty silk dresses. It screams to me that (whether it’s meant to or not) the book doesn’t have anything to do with the heroine’s mind, only what goes on below the neck, becausewho she is or what she thinks just doesn’t matter. It’s insulting.
    I like the covers in this post because they show the whole person. And they’re pretty and put me in a better mood.
    Happily the fashion for headless ladies seems to be passing because I’ve not noticed many of them lately.

    Reply
  52. I am put off by romance covers with headless heroines, just bodies with (or sometimes without) pretty silk dresses. It screams to me that (whether it’s meant to or not) the book doesn’t have anything to do with the heroine’s mind, only what goes on below the neck, becausewho she is or what she thinks just doesn’t matter. It’s insulting.
    I like the covers in this post because they show the whole person. And they’re pretty and put me in a better mood.
    Happily the fashion for headless ladies seems to be passing because I’ve not noticed many of them lately.

    Reply
  53. I am put off by romance covers with headless heroines, just bodies with (or sometimes without) pretty silk dresses. It screams to me that (whether it’s meant to or not) the book doesn’t have anything to do with the heroine’s mind, only what goes on below the neck, becausewho she is or what she thinks just doesn’t matter. It’s insulting.
    I like the covers in this post because they show the whole person. And they’re pretty and put me in a better mood.
    Happily the fashion for headless ladies seems to be passing because I’ve not noticed many of them lately.

    Reply
  54. I am put off by romance covers with headless heroines, just bodies with (or sometimes without) pretty silk dresses. It screams to me that (whether it’s meant to or not) the book doesn’t have anything to do with the heroine’s mind, only what goes on below the neck, becausewho she is or what she thinks just doesn’t matter. It’s insulting.
    I like the covers in this post because they show the whole person. And they’re pretty and put me in a better mood.
    Happily the fashion for headless ladies seems to be passing because I’ve not noticed many of them lately.

    Reply
  55. I am put off by romance covers with headless heroines, just bodies with (or sometimes without) pretty silk dresses. It screams to me that (whether it’s meant to or not) the book doesn’t have anything to do with the heroine’s mind, only what goes on below the neck, becausewho she is or what she thinks just doesn’t matter. It’s insulting.
    I like the covers in this post because they show the whole person. And they’re pretty and put me in a better mood.
    Happily the fashion for headless ladies seems to be passing because I’ve not noticed many of them lately.

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Kathy — I’m very pleased with it. And yes, people often forget to check an e-book cover in thumbnail size. The first thing I do when a friend sends me a cover for comment is shrink the image to see how clear the text is.
    I’ve had a few headless women (and a man) on my covers. I didn’t mind them — and I might argue that it was more appropriate for a Tudor-set book. *g*
    Actually I think self-e-publishing has done a lot to “up the game” for traditional publishers. Yes, there are a lot of not-very-good covers, but there are some wonderful ones. I think once authors learned how easy it was to get excellent covers (and for quite reasonable prices, I think), the pressure was put on the trad publishers to do better.

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Kathy — I’m very pleased with it. And yes, people often forget to check an e-book cover in thumbnail size. The first thing I do when a friend sends me a cover for comment is shrink the image to see how clear the text is.
    I’ve had a few headless women (and a man) on my covers. I didn’t mind them — and I might argue that it was more appropriate for a Tudor-set book. *g*
    Actually I think self-e-publishing has done a lot to “up the game” for traditional publishers. Yes, there are a lot of not-very-good covers, but there are some wonderful ones. I think once authors learned how easy it was to get excellent covers (and for quite reasonable prices, I think), the pressure was put on the trad publishers to do better.

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Kathy — I’m very pleased with it. And yes, people often forget to check an e-book cover in thumbnail size. The first thing I do when a friend sends me a cover for comment is shrink the image to see how clear the text is.
    I’ve had a few headless women (and a man) on my covers. I didn’t mind them — and I might argue that it was more appropriate for a Tudor-set book. *g*
    Actually I think self-e-publishing has done a lot to “up the game” for traditional publishers. Yes, there are a lot of not-very-good covers, but there are some wonderful ones. I think once authors learned how easy it was to get excellent covers (and for quite reasonable prices, I think), the pressure was put on the trad publishers to do better.

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Kathy — I’m very pleased with it. And yes, people often forget to check an e-book cover in thumbnail size. The first thing I do when a friend sends me a cover for comment is shrink the image to see how clear the text is.
    I’ve had a few headless women (and a man) on my covers. I didn’t mind them — and I might argue that it was more appropriate for a Tudor-set book. *g*
    Actually I think self-e-publishing has done a lot to “up the game” for traditional publishers. Yes, there are a lot of not-very-good covers, but there are some wonderful ones. I think once authors learned how easy it was to get excellent covers (and for quite reasonable prices, I think), the pressure was put on the trad publishers to do better.

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Kathy — I’m very pleased with it. And yes, people often forget to check an e-book cover in thumbnail size. The first thing I do when a friend sends me a cover for comment is shrink the image to see how clear the text is.
    I’ve had a few headless women (and a man) on my covers. I didn’t mind them — and I might argue that it was more appropriate for a Tudor-set book. *g*
    Actually I think self-e-publishing has done a lot to “up the game” for traditional publishers. Yes, there are a lot of not-very-good covers, but there are some wonderful ones. I think once authors learned how easy it was to get excellent covers (and for quite reasonable prices, I think), the pressure was put on the trad publishers to do better.

    Reply
  61. I agree with you, Sidney. A good cover is vital, and a bad cover makes me cringe. And if it’s a traditional publisher, I cringe for the author.
    The “clothes-falling-off” covers bemuse me. They seem so unlikely and a bit silly. As for the historically correct costumes on the cover, very few of the professional photo/cover sites have them. They’re watching costs. And even the big expensive photos used on some of the big-name traditionally published authors often have enlarged skirts, the better to display the author name.

    Reply
  62. I agree with you, Sidney. A good cover is vital, and a bad cover makes me cringe. And if it’s a traditional publisher, I cringe for the author.
    The “clothes-falling-off” covers bemuse me. They seem so unlikely and a bit silly. As for the historically correct costumes on the cover, very few of the professional photo/cover sites have them. They’re watching costs. And even the big expensive photos used on some of the big-name traditionally published authors often have enlarged skirts, the better to display the author name.

    Reply
  63. I agree with you, Sidney. A good cover is vital, and a bad cover makes me cringe. And if it’s a traditional publisher, I cringe for the author.
    The “clothes-falling-off” covers bemuse me. They seem so unlikely and a bit silly. As for the historically correct costumes on the cover, very few of the professional photo/cover sites have them. They’re watching costs. And even the big expensive photos used on some of the big-name traditionally published authors often have enlarged skirts, the better to display the author name.

    Reply
  64. I agree with you, Sidney. A good cover is vital, and a bad cover makes me cringe. And if it’s a traditional publisher, I cringe for the author.
    The “clothes-falling-off” covers bemuse me. They seem so unlikely and a bit silly. As for the historically correct costumes on the cover, very few of the professional photo/cover sites have them. They’re watching costs. And even the big expensive photos used on some of the big-name traditionally published authors often have enlarged skirts, the better to display the author name.

    Reply
  65. I agree with you, Sidney. A good cover is vital, and a bad cover makes me cringe. And if it’s a traditional publisher, I cringe for the author.
    The “clothes-falling-off” covers bemuse me. They seem so unlikely and a bit silly. As for the historically correct costumes on the cover, very few of the professional photo/cover sites have them. They’re watching costs. And even the big expensive photos used on some of the big-name traditionally published authors often have enlarged skirts, the better to display the author name.

    Reply
  66. Thanks so much, Mary. I agree with you about those “bodice-ripper” covers. They certainly sold the books, but there’s also a certain cringe factor at work — or there is for me. (Wimps R me)
    I’m glad you like it, but I wasn’t a fan of the cover of HIS CAPTIVE LADY — it was too “busy” for my liking. And I thought the background color was a bit pale and wishy-washy. Luckily, at the last minute they gave the paperback cover a bold blue background, which worked much better. The wishy-washy one is still what people see when they go on-line, though.
    Here it is, if anyone wants to see: https://www.amazon.com/Captive-Lady-Devil-Riders-Book-ebook/dp/B001ANYDG8/

    Reply
  67. Thanks so much, Mary. I agree with you about those “bodice-ripper” covers. They certainly sold the books, but there’s also a certain cringe factor at work — or there is for me. (Wimps R me)
    I’m glad you like it, but I wasn’t a fan of the cover of HIS CAPTIVE LADY — it was too “busy” for my liking. And I thought the background color was a bit pale and wishy-washy. Luckily, at the last minute they gave the paperback cover a bold blue background, which worked much better. The wishy-washy one is still what people see when they go on-line, though.
    Here it is, if anyone wants to see: https://www.amazon.com/Captive-Lady-Devil-Riders-Book-ebook/dp/B001ANYDG8/

    Reply
  68. Thanks so much, Mary. I agree with you about those “bodice-ripper” covers. They certainly sold the books, but there’s also a certain cringe factor at work — or there is for me. (Wimps R me)
    I’m glad you like it, but I wasn’t a fan of the cover of HIS CAPTIVE LADY — it was too “busy” for my liking. And I thought the background color was a bit pale and wishy-washy. Luckily, at the last minute they gave the paperback cover a bold blue background, which worked much better. The wishy-washy one is still what people see when they go on-line, though.
    Here it is, if anyone wants to see: https://www.amazon.com/Captive-Lady-Devil-Riders-Book-ebook/dp/B001ANYDG8/

    Reply
  69. Thanks so much, Mary. I agree with you about those “bodice-ripper” covers. They certainly sold the books, but there’s also a certain cringe factor at work — or there is for me. (Wimps R me)
    I’m glad you like it, but I wasn’t a fan of the cover of HIS CAPTIVE LADY — it was too “busy” for my liking. And I thought the background color was a bit pale and wishy-washy. Luckily, at the last minute they gave the paperback cover a bold blue background, which worked much better. The wishy-washy one is still what people see when they go on-line, though.
    Here it is, if anyone wants to see: https://www.amazon.com/Captive-Lady-Devil-Riders-Book-ebook/dp/B001ANYDG8/

    Reply
  70. Thanks so much, Mary. I agree with you about those “bodice-ripper” covers. They certainly sold the books, but there’s also a certain cringe factor at work — or there is for me. (Wimps R me)
    I’m glad you like it, but I wasn’t a fan of the cover of HIS CAPTIVE LADY — it was too “busy” for my liking. And I thought the background color was a bit pale and wishy-washy. Luckily, at the last minute they gave the paperback cover a bold blue background, which worked much better. The wishy-washy one is still what people see when they go on-line, though.
    Here it is, if anyone wants to see: https://www.amazon.com/Captive-Lady-Devil-Riders-Book-ebook/dp/B001ANYDG8/

    Reply
  71. It’s a shame, isn’t it, Cindy, when a cover puts off a potential reader? In traditional publishing the author often has very little say over the covers, and if the marketing dept is convinced that sex sells, that’s what they go for. Of course it does, but only if the book is as advertised. And it only works for readers who love the thought of “half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots.” LOL

    Reply
  72. It’s a shame, isn’t it, Cindy, when a cover puts off a potential reader? In traditional publishing the author often has very little say over the covers, and if the marketing dept is convinced that sex sells, that’s what they go for. Of course it does, but only if the book is as advertised. And it only works for readers who love the thought of “half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots.” LOL

    Reply
  73. It’s a shame, isn’t it, Cindy, when a cover puts off a potential reader? In traditional publishing the author often has very little say over the covers, and if the marketing dept is convinced that sex sells, that’s what they go for. Of course it does, but only if the book is as advertised. And it only works for readers who love the thought of “half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots.” LOL

    Reply
  74. It’s a shame, isn’t it, Cindy, when a cover puts off a potential reader? In traditional publishing the author often has very little say over the covers, and if the marketing dept is convinced that sex sells, that’s what they go for. Of course it does, but only if the book is as advertised. And it only works for readers who love the thought of “half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots.” LOL

    Reply
  75. It’s a shame, isn’t it, Cindy, when a cover puts off a potential reader? In traditional publishing the author often has very little say over the covers, and if the marketing dept is convinced that sex sells, that’s what they go for. Of course it does, but only if the book is as advertised. And it only works for readers who love the thought of “half naked, untidy, sweaty muscle bound idiots.” LOL

    Reply
  76. Oh, Lillian, I sympathize with you on that. We pour so much effort into writing the best book we can, but often have no control over the cover or the back-cover blurb, which initially at least is what sells the book.
    I must confess that I do get a giggle out of things like the Eiffel Tower showing up in historical covers. A friend of mine set a contemporary romance in New York — a really funky, urban story, and her cover showed her hero and heroine lying on a beach with a huge mountain looming in the background. As it does in New York. *g*

    Reply
  77. Oh, Lillian, I sympathize with you on that. We pour so much effort into writing the best book we can, but often have no control over the cover or the back-cover blurb, which initially at least is what sells the book.
    I must confess that I do get a giggle out of things like the Eiffel Tower showing up in historical covers. A friend of mine set a contemporary romance in New York — a really funky, urban story, and her cover showed her hero and heroine lying on a beach with a huge mountain looming in the background. As it does in New York. *g*

    Reply
  78. Oh, Lillian, I sympathize with you on that. We pour so much effort into writing the best book we can, but often have no control over the cover or the back-cover blurb, which initially at least is what sells the book.
    I must confess that I do get a giggle out of things like the Eiffel Tower showing up in historical covers. A friend of mine set a contemporary romance in New York — a really funky, urban story, and her cover showed her hero and heroine lying on a beach with a huge mountain looming in the background. As it does in New York. *g*

    Reply
  79. Oh, Lillian, I sympathize with you on that. We pour so much effort into writing the best book we can, but often have no control over the cover or the back-cover blurb, which initially at least is what sells the book.
    I must confess that I do get a giggle out of things like the Eiffel Tower showing up in historical covers. A friend of mine set a contemporary romance in New York — a really funky, urban story, and her cover showed her hero and heroine lying on a beach with a huge mountain looming in the background. As it does in New York. *g*

    Reply
  80. Oh, Lillian, I sympathize with you on that. We pour so much effort into writing the best book we can, but often have no control over the cover or the back-cover blurb, which initially at least is what sells the book.
    I must confess that I do get a giggle out of things like the Eiffel Tower showing up in historical covers. A friend of mine set a contemporary romance in New York — a really funky, urban story, and her cover showed her hero and heroine lying on a beach with a huge mountain looming in the background. As it does in New York. *g*

    Reply
  81. Sue, yes, I usually buy by author name too, and that’s fine for the author with a long backlist. But I also love discovering new-to-me authors, and as my local library doesn’t buy many books published overseas, or many romances, I have to explore a bit more. Luckily we have the wenchly WWR post at the end of each month, and that often introduces me to new writers.

    Reply
  82. Sue, yes, I usually buy by author name too, and that’s fine for the author with a long backlist. But I also love discovering new-to-me authors, and as my local library doesn’t buy many books published overseas, or many romances, I have to explore a bit more. Luckily we have the wenchly WWR post at the end of each month, and that often introduces me to new writers.

    Reply
  83. Sue, yes, I usually buy by author name too, and that’s fine for the author with a long backlist. But I also love discovering new-to-me authors, and as my local library doesn’t buy many books published overseas, or many romances, I have to explore a bit more. Luckily we have the wenchly WWR post at the end of each month, and that often introduces me to new writers.

    Reply
  84. Sue, yes, I usually buy by author name too, and that’s fine for the author with a long backlist. But I also love discovering new-to-me authors, and as my local library doesn’t buy many books published overseas, or many romances, I have to explore a bit more. Luckily we have the wenchly WWR post at the end of each month, and that often introduces me to new writers.

    Reply
  85. Sue, yes, I usually buy by author name too, and that’s fine for the author with a long backlist. But I also love discovering new-to-me authors, and as my local library doesn’t buy many books published overseas, or many romances, I have to explore a bit more. Luckily we have the wenchly WWR post at the end of each month, and that often introduces me to new writers.

    Reply
  86. Jennifer, you do have gorgeous covers, but I have to say I first bought THE MADNESS OF LORD IAN MACKENZIE on word-of-mouth, and now I’d buy all your books if they had covers made of old lunch-wrap. *g*
    But I think with the huge volume of self-published e-books, a beautifully designed cover is very important. It suggests to a reader that if the author has taken the time , thought and expense to get a beautiful cover, they will have taken just as much trouble over the writing. For instance, CJ Archer, a friend of mine who writes YA historicals with a slight paranormal and mystery element, has branded herself beautifully with themed covers that perfectly reflect the story, the tone and the era. You can see some of her covers here:
    https://www.amazon.com/C.J.-Archer/e/B004LLEHN0/

    Reply
  87. Jennifer, you do have gorgeous covers, but I have to say I first bought THE MADNESS OF LORD IAN MACKENZIE on word-of-mouth, and now I’d buy all your books if they had covers made of old lunch-wrap. *g*
    But I think with the huge volume of self-published e-books, a beautifully designed cover is very important. It suggests to a reader that if the author has taken the time , thought and expense to get a beautiful cover, they will have taken just as much trouble over the writing. For instance, CJ Archer, a friend of mine who writes YA historicals with a slight paranormal and mystery element, has branded herself beautifully with themed covers that perfectly reflect the story, the tone and the era. You can see some of her covers here:
    https://www.amazon.com/C.J.-Archer/e/B004LLEHN0/

    Reply
  88. Jennifer, you do have gorgeous covers, but I have to say I first bought THE MADNESS OF LORD IAN MACKENZIE on word-of-mouth, and now I’d buy all your books if they had covers made of old lunch-wrap. *g*
    But I think with the huge volume of self-published e-books, a beautifully designed cover is very important. It suggests to a reader that if the author has taken the time , thought and expense to get a beautiful cover, they will have taken just as much trouble over the writing. For instance, CJ Archer, a friend of mine who writes YA historicals with a slight paranormal and mystery element, has branded herself beautifully with themed covers that perfectly reflect the story, the tone and the era. You can see some of her covers here:
    https://www.amazon.com/C.J.-Archer/e/B004LLEHN0/

    Reply
  89. Jennifer, you do have gorgeous covers, but I have to say I first bought THE MADNESS OF LORD IAN MACKENZIE on word-of-mouth, and now I’d buy all your books if they had covers made of old lunch-wrap. *g*
    But I think with the huge volume of self-published e-books, a beautifully designed cover is very important. It suggests to a reader that if the author has taken the time , thought and expense to get a beautiful cover, they will have taken just as much trouble over the writing. For instance, CJ Archer, a friend of mine who writes YA historicals with a slight paranormal and mystery element, has branded herself beautifully with themed covers that perfectly reflect the story, the tone and the era. You can see some of her covers here:
    https://www.amazon.com/C.J.-Archer/e/B004LLEHN0/

    Reply
  90. Jennifer, you do have gorgeous covers, but I have to say I first bought THE MADNESS OF LORD IAN MACKENZIE on word-of-mouth, and now I’d buy all your books if they had covers made of old lunch-wrap. *g*
    But I think with the huge volume of self-published e-books, a beautifully designed cover is very important. It suggests to a reader that if the author has taken the time , thought and expense to get a beautiful cover, they will have taken just as much trouble over the writing. For instance, CJ Archer, a friend of mine who writes YA historicals with a slight paranormal and mystery element, has branded herself beautifully with themed covers that perfectly reflect the story, the tone and the era. You can see some of her covers here:
    https://www.amazon.com/C.J.-Archer/e/B004LLEHN0/

    Reply
  91. Janga, my house is drowning in books, so I’m forced to buy mostly e-books, too, these days. And I also buy a lot purely by author. I agree with you on titles, but it’s often just as hard to get a “provocative, evocative title” past an editor (and the Marketing Dept) as it is to get a cover of your choice.
    A lot of my friends write category (series) romance for Harlequin, and they often sighed or cringed at their generic titles — of “The Italian Prince’s Secret Baby’s Billionaire’s Surprise Revenge” type of thing. Then some of them went into self-poublishing, and lo! they soon learned that that kind of generic hook title sells, that it’s a clear signal to readers of the kind of book it is. Traditional publishers of single title romance aren’t quite so blatant, but there is a tendency that way, I think.
    Readers, especially readers shopping on line, don’t seem to be willing to spend the time pondering about an evocative, subtly suggestive or intriguing title (if they don’t know the author, I mean) — they just browse, shop and grab. Or go for keywords that will show up in a search.

    Reply
  92. Janga, my house is drowning in books, so I’m forced to buy mostly e-books, too, these days. And I also buy a lot purely by author. I agree with you on titles, but it’s often just as hard to get a “provocative, evocative title” past an editor (and the Marketing Dept) as it is to get a cover of your choice.
    A lot of my friends write category (series) romance for Harlequin, and they often sighed or cringed at their generic titles — of “The Italian Prince’s Secret Baby’s Billionaire’s Surprise Revenge” type of thing. Then some of them went into self-poublishing, and lo! they soon learned that that kind of generic hook title sells, that it’s a clear signal to readers of the kind of book it is. Traditional publishers of single title romance aren’t quite so blatant, but there is a tendency that way, I think.
    Readers, especially readers shopping on line, don’t seem to be willing to spend the time pondering about an evocative, subtly suggestive or intriguing title (if they don’t know the author, I mean) — they just browse, shop and grab. Or go for keywords that will show up in a search.

    Reply
  93. Janga, my house is drowning in books, so I’m forced to buy mostly e-books, too, these days. And I also buy a lot purely by author. I agree with you on titles, but it’s often just as hard to get a “provocative, evocative title” past an editor (and the Marketing Dept) as it is to get a cover of your choice.
    A lot of my friends write category (series) romance for Harlequin, and they often sighed or cringed at their generic titles — of “The Italian Prince’s Secret Baby’s Billionaire’s Surprise Revenge” type of thing. Then some of them went into self-poublishing, and lo! they soon learned that that kind of generic hook title sells, that it’s a clear signal to readers of the kind of book it is. Traditional publishers of single title romance aren’t quite so blatant, but there is a tendency that way, I think.
    Readers, especially readers shopping on line, don’t seem to be willing to spend the time pondering about an evocative, subtly suggestive or intriguing title (if they don’t know the author, I mean) — they just browse, shop and grab. Or go for keywords that will show up in a search.

    Reply
  94. Janga, my house is drowning in books, so I’m forced to buy mostly e-books, too, these days. And I also buy a lot purely by author. I agree with you on titles, but it’s often just as hard to get a “provocative, evocative title” past an editor (and the Marketing Dept) as it is to get a cover of your choice.
    A lot of my friends write category (series) romance for Harlequin, and they often sighed or cringed at their generic titles — of “The Italian Prince’s Secret Baby’s Billionaire’s Surprise Revenge” type of thing. Then some of them went into self-poublishing, and lo! they soon learned that that kind of generic hook title sells, that it’s a clear signal to readers of the kind of book it is. Traditional publishers of single title romance aren’t quite so blatant, but there is a tendency that way, I think.
    Readers, especially readers shopping on line, don’t seem to be willing to spend the time pondering about an evocative, subtly suggestive or intriguing title (if they don’t know the author, I mean) — they just browse, shop and grab. Or go for keywords that will show up in a search.

    Reply
  95. Janga, my house is drowning in books, so I’m forced to buy mostly e-books, too, these days. And I also buy a lot purely by author. I agree with you on titles, but it’s often just as hard to get a “provocative, evocative title” past an editor (and the Marketing Dept) as it is to get a cover of your choice.
    A lot of my friends write category (series) romance for Harlequin, and they often sighed or cringed at their generic titles — of “The Italian Prince’s Secret Baby’s Billionaire’s Surprise Revenge” type of thing. Then some of them went into self-poublishing, and lo! they soon learned that that kind of generic hook title sells, that it’s a clear signal to readers of the kind of book it is. Traditional publishers of single title romance aren’t quite so blatant, but there is a tendency that way, I think.
    Readers, especially readers shopping on line, don’t seem to be willing to spend the time pondering about an evocative, subtly suggestive or intriguing title (if they don’t know the author, I mean) — they just browse, shop and grab. Or go for keywords that will show up in a search.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Judy. It seems from the trend of these comments that a bad cover won’t put people off an author they already know, but it will stop them from picking up a book. And a good cover might inspire you to investigate a new author.
    The black-and-white tattooed guy thing is a trend at the moment, I know. But it will pass. I wonder what will replace it. Often a gorgeous new cover design will inspire a new trend.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Judy. It seems from the trend of these comments that a bad cover won’t put people off an author they already know, but it will stop them from picking up a book. And a good cover might inspire you to investigate a new author.
    The black-and-white tattooed guy thing is a trend at the moment, I know. But it will pass. I wonder what will replace it. Often a gorgeous new cover design will inspire a new trend.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Judy. It seems from the trend of these comments that a bad cover won’t put people off an author they already know, but it will stop them from picking up a book. And a good cover might inspire you to investigate a new author.
    The black-and-white tattooed guy thing is a trend at the moment, I know. But it will pass. I wonder what will replace it. Often a gorgeous new cover design will inspire a new trend.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Judy. It seems from the trend of these comments that a bad cover won’t put people off an author they already know, but it will stop them from picking up a book. And a good cover might inspire you to investigate a new author.
    The black-and-white tattooed guy thing is a trend at the moment, I know. But it will pass. I wonder what will replace it. Often a gorgeous new cover design will inspire a new trend.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Judy. It seems from the trend of these comments that a bad cover won’t put people off an author they already know, but it will stop them from picking up a book. And a good cover might inspire you to investigate a new author.
    The black-and-white tattooed guy thing is a trend at the moment, I know. But it will pass. I wonder what will replace it. Often a gorgeous new cover design will inspire a new trend.

    Reply
  101. Janice, I know a lot of people hate them, but I must admit to having a fondness for the headless covers. I think I had one of the first, with my Harlequin cover of An Honorable Thief. I liked it at the time because usually no cover EVER matches my vision of the character, and in fact was often wildly wrong, but headlessness left it up to my imagination. *g*
    For those who’ve never seen it, here it is:
    https://www.amazon.com/Honorable-Thief-Anne-Gracie/dp/0373292163/
    That headless cover is still one of my favorite cover, not just because it didn’t interfere with my vision of the characters, but because it feels quite sumptuous and textural.

    Reply
  102. Janice, I know a lot of people hate them, but I must admit to having a fondness for the headless covers. I think I had one of the first, with my Harlequin cover of An Honorable Thief. I liked it at the time because usually no cover EVER matches my vision of the character, and in fact was often wildly wrong, but headlessness left it up to my imagination. *g*
    For those who’ve never seen it, here it is:
    https://www.amazon.com/Honorable-Thief-Anne-Gracie/dp/0373292163/
    That headless cover is still one of my favorite cover, not just because it didn’t interfere with my vision of the characters, but because it feels quite sumptuous and textural.

    Reply
  103. Janice, I know a lot of people hate them, but I must admit to having a fondness for the headless covers. I think I had one of the first, with my Harlequin cover of An Honorable Thief. I liked it at the time because usually no cover EVER matches my vision of the character, and in fact was often wildly wrong, but headlessness left it up to my imagination. *g*
    For those who’ve never seen it, here it is:
    https://www.amazon.com/Honorable-Thief-Anne-Gracie/dp/0373292163/
    That headless cover is still one of my favorite cover, not just because it didn’t interfere with my vision of the characters, but because it feels quite sumptuous and textural.

    Reply
  104. Janice, I know a lot of people hate them, but I must admit to having a fondness for the headless covers. I think I had one of the first, with my Harlequin cover of An Honorable Thief. I liked it at the time because usually no cover EVER matches my vision of the character, and in fact was often wildly wrong, but headlessness left it up to my imagination. *g*
    For those who’ve never seen it, here it is:
    https://www.amazon.com/Honorable-Thief-Anne-Gracie/dp/0373292163/
    That headless cover is still one of my favorite cover, not just because it didn’t interfere with my vision of the characters, but because it feels quite sumptuous and textural.

    Reply
  105. Janice, I know a lot of people hate them, but I must admit to having a fondness for the headless covers. I think I had one of the first, with my Harlequin cover of An Honorable Thief. I liked it at the time because usually no cover EVER matches my vision of the character, and in fact was often wildly wrong, but headlessness left it up to my imagination. *g*
    For those who’ve never seen it, here it is:
    https://www.amazon.com/Honorable-Thief-Anne-Gracie/dp/0373292163/
    That headless cover is still one of my favorite cover, not just because it didn’t interfere with my vision of the characters, but because it feels quite sumptuous and textural.

    Reply
  106. I know you are right, Anne. I think that I’m just not a very visual reader. I generally avoid who-would-you-cast-as discussions too because I prefer the images the author’s words created in my head to the image of some celebrity who might not fit my idea of the character at all.
    I think editors of women’s fiction must be more open to immaginative, allusive titles. I always love the titles of Barbara Samuel/ O’Neal’s books, for example. I remember back in my Romance Vagabond days we once had a contest to see how many current romance titles used one or more of a dozen genre buzz words we identified. It was amazing how many used “Duke,” “Secret,” “Passion,” etc. That supports your point that titles as well as covers function as genre signs.

    Reply
  107. I know you are right, Anne. I think that I’m just not a very visual reader. I generally avoid who-would-you-cast-as discussions too because I prefer the images the author’s words created in my head to the image of some celebrity who might not fit my idea of the character at all.
    I think editors of women’s fiction must be more open to immaginative, allusive titles. I always love the titles of Barbara Samuel/ O’Neal’s books, for example. I remember back in my Romance Vagabond days we once had a contest to see how many current romance titles used one or more of a dozen genre buzz words we identified. It was amazing how many used “Duke,” “Secret,” “Passion,” etc. That supports your point that titles as well as covers function as genre signs.

    Reply
  108. I know you are right, Anne. I think that I’m just not a very visual reader. I generally avoid who-would-you-cast-as discussions too because I prefer the images the author’s words created in my head to the image of some celebrity who might not fit my idea of the character at all.
    I think editors of women’s fiction must be more open to immaginative, allusive titles. I always love the titles of Barbara Samuel/ O’Neal’s books, for example. I remember back in my Romance Vagabond days we once had a contest to see how many current romance titles used one or more of a dozen genre buzz words we identified. It was amazing how many used “Duke,” “Secret,” “Passion,” etc. That supports your point that titles as well as covers function as genre signs.

    Reply
  109. I know you are right, Anne. I think that I’m just not a very visual reader. I generally avoid who-would-you-cast-as discussions too because I prefer the images the author’s words created in my head to the image of some celebrity who might not fit my idea of the character at all.
    I think editors of women’s fiction must be more open to immaginative, allusive titles. I always love the titles of Barbara Samuel/ O’Neal’s books, for example. I remember back in my Romance Vagabond days we once had a contest to see how many current romance titles used one or more of a dozen genre buzz words we identified. It was amazing how many used “Duke,” “Secret,” “Passion,” etc. That supports your point that titles as well as covers function as genre signs.

    Reply
  110. I know you are right, Anne. I think that I’m just not a very visual reader. I generally avoid who-would-you-cast-as discussions too because I prefer the images the author’s words created in my head to the image of some celebrity who might not fit my idea of the character at all.
    I think editors of women’s fiction must be more open to immaginative, allusive titles. I always love the titles of Barbara Samuel/ O’Neal’s books, for example. I remember back in my Romance Vagabond days we once had a contest to see how many current romance titles used one or more of a dozen genre buzz words we identified. It was amazing how many used “Duke,” “Secret,” “Passion,” etc. That supports your point that titles as well as covers function as genre signs.

    Reply
  111. Thanks, Anne, though for Once a Rebel, it’s a pistol. The sword was for Once a Soldier. My editor is liking my armed heroines. *G* All three of the covers for this sub-series (including the one that isn’t public yet) have been great.

    Reply
  112. Thanks, Anne, though for Once a Rebel, it’s a pistol. The sword was for Once a Soldier. My editor is liking my armed heroines. *G* All three of the covers for this sub-series (including the one that isn’t public yet) have been great.

    Reply
  113. Thanks, Anne, though for Once a Rebel, it’s a pistol. The sword was for Once a Soldier. My editor is liking my armed heroines. *G* All three of the covers for this sub-series (including the one that isn’t public yet) have been great.

    Reply
  114. Thanks, Anne, though for Once a Rebel, it’s a pistol. The sword was for Once a Soldier. My editor is liking my armed heroines. *G* All three of the covers for this sub-series (including the one that isn’t public yet) have been great.

    Reply
  115. Thanks, Anne, though for Once a Rebel, it’s a pistol. The sword was for Once a Soldier. My editor is liking my armed heroines. *G* All three of the covers for this sub-series (including the one that isn’t public yet) have been great.

    Reply
  116. Janga, I flee from those “who would you cast” questions, too, because if I do have an actual person’s image in mind — I sometimes do story collages as a pre-writing exercise — it’s the mood of a particular photo that captures the character, not the person him/herself or his/her looks.
    As for buzzwords, how many of my own titles have “Bride” in the title — and on the cover. *g* And not necessarily my choice.
    I do think writers of mainstream novels and women’s fiction have a much wider choice. Barbara Samuels/O’Neal’s books are gorgeous, and the titles suit them perfectly. I think the more “genre” you write the more generic the title choices you’re allowed. I remember a friend of mine, a long-time writer for Mills and Book (Harlequin) talking wistfully about the titles they used to be allowed in the old days. I remember her talking about one called “Driftwood Dragon” (by another author) and the title stuck in my head until I was able to track it down in a second-hand bookstore.

    Reply
  117. Janga, I flee from those “who would you cast” questions, too, because if I do have an actual person’s image in mind — I sometimes do story collages as a pre-writing exercise — it’s the mood of a particular photo that captures the character, not the person him/herself or his/her looks.
    As for buzzwords, how many of my own titles have “Bride” in the title — and on the cover. *g* And not necessarily my choice.
    I do think writers of mainstream novels and women’s fiction have a much wider choice. Barbara Samuels/O’Neal’s books are gorgeous, and the titles suit them perfectly. I think the more “genre” you write the more generic the title choices you’re allowed. I remember a friend of mine, a long-time writer for Mills and Book (Harlequin) talking wistfully about the titles they used to be allowed in the old days. I remember her talking about one called “Driftwood Dragon” (by another author) and the title stuck in my head until I was able to track it down in a second-hand bookstore.

    Reply
  118. Janga, I flee from those “who would you cast” questions, too, because if I do have an actual person’s image in mind — I sometimes do story collages as a pre-writing exercise — it’s the mood of a particular photo that captures the character, not the person him/herself or his/her looks.
    As for buzzwords, how many of my own titles have “Bride” in the title — and on the cover. *g* And not necessarily my choice.
    I do think writers of mainstream novels and women’s fiction have a much wider choice. Barbara Samuels/O’Neal’s books are gorgeous, and the titles suit them perfectly. I think the more “genre” you write the more generic the title choices you’re allowed. I remember a friend of mine, a long-time writer for Mills and Book (Harlequin) talking wistfully about the titles they used to be allowed in the old days. I remember her talking about one called “Driftwood Dragon” (by another author) and the title stuck in my head until I was able to track it down in a second-hand bookstore.

    Reply
  119. Janga, I flee from those “who would you cast” questions, too, because if I do have an actual person’s image in mind — I sometimes do story collages as a pre-writing exercise — it’s the mood of a particular photo that captures the character, not the person him/herself or his/her looks.
    As for buzzwords, how many of my own titles have “Bride” in the title — and on the cover. *g* And not necessarily my choice.
    I do think writers of mainstream novels and women’s fiction have a much wider choice. Barbara Samuels/O’Neal’s books are gorgeous, and the titles suit them perfectly. I think the more “genre” you write the more generic the title choices you’re allowed. I remember a friend of mine, a long-time writer for Mills and Book (Harlequin) talking wistfully about the titles they used to be allowed in the old days. I remember her talking about one called “Driftwood Dragon” (by another author) and the title stuck in my head until I was able to track it down in a second-hand bookstore.

    Reply
  120. Janga, I flee from those “who would you cast” questions, too, because if I do have an actual person’s image in mind — I sometimes do story collages as a pre-writing exercise — it’s the mood of a particular photo that captures the character, not the person him/herself or his/her looks.
    As for buzzwords, how many of my own titles have “Bride” in the title — and on the cover. *g* And not necessarily my choice.
    I do think writers of mainstream novels and women’s fiction have a much wider choice. Barbara Samuels/O’Neal’s books are gorgeous, and the titles suit them perfectly. I think the more “genre” you write the more generic the title choices you’re allowed. I remember a friend of mine, a long-time writer for Mills and Book (Harlequin) talking wistfully about the titles they used to be allowed in the old days. I remember her talking about one called “Driftwood Dragon” (by another author) and the title stuck in my head until I was able to track it down in a second-hand bookstore.

    Reply
  121. Nope. Can’t agree. Looks too generic to me; that body in that dress and the man’s hands could be anybody. If I hadn’t known you wrote it, I likely would have not given it much of a look. I like your recent covers much better.

    Reply
  122. Nope. Can’t agree. Looks too generic to me; that body in that dress and the man’s hands could be anybody. If I hadn’t known you wrote it, I likely would have not given it much of a look. I like your recent covers much better.

    Reply
  123. Nope. Can’t agree. Looks too generic to me; that body in that dress and the man’s hands could be anybody. If I hadn’t known you wrote it, I likely would have not given it much of a look. I like your recent covers much better.

    Reply
  124. Nope. Can’t agree. Looks too generic to me; that body in that dress and the man’s hands could be anybody. If I hadn’t known you wrote it, I likely would have not given it much of a look. I like your recent covers much better.

    Reply
  125. Nope. Can’t agree. Looks too generic to me; that body in that dress and the man’s hands could be anybody. If I hadn’t known you wrote it, I likely would have not given it much of a look. I like your recent covers much better.

    Reply
  126. I’m all ebooks, all the time now, but covers are still important to me. I get Bookbub and Early Bird Books emails on a regular basis and have learned to minimize the time I spend on them by shorthanding through the cover photos. Bare-chested Navy Seals and underclad Highlanders need not apply, nor most books with “Duke” in the title. One-unclad, one-dressed-for-a-ball couples likewise (my left brain just won’t accept them). I used to really be drawn to the well-dressed Regency couples (with faces!, and yes, extra points for a cat or dog tucked into the beautifully appointed salon). Guess those days are gone forever.

    Reply
  127. I’m all ebooks, all the time now, but covers are still important to me. I get Bookbub and Early Bird Books emails on a regular basis and have learned to minimize the time I spend on them by shorthanding through the cover photos. Bare-chested Navy Seals and underclad Highlanders need not apply, nor most books with “Duke” in the title. One-unclad, one-dressed-for-a-ball couples likewise (my left brain just won’t accept them). I used to really be drawn to the well-dressed Regency couples (with faces!, and yes, extra points for a cat or dog tucked into the beautifully appointed salon). Guess those days are gone forever.

    Reply
  128. I’m all ebooks, all the time now, but covers are still important to me. I get Bookbub and Early Bird Books emails on a regular basis and have learned to minimize the time I spend on them by shorthanding through the cover photos. Bare-chested Navy Seals and underclad Highlanders need not apply, nor most books with “Duke” in the title. One-unclad, one-dressed-for-a-ball couples likewise (my left brain just won’t accept them). I used to really be drawn to the well-dressed Regency couples (with faces!, and yes, extra points for a cat or dog tucked into the beautifully appointed salon). Guess those days are gone forever.

    Reply
  129. I’m all ebooks, all the time now, but covers are still important to me. I get Bookbub and Early Bird Books emails on a regular basis and have learned to minimize the time I spend on them by shorthanding through the cover photos. Bare-chested Navy Seals and underclad Highlanders need not apply, nor most books with “Duke” in the title. One-unclad, one-dressed-for-a-ball couples likewise (my left brain just won’t accept them). I used to really be drawn to the well-dressed Regency couples (with faces!, and yes, extra points for a cat or dog tucked into the beautifully appointed salon). Guess those days are gone forever.

    Reply
  130. I’m all ebooks, all the time now, but covers are still important to me. I get Bookbub and Early Bird Books emails on a regular basis and have learned to minimize the time I spend on them by shorthanding through the cover photos. Bare-chested Navy Seals and underclad Highlanders need not apply, nor most books with “Duke” in the title. One-unclad, one-dressed-for-a-ball couples likewise (my left brain just won’t accept them). I used to really be drawn to the well-dressed Regency couples (with faces!, and yes, extra points for a cat or dog tucked into the beautifully appointed salon). Guess those days are gone forever.

    Reply
  131. That’s a great expression, Mary — “shorthanding through the cover photos” and I expect quite a few of us do the same. I’m not so sure those days are gone — styles sometimes come back into favor, albeit with a new modern twist. I have a dog in the new book I’m writing, so I’m wondering if I can get it on the cover. *g*

    Reply
  132. That’s a great expression, Mary — “shorthanding through the cover photos” and I expect quite a few of us do the same. I’m not so sure those days are gone — styles sometimes come back into favor, albeit with a new modern twist. I have a dog in the new book I’m writing, so I’m wondering if I can get it on the cover. *g*

    Reply
  133. That’s a great expression, Mary — “shorthanding through the cover photos” and I expect quite a few of us do the same. I’m not so sure those days are gone — styles sometimes come back into favor, albeit with a new modern twist. I have a dog in the new book I’m writing, so I’m wondering if I can get it on the cover. *g*

    Reply
  134. That’s a great expression, Mary — “shorthanding through the cover photos” and I expect quite a few of us do the same. I’m not so sure those days are gone — styles sometimes come back into favor, albeit with a new modern twist. I have a dog in the new book I’m writing, so I’m wondering if I can get it on the cover. *g*

    Reply
  135. That’s a great expression, Mary — “shorthanding through the cover photos” and I expect quite a few of us do the same. I’m not so sure those days are gone — styles sometimes come back into favor, albeit with a new modern twist. I have a dog in the new book I’m writing, so I’m wondering if I can get it on the cover. *g*

    Reply
  136. For those who buy by browsing in bookshops, covers are still important. I do almost all my browsing online these days, and the list of historical authors that I’m familiar with is long, so I have trouble just keeping up the authors I already know. For new authors, I go mostly by blog recommendations and online reviews, or I get sucked in by an Amazon sale price. However I do appreciate a lovely cover when I see it. Anne, I did love your early covers, like the one on The Perfect Rake. And if I recall correctly, it was glossy and embossed, which gives a lovely high quality feel to it. Mary Balogh used to get those too, in her Bedwyn family series.
    If it’s an author I love, I’ll buy the book regardless, but it is annoying when the clothes and characters on the cover are completely inaccurate, for instance, dresses from a totally different era. I’ve read books where the hero was scarred or disfigured in some way, but on the cover, he’s a perfect hunk!

    Reply
  137. For those who buy by browsing in bookshops, covers are still important. I do almost all my browsing online these days, and the list of historical authors that I’m familiar with is long, so I have trouble just keeping up the authors I already know. For new authors, I go mostly by blog recommendations and online reviews, or I get sucked in by an Amazon sale price. However I do appreciate a lovely cover when I see it. Anne, I did love your early covers, like the one on The Perfect Rake. And if I recall correctly, it was glossy and embossed, which gives a lovely high quality feel to it. Mary Balogh used to get those too, in her Bedwyn family series.
    If it’s an author I love, I’ll buy the book regardless, but it is annoying when the clothes and characters on the cover are completely inaccurate, for instance, dresses from a totally different era. I’ve read books where the hero was scarred or disfigured in some way, but on the cover, he’s a perfect hunk!

    Reply
  138. For those who buy by browsing in bookshops, covers are still important. I do almost all my browsing online these days, and the list of historical authors that I’m familiar with is long, so I have trouble just keeping up the authors I already know. For new authors, I go mostly by blog recommendations and online reviews, or I get sucked in by an Amazon sale price. However I do appreciate a lovely cover when I see it. Anne, I did love your early covers, like the one on The Perfect Rake. And if I recall correctly, it was glossy and embossed, which gives a lovely high quality feel to it. Mary Balogh used to get those too, in her Bedwyn family series.
    If it’s an author I love, I’ll buy the book regardless, but it is annoying when the clothes and characters on the cover are completely inaccurate, for instance, dresses from a totally different era. I’ve read books where the hero was scarred or disfigured in some way, but on the cover, he’s a perfect hunk!

    Reply
  139. For those who buy by browsing in bookshops, covers are still important. I do almost all my browsing online these days, and the list of historical authors that I’m familiar with is long, so I have trouble just keeping up the authors I already know. For new authors, I go mostly by blog recommendations and online reviews, or I get sucked in by an Amazon sale price. However I do appreciate a lovely cover when I see it. Anne, I did love your early covers, like the one on The Perfect Rake. And if I recall correctly, it was glossy and embossed, which gives a lovely high quality feel to it. Mary Balogh used to get those too, in her Bedwyn family series.
    If it’s an author I love, I’ll buy the book regardless, but it is annoying when the clothes and characters on the cover are completely inaccurate, for instance, dresses from a totally different era. I’ve read books where the hero was scarred or disfigured in some way, but on the cover, he’s a perfect hunk!

    Reply
  140. For those who buy by browsing in bookshops, covers are still important. I do almost all my browsing online these days, and the list of historical authors that I’m familiar with is long, so I have trouble just keeping up the authors I already know. For new authors, I go mostly by blog recommendations and online reviews, or I get sucked in by an Amazon sale price. However I do appreciate a lovely cover when I see it. Anne, I did love your early covers, like the one on The Perfect Rake. And if I recall correctly, it was glossy and embossed, which gives a lovely high quality feel to it. Mary Balogh used to get those too, in her Bedwyn family series.
    If it’s an author I love, I’ll buy the book regardless, but it is annoying when the clothes and characters on the cover are completely inaccurate, for instance, dresses from a totally different era. I’ve read books where the hero was scarred or disfigured in some way, but on the cover, he’s a perfect hunk!

    Reply
  141. I agree with many of the commenters above. I think covers are so important and definitely affect sales. I buy mostly ebooks now and the covers change over time. It’s sad if there was one I really liked, but so interesting to see the new take on it!

    Reply
  142. I agree with many of the commenters above. I think covers are so important and definitely affect sales. I buy mostly ebooks now and the covers change over time. It’s sad if there was one I really liked, but so interesting to see the new take on it!

    Reply
  143. I agree with many of the commenters above. I think covers are so important and definitely affect sales. I buy mostly ebooks now and the covers change over time. It’s sad if there was one I really liked, but so interesting to see the new take on it!

    Reply
  144. I agree with many of the commenters above. I think covers are so important and definitely affect sales. I buy mostly ebooks now and the covers change over time. It’s sad if there was one I really liked, but so interesting to see the new take on it!

    Reply
  145. I agree with many of the commenters above. I think covers are so important and definitely affect sales. I buy mostly ebooks now and the covers change over time. It’s sad if there was one I really liked, but so interesting to see the new take on it!

    Reply
  146. For me, the most important thing on a cover is the name of the author. If it is someone I know, I will look to see the plot description. If it is a book I have heard about, I will look to check on the plot.
    I agree the cover is of value to me in finding a book to read. But I also agree that at times the cover may have no connection to the book itself. “her hair was black as a raven’s wing” becomes a blond on the cover. Or a regency story has a cover with the wrong fashions.
    So, we come back to – the author is generally very important to me. I will usually trust certain authors to provide me with a wonderful story.

    Reply
  147. For me, the most important thing on a cover is the name of the author. If it is someone I know, I will look to see the plot description. If it is a book I have heard about, I will look to check on the plot.
    I agree the cover is of value to me in finding a book to read. But I also agree that at times the cover may have no connection to the book itself. “her hair was black as a raven’s wing” becomes a blond on the cover. Or a regency story has a cover with the wrong fashions.
    So, we come back to – the author is generally very important to me. I will usually trust certain authors to provide me with a wonderful story.

    Reply
  148. For me, the most important thing on a cover is the name of the author. If it is someone I know, I will look to see the plot description. If it is a book I have heard about, I will look to check on the plot.
    I agree the cover is of value to me in finding a book to read. But I also agree that at times the cover may have no connection to the book itself. “her hair was black as a raven’s wing” becomes a blond on the cover. Or a regency story has a cover with the wrong fashions.
    So, we come back to – the author is generally very important to me. I will usually trust certain authors to provide me with a wonderful story.

    Reply
  149. For me, the most important thing on a cover is the name of the author. If it is someone I know, I will look to see the plot description. If it is a book I have heard about, I will look to check on the plot.
    I agree the cover is of value to me in finding a book to read. But I also agree that at times the cover may have no connection to the book itself. “her hair was black as a raven’s wing” becomes a blond on the cover. Or a regency story has a cover with the wrong fashions.
    So, we come back to – the author is generally very important to me. I will usually trust certain authors to provide me with a wonderful story.

    Reply
  150. For me, the most important thing on a cover is the name of the author. If it is someone I know, I will look to see the plot description. If it is a book I have heard about, I will look to check on the plot.
    I agree the cover is of value to me in finding a book to read. But I also agree that at times the cover may have no connection to the book itself. “her hair was black as a raven’s wing” becomes a blond on the cover. Or a regency story has a cover with the wrong fashions.
    So, we come back to – the author is generally very important to me. I will usually trust certain authors to provide me with a wonderful story.

    Reply
  151. Karin, yes, The Perfect Rake cover was glossy and embossed — it was beautiful and I recall stroking it. *g* Same with quite a few of them — the raised silver dance card on the cover of The Perfect Waltz was a fave, too. They only do the embossing for the first printing, so later editions have the same cover without the embossing.
    Yes, the faces on covers are generally idealized, according to what the designers think will appeal to most people. And the clothes are what the photographer has in their wardrobe, I guess. With the volume of covers these days, I suppose it’s too expensive to have authentic costumes made. But they should make a push to be era-correct, I agree.

    Reply
  152. Karin, yes, The Perfect Rake cover was glossy and embossed — it was beautiful and I recall stroking it. *g* Same with quite a few of them — the raised silver dance card on the cover of The Perfect Waltz was a fave, too. They only do the embossing for the first printing, so later editions have the same cover without the embossing.
    Yes, the faces on covers are generally idealized, according to what the designers think will appeal to most people. And the clothes are what the photographer has in their wardrobe, I guess. With the volume of covers these days, I suppose it’s too expensive to have authentic costumes made. But they should make a push to be era-correct, I agree.

    Reply
  153. Karin, yes, The Perfect Rake cover was glossy and embossed — it was beautiful and I recall stroking it. *g* Same with quite a few of them — the raised silver dance card on the cover of The Perfect Waltz was a fave, too. They only do the embossing for the first printing, so later editions have the same cover without the embossing.
    Yes, the faces on covers are generally idealized, according to what the designers think will appeal to most people. And the clothes are what the photographer has in their wardrobe, I guess. With the volume of covers these days, I suppose it’s too expensive to have authentic costumes made. But they should make a push to be era-correct, I agree.

    Reply
  154. Karin, yes, The Perfect Rake cover was glossy and embossed — it was beautiful and I recall stroking it. *g* Same with quite a few of them — the raised silver dance card on the cover of The Perfect Waltz was a fave, too. They only do the embossing for the first printing, so later editions have the same cover without the embossing.
    Yes, the faces on covers are generally idealized, according to what the designers think will appeal to most people. And the clothes are what the photographer has in their wardrobe, I guess. With the volume of covers these days, I suppose it’s too expensive to have authentic costumes made. But they should make a push to be era-correct, I agree.

    Reply
  155. Karin, yes, The Perfect Rake cover was glossy and embossed — it was beautiful and I recall stroking it. *g* Same with quite a few of them — the raised silver dance card on the cover of The Perfect Waltz was a fave, too. They only do the embossing for the first printing, so later editions have the same cover without the embossing.
    Yes, the faces on covers are generally idealized, according to what the designers think will appeal to most people. And the clothes are what the photographer has in their wardrobe, I guess. With the volume of covers these days, I suppose it’s too expensive to have authentic costumes made. But they should make a push to be era-correct, I agree.

    Reply
  156. Jeanne, it’s so easy for e-book covers to be changed these days, and quite a few of publishers will change not only the cover but the title of a book to give it a new lease of life. My stories with harlequin were brought out by Harlequin Australia with different covers (and Victorian-era clothing), for instance. I’m not sure why they chose those covers.

    Reply
  157. Jeanne, it’s so easy for e-book covers to be changed these days, and quite a few of publishers will change not only the cover but the title of a book to give it a new lease of life. My stories with harlequin were brought out by Harlequin Australia with different covers (and Victorian-era clothing), for instance. I’m not sure why they chose those covers.

    Reply
  158. Jeanne, it’s so easy for e-book covers to be changed these days, and quite a few of publishers will change not only the cover but the title of a book to give it a new lease of life. My stories with harlequin were brought out by Harlequin Australia with different covers (and Victorian-era clothing), for instance. I’m not sure why they chose those covers.

    Reply
  159. Jeanne, it’s so easy for e-book covers to be changed these days, and quite a few of publishers will change not only the cover but the title of a book to give it a new lease of life. My stories with harlequin were brought out by Harlequin Australia with different covers (and Victorian-era clothing), for instance. I’m not sure why they chose those covers.

    Reply
  160. Jeanne, it’s so easy for e-book covers to be changed these days, and quite a few of publishers will change not only the cover but the title of a book to give it a new lease of life. My stories with harlequin were brought out by Harlequin Australia with different covers (and Victorian-era clothing), for instance. I’m not sure why they chose those covers.

    Reply
  161. Annette, sometimes the publisher deliberately decides not to be accurate — for instance you’ll rarely see a red-headed hero on a cover, because marketing wisdom apparently tells us that a red-haired hero is less attractive to women and will result in fewer sales.
    But yes, the author’s name is the most important.

    Reply
  162. Annette, sometimes the publisher deliberately decides not to be accurate — for instance you’ll rarely see a red-headed hero on a cover, because marketing wisdom apparently tells us that a red-haired hero is less attractive to women and will result in fewer sales.
    But yes, the author’s name is the most important.

    Reply
  163. Annette, sometimes the publisher deliberately decides not to be accurate — for instance you’ll rarely see a red-headed hero on a cover, because marketing wisdom apparently tells us that a red-haired hero is less attractive to women and will result in fewer sales.
    But yes, the author’s name is the most important.

    Reply
  164. Annette, sometimes the publisher deliberately decides not to be accurate — for instance you’ll rarely see a red-headed hero on a cover, because marketing wisdom apparently tells us that a red-haired hero is less attractive to women and will result in fewer sales.
    But yes, the author’s name is the most important.

    Reply
  165. Annette, sometimes the publisher deliberately decides not to be accurate — for instance you’ll rarely see a red-headed hero on a cover, because marketing wisdom apparently tells us that a red-haired hero is less attractive to women and will result in fewer sales.
    But yes, the author’s name is the most important.

    Reply
  166. Covers are very important to me as a reader. I would actually dismiss a book if the cover had the half naked male/female on the cover. When I go into a bookshop I skim along the shelves first and usually a cover jumps out at me. If it doesn’t I go back for a careful look. Love your covers above Anne and I can see what you mean about the one that wasn’t a favorite with your fans even though I quite like it. The cover of the new book is fabulous!

    Reply
  167. Covers are very important to me as a reader. I would actually dismiss a book if the cover had the half naked male/female on the cover. When I go into a bookshop I skim along the shelves first and usually a cover jumps out at me. If it doesn’t I go back for a careful look. Love your covers above Anne and I can see what you mean about the one that wasn’t a favorite with your fans even though I quite like it. The cover of the new book is fabulous!

    Reply
  168. Covers are very important to me as a reader. I would actually dismiss a book if the cover had the half naked male/female on the cover. When I go into a bookshop I skim along the shelves first and usually a cover jumps out at me. If it doesn’t I go back for a careful look. Love your covers above Anne and I can see what you mean about the one that wasn’t a favorite with your fans even though I quite like it. The cover of the new book is fabulous!

    Reply
  169. Covers are very important to me as a reader. I would actually dismiss a book if the cover had the half naked male/female on the cover. When I go into a bookshop I skim along the shelves first and usually a cover jumps out at me. If it doesn’t I go back for a careful look. Love your covers above Anne and I can see what you mean about the one that wasn’t a favorite with your fans even though I quite like it. The cover of the new book is fabulous!

    Reply
  170. Covers are very important to me as a reader. I would actually dismiss a book if the cover had the half naked male/female on the cover. When I go into a bookshop I skim along the shelves first and usually a cover jumps out at me. If it doesn’t I go back for a careful look. Love your covers above Anne and I can see what you mean about the one that wasn’t a favorite with your fans even though I quite like it. The cover of the new book is fabulous!

    Reply
  171. Thanks Teresa, I’m quietly thrilled about the new cover (or maybe not so quiet, eh? *g*) The trouble with the half-naked people on the covers is that some of them I know, have beautiful stories inside, that never get to the kind of audience that will love them.
    A cover is a gamble. If the marketing dept thinks half-naked cover models will sell more than buttoned up ones, the half-naked will win.

    Reply
  172. Thanks Teresa, I’m quietly thrilled about the new cover (or maybe not so quiet, eh? *g*) The trouble with the half-naked people on the covers is that some of them I know, have beautiful stories inside, that never get to the kind of audience that will love them.
    A cover is a gamble. If the marketing dept thinks half-naked cover models will sell more than buttoned up ones, the half-naked will win.

    Reply
  173. Thanks Teresa, I’m quietly thrilled about the new cover (or maybe not so quiet, eh? *g*) The trouble with the half-naked people on the covers is that some of them I know, have beautiful stories inside, that never get to the kind of audience that will love them.
    A cover is a gamble. If the marketing dept thinks half-naked cover models will sell more than buttoned up ones, the half-naked will win.

    Reply
  174. Thanks Teresa, I’m quietly thrilled about the new cover (or maybe not so quiet, eh? *g*) The trouble with the half-naked people on the covers is that some of them I know, have beautiful stories inside, that never get to the kind of audience that will love them.
    A cover is a gamble. If the marketing dept thinks half-naked cover models will sell more than buttoned up ones, the half-naked will win.

    Reply
  175. Thanks Teresa, I’m quietly thrilled about the new cover (or maybe not so quiet, eh? *g*) The trouble with the half-naked people on the covers is that some of them I know, have beautiful stories inside, that never get to the kind of audience that will love them.
    A cover is a gamble. If the marketing dept thinks half-naked cover models will sell more than buttoned up ones, the half-naked will win.

    Reply
  176. First: Anne, I think your covers are beautiful. And yes, that one is rather misleading and too generic. And when I discover a new favorite author I give the backlist covers a lot of slack knowing that they went with the years they were originally published. Like everyone else I have my auto-buy authors, but I’m still forced to try and wait out for a sale.
    I do admit I am influenced by covers quite a bit at first glance. But I don’t buy unless the description is interesting and the reviews are mostly positive. I have a certain filter elimination process for poor reviews unless their complaint is particularly important to me. And I’m grateful for the covers giving a clue to their content, because I’m not interested in plenty of sub-genres of romance novels out there.
    I have some fave authors that have rather badly done covers, being self-published and self-disigners. And some whose covers are all about the dress, usually not fitting the time period. But I can’t wait until their next book in the series appears.
    I have the usual complaints about covers that have already been mentioned (but no one has gone so far to mention just HOW much undressed some of the male models are, for crying out loud!! (eeww.) A little glimpse of chest is one thing…but…)
    One of my pet peeves is that a new cover will come out and all of a sudden there are twenty other books with the same exact cover. EXACTLY identical. I’ve mostly gotten over the whole new-dress-in-the-cover-producer’s-repertoir-so-it-shows-up-on-every-future-book-cover-produced-thing. Until they can afford a new one. Makes me want to volunteer to sew them a new dress.
    And I’m sorry but I don’t like it when a cover style from an author from whom I own lots of books changes. A recent favorite started changing her covers, which so so disappointing. I thought her covers were so unique and eye-grabbing. Now they look like everyone else’s.
    The last thing I definitely will disregard about any book is when the author’s name takes up a good 2/3 (or more) of the cover. Prominent is good. But that much tells me the author churns them out by the dozen and she’s so popular that it doesn’t matter what she writes, her audience will buy it. Thanks for letting me have my say. This is why I don’t comment often. :/

    Reply
  177. First: Anne, I think your covers are beautiful. And yes, that one is rather misleading and too generic. And when I discover a new favorite author I give the backlist covers a lot of slack knowing that they went with the years they were originally published. Like everyone else I have my auto-buy authors, but I’m still forced to try and wait out for a sale.
    I do admit I am influenced by covers quite a bit at first glance. But I don’t buy unless the description is interesting and the reviews are mostly positive. I have a certain filter elimination process for poor reviews unless their complaint is particularly important to me. And I’m grateful for the covers giving a clue to their content, because I’m not interested in plenty of sub-genres of romance novels out there.
    I have some fave authors that have rather badly done covers, being self-published and self-disigners. And some whose covers are all about the dress, usually not fitting the time period. But I can’t wait until their next book in the series appears.
    I have the usual complaints about covers that have already been mentioned (but no one has gone so far to mention just HOW much undressed some of the male models are, for crying out loud!! (eeww.) A little glimpse of chest is one thing…but…)
    One of my pet peeves is that a new cover will come out and all of a sudden there are twenty other books with the same exact cover. EXACTLY identical. I’ve mostly gotten over the whole new-dress-in-the-cover-producer’s-repertoir-so-it-shows-up-on-every-future-book-cover-produced-thing. Until they can afford a new one. Makes me want to volunteer to sew them a new dress.
    And I’m sorry but I don’t like it when a cover style from an author from whom I own lots of books changes. A recent favorite started changing her covers, which so so disappointing. I thought her covers were so unique and eye-grabbing. Now they look like everyone else’s.
    The last thing I definitely will disregard about any book is when the author’s name takes up a good 2/3 (or more) of the cover. Prominent is good. But that much tells me the author churns them out by the dozen and she’s so popular that it doesn’t matter what she writes, her audience will buy it. Thanks for letting me have my say. This is why I don’t comment often. :/

    Reply
  178. First: Anne, I think your covers are beautiful. And yes, that one is rather misleading and too generic. And when I discover a new favorite author I give the backlist covers a lot of slack knowing that they went with the years they were originally published. Like everyone else I have my auto-buy authors, but I’m still forced to try and wait out for a sale.
    I do admit I am influenced by covers quite a bit at first glance. But I don’t buy unless the description is interesting and the reviews are mostly positive. I have a certain filter elimination process for poor reviews unless their complaint is particularly important to me. And I’m grateful for the covers giving a clue to their content, because I’m not interested in plenty of sub-genres of romance novels out there.
    I have some fave authors that have rather badly done covers, being self-published and self-disigners. And some whose covers are all about the dress, usually not fitting the time period. But I can’t wait until their next book in the series appears.
    I have the usual complaints about covers that have already been mentioned (but no one has gone so far to mention just HOW much undressed some of the male models are, for crying out loud!! (eeww.) A little glimpse of chest is one thing…but…)
    One of my pet peeves is that a new cover will come out and all of a sudden there are twenty other books with the same exact cover. EXACTLY identical. I’ve mostly gotten over the whole new-dress-in-the-cover-producer’s-repertoir-so-it-shows-up-on-every-future-book-cover-produced-thing. Until they can afford a new one. Makes me want to volunteer to sew them a new dress.
    And I’m sorry but I don’t like it when a cover style from an author from whom I own lots of books changes. A recent favorite started changing her covers, which so so disappointing. I thought her covers were so unique and eye-grabbing. Now they look like everyone else’s.
    The last thing I definitely will disregard about any book is when the author’s name takes up a good 2/3 (or more) of the cover. Prominent is good. But that much tells me the author churns them out by the dozen and she’s so popular that it doesn’t matter what she writes, her audience will buy it. Thanks for letting me have my say. This is why I don’t comment often. :/

    Reply
  179. First: Anne, I think your covers are beautiful. And yes, that one is rather misleading and too generic. And when I discover a new favorite author I give the backlist covers a lot of slack knowing that they went with the years they were originally published. Like everyone else I have my auto-buy authors, but I’m still forced to try and wait out for a sale.
    I do admit I am influenced by covers quite a bit at first glance. But I don’t buy unless the description is interesting and the reviews are mostly positive. I have a certain filter elimination process for poor reviews unless their complaint is particularly important to me. And I’m grateful for the covers giving a clue to their content, because I’m not interested in plenty of sub-genres of romance novels out there.
    I have some fave authors that have rather badly done covers, being self-published and self-disigners. And some whose covers are all about the dress, usually not fitting the time period. But I can’t wait until their next book in the series appears.
    I have the usual complaints about covers that have already been mentioned (but no one has gone so far to mention just HOW much undressed some of the male models are, for crying out loud!! (eeww.) A little glimpse of chest is one thing…but…)
    One of my pet peeves is that a new cover will come out and all of a sudden there are twenty other books with the same exact cover. EXACTLY identical. I’ve mostly gotten over the whole new-dress-in-the-cover-producer’s-repertoir-so-it-shows-up-on-every-future-book-cover-produced-thing. Until they can afford a new one. Makes me want to volunteer to sew them a new dress.
    And I’m sorry but I don’t like it when a cover style from an author from whom I own lots of books changes. A recent favorite started changing her covers, which so so disappointing. I thought her covers were so unique and eye-grabbing. Now they look like everyone else’s.
    The last thing I definitely will disregard about any book is when the author’s name takes up a good 2/3 (or more) of the cover. Prominent is good. But that much tells me the author churns them out by the dozen and she’s so popular that it doesn’t matter what she writes, her audience will buy it. Thanks for letting me have my say. This is why I don’t comment often. :/

    Reply
  180. First: Anne, I think your covers are beautiful. And yes, that one is rather misleading and too generic. And when I discover a new favorite author I give the backlist covers a lot of slack knowing that they went with the years they were originally published. Like everyone else I have my auto-buy authors, but I’m still forced to try and wait out for a sale.
    I do admit I am influenced by covers quite a bit at first glance. But I don’t buy unless the description is interesting and the reviews are mostly positive. I have a certain filter elimination process for poor reviews unless their complaint is particularly important to me. And I’m grateful for the covers giving a clue to their content, because I’m not interested in plenty of sub-genres of romance novels out there.
    I have some fave authors that have rather badly done covers, being self-published and self-disigners. And some whose covers are all about the dress, usually not fitting the time period. But I can’t wait until their next book in the series appears.
    I have the usual complaints about covers that have already been mentioned (but no one has gone so far to mention just HOW much undressed some of the male models are, for crying out loud!! (eeww.) A little glimpse of chest is one thing…but…)
    One of my pet peeves is that a new cover will come out and all of a sudden there are twenty other books with the same exact cover. EXACTLY identical. I’ve mostly gotten over the whole new-dress-in-the-cover-producer’s-repertoir-so-it-shows-up-on-every-future-book-cover-produced-thing. Until they can afford a new one. Makes me want to volunteer to sew them a new dress.
    And I’m sorry but I don’t like it when a cover style from an author from whom I own lots of books changes. A recent favorite started changing her covers, which so so disappointing. I thought her covers were so unique and eye-grabbing. Now they look like everyone else’s.
    The last thing I definitely will disregard about any book is when the author’s name takes up a good 2/3 (or more) of the cover. Prominent is good. But that much tells me the author churns them out by the dozen and she’s so popular that it doesn’t matter what she writes, her audience will buy it. Thanks for letting me have my say. This is why I don’t comment often. :/

    Reply
  181. I think I am guilty of judging books by their covers recently. I hate it when a regency book will have a couple on the cover and he is wearing a day’s growth on his face. It implies to me that the author either knows nothing about the period or just can’t be bothered having it corrected.
    The same with the “naked” men all over the covers of many books, no matter what they are about. I find lately, that I am ignoring those, and now, am feeling rather guilty about it. Maybe I have missed finding another good author.
    Of course, for my favourite (and auto-buy) authors, I hardly look at the cover before buying, and then check out how well the cover fits the story while I am reading it. Then, I am maybe disappointed in the cover but then the quality inside the cover is enough to negate that.

    Reply
  182. I think I am guilty of judging books by their covers recently. I hate it when a regency book will have a couple on the cover and he is wearing a day’s growth on his face. It implies to me that the author either knows nothing about the period or just can’t be bothered having it corrected.
    The same with the “naked” men all over the covers of many books, no matter what they are about. I find lately, that I am ignoring those, and now, am feeling rather guilty about it. Maybe I have missed finding another good author.
    Of course, for my favourite (and auto-buy) authors, I hardly look at the cover before buying, and then check out how well the cover fits the story while I am reading it. Then, I am maybe disappointed in the cover but then the quality inside the cover is enough to negate that.

    Reply
  183. I think I am guilty of judging books by their covers recently. I hate it when a regency book will have a couple on the cover and he is wearing a day’s growth on his face. It implies to me that the author either knows nothing about the period or just can’t be bothered having it corrected.
    The same with the “naked” men all over the covers of many books, no matter what they are about. I find lately, that I am ignoring those, and now, am feeling rather guilty about it. Maybe I have missed finding another good author.
    Of course, for my favourite (and auto-buy) authors, I hardly look at the cover before buying, and then check out how well the cover fits the story while I am reading it. Then, I am maybe disappointed in the cover but then the quality inside the cover is enough to negate that.

    Reply
  184. I think I am guilty of judging books by their covers recently. I hate it when a regency book will have a couple on the cover and he is wearing a day’s growth on his face. It implies to me that the author either knows nothing about the period or just can’t be bothered having it corrected.
    The same with the “naked” men all over the covers of many books, no matter what they are about. I find lately, that I am ignoring those, and now, am feeling rather guilty about it. Maybe I have missed finding another good author.
    Of course, for my favourite (and auto-buy) authors, I hardly look at the cover before buying, and then check out how well the cover fits the story while I am reading it. Then, I am maybe disappointed in the cover but then the quality inside the cover is enough to negate that.

    Reply
  185. I think I am guilty of judging books by their covers recently. I hate it when a regency book will have a couple on the cover and he is wearing a day’s growth on his face. It implies to me that the author either knows nothing about the period or just can’t be bothered having it corrected.
    The same with the “naked” men all over the covers of many books, no matter what they are about. I find lately, that I am ignoring those, and now, am feeling rather guilty about it. Maybe I have missed finding another good author.
    Of course, for my favourite (and auto-buy) authors, I hardly look at the cover before buying, and then check out how well the cover fits the story while I am reading it. Then, I am maybe disappointed in the cover but then the quality inside the cover is enough to negate that.

    Reply
  186. Jenny, I know many instances when authors have complained about “designer stubble”, for instance, or other cover features that are wrong — and they’re overruled. I’ve learned not to obsess over historically accurate covers, or covers that don’t particularly fit the story — basically if the cover is pretty and pickable-up, I’m happy.

    Reply
  187. Jenny, I know many instances when authors have complained about “designer stubble”, for instance, or other cover features that are wrong — and they’re overruled. I’ve learned not to obsess over historically accurate covers, or covers that don’t particularly fit the story — basically if the cover is pretty and pickable-up, I’m happy.

    Reply
  188. Jenny, I know many instances when authors have complained about “designer stubble”, for instance, or other cover features that are wrong — and they’re overruled. I’ve learned not to obsess over historically accurate covers, or covers that don’t particularly fit the story — basically if the cover is pretty and pickable-up, I’m happy.

    Reply
  189. Jenny, I know many instances when authors have complained about “designer stubble”, for instance, or other cover features that are wrong — and they’re overruled. I’ve learned not to obsess over historically accurate covers, or covers that don’t particularly fit the story — basically if the cover is pretty and pickable-up, I’m happy.

    Reply
  190. Jenny, I know many instances when authors have complained about “designer stubble”, for instance, or other cover features that are wrong — and they’re overruled. I’ve learned not to obsess over historically accurate covers, or covers that don’t particularly fit the story — basically if the cover is pretty and pickable-up, I’m happy.

    Reply

Leave a Comment